Comments on: Chinese Stir Fried Sticky Rice Cakes (Nian Gao) http://steamykitchen.com/15288-chinese-stirfried-sticky-rice-cakes-nian-gao.html Steamy Kitchen Food Blog: fast recipes, simple recipes, with fresh ingredients to create delicious meals. Thu, 23 Apr 2015 19:10:52 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2 By: Cooking Mama http://steamykitchen.com/15288-chinese-stirfried-sticky-rice-cakes-nian-gao.html/comment-page-1#comment-1236871 Sun, 05 Apr 2015 00:10:15 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=15288#comment-1236871 ]]> Thank you for sharing this recipe. Like you and others who have commented on how they miss their mom’s cooking, seeing this recipe reminds me of my mom. Especially since she has the same pattern of dishes! 😊

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By: How to Celebrate Chinese New Year | Manilla Blog http://steamykitchen.com/15288-chinese-stirfried-sticky-rice-cakes-nian-gao.html/comment-page-1#comment-1103219 Wed, 05 Feb 2014 14:50:05 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=15288#comment-1103219 […] and the like. While many foods are extremely specialized and vary from region to region, Nian Gao—Stir-Fried Sticky Rice Cakes—are a favorite, as are pork dumplings. Many families also make Eight Treasure Sticky Rice, and […]

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By: The Courier » 7 Foods to Eat for Good Luck on Chinese New Year http://steamykitchen.com/15288-chinese-stirfried-sticky-rice-cakes-nian-gao.html/comment-page-1#comment-1102988 Fri, 31 Jan 2014 00:30:57 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=15288#comment-1102988 […] to the Mandarin pronunciation for the words “year high” or “year tall.”Recipe to try: Chinese Stir Fried Sticky Rice Cakes (via […]

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By: Ron http://steamykitchen.com/15288-chinese-stirfried-sticky-rice-cakes-nian-gao.html/comment-page-1#comment-1099259 Tue, 01 Oct 2013 14:37:28 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=15288#comment-1099259 I am Chinese American and worked in Korea for a couple of years. I never encountered these noodles growing up in Hawaii (Cantonese cooking dominates) but it was a staple in Korea. Tok is the noodle and Guk means it is a soup. I buy fresh but freeze to make it keep. In soup I just through it in. I encountered this fried in a Chinese restaurant in Boston and my son who lived near Shanghai said it was a chinese noodle. I think when I used it fried I boiled it for a couple of minutes before draining and frying.

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By: Sang http://steamykitchen.com/15288-chinese-stirfried-sticky-rice-cakes-nian-gao.html/comment-page-1#comment-1095544 Tue, 11 Jun 2013 07:58:28 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=15288#comment-1095544 If you don’t have time to wait for the rice cake you can also boil them for about 10 few minutes. I’m korean and i put them in soups, we just dump them in the water..

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By: Day 3 | 10dollars4dinner http://steamykitchen.com/15288-chinese-stirfried-sticky-rice-cakes-nian-gao.html/comment-page-1#comment-1092079 Thu, 02 May 2013 20:22:11 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=15288#comment-1092079 […] but chewy like mochi.  I looked up a few recipes online and it seemed fairly easy. This is the recipe I was going for, but they did a lot more prep than […]

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By: Erin in Bay Ridge, Brooklyn http://steamykitchen.com/15288-chinese-stirfried-sticky-rice-cakes-nian-gao.html/comment-page-1#comment-1091712 Sat, 20 Apr 2013 19:17:57 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=15288#comment-1091712 Thank you so much for sharing this wonderful recipe and story! I just bought a package of rice cakes on a whim in Sunset Park, Brooklyn yesterday and am preparing a smoked mushroom version of this dish tonight. Thanks so much for the guidance! In particular, I never would have known that the cakes needed to be soaked (I can now see that that would have made for a pretty disastrous dish). :)

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By: Yen at GHOTH http://steamykitchen.com/15288-chinese-stirfried-sticky-rice-cakes-nian-gao.html/comment-page-1#comment-1091425 Sat, 13 Apr 2013 05:48:43 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=15288#comment-1091425 I haven’t had 年糕 in YEARS!
I was at my local Korean market and for the life of me, I could not find Chinese rice wine. I looked in the cooking section next to all the vinegar and even the booze section. Nope! Asking them? That made them confused and then it confused me even more. I read you can use Shao Xing rice wine, which they don’t have either.

Where can I find dry sherry? Can I find it at my local grocery store? Will it be okay if I just omit it all together??

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By: stevchipmunk http://steamykitchen.com/15288-chinese-stirfried-sticky-rice-cakes-nian-gao.html/comment-page-1#comment-1089508 Sun, 10 Feb 2013 01:52:06 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=15288#comment-1089508 CORRECTION. Just read what I submitted and found the last line needs correction. 年糕 sounds like “Year High” but really and actually means (New) “Year Cake”. sorry.

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By: stevchipmunk http://steamykitchen.com/15288-chinese-stirfried-sticky-rice-cakes-nian-gao.html/comment-page-1#comment-1089506 Sun, 10 Feb 2013 01:48:28 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=15288#comment-1089506 Great recipe! Haven’t had Nian Gao in years; seems like it was much more pervasive and popular when I was growing up in NYC, which, sigh, was long, long ago… But reading your recipe has inspired me to get the ingredients and make it during the coming Chinese New Year 15 day celebration period; but I think I might add more napa cabbage and a big bunch of scallions (for color as well as flavor) and perhaps add some oyster sauce. Can’t wait! By the way, FYI, “Nian Gao” 年糕 means “YEAR CAKE” or New Year’s Cake. The word Gao(糕) of Nian Gao means “Cake”. But it is true that the word “Gao” 糕 in Mandarin Chinese is a TRUE homonym of the word 高 or “High”. So 年糕 Nian Gao, while it may also sound like “Year High”, actually and truly, means “Rice Cake”. Just sayin’…

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