Comments on: Doggy advice? http://steamykitchen.com/23062-doggy-advice.html Steamy Kitchen Food Blog: fast recipes, simple recipes, with fresh ingredients to create delicious meals. Fri, 01 May 2015 10:57:28 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.1 By: Kate http://steamykitchen.com/23062-doggy-advice.html/comment-page-1#comment-1085816 Wed, 29 Aug 2012 04:23:34 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=23062#comment-1085816 You might want to consider an Australian cattle dog (sometimes called a red or blue heeler). They love to run, herd and chase frisbees and ball. They can keep up with just about anyone and because they are high energy they often need new homes when their old families discover that a dog kept in a house all day with no play leads to destruction! But give them a task and lots of space and they will be loyal forever. Very smart and trainable too!

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By: Gabrielle http://steamykitchen.com/23062-doggy-advice.html/comment-page-1#comment-1085750 Mon, 27 Aug 2012 03:02:34 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=23062#comment-1085750 The finest dog I ever had was a pit bull/Lab mix who was as loving, smart(!), and gentle as could be, so I admit to being somewhat prejudiced in favor of that particular combination (other folks I’ve known who had dogs with that mix tend to concur), but I agree with those who have advised you to vet individual dogs. You can’t judge a book by its title and genre. You should definitely see how the dog gets along with Coco and also hear from the rescue/shelter about what they know of the dog’s temperament and tendencies.

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By: Sara http://steamykitchen.com/23062-doggy-advice.html/comment-page-1#comment-1085740 Sun, 26 Aug 2012 02:00:01 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=23062#comment-1085740 As someone who works at my local humane society, I do have some tips for you!

1. First, it’s not really about breed, but about dog. While some breeds are more inclined toward specific behavior traits, it’s not always a given. For example, shepherds and pits have pretty high prey drives typically, but not all shepherds and pits are going to go after other smaller prey animals (i.e. chickens, cats). I’ve found that pits can be some of the most loving dogs around! It’s only in recent times that they’ve become these horrible attack dogs. Go for the individual dog, not the breed! Pointers and labs tend to be very hyper the first few (3-4) years then settle down. Huskies love to escape! We get 90% of our huskies and husky mixes as strays or because the continuously escaped. Herding dogs (http://www.akc.org/breeds/herding_group.cfm) love to chase things (kids, chickens, I’ve even heard of them rounding up loose furniture to the center of the room!). Shepherds and huskies are big shedders.

2. In my experience, opposite sex, smaller, and younger dogs are often more accepted in a new home. Puppies can be nice in that they are usually more submissive, but they are also more annoying to an adult dog. Puppies want to play, play, play and adult dogs generally don’t. But the nice thing about having an adult dog already when getting a puppy is that the existing dog can help train! They help with basic good doggie manners, house training, etc.

3. At my shelter we do allow prospective adopters to bring in their own dogs, but we have found that it often does not give an accurate idea of how the two dogs will get along at home. Your dog can be extremely stressed by coming to the shelter. It will be filled with smells, sounds, and sights that s/he won’t be ready for. I know a lot of dogs get really freaked out by the floors in our shelter. Also the smell of a shelter often is similar to that of a vet’s office – and many dogs don’t like the vet! So keep in mind that your dog (and the shelter dog) will not act the same at the shelter as they would in a real-life environment (home). We often encourage adopters to introduce the new dogs outside. You’ll definitely need to introduce them outside the home before bringing a new friend home – that way your dog can get to know the dog before bringing it straight into his/her territory where s/he will be defensive immediately – walks are great for this too! Leash up both dogs, allow them to sniff each other and give them time. You’ll need to keep them separated when you’re not there to supervise (this includes night time!) and you might want to think about keeping leashes on one or both of them – that way, in case they do get into a scuffle, they’ll be easier to pull apart. There will be some growling and some snapping, but that’s normal; they have to figure out the hierarchy with the new friend.

Good luck on your new family member! In my opinion, shelter dogs are the best!

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By: Hope http://steamykitchen.com/23062-doggy-advice.html/comment-page-1#comment-1085729 Sat, 25 Aug 2012 00:21:27 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=23062#comment-1085729 Long time lurker….and I’m on the Boxer bandwagon!! We have two – one we got from a boxer rescue, the other from a breeder. Both are phenomenal and very happy dogs. Probably wouldn’t protect me from a flea, but then again I figure that’s what the firearms are for versus our pups! Ha! Good luck on your search!

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By: Leighton VanSickel http://steamykitchen.com/23062-doggy-advice.html/comment-page-1#comment-1085704 Thu, 23 Aug 2012 19:47:22 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=23062#comment-1085704 BEAGLE !! I have had several – they are happy, loving, love children, love to romp and play – very social. Love other dogs. They are suited for outdoor running and romping, and also love to be inside. You can’t go wrong with a rescue beagle……

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By: jen http://steamykitchen.com/23062-doggy-advice.html/comment-page-1#comment-1085703 Thu, 23 Aug 2012 19:17:18 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=23062#comment-1085703 i have no advice for you…im’ not a dog person/owner. But i LOVED the photos!

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By: Dagmar Finch http://steamykitchen.com/23062-doggy-advice.html/comment-page-1#comment-1085693 Thu, 23 Aug 2012 04:58:35 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=23062#comment-1085693 Hi Jaden,
all of the above and then some – most of the comments have been very sound and leave you exactly where you started – you have to make up your own mind!
I have fostered over 150 dogs of all breeds and sizes and when it comes down to it my fave pair was a little Terrier bitch and a big Boxermix male. She had him wrapped around her little paw and he did whatever she told him to do – very funny to live with. If you think you’d like a smaller dog to go with your big one, pls consider Cocker Spaniels or King Charles Spaniels. Many are absolutely wonderful dogs who want nothing more than to please their people. Also look at the Hound group. Some of my best dogs were black and tan hounds. Not a mean bone in their bodies and the best companions to children ever. I have a feeling you’ll be spending time on Petfinder.com.
And Happy Birthday while I am on here – many happy, healthy ones more!

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By: JC Marc http://steamykitchen.com/23062-doggy-advice.html/comment-page-1#comment-1085691 Thu, 23 Aug 2012 02:04:47 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=23062#comment-1085691 Jaden, one more thing – my son has a Rhodesian Ridgeback/Lab mix. We babysat her for 2 yrs when he was in transition. Best dog I have ever known – social and energetic. Ridgebacks were bred to hunt lions and were “keepers of the castle”, so they are protective in a quiet way (she used to do a bed check every 3-4 hrs at night, especially if there were guests). Long legs, some shedding. Smart and easy to train. Got along with EVERY dog she came in contact with, very social. Great mix of breeds. If I ever come across this same mix of breeds . . .

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By: JC Marc http://steamykitchen.com/23062-doggy-advice.html/comment-page-1#comment-1085690 Thu, 23 Aug 2012 02:00:08 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=23062#comment-1085690 I agree with EVERYTHING you said, Amy, about shepherds. Jaden, you will not find a more loyal dog than a shepherd and so easy to train. I have had 3 shepherds through the years and they adapted easily to every dog they were paired with – even my brother’s pit bull that we babysat for 3 months. One of my GS loved cats, one tolerated them, and one thought they were great fun to chase, so no help with the cat thing. Major drawback was the hair. They shed a new dog everyday. Lots of vacuuming. As a lifelong dog lover, I can tell you the traits of every dog breed. You should talk with a local shelter because they can physically help you pair your baby with a new friend. They should meet each other before bringing the new friend home. Good luck to you.

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By: Chris http://steamykitchen.com/23062-doggy-advice.html/comment-page-1#comment-1085689 Thu, 23 Aug 2012 00:39:09 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=23062#comment-1085689 Weimaraner rescue – they are the world’s best dogs.

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