Steamy Kitchen Recipes | RSS Feed http://steamykitchen.com Steamy Kitchen Food Blog: fast recipes, simple recipes, with fresh ingredients to create delicious meals. Fri, 26 Jun 2015 12:53:12 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.2 Chinese New Year Recipes: What to eat if you want a raise! http://steamykitchen.com/31179-chinese-new-year-2014-what-to-eat-if-you-want-a-raise.html http://steamykitchen.com/31179-chinese-new-year-2014-what-to-eat-if-you-want-a-raise.html#comments Fri, 13 Feb 2015 12:29:14 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=31179 Chinese New Year begins Thursday, February 19th! It’s the Year of the Sheep, Goat and Ram. Because the Chinese in particular are extremely superstitious, there are “rules” for what to do and eat (and NOT) to usher in the New Year and ward off bad spirits. The specific recipes in the infographic are in my cookbook, Healthy Asian Favorites, on ...

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Chinese New Year begins Thursday, February 19th! It’s the Year of the Sheep, Goat and Ram.

Because the Chinese in particular are extremely superstitious, there are “rules” for what to do and eat (and NOT) to usher in the New Year and ward off bad spirits.

chinese-new-year-infographic

The specific recipes in the infographic are in my cookbook, Healthy Asian Favorites, on sale at Amazon.com for $18.99.

Below is a big list of recipes free, on SteamyKitchen.com:

Gong Hay Fat Choy!

Chinese New Year Recipes

From top left:

  1. My Mother’s Famous Chinese Egg Rolls or Vegetable Spring Rolls with video (egg rolls look like gold bars, which symbolize wealth) 
  2. Chinese Boiled Pork Dumplings (also symbolize wealth)
  3. Pan Fried Shrimp & Pork Potstickers (wealth)
  4. Shrimp Fried Rice (shrimp for happiness and joy)
  5. Chinese Broccoli Beef Noodles (noodles for longevity)
  6. Fresh Pear and Shrimp Stir Fry (shrimp for happiness and joy)

From top left:

  1. Long Life Fertility Noodles and Happy Shrimp
  2. Chinese Lettuce Cups (lettuce = rising fortune)
  3. Hainanese Chicken Rice (serve your chicken whole & cut at table for Chinese New Year. Cooking a whole chicken or duck represents health — carving it before serving would meant to “cut” your health)
  4. Chinese Tea Eggs (for prosperity)
  5. Chinese Whole Steamed Fish
  6. Stir Fried Beef with Nectarines (nectarine = happiness, health)

See more Chinese New Year Recipes on Steamy Kitchen!

More Chinese New Year Recipes

Thai Larb Lettuce Cups from my good friends Diane and Todd of White on Rice Couple
Dan Dan Mien from Jeannette’s Healthy Kitchen
Jiaozi Dumplings
 – from my friends Nate & Mary Kate on Epicurious (who just came out with their Chinese cookbook Feeding the Dragon!)
Chicken Lettuce Cups – Nate & Mary Kate on Epicurious
Stir Fried Prawns with XO Sauce – Noob Cook
Stir Fried Leeks with Vegetable – Noob Cook
Chinese Almond Chicken – Appetite for China
Braised Bok Choy – Taste Hong Kong
Sichuan Wonton – Appetite for China
Steamed Pork & Shrimp Dumplings (Sui Mai) – Flavor Explosions
Steamed Chicken in Lotus Leaf
 – RasaMalaysia
Stir Fried Pine Nuts with Corn and Peas – RasaMalaysia (dish means “full of gold and jade”)
Stir Fried Broccoli and Scallop – RasaMalaysia (“richness and abundance”)
Baked BBQ Pork Buns – RasaMalaysia
Soy Sauce Chicken – RasaMalaysia (though serve your chicken whole & cut at table for Chinese New Year. Cooking a whole chicken or duck represents health — carving it before serving would meant to “cut” your health)
Flank Steak with Fried Noodles – Food Network
Ketchup Prawns – Sea Salt with Food
Egg Dumplings – Show Shanti
Homemade Chili Oil – Show Shanti
Singapore Black Pepper Crab – Sea Salt with Food
Chinese Long Beans – Washington Post (long beans = longevity)
Chinese Almond Cookies – Simply Recipes (beautiful, Garrett, just beautiful!)
Fortune Cookie Recipe – Martha Stewart
Fortune Cookie Recipe video – Cookbook Maniac (love her tips for fortune cookies)
Chocolate Fortune Cookies – Martha Stewart
Vegetarian Buddha’s Delight – Epicurious
Orange Peking Duck – recipe from Ken Hom, author of Ken Hom’s Top 100 Stir Fry Recipes
Sweet & Sour Pork – recipe from Grace Young, author Breath of a Wok
Buddha’s Delight with Tofu & Brocooli– Cooking Light
Peanut Sesame Noodles – Appetite for China
Soy Sauce Chicken – Appetite for China
Water Chestnut Cake with Ginger – Appetite for China
Dragon Well Tea Shrimp – Appetite for China
Dan Dan Mian – Appetite for China
Stir Fried Noodles, Taiwanese Style – Explore Hong Kong
Chinese New Year Cake – Asian Grandmother’s Cookbook
Scallion Pancakes – Tigers and Strawberries (perfect recipe. we made these many times)
Chinese White Cut Chicken – Sunday Nite Dinner (serve your chicken whole & cut at table for Chinese New Year. Cooking a whole chicken or duck represents health — carving it before serving would meant to “cut” your health)
Tea Smoked Duck – Cooking Channel
Nian Gao Cake – Asian Grandmother’s Cookbook
Shanghai Style Nian Gao – Donna Cooks (“rising higher each year” This dish is a must for our table – I love the soft, chewy noodles. This is also one of my Dad’s hometown dishes)
Stir Fried Shanghai Nian Gao – mmm-yoso
Lion’s Head Meatballs – NY Times (lion = strength; big round meatballs = family togetherness)
Fuscshia Dunlop’s Braised Pork Belly – Cookbook Maniac
Chinese Walnut Cookies – Lily’s Wai Sek Hong
Paper Lined Cup Sponge Cake – Lily’s Wai Sek Hong
Dragon Cookies – Lily’s Wai Sek Hong (love this idea – we’ll make these dragon cookies w/my kids)
Almond Cookie Cresents – Lily’s Wai Sek Hong
Double Sided Gold Noodles – Lily’s Wai Sek Hong (one of my favorite noodles as a kid)
Steamed Pork Bun Recipe + how to fold Chinese buns video – Christine’s Recipes
Braised Chinese Mushrooms – Christine’s Recipes (easy dish to make, we always have whole Chinese mushrooms on CNY)
Egg Custard Pastry – Christine’s Recipes (with a cheater crust! brilliant)
Stir Fried Glutinous Rice – Christine’s Recipes
Stir Fried Broccoli with Fish Fillet – Christine’s Recipes
Tomato Chili Prawns – Christine’s Recipes (shrimp = laughter and joy)
Butter Cookies – Christine’s Recipes
Braised Chinese Mushrooms – Christine’s Recipes
Baked Coconut Cake – Christine’s Recipes
Radish Cake – Christine’s Recipes

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Pad Thai Zoodles Recipe http://steamykitchen.com/37769-pad-thai-zoodles-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/37769-pad-thai-zoodles-recipe.html#comments Wed, 01 Oct 2014 18:23:41 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=37769   Before I get into the recipe, I wanted to give you a quick peek at the Daytime TV studios where I tape cooking segments at. It’s a show that’s syndicated in nearly 200 markets in the US with hosts Cyndi Edwards and the incredibly funny Jerry Penacoli (formerly of EXTRA.) My cooking segments are around 4 minutes-ish long. We tape ...

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Before I get into the recipe, I wanted to give you a quick peek at the Daytime TV studios where I tape cooking segments at. It’s a show that’s syndicated in nearly 200 markets in the US with hosts Cyndi Edwards and the incredibly funny Jerry Penacoli (formerly of EXTRA.) My cooking segments are around 4 minutes-ish long. We tape the segment and then it gets aired 2 or 3 days after that, depending on the market.

The studio is HUGE. This is just a picture of the back half.

 

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Here’s another angle. I’m fascinated by the ceiling – every available inch is covered by cables that hold up lights, speakers and I have no idea what else is hidden up there.

 

pad-thai-zoodles-recipe-7792

 

This is from the kitchen, looking out towards the cameras. There are 3 cameras, but I pretty much don’t look straight at the camera, except for at the beginning (intro and saying hi) and at the end (saying goodbye.) My focus is on the food and cooking alongside and chatting with the co-host.

The cooking segment is divided into 4 parts:

Hello
Demo/Cook
Taste
Goodbye

 

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But just because I’m not LOOKING at the camera, doesn’t mean that I ignore them! Quite the contrary. I always know with my peripheral vision which camera is on (see that red light on top of the middle camera?)

When I’m cooking and need to show something, I have to keep in mind to stop, make sure the camera gets it and hold my hands still while I’m still talking and cooking. That prevents you, the viewer, from getting all dizzy trying to follow my hands!

Whether or not my cooking is done, time over is time over! Daytime doesn’t like to re-record or “cut” – we go with the flow and do it all in one take. Unless there’s a oopsie with a camera. Even if *I* make a mistake or don’t finish cooking in time – there’s no re-do!

That’s what I love, though. Learning to tape cooking segments this way has trained me to let go of perfection. In fact, if you happen to see the segment tomorrow or Friday, you’ll see that not only did I forget an ingredient (cilantro) but also made a MASSIVE mess trying to get the Pad Thai Zoodles on the stupid plate! LOL. The co-host, Cyndi and I laughed about it on-camera and just let it slide.

It makes the show a lot more natural, less “scripted” (nothing is scripted and there is no teleprompter other than the intro and the exit.) I’ve also trained myself to mentally walk through the recipe backwards to see what I have to prep or cook beforehand, so that we end up perfectly on time. For this recipe, I had to pre-cook the tofu. I also pre-spiralized the “zoodles” so we had a batch ready to go into the wok. So I started cooking while Cyndi was zoodling away with the zoodle-maker, called the Paderno 4-Blade Spiralizer magical machine.

If for some reason, Rob waves his 2-minute fingers at us, and there’s NO WAY that I’ll be done in those 2 minutes, I’ll either:

  • Cut out steps or some ingredients, just get something to taste*
  • Freak out

Just kidding. I don’t freak out. One time, the chicken was not cooked through, it was obvious that it wasn’t cooked through, but time was up and it was the “taste” time. I ended up saying, “So Jerry, we are running out of time, the chicken needs to cook for another couple of minutes. Here. take a fork and give the vegetables and the sauce a try!” We proceeded to dip into the pan (it was a one-pan dish) and tasted NOT-CHICKEN. This way, Jerry had something to say about the flavor for the camera. I hope I didn’t give him salmonella or gastroenteritis.

Sooooo, enough about the TV! What about the food that I came here for????

This was the recipe I made on-air, but I had to re-create it for the photo shoot on a little camping stove in my backyard (Less than 1 week before I get a real kitchen back!)

By the way, my cilantro looks very parsley-ish, We grow both. I wonder if they cross-pollinate and now I’ve just created Cilantrey or Partro. Or, as my friend, Cheri, would call it, “You-Ruined-The-Parsley.”

PAD THAI

 

The JERF Analysis

JERF is “Just Eat Real Food”

JERF

Tofu
Eggs
Green Onion
Garlic
Ginger
Carrots
Zucchini
Lime
Peanuts
Cilantro

Not-JERF

Thai Kitchen Pad Thai Sauce (though we are only using 3 tablespoons of the sauce)

__

 

*I haven’t done enough research on cooking oils yet to put them in a category.

I don’t mind using Prepared Pad Thai Sauce – or any shortcut sauce as long as the JERF column is significant. This recipe serves four, so 3 tablespoons of the sauce isn’t a deal-breaker. HOWEVER, if you want to stay JERF, go check out Todd and Diane’s version of Pad Thai Zoodles! They make their sauce from scratch, with ketchup, fish sauce, vinegar, etc.

The Zoodle Machine a.k.a. Spiralizer

This is what I used to make the zucchini noodles: the Paderno 4-Blade Vegetable Spiralizer

paderno-4-blade-spiralizer

 

I had previously done a video review of the Paderno 3-Blade (earlier model) and other options – here’s the Spiralizer Review Video. This new 4-Blader is even better – extra blade to cut angelhair sized zoodles and a metal rod so that you can make those carnival-style potato chips on a stick.

The Paderno 4-Blade Spiralizer price is $49.95 on Amazon. It’s a must-by if you plan on making a lot of zoodles. If you think it’s a once-in-a-while thing, you might want to consider one of my most-used tools in the kitchen – the Oxo Julienne Peeler for $10 – it’s smaller, fits in a drawer, cheaper.

 

How to cook Pad Thai Zoodles

I’m a crispy-crunchy tofu-lover. To make sure they stay crispy-crunchy, you have to cook them separately and remove the tofu from the pan so that they don’t drown in the sauce or vegetables.

Toss them in a little oil, add to hot pan, Brown on each side. This takes 1-2 minutes per side. But it’s worth the wait.

 

pad-thai-zoodles-recipe-2670

 

Remove them from the pan

Next up, the eggs! Look how beautiful our hens’ eggs are. The yolks are so bright, vivid, vibrant.

 

pad-thai-zoodles-recipe-2674

 

Give ’em a good scramble. Then remove them from the pan.

 

pad-thai-zoodles-recipe-2676

 

Why remove the eggs? Good question:

1. I like my eggs to be perfectly cooked, firm, separate from the rest of the stir-fry.

2. If I cook the eggs first, and then add everything else, the eggs will be overcooked. Plus, the “everything else” will be drowned by the wetness of the eggs. I want the “everything else” to have its own time in the wok, its own chance to fry in the cooking oil. Eggs are oil-hoggers.

3. If I cook all the vegetables first, then add the egg, then the raw egg will just “coat” the vegetables, making giant, soggy mess.

4. I could do this: Cook the aromatics (ginger, garlic, green onion), then cook the carrots, then zucchini. Then make a nice big hole in middle of wok, dribble in just a bit of cooking oil. Add eggs and scramble the eggs in that empty space. Once the eggs firm up, thoroughly mix all of the stir fry together and incorporate the cooked eggs.

HOWEVER – zucchini noodles cook way too fast. They are best cooked 80% of the way so that you still get some nice texture and bite. Soggy, overcooked zucchini becomes watery. Bad.

So to be on the safe side, I cook the eggs separate. You’ll see when I add them back into the pan later.

Once eggs are out, use a paper towel and just do a couple of swipes to clean the wok. Swirl in the remaining cooking oil, just a tiny bit, and add in the aromatics: ginger, garlic, green onion. Let that stir fry in the oil until crazy fragrant. This takes about 15-30 seconds.

 

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By the way, the reason we only use 3 tablespoons of prepared Pad Thai sauce (and not the entire jar) is because we’re amping up the “aromatics” and flavor with the garlic, ginger and green onion.

Add in the carrots to the pan and stir fry. *NOTE I didn’t use the Paderno Spiralizer to cut these carrots (I chose to just buy a bag of matchstick cut carrots to save time) – because in order to use the spiralizer effectively, the carrots have to be FAT. My store carries wimpy organic carrots. The carrots from our garden are too skinny.

 

pad-thai-zoodles-recipe-2681

 

Cook for a minute or so – carrots take longer than zucchini to cook, so I add carrots in first. The secret to wok-cooking is knowing when to add ingredients. If I had added in the zucchini at the same time as the carrots, the zucchini would be overcooked while waiting for the carrots to catch up.

Now add in the zucchini zoodles.

 

pad-thai-zoodles-recipe-2683

 

Toss very well, let it stir fry for a bit until you start seeing the zucchini change color from opaque to just beginning stages of slightly transluscent. Zucchini cooks fast, so this doesn’t take long.

Add in the Pad Thai sauce – I use Thai Kitchen Pad Thai Sauce (gluten free, dairy free, but it does contain fish sauce, so not vegetarian.) It’s on the sweet side, so if you feel like you need more salty flavor but not sweetness, try adding a few sprinkles of fish sauce or soy sauce.

 

pad-thai-zoodles-recipe-2685

 

Add in the tofu and the eggs. Toss! Toss! Toss!

 

pad-thai-zoodles-recipe-2687

To finish, squeeze in some fresh lime juice. (Toss again), Top with peanuts and cilantro. Serve with more lime wedges and some hot sauce!

On the TV segment that I taped, I used a new product that I just got from Rodelle. Sriracha Seasoning!!

pad-thai-zoodles-recipe-2710

 

It is like an explosion of spice, garlic, salty, sweet, tangy. When we did our “taste” on air, both Cyndi and I said, “WOW!”

The good: Adds a POW of flavor. Ingredients that I can pronounce: sugar, salt, spices, garlic, vinegar powder (maltodextrin + distilled white vinegar), citric acid, soybean oil.

The bad: Sugar is the first ingredient, but since it’s a spice, you’re only using 1/4 teaspoon per serving.

I can’t wait to try this as a dry rub for shrimp on the grill, well….anything on the grill. I’m sure it will be wonderful on a roast too!

What I used to make Pad Thai Zoodles

Thank you for using my affiliate links! :-)

The magical Paderno zoodle machine. See my video review of different spiralizers here

The highly recommended Oxo Julienne Peeler that I love, love, love

The Sriracha spice blend:

My favorite wok:

Pad Thai Zoodles Recipe

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Pad Thai Zoodles

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 20 minutes
pad-thai-zoodles-recipe-2

The prepared Pad Thai sauce is sweet. Start with 3 tablespoons of the sauce and if you feel like you need more salty (but not sweet), add a teaspoon of fish sauce or soy sauce. If you enjoy more sweet, add another tablespoon of the Pad Thai sauce.

Ingredients:

8 ounces extra firm tofu, cubed
2 tablespoons cooking oil, divided
2 eggs, beaten
1 stalk green onion, cut into 2" lengths
1 clove garlic
1 teaspoon fresh grated ginger
1 cup matchstick cut carrots
3 large zucchini, cut into noodle spirals
3 tablespoons prepared Pad Thai sauce (or more, depending on taste)
1 lime, halved (use 1 half for step 5, cut other half into wedges for serving)
1/4 cup chopped peanuts
sprigs of cilantro, minced

Directions:

1. Pat the tofu very dry with paper towels. Toss just 1 tablespoon of the cooking oil with the tofu. Heat a wok over high heat. When hot, carefully slide the tofu (be careful of any splatters). Brown all sides of tofu, about 1-2 minutes each side. Remove tofu to plate and set aside.

2. With a paper towel, wipe the wok clean. Swirl in just half of the remaining cooking oil and turn the heat to medium-high. When hot, add in the eggs and scramble. Remove the eggs to to the tofu plate and set aside.

3. Return wok to medium-high heat. Swirl in the last of the cooking oil and turn heat to medium-high. When hot, add in the green onion, garlic and ginger. Cook for 15 seconds, until fragrant.

4. Turn heat to high and add in the carrots. Toss and stir fry for 1 minute. Then add in the zucchini noodles. Toss well and when zucchini begins to soften (about 1 minute), then stir in the Pad Thai sauce. Add in the eggs and the tofu. Toss, cook for 2 minutes. Taste and add additional sauce if desired.

5. Squeeze a little lime on top, top with chopped peanuts and cilantro. Serve with additional lime wedges.

 

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New logo, new stuff coming! http://steamykitchen.com/37728-new-logo-new-stuff-coming.html http://steamykitchen.com/37728-new-logo-new-stuff-coming.html#comments Tue, 30 Sep 2014 14:32:21 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=37728 Ever since our post Needs Reboot, Scott had I have been working so hard re-vitalizing our business. We’ve been listening to podcasts, reading business manifestos, devouring great books, masterminding with smart people and having “Board of Directors” meetings with Nathan and Andrew at the dinner table. The boys have equal say in the business (most of the time), there have been a couple ...

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Ever since our post Needs Reboot, Scott had I have been working so hard re-vitalizing our business. We’ve been listening to podcasts, reading business manifestos, devouring great books, masterminding with smart people and having “Board of Directors” meetings with Nathan and Andrew at the dinner table.

The boys have equal say in the business (most of the time), there have been a couple of situations where Scott and I pulled an “executive veto” on things such as launching a Minecraft “recipe” section of Steamy Kitchen. We’ve also shelved ideas for next year, like building a treehouse as our company headquarters (which would be SO fun, but we currently don’t have a tree on our property strong enough to support a treehouse.

For the past 3 years, Scott and I have really been “coasting,” riding the wave that blogging and the Internet has brought us. While only working 2 days a week has given us precious time to be with the kids, learn new hobbies, volunteer and just plain goof-off, it’s time to get off our butts and create meaning again in our work. “Change the world” kind of work.

What we love doing as a family is growing food, raising chickens, cooking together, helping rescue dogs find new fur-ever homes and encouraging others to eat J.E.R.F. (just eat real food.) Scott and I personally love (and are really, really good) at teaching blog business skills.

There are so many things we want to improve on Steamy Kitchen. Here are the top areas:

1. Less advertisements

I don’t mind an ad or two, but too many get in the way of the good content that we spend HOURS creating. Each of our posts that include a recipe take a minimum of 12 hours to produce, from recipe development, recipe testing, food styling, food photography, editing, uploading, writing, videography, video editing and promotion. It’s a lot of work (and I absolutely LOVE it!) but when we have too many flashy, animated, attention-grabbing ads, it just takes away from all that hard work.

That doesn’t mean we are dropping all ads immediately (that would be shooting ourselves in the foot!) We love love love BlogHer and we’d love to continue to work with them on relevant ad buys and partnerships that make sense.  But it does mean cutting back on the number of ad spots, ad partnerships, and over time, we’ll be creating new ways to earn income that is meaningful, significantly improve other people’s lives and earns great residual income to support our family (more on this later.)

We’re working on the new site! Coming soon!

2. More diversified recipes & JERF

This came as a request from Andrew and Nathan. While they are both rice-eating boys at heart, they would like Steamy Kitchen to be more balanced and have more non-Asian recipes, like Nathan’s hamburger buns!

The specific podcast that has completely changed the way our family thinks about food is The Shawn Stevenson Model Health Show episode #11. There were some concepts I totally didn’t agree with in the podcast, but we learned one important concept that stuck with us. The podcasts features Sean Croxton of Underground Wellness and the saying – “just eat real food” or JERF for shorthand.

JERF is such a catchy, cute name that Scott, Nathan and Andrew really took to. It’s part of our daily language now, “Did you eat JERF at school today?” or “Mom, are Pop-Tarts JERF?”

We’ve all changed our eating habits, we strive for JERF, but sometimes settle for JERF-ish, as the boys say. Here’s Nathan teaching Food Blog Forum participants about JERF:

(Sorry for video and sound quality. I’m only giving you a snippet of this video because I recorded it on my cell phone and later on Nathan plays a game with the audience, “JERF or not-JERF?” I’m like laughing so loud it sounds like a squawking cackle. I won’t subject your ears to such bizarre noise.

 

3. More homesteading

When we first moved to this home three years ago, we were contemplating starting another blog for our homesteading and gardening information, as it just didn’t seem to fit within the “Steamy Kitchen Asian Recipes” mold. We never did (thank goodness), and now homesteading, aquaponics, microgreens, hydroponics, raising chickens, raising animals for food, raised bed gardening, will take just as much spotlight on Steamy Kitchen. We really want to create a “Farm to Fork for Home” experience showing all aspects of food from raising it at home to preparing it for your family. Scott calls it “Garden to Gut” coverage.

One day, I might even tell you about my first (and possibly ONLY time) cleaning and plucking two ducks that we had to shoot, getting instructions via text and cell phone with Hank Shaw. Let’s just say that candle wax + a bottle of tequila + 2 dead ducks = massive disaster.

Oh, Mrs. FlufferNuffer says hi:

 

Mrsfluffernuffer-7783

Here’s what she looked like a few weeks ago.

4. Creating products that massively help others

Steamy Kitchen is a business, and we do have to find a way to sustain and grow the company to support our family. I don’t think being a homeless food blogger is that appealing.

But beyond just “making money to support our family,” Scott and I need to swing the business back to “massively helping and empowering others while happily, abundantly making money.”

There’s a big difference in how you feel just reading those two sentences, right?

By the way, making money is not a bad thing. Bloggers shouldn’t have to feel bad about being successful. If some readers feel offended by our company making money providing free recipes, entertainment, useful information, that’s totally okay. There are so many other food blogs they can visit!

So how does a food blog that’s completely free to access make money? How can I continue to dedicate 12 hours for each recipe post with fewer advertisements, especially if ad revenue is 90% of our income?

We have so many ideas!

1. I’ll still be working 1:1 with companies that matter. These are brands that I know, trust and recommend. But unlike advertisements, the endorsements are clear. I stand behind these products and companies. Next week, I get to show off the kitchen that Scott, myself and Susan Serra been working so hard on the past four weeks. Some of our partners were KitchenAid, KraftMaid and Dekton.

tinybook2. We wrote a new book! This is a series of business strategy ebooks for other food bloggers, teaching them what we’ve learned in the nearly 8 years of food blogging and all the mistakes we’ve made and the massive wins we’ve celebrated.

The topic of Blogging + Business is our sweet spot – it’s what I’ve speaking about, teaching at more than 25 blogging and food conferences. At the last Food Blog Forum in Asheville, I taught this particular topic of Pricing and Negotiation for Food Bloggers and it was one of the best sessions I’ve ever given.

In all honesty, I am a better businesswoman than I am a food blogger!! :-)

Come  take a peek!

3. I can’t tell you about the third one yet – but it has to do with Ninjas.

 

and…Curating products that delight

The only affiliate partnership we currently have is Amazon. So, when you start your Amazon shopping from this little link right here: Shop Amazon, we get around 7.5% commission from the sale.

It’s a fantastic partnership, we ourselves are Amazon Prime members and love the convenience and the price. It’s also low-maintenance. Actually, zero-maintenance. Which is why there’s a lot of opportunity for growth (I’m telling myself that maybe if I paid more attention to the Amazon partnership, we could make more than $1,000 a month that we’re currently getting.)

There are a TON of other companies who offer affiliate programs, we’ll be exploring the ones we absolutely love. I spent this morning shopping at several online stores, testing out product selection, quality and customer service.

I’m bummed that Etsy doesn’t have an affiliate program open, I love Etsy!

In Semi-Conclusion….

(I have so much more to write but my poor arms are in a lot of pain from the typing!)

We’re celebrating with a new logo that we’re currently working on, a new site design that’s simpler, cleaner, less ads (launching soon!), a new book on business for food bloggers.

It also means that a bag of frozen corn draping over my arms is my best friend, from all the computer work. I’ll have to go back to dictation software soon!

jaden-boys-corn-23

Logo work in progress!

We’ve decided to bootstrap any new projects we work on. That means, if we can design a new logo for $10, you can too!

Font: I found a font from DaFont.com that I really love – happy, cheerful and still legible and pretty.

Images: The background images were purchased at Creative Market for less than $10! We just discovered Creative Market this past weekend, and I’ve been playing fumbling in Adobe Illustrator to put together all the elements to create a unique logo.

handcrafted-beige
(Yay, a new affiliate partner!)

Creative Market is sort of like an Etsy for graphic design, logos, fonts, images, photos, etc. I love supporting artists. Even though I could have gotten images or icons, I really loved that we chose to use and pay a small amount to talented artists! The great thing about Creative Market is that they give FREE STUFF EVERY WEEK!

Colors: I spent a good two hours meditating on colors on Design Seed’s website. I chose a couple palettes I really love, did a quick “save-as” on the image, then uploaded it to Adobe’s Kuler, where I got to play with  adjusting the colors. If you use Adobe Creative Cloud,  Adobe Kuler integrates perfectly and you can save the palette (directly into Photoshop or Illustrator) without having to export/import.  Both are free resources (well not Adobe Creative Cloud, but Design Seed and Kuler)

What do you think? Do you like? I was thinking that with the three layouts that look similar, we could change up the nifty little icon based on the subject or category.

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Or how about this?

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chickenbombed

You’ve been chicken-bombed!

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Home Grown Star Anise http://steamykitchen.com/37695-home-grown-star-anise.html http://steamykitchen.com/37695-home-grown-star-anise.html#comments Wed, 24 Sep 2014 20:17:23 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=37695 A lovely reader sent a package of his homegrown star anise spice. Have you ever used star anise before? Normally, when I buy them at the Asian market, they look like they’ve been picked through – none of the “stars” even resemble stars. Upon opening the bag, there is a dusty, musty smell. Not these. These are fresh and dried ...

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A lovely reader sent a package of his homegrown star anise spice. Have you ever used star anise before?

Normally, when I buy them at the Asian market, they look like they’ve been picked through – none of the “stars” even resemble stars. Upon opening the bag, there is a dusty, musty smell.

Not these.

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These are fresh and dried star anise from Greg’s yard. Did you know star anise is actually an immature fruit that’s dried?

Greg says that the star anise tree (it’s a tree!), kept low and trimmed, make wonderful hedges. When you cut the hedges, it releases an amazing, spicy, warm fragrance. I think I’ll take the seeds and plant them in my front yard, what a wonderful way to welcome our friends (and the UPS guy) to house!

I’ve just learned this pod’s folklore, “Place Star anise under your pillow at night to keep bad dreams away and also to dream of someone far away,” says Growing Hermioine’s Garden.

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The green fruit will dry to become the nutty-brown star anise spice that we use in Chinese cooking. Greg included instructions with his care package: Dry in a ventilated screen or it will mold. Also cover with the green pods with some kind of cloth or paper, because as the pods dry, they will SHOOT the seeds out!

How fun! I really want to see the shooting seeds. Maybe I’ll have to stage a camera in front of the drying pods and catch it shooting seeds!

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I’ll have to report back on our progress in growing the seeds. In my research, I’ve found out that the “Illicium verum” is of the magnolia tree family. Here in the U.S., it grows nicely as a small to medium, spreading evergreen tree in zones 9 and 10 (it doesn’t do well in below freezing temperatures.)

Cooking with Star Anise

The Homestead Garden states that, “This spice has a savory-sweet flavor to it, often compared to licorice with a slight cinnamon and clove taste. It has a large quantity of a chemical called anethole, which makes star anise 13 times sweeter than sugar.”

The spice is quite strong, only 1 or 2 star anise is needed to flavor an entire pot of stew. Star anise is also a component of Chinese 5-Spice Powder.

Here’s something interesting from The Epicentre, “Star anise pairs brilliantly with tomatoes. It’s licorice-like flavor actually bears a close resemblance to that of fennel and basil, tomato’s classic companions. A single pod of star anise  adds a new level of flavour to a tomato-based sauce or stew with a warm, spicy undertone. The same goes for braised beef dishes – from stews to chili to oxtail soup, star anise can be the secret ingredient that elevates the dish to a whole new level.”

I’ve never tried star anise with tomatoes, but I think the next batch of tomato sauce will be an experiment with a star or two thrown in.

Here are a few recipes I’ve made using star anise!

Vietnamese Pho

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Chinese Marbled Tea Eggs 

Chinese Tea Egg Recipe

Chinese Boiled Peanuts

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Taiwanese Pork Noodles

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Mohawks and Tombstone in the Kitchen http://steamykitchen.com/37585-mohawk-tombstone.html http://steamykitchen.com/37585-mohawk-tombstone.html#comments Mon, 15 Sep 2014 16:08:32 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=37585 Our new “mail-order” baby chicks are now about 1 month old. For the first couple of weeks, the baby chicks are so adorable and teeny that you just want to keep them in your house and pet them all day! Well, the bigger they get, the more they eat. The more they eat, the more they crap. Chicken poop STINKS. ...

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Our new “mail-order” baby chicks are now about 1 month old. For the first couple of weeks, the baby chicks are so adorable and teeny that you just want to keep them in your house and pet them all day!

Well, the bigger they get, the more they eat. The more they eat, the more they crap. Chicken poop STINKS.

We finally had to move them from our back covered porch to the second coop that Scott built for the ducks way out in the yard (The ducks never liked the coop anyways).

The babies will live there for another couple of months, until they are big enough to be in the Palace Coop with the rest of the hens.

Right now, they’re just too small – Oreo, our bossy mama-hen, would just peck on them. I’ve got three to introduce to you today. Quick, tell me which cartoon character this reminds you of:

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CRUELLA!!!

Cruella is a White Crested Black Polish Bantam, when she grows up her bouffant billow out even more and will cover her eyes. She’ll look like this as an adult.

Crazy Mops

The next one is named Crazy Mops, a Silver Laced Polish. She’s CRAZY looking with the tall mohawk!! Who does she look like? I’m trying to think of what cartoon character she resembles.

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Mrs. Fluffernuffer

Doesn’t she look like one of those Troll dolls on an end of a pencil that we used to have as kids?? The ones with fuzzy hair that fluffs out when you twirl your pencil really fast between your palms?!

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I would show you more photos, but these little peckers are hard to catch! The duck coop is deep, low and long, and it makes catching the squirmy, squeaky chicks really hard to catch.

Kitchen Progress

Goodbye ugly tile!

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Since the kitchen opens up to our family room, Scott put up plastic sheets to keep the dust contained in the area. It’s very Dexter-esque.

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Oh look, is that a JACKHAMMER!??

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Oh yes, it is.

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We jackhammered into the concrete slab to bring power and water into the new kitchen island. It looks like we’re burying a dead body.

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Complete with a metal tombstone.

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I think the metal thingy is for the KitchenAid Downdraft Exhaust.

Not quite sure, but for a few days, it just looked creepy in my kitchen with all that plastic wrap, empty hole, tombstone and big ol’ pile of dirt. How many people does it take to bury a dead body?

Well, apparently a General Contractor, electrician, plumber, carpenter and a dog.

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Deed, done.

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Our security team on high alert:

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Food Blog Forum, Asheville NC http://steamykitchen.com/37495-food-blog-forum-asheville.html http://steamykitchen.com/37495-food-blog-forum-asheville.html#comments Sat, 06 Sep 2014 18:49:15 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=37495 Four and a half years ago, Diane crossed the Mexican border with “contraband” that I had requested via text from Tecate, Mexico. She arrived at my door late at night with a small rolling luggage piece in one hand and a single, red backpack in the other that I immediately tore into. Beef jerky, 2 bottles of wine, Doritos, chocolate ...

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Four and a half years ago, Diane crossed the Mexican border with “contraband” that I had requested via text from Tecate, Mexico.

She arrived at my door late at night with a small rolling luggage piece in one hand and a single, red backpack in the other that I immediately tore into.

Beef jerky, 2 bottles of wine, Doritos, chocolate bars. Oh, you were thinking of another type of contraband, were you?! We were spending a week at the legendary Rancho La Puerta, otherwise known as the “#1 World’s Best Destination Spa” (Condé Nast Traveler 2014).

It’s a wellness spa for mind, body and soul. It’s a vice-free spa — all vegetarian, no alcohol. I didn’t adequately prepare myself for the week of no vices, so it was like going cold turkey (eh….literally) on my meat-rich diet and “healthy” nightly dose of red wine.

It was over a delight of contraband consumption (perhaps overdose?)  that Diane and I came up with creating Food Blog Forum, a not-for-profit yearly event where we teach food photography, monetization strategies and writing skills to our community of food bloggers. I’m proud to say that we’ve just returned from our 7th event in Asheville, North Carolina!

 

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Three days of fun, friendship, networking, learning, laughing, EATING (of course!) and drinking. Our speakers talked about creating a tribe, writing for traditional media, food photography, negotiation skills, PR relationships and working with brands. Our hosts, The Biltmore Estates, is the true essence of graciousness and grandeur. We were treated like kings and queens throughout our stay, including a tour of the “big house” itself.

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Oh, and by the way, when you’re in front of a lawn this luscious, what do you do? Here in Florida, we don’t have nice squishy grass. It’s hard, scratchy, full of red ants (ouch!). So when my boys visited Biltmore Estates in Asheville, North Carolina, they were in awe of the soft lawn and decided to roll in grass for the very first time in their little lives.

hah! Major FAIL! The day of the conference in the Biltmore Estates Antler Hill Barn with over 100 attendees:

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Come check out Todd and Diane’s photos from the event at their site including the opening party hosted by the DoubleTree at Biltmore, Asheville Farm Tours, Restaurant Tours and the closing party at The Biltmore Estates:

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More photos from Instagram #FBFAsh hashtag (there are nearly 1,000 photos from the event!)

 

We love Asheville!

Here’s a list of the restaurants, shops, farms, producers that we got to experience during our trip in Asheville:

French Broad Chocolates / The Market Place Posana /  Ultimate Ice Cream  /  King James Public House  / The Cantina /  The Junction  / Biscuit Head  / Red Stag Grill  / 12 Bones  / Curate  / Green Sage  / Asheville Bee Charmer  / Crooked Condiments  / Smoking J’s Fiery Foods  / Annie’s Bread  / Green River Picklers  / Looking Glass Creamery  / Farm & Sparrow  / Blue Kudzu Sake Co.  / Blue Ridge Mountain Creamery /  Sunburst Trout Farms  / Hickory Nut Gap Farm  / Buchi Tupelo  / Honey Café  / Isa’s Bistro  / The Lobster Trap  / Bouchon  / Nightbell  / Early Girl Eatery  / Seven Sows  / Rhubarb S / trada  / Zambra  / Chestnut  / Chai Pani  / Sante Wine Bar & Tap Room  / Asheville Distilling Company (Troy & Sons)  / Biltmore  / Doubletree by Hilton Asheville-Biltmore  / Highland Brewing Company

Batistini-LogoInt-copy1 (the best olive oil you’ll ever taste!)

ExploreAsheville TWITTER: @Foodtopia, INSTAGRAM: @VisitAsheville BiltmoreTWITTER/INSTAGRAM: @BiltmoreEstate
KitchenAid®TWITTER/INSTAGRAM: @KitchenAidUSA DoubleTree TWITTER: @DbltreeBiltmore OxoTWITTER/INSTAGRAM: @OXO

Food Blog Forum 2015

Guess where next year’s Food Blog Forum will be held at? Here’s a clue:

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Come see if you are right!

More Food Blog Forum Asheville Posts

White on Rice Couple

Big Bear’s Wife

Love and Olive Oil

Simply Southern Baking

That Susan Williams

Kelly Senyei from KitchenAid

Feast and West

Cake n Knife

Love ‘n Flour (Day 1 and Day 2)

Southern Kissed

This Cookin’ Dad

Melangery (Part 1, Part 2, Part 3)

Running in a Skirt

How Dairy You

Development of Taste (Part 1, Part 2)

Sugar Dish Me

Army Mom

Jeannine’s Cuisine 

Mountain Xpress

Carolina Epicurean

(if I’ve missed your post – PLEASE LET ME KNOW!!!)

 

 

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Goodbye Kitchen! http://steamykitchen.com/37445-goodbye-kitchen.html http://steamykitchen.com/37445-goodbye-kitchen.html#comments Tue, 26 Aug 2014 17:20:18 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=37445 After 3 years of planning, designing, re-designing and procrastinating, we’ve finally started our kitchen remodel. I’ve been both looking forward to and dreading the start date – three weeks without a kitchen is traumatic. Well, I should say estimated three weeks. Which probably means closer to 3 months in home remodel timeline. I spent all weekend cleaning out the cabinets and ...

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After 3 years of planning, designing, re-designing and procrastinating, we’ve finally started our kitchen remodel. I’ve been both looking forward to and dreading the start date – three weeks without a kitchen is traumatic. Well, I should say estimated three weeks. Which probably means closer to 3 months in home remodel timeline.

I spent all weekend cleaning out the cabinets and boxing/trashing the contents. Those sneaky cabinets and pantry can certainly hold a lot of secrets. Like 6 year old jar of plum sauce. A can of Spam that has no expiration date (7 years ago, I had a hankering for Spam Fried Rice) and all the tops to plastic containers that I thought I had lost.

In the juggle of emptying out my spice and sauce cabinet, and sorting through keep/not keep (I have 5 bottles of soy sauce!), I accidentally knocked over the worst possible thing to knock over in the kitchen.

FISH SAUCE.

What’s the rule of fish sauce???

DO NOT DROP GLASS BOTTLE.

Because if the bottle breaks, your house will reek of rotted sardines for weeks.

Luckily, the fish sauce’s fall was caught by the dog bowl. Wow. Good save.

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Side note – We were at Food Blog Forum Asheville last week (I’ll recap with photos soon, but in meantime, come read Diane/Todd’s recap) and asked Diane what her favorite fish sauce was. Red Boat was her answer.

My stores only carry Squid brand (too salty) and Three Crabs (love it), so I ordered from Amazon (yay Amazon!) Haven’t had a chance to try it yet, though if that dog bowl wasn’t there, I could have told you exactly what it smelled like.

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Scott spent all day yesterday removing the appliances, counters and cabinets. The appliances went to a friend who desperately needed a new set.

The cabinets were really nice, made of solid wood and still was very good condition. I posted on Craigslist a photo of the cabinets and offered it for free if anyone wanted to come pick them up.

Within SECONDS of hitting “submit” on Craiglist, I was inundated with offers to take the cabinets. Apparently, people in my town are all in need of a kitchen remodel.

In the end, I gave the cabinets away to a woman whose husband passed away before he could finish the kitchen remodel. They were halfway done, cabinets were removed when he died. She’s been living with a half-kitchen and no cabinets since then.

I forgot to warn her that those cabinets like to hide stuff like lids and Spam.

Oh, and I found out exactly where the dogs like to hide dog food that they don’t like. There’s a brand of kibbles that Lainey, Coco and Rocco don’t particularly care for. I bought it because it was on sale. It rhymes with “urina.”  (With three big dogs, designer dog food gets expensive, so sometimes we just get what’s on sale)

Anyways, when we slid out the dishwasher and the range, we found hundreds of kibbles. Well, no wonder why we thought we heard mice in the kitchen a few weeks ago.

Last night was our first night without a kitchen. I created a makeshift food prep station in our dining room, lit the outdoor BBQ grill and pulled out a bottle of fancy wine to celebrate Day 1.

Problem was….somewhere in this mess:

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was my wine opener and wine glasses.

Crap.

Ah, what was I thinking, packing the essentials to life????

All these methods to open a wine bottle without a corkscrew?  Too dangerous or too fussy. I mean, really. a bicycle pump? Or smacking a wine bottle against the wall with a book in between?

My Herradura tequila requires no corkscrew.

So here’s the kitchen as of last night. Today, Scott is working on tearing down the soffets that are hanging off the wall and down from ceiling. Then the tile gets taken up.

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susanserraThe lovely Susan Serra is designing the kitchen for us, complete with KitchenAid appliances, KraftMaid cabinets, Dekton counters and a ‘family entertaining’ style that makes the kitchen more like an extension of our family room.

We haven’t picked out flooring or wall color yet. I’m toying with Susan’s idea of faint photo mural on one wall of bamboo. I think it would look neat. I could see how awesome that would look in the kitchen. Susan used Customized Walls to turn a photo she took at Martha’s Vineyard into a photographic wall mural – click through to the last couple of photos of this kitchen she designed.

What do you think? I’m not sure I even have a photograph of bamboo forest – but I was thinking something green, lush and peaceful, like this.

 

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Review: iDevices Bluetooth Kitchen Thermometer http://steamykitchen.com/37395-review-idevices-bluetooth-kitchen-thermometer.html http://steamykitchen.com/37395-review-idevices-bluetooth-kitchen-thermometer.html#comments Tue, 12 Aug 2014 17:00:16 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=37395 I love this thing! No more having to wonder if my timer went off (while I’m in a different room). My phone syncs with the iDevices Kitchen Thermometer and will zap me when the food is done (just kidding – it just beeps). Or how about when the grill is outside and you’re inside the house?!   Review of the ...

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I love this thing! No more having to wonder if my timer went off (while I’m in a different room). My phone syncs with the iDevices Kitchen Thermometer and will zap me when the food is done (just kidding – it just beeps). Or how about when the grill is outside and you’re inside the house?!

 

Review of the iDevices Bluetooth Kitchen Thermometer

Links:

iDevices Kitchen Thermometers on Amazon 

iDevices homepage

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Chinese Boiled Peanuts Recipe http://steamykitchen.com/37341-chinese-boiled-peanuts-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/37341-chinese-boiled-peanuts-recipe.html#comments Tue, 05 Aug 2014 16:33:21 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=37341 Alongside fire-roasted chestnuts, Boiled Chinese Peanuts are sold as cheap street food in China. It’s a cold-weather thing, and I know I’m posting this recipe in the dead heat of the summer, but I am missing real Chinese food….a little nostalgic for humble eats. Raw peanuts are boiled in water with cinnamon sticks, star anise, garlic cloves and a little salt. ...

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Alongside fire-roasted chestnuts, Boiled Chinese Peanuts are sold as cheap street food in China. It’s a cold-weather thing, and I know I’m posting this recipe in the dead heat of the summer, but I am missing real Chinese food….a little nostalgic for humble eats.

Raw peanuts are boiled in water with cinnamon sticks, star anise, garlic cloves and a little salt. Even though there’s no sugar in the mix, you’ll get a molasses-like sweetness just from boiling the peanuts (even if you add NO spices!)

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Star Anise and cinnamon will add complex flavors, liquorice-like (though please don’t let that scare you – it is NOTHING like black liquorice), rich and sweet-smelling. If you’re a chile-nut, go ahead and add a couple of dried red chiles into the pot.

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3 sticks of cinnamon, 3 star anise, 3 cloves of garlic, 3 tablespoons of kosher salt. If you’ve got really good quality cinnamon sticks, just use one or two. I had to use 3 sticks, well….because I’m cheap and bought a lower quality of cassia bark.

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There are 4 ways you can cook this:

  • No soak + pressure cooker for 60 minutes
  • No soak + slow cooker all day
  • No soak + boil on stove for 4 hours
  • Overnight soak + boil on stove 1 hour

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How to cook Chinese Boiled Peanuts

Step 1: Wash the raw peanuts
Give them a good rinse. Pick out any peanuts that just don’t look right, twigs, roots, etc.

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Step 2: Add in seasonings & water

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Step 3: Weigh down the peanuts
Raw peanuts float to the top of the water, so to make sure that they cook evenly, I like to add a plate into the pot to submerge the peanuts.

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Step 4: Cook
I am using a pressure cooker (60 minutes under high pressure), but you can use a slow cooker (high for 6-8 hours) or boil on stove (bring to boil, cover and simmer on low for 3-4 hours)

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Chinese Boiled Peanuts Recipe

Servings: 8 Prep Time: 5 minutes Cook Time: varies
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Make sure you buy RAW PEANUTS. If you don't have star anise or cinnamon stick, just use 1 teaspoon of Chinese 5-spice powder instead.

Ingredients:

1 pound raw peanuts (also called green peanuts)
3 cloves garlic, peeled
3 star anise
1-3 cinnamon sticks
3 tablespoons of kosher or sea salt

Directions:

Wash the peanuts. In a large pot, add in all of the ingredients. Fill pot with water, enough to cover the peanuts by 3" when submerged. Optional - use a plate to submerge the peanuts in the water.

FOR PRESSURE COOKER:
Cook under pressure 60 minutes high (it will take time to get up to pressure as well as cool-off period to release steam). Follow manufacturer's instructions.

FOR SLOW COOKER:
Cook high for 6-8 hours

FOR STOVETOP:
Bring to boil, cover and set heat to low. Simmer for 3-4 hours or until desired tenderness.

Alternatively, you can soak the peanuts overnight in cool water. The next day, simmer on stovetop for 1 hour or until desired tenderness.

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Asian Rice Noodle Salad with Steak Recipe http://steamykitchen.com/37270-asian-rice-noodle-salad-with-steak-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/37270-asian-rice-noodle-salad-with-steak-recipe.html#comments Fri, 01 Aug 2014 13:03:06 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=37270 Here’s what you’ll learn: Why skirt and flank steak are perfect for this dish How to cut the steak to guarantee most tenderness Nathan’s marinating method How to cook mai-fun (skinny rice noodles) in 30 seconds How to julienne a cucumber in 30 seconds This is a recipe long overdue, the amazing Field to Fork dinner hosted by our local CSA, ...

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Here’s what you’ll learn:

  • Why skirt and flank steak are perfect for this dish
  • How to cut the steak to guarantee most tenderness
  • Nathan’s marinating method
  • How to cook mai-fun (skinny rice noodles) in 30 seconds
  • How to julienne a cucumber in 30 seconds

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This is a recipe long overdue, the amazing Field to Fork dinner hosted by our local CSA, Geraldson Community Farms, and Sarasota Whole Foods  was months ago! I had wanted to highlight Geraldson’s certified organic produce grown on their 20 acres and the dedication to safe, healthy produce for our small town.

But we’re currently in the middle of our choking-hot summer (so humid and hot that my eyelashes sweat) and that means it’s resting time for our fields. All of our local farms here close down or drastically reduce their growing, and I would like imagine that the teams of farmers and volunteers are off on vacation, enjoying their time off.

However, I know farmers are some of the most hard-working people…and I can’t think of a single farmer I know that takes long vacations. There’s always something that needs attention: equipment to fix, animals to tend to, fields to compost, work to be done.

I’ll have to wait until Fall, when they re-open, to show off their organic vegetables. In the meantime, let’s talk about STEAK!

Screen Shot 2014-07-31 at 12.53.42 PM
photo by the event photographer, B.Lively, at the Field to Fork dinner

asian-noodles-steak-recipe-3While Geraldson Community Farms provided all the produce for the dinner, Whole Foods here in Sarasota brought in the meat and their grillers.

I found out that Whole Foods’ meats are from animals that have never been raised with antibiotics or hormones. Also, their meats have a 5-step Animal Welfare rating system, so that you can easily identify how the animal was raised.

We chose to make this Rice Noodle Salad with Steak recipe from Whole Foods, but changed the recipe up a bit to suit our tastes.

Our family loves skirt steak and flank steak – it’s more tender (when cut properly), soaks up marinade faster (especially skirt), and the thinness of these cuts make for fast cooking.

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Asian Rice Noodle Salad with Steak Recipe Video

Here’s our video, and Nathan’s tip for the best steak ever.

 

asian-noodles-skirt-steak-2411-bTo make this a 20-Minute Meal

– Buy thin steak (like skirt steak) because it will cook faster. After adding the steak to the marinade, skip the waiting and proceed to grill/broil. You’ll still get a ton of flavor! *Bonus – massage the marinade into the steak like Nathan showed you in the video.

– Buy already-shredded carrots. Use a julienne tool to cut the cucumber.

– Use fine rice noodles (like I did in the video) – it cooks in 30 seconds.

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Asian Rice Noodle Salad with Steak Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes
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-If you love spicy - add in a spoonful of Asian chile-garlic sauce to the dressing!
-I prefer using flank or skirt steak, 3/4" thickness. Make sure you slice ACROSS the grain (see video)
-Use any type of noodles you want - even thin spaghetti noodles or angel hair noodles. If you are using rice noodles, remember that they cook very quickly.

Ingredients:

2 cloves garlic, minced
1 small nub of fresh ginger, grated
2 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce, divided
4 teaspoons toasted sesame oil
1 teaspoon brown sugar
1 (8-ounce) steak of your choice (skirt, flank, sirloin)
1 tablespoon rice vinegar
1 lime, juiced (1 tablespoon)
1 teaspoon sugar
1 tablespoon sesame seeds
1 cup shredded carrots
1 large cucumber, finely chopped
1 (8-ounce) package rice noodles
1/4 cup chopped peanuts

Directions:

1. To a resealable bag, add most of the minced garlic (reserve the rest for the dressing), grated ginger, just 1 tablespoon soy sauce (reserve rest for dressing), sesame oil and brown sugar. Mix well. Add in the steak, remove as much air as possible and seal. Marinate for up to overnight.

2. To make the dressing, whisk together the remaining soy sauce, remaining garlic, rice vinegar, lime juice, sugar and sesame seeds. Add in 2 tablespoons of water and whisk well. 

3. Cook the noodles according to package instructions. Drain. Taste the noodle to make sure it is done. 

4. Grill or broil steak for 4 minutes per side, or until done to your liking. Let steak rest for 5 minutes, then thinly slice.
5. For each bowl, toss noodles, carrots, cucumbers and steak slices with dressing. Top with chopped peanuts.

The post Asian Rice Noodle Salad with Steak Recipe appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

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