Steamy Kitchen Recipes | RSS Feed http://steamykitchen.com Steamy Kitchen Food Blog: fast recipes, simple recipes, with fresh ingredients to create delicious meals. Tue, 21 Jul 2015 18:52:51 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.2 Chinese Steamed Buns http://steamykitchen.com/39943-chinese-steamed-buns-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/39943-chinese-steamed-buns-recipe.html#comments Tue, 21 Apr 2015 17:22:46 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=39943 This Chinese Steamed Buns Recipe features: Simple dough that can be used for many different Chinese steamed buns Step by step photos to show you exactly how to make the buns How to prevent the buns from splitting apart too soon Tips to get your buns smooth, white and puffy A few weeks ago, my parents came to visit from the ...

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chinese steamed buns recipe roasted duck-4194

This Chinese Steamed Buns Recipe features:

  • Simple dough that can be used for many different Chinese steamed buns
  • Step by step photos to show you exactly how to make the buns
  • How to prevent the buns from splitting apart too soon
  • Tips to get your buns smooth, white and puffy

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A few weeks ago, my parents came to visit from the lovely state of Nevada. Even though their stay is just for a week, we are never surprised to see that they’ve brought enough luggage to stay a month.

That’s because the luggage are all packed with goodies for us and the kids! Food goodies! Seaweed crackers, special Chinese sausage, lap cheong, that you can only buy from Canada (the brand is called Happy Meat), salted kumquat for sore throat, dried anchovies with peanuts.

Mom also used a cooler in her carry on to bring fresh roasted duck and crispy roasted pork from a famous restaurant near her home. That’s the dedication of a loving Mom and true food lover!

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Chinese Roast Duck certainly begs for handmade, freshly steamed buns. I’ve shared before our little shortcut secret using store-bought sourdough biscuit dough sold in cans, or a pre-mixed flour found in Asian supermarkets. This time, Mom and I made them from scratch, experimenting with a couple of different recipes and declaring this recipe the winner.

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How to make Chinese Steamed Bun Recipe 

The first step is to make the dough, mixing in warm water, yeast, sugar and cooking oil. Then flour, baking powder, salt. In the photo below, the dough was sticking to the side of the bowl, we added another tablespoon of flour.

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Let your mixer do the work for you, mixing with the paddle first, then switching to the dough hook to knead — or turn out on your counter to knead by hand, which is what my Mom prefers to do.

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Knead until you get a smooth, supple dough.

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You can return this dough back in the same mixer bowl. Cover with plastic wrap or a towel and let it rise in a warm spot for 1-2 hours, until it just about doubles in size.

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After the rise, gently turn out the dough back on your counter that you’ve lightly dusted with flour. Divide the dough into half, roll out each half into a long log. Cover one log with plastic wrap so that it doesn’t dry out. Further divide the log into 6-7 pieces, depending on how big you want your buns.

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Take one piece of dough into your hand.

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Fold the edge of the dough into the center and press down. Do this all the way around. This motion creates a smooth ball and increases the surface tension to help shape the ball.

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See how all the edges of the dough have come into the center? Pinch that center to keep all the edges together.

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Turn the ball over. Now you should have a perfectly smooth, round piece that is nice and taut with surface tension.

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Use your palm to flatten that ball out.

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Use a rolling pin to roll back and forth to create an oval.

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Like this:

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Brush the surface with cooking oil.

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Fold over one edge.

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To create the bun. The cooking oil helps keep that seam, so that when you are ready to eat, you can open the bun. Without the cooking oil, the dough would stick together and be difficult to open the bun.

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However, if you steam the bun after this step, the bun will open up in the steamer. That’s not what you want. You want the bun to stay closed during cooking.

So, what you need to do is roll one more time on top, not too hard, just a little bit of pressure is all that’s needed.

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Place bun on a small square of parchment paper.

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Fill your steamer, but give the buns enough room to expand during cooking without touching. We use 10″ bamboo steamer at our house (I suggest no smaller than 10″). My Mom loves her multi purpose, stainless steel double boiler/steamer set.

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I used to just set my bamboo steamer directly into my wok, but it would sit so low that I would constantly run out of water during steaming. This is a big problem – when you run out of water during steaming, the food will begin to taste burnt and metallic. No water in the wok means no steam…instead, smoke.

I began using Helen Chen’s Steaming Ring set on top of any of my large pots. The Steaming Ring is $9.99 and allows you to transform any of your stockpots or dutch ovens to work with a bamboo steamer. It’s definitely worth every penny!

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Place the ring on top of the pan. Fill pan with about an inch of water.

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Set your bamboo steamer on top. It works perfectly with a 10″ bamboo steamer.

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Next steps:

1. Do not turn on the heat yet. Let the buns rest and rise for 10 minutes, just as-is.

2. After 10 minutes, turn on the heat to high.

3. When you begin seeing steam rise from the top of the bamboo steamer, reduce heat to medium-high and set your timer for 5 minutes.

4. After 5 minutes, turn off heat. Do not open steamer – let the buns rest for 1 minute.

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Secret Tips That Make a Big Difference

Here’s the secret to white, puffy buns that don’t collapse or fall:

I’ve made these buns so many times, and each time, the buns would turn out beautiful and perfect, but then would deflate or flatten after cooling. They also would take on a little yellowish tinge and be a bit chewy.

The secret that I’ve learned from my Mom:

The bamboo steamer needs to be in place before the heat is turned on. This allows the buns to heat up and steam gently and slowly, as the water begins to boil. My old method was to wait for the water to boil before placing the bamboo steamer, which caused the buns to cook too quickly, which resulted in a chewier bun.

Remember, steamed buns should be delicate and light — and so the cooking method needs to be gentle as well.

Turning off the heat (step 4 above) but NOT opening the steamer for 1 minute allows the buns to gradually come down in temperature and also lets the buns sit in gentle steam to finish the cooking process. This helps prevent collapsing buns — and keeps the buns nice and white.

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Take a look at this bun – nice and fluffy. The seam is distinct and easy to open, but stays closed during cooking, which is what you want.

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I hope you have a chance to make these Chinese Steamed Buns, the next time you get a Chinese Roasted Duck on your hands (maybe you are lucky enough to have Mom who will bring you one?) Or you can make your own Chinese Roasted Duck – here’s my easy recipe.

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To Accompany the Chinese Roast Duck

  • Julienned cucumber
  • Thin slivers of green onion (I soak in ice cold water to get them super crispy/crunchy and curly)
  • Hoisin sauce (store-bought)

Chinese Roasted Duck Recipe (with pre-mixed Asian dough for steamed buns)

How about Pork Belly with the Chinese Steamed Buns?

Chinese Pork Belly with Steamed Buns (with cheater buns recipe from store-bought sourdough biscuit dough in can)

Sous Vide Pork Belly Recipe (WOW – we love this recipe!)

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Chinese Steamed Buns Recipe

Servings: 12-14 buns Prep Time: 30 minutes + 1 hour resting Cook Time: 18 minutes
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Equipment: Steaming basket, pastry brush, parchment paper

Ingredients:

1 cup warm water
1 1/2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 tablespoon cooking oil (canola or vegetable), plus more for brushing
3 tablespoons sugar
3 cups all-purpose flour + more for dusting
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
14 squares parchment paper (4"x4")

Directions:

1. In a mixer bowl, add the warm water, oil, yeast and sugar. Let sit for 1 minute, until the yeast begins to bubble a bit. Next, add in the flour, baking powder and salt, in that order. With the paddle attachment, mix on low for 2 minutes. Add more flour, a tablespoon at a time, if the dough sticks to the sides of the bowl. Change to a dough hook, and on speed 2, knead for 4 minutes, until dough is smooth, supple and clear the sides of the bowl. If the dough sticks to the side of the bowl, add more flour, a tablespoon at a time.

2. Dust your counter with a little flour and turn out your dough. I like to hand knead it a few times, so that I can get a feel for the dough. Shape the dough into a smooth ball. Return the dough ball to the mixing bowl, cover with a clean towel and let rise in a warm, dry spot for 1-2 hours, until it nearly doubles in size.

3. Turn out your dough onto a lightly floured surface. Cut the dough in half. Gently roll each half into a log shape. Cut each log into 6 or 7 little balls. We'll work with one ball at a time, so keep the rest covered with plastic wrap so that they don't dry out. Form each ball by bringing in the sides (see photos above) and pinching the center. Turn ball over to get a nice, taut ball. Roll the dough ball out to a long, oval shape about 6"x3". Brush the top with a little cooking oil. Fold over one side of the oval. Use your rolling pin to gently roll and press one last time. Place bun on a parchment paper square, place into the bamboo steamer and cover with lid to prevent drying. Repeat with the remaining dough balls.

4. Fill your pot or wok with 2" of water. Place the steamer ring (if you have one) bamboo baskets on top. Do not turn on the heat yet. Let rest for 10 minutes. Then, turn on the heat to high. When you begin to see steam coming up from the top of the steamer, reduce heat to medium-high. Let steam for 5 minutes. Turn off the heat, without opening the steamer. Let rest for 1 minute. Open steamer and gently lift the steamer baskets off one another to let the buns cool.

TIP: If you are not eating right away, you can keep the buns in the bamboo steamer, on top of the pot of water. Make sure there is plenty of water in the pot. Turn heat to low, so that you have a gentle mist of steam coming up to keep the buns moist and warm. Make sure you don't run out of water in the pot!

Other recipes for Chinese Steamed Buns

Chinese Mantou Buns (Food 52)

Char Siu Bao (Woks of Life)

Chinese Fold Over Buns (Thirsty for Tea)

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Chinese New Year Recipes: What to eat if you want a raise! http://steamykitchen.com/31179-chinese-new-year-2014-what-to-eat-if-you-want-a-raise.html http://steamykitchen.com/31179-chinese-new-year-2014-what-to-eat-if-you-want-a-raise.html#comments Fri, 13 Feb 2015 12:29:14 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=31179 Chinese New Year begins Thursday, February 19th! It’s the Year of the Sheep, Goat and Ram. Because the Chinese in particular are extremely superstitious, there are “rules” for what to do and eat (and NOT) to usher in the New Year and ward off bad spirits. The specific recipes in the infographic are in my cookbook, Healthy Asian Favorites, on ...

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Chinese New Year begins Thursday, February 19th! It’s the Year of the Sheep, Goat and Ram.

Because the Chinese in particular are extremely superstitious, there are “rules” for what to do and eat (and NOT) to usher in the New Year and ward off bad spirits.

chinese-new-year-infographic

The specific recipes in the infographic are in my cookbook, Healthy Asian Favorites, on sale at Amazon.com for $18.99.

Below is a big list of recipes free, on SteamyKitchen.com:

Gong Hay Fat Choy!

Chinese New Year Recipes

From top left:

  1. My Mother’s Famous Chinese Egg Rolls or Vegetable Spring Rolls with video (egg rolls look like gold bars, which symbolize wealth) 
  2. Chinese Boiled Pork Dumplings (also symbolize wealth)
  3. Pan Fried Shrimp & Pork Potstickers (wealth)
  4. Shrimp Fried Rice (shrimp for happiness and joy)
  5. Chinese Broccoli Beef Noodles (noodles for longevity)
  6. Fresh Pear and Shrimp Stir Fry (shrimp for happiness and joy)

From top left:

  1. Long Life Fertility Noodles and Happy Shrimp
  2. Chinese Lettuce Cups (lettuce = rising fortune)
  3. Hainanese Chicken Rice (serve your chicken whole & cut at table for Chinese New Year. Cooking a whole chicken or duck represents health — carving it before serving would meant to “cut” your health)
  4. Chinese Tea Eggs (for prosperity)
  5. Chinese Whole Steamed Fish
  6. Stir Fried Beef with Nectarines (nectarine = happiness, health)

See more Chinese New Year Recipes on Steamy Kitchen!

More Chinese New Year Recipes

Thai Larb Lettuce Cups from my good friends Diane and Todd of White on Rice Couple
Dan Dan Mien from Jeannette’s Healthy Kitchen
Jiaozi Dumplings
 – from my friends Nate & Mary Kate on Epicurious (who just came out with their Chinese cookbook Feeding the Dragon!)
Chicken Lettuce Cups – Nate & Mary Kate on Epicurious
Stir Fried Prawns with XO Sauce – Noob Cook
Stir Fried Leeks with Vegetable – Noob Cook
Chinese Almond Chicken – Appetite for China
Braised Bok Choy – Taste Hong Kong
Sichuan Wonton – Appetite for China
Steamed Pork & Shrimp Dumplings (Sui Mai) – Flavor Explosions
Steamed Chicken in Lotus Leaf
 – RasaMalaysia
Stir Fried Pine Nuts with Corn and Peas – RasaMalaysia (dish means “full of gold and jade”)
Stir Fried Broccoli and Scallop – RasaMalaysia (“richness and abundance”)
Baked BBQ Pork Buns – RasaMalaysia
Soy Sauce Chicken – RasaMalaysia (though serve your chicken whole & cut at table for Chinese New Year. Cooking a whole chicken or duck represents health — carving it before serving would meant to “cut” your health)
Flank Steak with Fried Noodles – Food Network
Ketchup Prawns – Sea Salt with Food
Egg Dumplings – Show Shanti
Homemade Chili Oil – Show Shanti
Singapore Black Pepper Crab – Sea Salt with Food
Chinese Long Beans – Washington Post (long beans = longevity)
Chinese Almond Cookies – Simply Recipes (beautiful, Garrett, just beautiful!)
Fortune Cookie Recipe – Martha Stewart
Fortune Cookie Recipe video – Cookbook Maniac (love her tips for fortune cookies)
Chocolate Fortune Cookies – Martha Stewart
Vegetarian Buddha’s Delight – Epicurious
Orange Peking Duck – recipe from Ken Hom, author of Ken Hom’s Top 100 Stir Fry Recipes
Sweet & Sour Pork – recipe from Grace Young, author Breath of a Wok
Buddha’s Delight with Tofu & Brocooli– Cooking Light
Peanut Sesame Noodles – Appetite for China
Soy Sauce Chicken – Appetite for China
Water Chestnut Cake with Ginger – Appetite for China
Dragon Well Tea Shrimp – Appetite for China
Dan Dan Mian – Appetite for China
Stir Fried Noodles, Taiwanese Style – Explore Hong Kong
Chinese New Year Cake – Asian Grandmother’s Cookbook
Scallion Pancakes – Tigers and Strawberries (perfect recipe. we made these many times)
Chinese White Cut Chicken – Sunday Nite Dinner (serve your chicken whole & cut at table for Chinese New Year. Cooking a whole chicken or duck represents health — carving it before serving would meant to “cut” your health)
Tea Smoked Duck – Cooking Channel
Nian Gao Cake – Asian Grandmother’s Cookbook
Shanghai Style Nian Gao – Donna Cooks (“rising higher each year” This dish is a must for our table – I love the soft, chewy noodles. This is also one of my Dad’s hometown dishes)
Stir Fried Shanghai Nian Gao – mmm-yoso
Lion’s Head Meatballs – NY Times (lion = strength; big round meatballs = family togetherness)
Fuscshia Dunlop’s Braised Pork Belly – Cookbook Maniac
Chinese Walnut Cookies – Lily’s Wai Sek Hong
Paper Lined Cup Sponge Cake – Lily’s Wai Sek Hong
Dragon Cookies – Lily’s Wai Sek Hong (love this idea – we’ll make these dragon cookies w/my kids)
Almond Cookie Cresents – Lily’s Wai Sek Hong
Double Sided Gold Noodles – Lily’s Wai Sek Hong (one of my favorite noodles as a kid)
Steamed Pork Bun Recipe + how to fold Chinese buns video – Christine’s Recipes
Braised Chinese Mushrooms – Christine’s Recipes (easy dish to make, we always have whole Chinese mushrooms on CNY)
Egg Custard Pastry – Christine’s Recipes (with a cheater crust! brilliant)
Stir Fried Glutinous Rice – Christine’s Recipes
Stir Fried Broccoli with Fish Fillet – Christine’s Recipes
Tomato Chili Prawns – Christine’s Recipes (shrimp = laughter and joy)
Butter Cookies – Christine’s Recipes
Braised Chinese Mushrooms – Christine’s Recipes
Baked Coconut Cake – Christine’s Recipes
Radish Cake – Christine’s Recipes

The post Chinese New Year Recipes: What to eat if you want a raise! appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

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Chinese Soup Dumplings Recipe (with Pork & Crab) http://steamykitchen.com/38446-chinese-soup-dumplings-recipe-pork-crab.html http://steamykitchen.com/38446-chinese-soup-dumplings-recipe-pork-crab.html#comments Tue, 18 Nov 2014 13:58:01 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=38446 Chinese Soup Dumplings, or Xiaolongbao is a MUST TRY at least once! It’s a long recipe, the dumpling skin is hand made and the filling requires several hours of chilling. But it’s so worth it! These are the real deal. This is an authentic Xiaolongbao recipe from Top Chef star Lee Anne Wong from her new book, Dumplings All Day ...

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Chinese Soup Dumplings Recipe - Xiaolongbao | steamyktichen.com

Chinese Soup Dumplings, or Xiaolongbao is a MUST TRY at least once! It’s a long recipe, the dumpling skin is hand made and the filling requires several hours of chilling. But it’s so worth it! These are the real deal. This is an authentic Xiaolongbao recipe from Top Chef star Lee Anne Wong from her new book, Dumplings All Day Wong.

Have you ever tried Xiao Long Bao? These are Chinese Soup Dumplings, steamed dumplings that contain a rich broth trapped inside the parcel of the folded dumpling. This dish should be on your must-try foods!

So, how does the liquid, or soup, get inside the dumpling? It’s gelatin, baby. A concentrated, rich soup made with pork belly and ham is set with gelatin, so that the liquid becomes a solid. Then it is mixed with ground pork, crab and shrimp, along with green onions and ginger.

chinese-soup-dumplings-recipe-

A dough is hand-made, rolled out and filled.

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Then pleated and folded.

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To make little dumplings.

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Once the dumplings are steamed, the soup turns back into liquid. How do you eat such a dumpling? Very carefully! Place a dumpling on a large spoon, preferably a Chinese soup spoon, which is deep enough to capture all of the soup. Take a little nibble, let some of the steam escape (so that you don’t burn your mouth), and also let some of the soup spill out into the spoon. Take small bites of the dumpling, eating and sipping at the same time.


This recipe is from Lee Anne Wong, Top Chef finalist from the very first season. I remember watching Lee Anne, cheering her on from my couch, “Go Asian sister, go!”

After watching Lee Anne, I had serious thoughts about going to culinary school, even filling out the application forms at a brand new culinary center institute up near my home. But instead of spending $60,000 a year in culinary school fees, I started Steamy Kitchen instead.

These days, I’m getting asked by culinary schools to come TEACH their students! I think I made a wise decision.

But, Lee Anne Wong inspired me to move in the right direction – a career in food and cooking. 

 lee-anne-wong-photo

 

Dumplings All Day Wong


Chinese-soup-dumplings-recipe


The recipe for Chinese Soup Dumplings is from Lee Anne’s new book, Dumplings All Day Wong. Included in the book are dozens of Lee Anne’s favorite Asian dumplings, with step-by-step photos (like the ones above.)

Here’s a description:

Folds such as Potstickers, Gyozas, Shumai, Har Gow, Wontons and more, along with countless fillings and different cooking methods such as steaming, pan-frying, baking or deep-frying, allow you to create awe-inspiring dumplings in innumerable ways. With friends and family begging to come over and try a new dumpling recipe from the master again and again, this book will be a go-to in your kitchen for years to come. 

Xiaolongbao

My very first xiaolongbao was at the original Joe’s Shanghai, which resides on Pell Street in New York City’s Chinatown. I had read all about their famously plump and juicy steamed delights in many various local food publications, so I was compelled to try them for myself. Forewarned by many who had devoured before me, I knew to be careful with the first bite, as these dumplings were notorious for the hot broth inside that could easily burn and injure. Whatever your plan of attack is, these will surely become a favorite, as they are mine. No kidding, the sky could be falling, but if I have a dim sum steamer full of xiaolongbao, I’ll be fine. These dumplings take a whole day or two to make, so get the soup stock going first. By sundown, you’ll have fresh soup dumplings in the comfort of your own home—what I consider to be one of the true secret keys to happiness. -Lee Anne Wong

Recommended Equipment




These bamboo steamers are inexpensive and you can set them on top of your wok.


If you don’t have a wok, use this steamer ring! I own one of these and set this on top of a large pot filled with water. Then I set the bamboo steamer stacks on TOP of the ring.
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Chinese Soup Dumplings Recipe (Pork & Crab)

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 2 hours + 3 hours chilling gelatin Cook Time: 8 minutes
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Recipe from Dumplings All Day Wong by Lee Anne Wong. Reprinted with Permission. A note on chicken feet: Chicken feet happen to be great for making stock because of the natural gelatin and collagen they contain, and the price is usually pretty low if you can find fresh or frozen chicken feet. Wings are my other option as I find the meat can be pulled from the bones later on and used for a variety of recipes, and the meat adds great flavor to the stock.


Makes 40 dumplings.

Ingredients:

SOUP GELATIN
2 tablespoons (30 ml) Shaoxing rice wine, chilled
1 tablespoon (15 ml) soy sauce
1 tablespoon powdered gelatin or agar agar
2 pounds (900 g) chicken wings and/or feet*
8 ounces (225 g) pork belly, with skin
4 ounces (115 g) Chinese ham or bacon
8 cups (2 quarts) water
3 whole green onions, minced
1-inch (2.5 cm) piece ginger, thinly sliced
3 cloves garlic, lightly crushed


FILLING
8 ounces (225 g) ground pork
4 ounces (115 g) crabmeat, cleaned and picked through, or shrimp, peeled, deveined, minced
1/2 cup (25 g) minced scallion, white and green parts
2 tablespoons (30 ml) soy sauce
1 tablespoon (15 ml) Shaoxing rice wine
1/2 tablespoon (7.5 ml) sesame oil
2 teaspoon (10 g) sugar
1 teaspoon (5 g) salt
1 teaspoon (5 g) finely grated ginger
1/4 teaspoon ground white pepper


SOUP DUMPLING DOUGH
2 cups (200 g) packed all-purpose flour
1 cup (235 ml) boiling water
1 tablespoons (15 ml) sesame oil

DIPPING SAUCE
2-inch piece ginger, peeled
1/4 cup (60ml) red vinegar (or Chinese black vinegar)

Directions:

To make the gelatin:
In a small bowl, combine the wine and the soy sauce and refrigerate. We'll use this later with the gelatin.

Rinse the chicken and pork under cold water, then pat dry with paper towels. Using a large knife or cleaver, chop the chicken wings and feet in half to expose the bone. Dice the pork belly and ham into large chunks. Combine with the water, scallion, ginger and garlic in a large stockpot. Bring the water to a boil and then reduce to a rolling simmer. Skim the foam and impurities that rise to the surface of the stock for a clearer broth. Cook the broth, uncovered, for 2½ hours. Strain the stock through a fine-mesh sieve or colander lined with a lint-free towel into a clean pot. Discard the solids (or pull the braised meat from the wing bones and chop and use for dumpling filling, stir-fry, salad, stew or sandwiches). Place the strained broth back on the burner.

To the chilled wine/soy sauce mixture, stir in the gelatin powder. Pour this mixture into a shallow baking dish. Pour the hot soup into the baking dish and use a fork to stir and whisk. Allow this mixture to cool enough to stop steaming, then cover and place in your refrigerator. Chill the stock for about 2 hours, until it is completely cold and set, like Jell-O. Using a fork, scrape up the gelatin and gently mash it to break it up into small pieces. You can also place in freezer to speed up chilling.


To make the filling:
Combine the ingredients in a bowl. Mix well. Stir in the soup gelatin until it is well distributed. Cover and refrigerate the filling until ready to use.



To make the dough:
Place the flour in a bowl and make a well in the center. Pour the boiling water and sesame oil into the center of the well and stir with a fork or pair of chopsticks until the dough begins to come together. You may need to add more water if it is dry, or if the dough is sticky, a touch more flour. Once the dough comes together, turn it out onto a lightly floured surface and knead lightly for 3 to 4 minutes, until it can be kneaded into a smooth ball.

Working on a lightly floured surface, roll the dough into a 2-inch (5-cm)-thick rope and divide the dough into 10 even pieces. Roll each piece into a 1-inch (2.5-cm)-thick rope and cut into 4 pieces, for a total of 40 pieces. Keep the dough covered in plastic wrap and refrigerate all but just the few pieces you are currently working with.

Using a small rolling pin, roll each piece of dough into a 4-inch (10-cm) circle about 1⁄16 inch (0.2 cm) thick.

To make the dumpling:
Add a heaping tablespoon (12 g) of filling to the center of the wrapper and wet the edges with a pastry brush or your finger. Begin to gather the edge of the wrapper and make tiny overlapping pleats, keeping the center of the dumpling as the focal point, until you have gathered all of the dough and the dumpling is formed. Gently pinch the pleats to seal the dumpling. Store on a lightly floured tray, covered with plastic wrap. Refrigerate the dumplings (as you go) or freeze as needed.


To steam the dumpling:
Arrange the dumplings at least 1½ inches (4 cm) apart in a dim sum steamer lined with blanched napa cabbage leaves or place a 3x3-inch piece of parchment paper under each dumpling. Place the dim sum basket over several inches of water in a wok (the water should reach just below the bottom tier of the first basket). Bring the water to a boil and steam the dumplings for 6 to 8 minutes, adding more water to the bottom pan as necessary. Serve hot with red vinegar dipping sauce.



To make the dipping sauce
Use a vegetable peeler to peel the ginger into very thin strips. Then, use a chef's knife to thinly julienne the strips. Combine with the vinegar.

More Xiaolongbao Recipes

This Xiaolongbal Chinese Soup Dumplings Recipe is one I posted years ago! Warning – it’s sorta porn-ish.

Chinese Soup Dumplings – from Serious Eats

Steamed Shanghai Soup Dumplings – The Woks of Life

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Roasted Duck with Chinese Steamed Buns http://steamykitchen.com/28629-roasted-duck-with-chinese-steamed-buns-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/28629-roasted-duck-with-chinese-steamed-buns-recipe-video.html#comments Mon, 07 Oct 2013 18:51:03 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=28629 On the dinner plate, Chicken has been the reigning king of fowl for far too long. I’ve been asking my meat market to stock a more diversified fresh poultry section, but apparently, I’m the only fool asking for such. Any poultry other than chicken and ground turkey gets banned to the frozen foods department: quail, duck, goose and turkey. (Guinea ...

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chinese smoked duck and steamed buns-9934

On the dinner plate, Chicken has been the reigning king of fowl for far too long. I’ve been asking my meat market to stock a more diversified fresh poultry section, but apparently, I’m the only fool asking for such. Any poultry other than chicken and ground turkey gets banned to the frozen foods department: quail, duck, goose and turkey. (Guinea fowl, partridge, pheasant and pigeons can be had but only on special order).

I’m on a quest to lay off chicken for a while and explore some of the “other poultry”- both in the kitchen as well as on our homestead. While it’s a little too early to talk about the 20, 18, 17 duck eggs that we’re incubating (they’ll hatch this week), our plan all along is to raise our own meats.

Smoked Duck and Chinese Steamed Buns Recipe

Oh, before any of my readers freak out, no we haven’t cooked Duckie Momo or Nibbles. Both of them are on the “protected list” and are considered our pets. 

The past two weeks of recipe testing were devoted to taking one of the most elaborate Chinese dishes and creating a no-fuss, simple recipe that anyone can make.

Smoked Duck and Chinese Steamed Buns Recipe

Have you ever tried one of China’s most celebrated dishes – the sublime Roast Peking Duck with its crackling, crispy skin served in a fluffy Chinese steamed bun? It’s a complicated, multi-step recipe that involves air-drying the duck, blowing the duck to separate the skin from the body (essential to get the crackly-thin skin), pouring boiling water over the duck to tighten the skin, and roasting the duck while hanging (the duck, not you). If you’re interested, Serious Eats has an easier version.

Smoked Duck and Chinese Steamed Buns Recipe

I wasn’t interested in getting my version of the recipe to match Peking Duck, but rather to create a recipe that we could build on and that any kitchen novice to tackle. I distilled the dish to just 3 main ingredients.

1) duck
2) green onion (scallion)
3) bun made with a brilliant secret ingredient

Prep and hands-on cooking is less than 1 hour. (The duck will take longer in the oven, but it’s inactive, hands-off babysitting)

Smoked Duck and Chinese Steamed Buns Recipe

Roasting the Duck

The original Peking Duck is slathered and basted with a sweet/salty liquid of soy sauce and honey. I opted to simply season the duck with salt and pepper. Why make it any more complicated than than, when the duck itself has such incredible flavor?

I’m using our outdoor wood-fired grill from Memphis Grills, which acts as our outdoor oven. Yes, it’s wood-fired! We use 100% hardwood wood pellets that fuel the grill. It’s cleaner and healthier than charcoal and gives everything we cook a natural wood-fired taste.

You can roast your duck in your oven or out in your BBQ grill.  The most foolproof method of cooking duck is low and slow to keep the meat moist and tender — and then finish off with a blast of high heat to crisp up the skin.

Smoked Duck and Chinese Steamed Buns Recipe

Green Onion Goodness

In Asian cookery, green onion (or scallion) is used more than just for garnish. Raw green onion, cut into very thin, long slivers  and soaked in ice-cold water adds curly crunch texture! Plus, soaking it in water mellows out the spicy/harsh flavor of raw green onion. Give it a try. Here’s a more in-depth post on how to do this as a garnish.

In addition to curly-crunchies, I also minced some of the green onion with salt and flash-cooked with smoking-hot cooking oil to make “Scallion Oil.” It’s easy. It takes 5 minutes.

Smoked Duck and Chinese Steamed Buns Recipe

Cheater Chinese Steamed Buns

Okay, get ready for my secret ingredient. Prepared dough! This is a trick I learned from my Mom. A can of prepared sourdough biscuit dough creates light, fluffy, pillowy steamed buns!

All you have to do is roll out the dough discs into ovals and fold over. Steam for 8 minutes. Done.

The only thing missing now is the Sweet Chili Sauce, which you can make yourself, purchase (try finding Mae Ploy brand) or use purchased sweet plum sauce.

Roasted Duck with Chinese Steamed Buns Recipe Video

 

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Smoked Duck with Chinese Steamed Buns Recipe

Servings: 8-10 Prep Time: 45 minutes Cook Time: 2 hours
chinese smoked duck and steamed buns featured-9948

You'll also need roasting pan with rack (if oven cooking). I do not truss the duck (tie duck legs together), because I find that it's unnecessary - the bird cooks more evenly if you don't truss. Plus, an untrussed duck is easier to carve.

Regarding the prepared dough in a can: Look for the regular sized cans (the giant, fat "Grands" are too big). From my testing, the sourdough biscuits work the best, but buttermilk biscuits also work too.

Ingredients:

1 whole duck
kosher salt and pepper
1 large bulb ginger, sliced
1 whole garlic bulb, cut in half
8 stalks green onion/scallion)
1/2 cup cooking oil (rice, vegetable, canola or peanut)
2-3 cans prepared sourdough biscuit dough
1 tablespoon white vinegar
Prepared Asian Sweet Chili Sauce or Plum Sauce

Directions:

Preheat oven or grill to 300F

1. To clean the duck, I like to give it a little salt rub to thoroughly clean the skin. Rub a handful of kosher salt all over the duck. Give that duck an exfoliating scrub! Rinse all salt away and pat dry. Season duck with salt and pepper, inside and outside. Cut away and discard any extra fat. Stuff the duck with the ginger and garlic. I like to sew the cavity shut, but it's not necessary.

OVEN COOKING: Place duck, breast side up in roasting pan with rack. Roast duck at 300F for approximately 45 minutes per pound, or until internal temperature of duck is 160F. Turn up the heat to 450F and roast an additional 5-8 minutes to crisp up the skin.

GRILL COOKING: Prepare for indirect cooking at 300F. Have a drip pan as well - the duck is very fatty and you'll want something to catch the fat. Roast until internal temperature of duck is 160F, approximately 45 minutes per pound. Turn up the heat to high and roast an additional 5-8 minutes to crisp up the skin.

2. While the duck is cooking, let's prepare the scallions and bun.

SCALLION OIL: Mince 4 stalks of green onion. Place in a large, heat-proof bowl (like Pyrex or Corningware). Set aside.

CURLY-CRUNCHY SCALLION: With the remaining 4 stalks of green onion, slice as thin as you can at a very steep angle. Place in a bowl of ice water.

BUN: Flour clean surface to work on. Roll each biscuit into a oval shape. Fold over in half and place on a square of parchment paper. Cover with plastic wrap and set on counter until ready to cook.

3. Once the duck is cooked, remove from grill or oven and let rest while we steam the bun and make the Scallion oil.

BUN: In a large wok, bamboo steamer or large saute pan, add 2 cups of water with 1 tablespoon white vinegar. When boiling, steam the buns for 8 minutes on medium heat.

SCALLION OIL: While the buns are steaming, in a small pot or frying pan, heat up the 1/2 cup of cooking oil until the oil begins to smoke. Carefully pour the super-hot oil over the minced scallions and salt, mix well.

4. Carve the duck at the table, slice the duck breast into very thin slices to eat in between the steamed buns! Add a little Scallion Oil, Curly-Crunchy Scallion and Asian Sweet Chili Sauce.

 

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Mushroom Tofu Potstickers http://steamykitchen.com/27184-mushroom-tofu-potstickers-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/27184-mushroom-tofu-potstickers-recipe-video.html#comments Mon, 24 Jun 2013 20:17:46 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=27184 While these may not look like your normal cutely folded potstickers, let me assure you that these are 100% even better. Not only are they easier and faster to fold (No delicate crimping of pleating), they have MAXIMUM crispy crunchy surface! Double win for sure. We ended up folding 100 of these babies. 25 to eat straight away and the ...

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Mushroom Tofu Potstickers Recipe

While these may not look like your normal cutely folded potstickers, let me assure you that these are 100% even better. Not only are they easier and faster to fold (No delicate crimping of pleating), they have MAXIMUM crispy crunchy surface!

Double win for sure.

Mushroom Tofu Potstickers Recipe

We ended up folding 100 of these babies. 25 to eat straight away and the rest went into the freezer for a rainy day – which in tropical sunny Florida, means every single afternoon for 30 minutes. Those unfamiliar with Florida summers might think that a daily afternoon shower equals a “refreshing wash”, but in reality, it feels like every rain drop is made of wet flannel, blanketing the atmosphere with a heavy, muggy sigh.

Okay, it’s not that bad. It just feels like it this morning.

Mushroom Tofu Potstickers Recipe

Circling back to the recipe, the Mushroom Tofu Potstickers are also healthy (isn’t anything with tofu considered healthy?), qualify for easy finger-food (you can eat them with 2 fingers) and best of all, dip-able. The red in the photo is Lingham’s Hot Sauce, which is not really that spicy – sort of a combo of sriracha and sweet chili sauce – but even better.

Mushroom Tofu Potstickers Recipe

LinghamMy friend and fellow Asian food blogger, Rasa Malaysia, says ” There are countless hot sauces out there, but I don’t think any are as versatile or as addictive as Lingham’s, which has been produced in Penang, Malaysia, for over a century.” Here’s rest of her description in Saveur Magazine.

No preservatives, no gluten, no artificial coloring, all natural.

Look for Lingham’s in your local Asian market. I’ve found a handful of retailers online to purchase, but of course the prices are a bit higher.

Wanna know what I’m craving for? LINGHAM CHILI CRAB!

Mushroom Tofu Potstickers Recipe

 

Mushroom Tofu Potstickers Recipe Video

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Mushroom Tofu Potstickers Recipe

Servings: 48 dumplings Prep Time: 45 minutes Cook Time: 15 minutes
mushroom-tofu-dumplings-recipe-featured-1731

Potstickers are so easy to freeze! Once you have folded the potstickers, lay them in a single layer on a pan or plate (something that will fit in your freezer). Cover with plastic wrap and then you can lay another layer on top. Just make sure that each layer has plastic wrap in between so that the dumplings don't stick to each other. When potstickers are completely frozen, you can gather them all up and store them in a freezer bag.

When ready to cook frozen potstickers, do not defrost (you'll end up with soggy mess). Follow the instructions to cook the potstickers below. Add an additional 3 minutes to the "steaming" time to completely cook the frozen dumplings. They'll turn out perfect.

Ingredients:

3 cups cabbage, shredded on large holes of box grater
8 ounces tofu (any firmness), crumbled
4 ounces fresh shiitake mushrooms, stems removed, chopped
2 cloves garlic, finely minced
2 teaspoons grated fresh ginger
1 tablespoon fresh basil, finely chopped
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1 package of 50 dumpling wrappers
1 teaspoon cornstarch + 1/4 cup cool water
3 tablespoons cooking oil, or more if needed

Directions:

In a large mixing bowl, add cabbage, tofu, mushrooms, garlic, ginger, basil and soy sauce. Mix well.

Prepare the cornstarch slurry: whisk together the cornstarch and water in a small bowl.

To wrap: Place a potstickers wrapper flat in one hand. Place 1 heaping teaspoon of the potstickers filling mixture in the middle of the wrapper. Dip a finger in the slurry mixture and paint along the outside of the wrapper. Fold over to a half-moon shape. Pinch along the outside of the wrapper to close the wrapper completely around the mixture.. Repeat until all potstickers are filled and closed.

Lay folded potstickers in a single layer. Cover with plastic wrap to keep them from drying out. (See headnote re: freezing)

When ready to cook, in a non-stick skillet, heat 1 tablespoon of oil over medium high heat. When the oil is hot, add potstickers in a single layer along the bottom of the pan. Cook until browned on one side, about 2 minutes. Flip and brown the other side equally.

Using the pan cover as a shield from splattering, add 2 tablespoons of water to the pan and cover immediately. Steam potstickers for 3-4 minutes. Uncover skillet, you should see almost all of the water has evaporated. Remove potstickers, then wipe pan dry with towel and repeat for remaining batches.


Mushroom Tofu Potstickers Recipe

 

Mushroom Tofu Potstickers Recipe

 

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Curried Beef Dumplings http://steamykitchen.com/25753-curried-beef-dumplings-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/25753-curried-beef-dumplings-recipe-video.html#comments Tue, 05 Mar 2013 18:11:06 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=25753 This recipe for Curried Beef Dumplings is from Carla Hall’s brand new book, Cooking with Love. Carla is a co-host on ABC’s The Chew and a “Fan Favorite on Bravo’s Top Chef All Stars. What I love about this recipe is that it’s sort of a cross between steamed sui mai (dim sum dumpling) and pan-fried potstickers. It’s the best ...

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Curried Beef Dumplings Recipe

curried beef dumplings recipeThis recipe for Curried Beef Dumplings is from Carla Hall’s brand new book, Cooking with Love. Carla is a co-host on ABC’s The Chew and a “Fan Favorite on Bravo’s Top Chef All Stars.

What I love about this recipe is that it’s sort of a cross between steamed sui mai (dim sum dumpling) and pan-fried potstickers. It’s the best of both worlds! The beautiful fluted, flowery shape of the dumpling wrapper gives you a peek of the beef and curry filling. But they are pan fried so you get the nice crisp, browned bottom.

Curried Beef Dumplings Recipe

The curry spice used in these dumplings is mild (but feel free to use a spicer version). Yellow curry powder is made up of an array of spices: coriander, cumin, turmeric, chiles, mustard seeds, etc.  You can make your own or buy either mild or spice at the Spice House.

Curried Beef Dumplings Recipe

Yellow curry powder is mostly associated with Indian cooking here in America, but did you know that it’s used throughout Asia? Curry is simply a term for spice blend. The actual ingredients in yellow curry powder may vary a bit, but the powder is a main ingredient in Singapore Rice Noodle Stir Fry (a recipe in my new book!), Chinese curry stews and noodle soups.

Mom used make baked puff triangles filled with ground beef and spiced with yellow curry powder (I think she used S&B Curry Powder), so these dumplings remind me of her. At the store, look for “Yellow Curry Powder” or “Madras Curry Powder”.

Curried Beef Dumplings Recipe Video

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Curried Beef Dumplings

Servings: Makes 40 dumplings Prep Time: 30 minutes Cook Time: 15 minutes
Curried Beef Dumplings Recipe

You can use either wonton wrappers (square, thinner) or gyoza dumpling wrappers (round, a little thicker). You can find these frozen at the Asian market (preferred over the refrigerated kind found in regular supermarkets near the tofu section - which are too "doughy" for my taste)

Dumpling wrappers (and dumplings) dry out very easily. Make sure you cover the unused wrappers and any folded dumplings with a barely damp towel or plastic wrap until you are ready to cook.

We loved these dumplings as little appetizers. There's no need for a dipping sauce (the dumplings are so flavorful with the warming curry powder!) but if you like one, try using Mae Ploy Sweet Chili Sauce, it provides a nice sweet and fruity contrast.

Carla's tip: Set up an assembly line! Or better yet, get your kids or friends to help you out. There's little difference between making 25 or 125, so why not make more and freeze for later? To cook frozen dumplings, no need to defrost. Just add 'em to the pan and let them cook for additional 5 minutes.

Recipe adapted from Cooking with Love by Carla Hall

Ingredients:

3/4 pound lean (90%) ground beef sirloin
1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger
1-2 garlic cloves, finely minced
1 tablespoon yellow curry powder
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1 tablespoons cornstarch
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon dark sesame oil
2 large eggs, divided
1 red bell pepper, finely diced
1 stalk green onion, finely chopped
cooking oil, for pan frying
40 round wonton wrappers or round dumpling wrappers (about 3-1/2-inch diameter)

Directions:

In a large bowl, combine: ground beef, ginger, garlic, curry powder, soy sauce cornstarch, salt, sesame oil, just ONE of the eggs, bell pepper and green onion. Mix thoroughly.

In a small bowl, combine the final egg and 1 tablespoon water and whisk to make the egg wash.

Place one wonton wrapper in your hand or flat on the table. Lightly brush a thin layer of the egg wash around the edges of the wrapper. Scoop 1 tablespoon of the beef mixture into the center of the wrapper. Pull the sides of the wrapper up and push together slightly to stick to the meat mixture. The bottom of the dumpling should be flat so it can stand up in the pan.

Repeat until all the wrappers and filling are used up, making sure to cover any finished dumplings and the unused wrappers with plastic wrap or a barely damp towel to keep them from drying out.

Dumplings can be cooked immediately or frozen for up to 1 month. If freezing, make sure they are not touching when they are first frozen, then once they're frozen, they can be gathered together and stored in a freezer bag.

To cook, in a large nonstick sauté pan or skillet, heat 1 tablespoon of cooking oil over medium heat. Add dumplings to the pan, making sure they are not too crowded. Cook for about 2 minutes, or until the bottoms are lightly browned.

Once the bottoms are browned, it's ready to finish cooking them by steaming. Hold the sauté pan lid (like a shield) to protect you from splatters. Carefully pour in 3-4 tablespoons of water into the pan and immediately cover. Turn heat down to medium-low and let the dumplings steam until they are cooked through and the water has mostly evaporated. This should take about 2 minutes.

Transfer the cooked dumplings to a plate and tent with a piece of foil to keep them warm. Repeat with the remaining dumplings. Serve immediately.

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Chinese Fried Wontons http://steamykitchen.com/26014-chinese-fried-wontons-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/26014-chinese-fried-wontons-recipe-video.html#comments Wed, 20 Feb 2013 16:53:38 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=26014 Chinese dumplings are probably one of the most convenient and versatile foods to keep around. 1- They go from frozen to appetizer or dinner in just a few minutes. 2- You can pan fry/steam (like potstickers/gyoza), deep fry, boil or steam. 3- They’ll store in the freezer for months. Dumplings are my emergency food (unexpected hungry visitors!), midnight snack (shhhh….don’t ...

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Chinese Fried Wontons Recipe

Chinese dumplings are probably one of the most convenient and versatile foods to keep around.

1- They go from frozen to appetizer or dinner in just a few minutes.

2- You can pan fry/steam (like potstickers/gyoza), deep fry, boil or steam.

3- They’ll store in the freezer for months. Dumplings are my emergency food (unexpected hungry visitors!), midnight snack (shhhh….don’t tell anyone) and my emergency dinner (crap! what can I make for dinner that takes 15 minutes?)

4- You can use any type of ingredient your little tummy desires. Shrimp, beef, lamb, tofu, mushroom, kale, spinach, carrots, etc. etc.

Chinese Fried Wontons Recipe

And if you make it a “dumpling party” where you invite your friends and family to fold up a crazy batch, it’s also entertainment :-) Not only can you eat them the same day, but everyone gets to take home a batch to store in the freezer.

Chinese Fried Wontons Recipe

I don’t deep fry the dumplings much, but if I’m frying up a batch of My Mother’s Famous Chinese Egg Rolls (and here’s a vegetable version), then we most definitely make double duty use of the oil to make Chinese Fried Wontons.

Chinese Fried Wontons Recipe

In this batch below, I used kale from the garden and ground turkey. But have fun, throw in whatever chopped vegetable that you like, whatever meat (or not) that you have on hand. Make up a big batch and save some for the freezer!

Chinese Fried Wontons Recipe Video

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Chinese Wonton Tips

  1. Vegetable: I used kale in my video, and kale is NOT a water-dense vegetable. If you are using a water dense vegetable, like Napa cabbage, spinach and even regular cabbage, you will want to get rid of as much water from the vegetable as possible to avoid soggy wonton. Shred or finely chop the vegetable and place in a large bowl. Sprinkle generously with salt and toss. Let sit for 10 minutes. The salt will draw out a lot of the moisture from the vegetable. Take a handful of the shredded vegetable and squeeze hard to discard the water.If you are using frozen spinach, defrost, then squeeze out and discard as much water as possible. No need to salt.
  2. If you want to boil the wonton instead of frying, bring a pot of water to boil. Add in a batch of wonton. When the water returns to a boil, pour in 1 cup of cool water. Bring to a boil again. Add one more cup of cool water. Bring to a boil. Repeat one more time. Now your wonton is ready. Same procedure if you are adding the wonton frozen into the water. Drain and serve with dipping sauce. Substitute broth for water if you want to serve wonton with the broth. Throw in some noodles and vegetables to make wonton noodle soup!
  3. Dipping sauces – I love ready-made chile sauces like Mae Ploy Sweet Chili Sauce, Lingham Chili Sauce, Chinese chili-garlic sauce or rooster sriracha sauce. You can also make your own.

Chinese Fried Wontons Recipe

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Chinese Fried Wonton Recipe

Servings: 50 wontons Prep Time: 25 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes
chinese-fried-wontons-recipe-featured-1265

Ingredients:

1 pound ground meat (chicken, turkey, beef, lamb, pork)
1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger
2 cloves garlic, finely minced
1 stalk green onion, chopped
1 tablespoon soy sauce
2 tablespoons oyster sauce
2 cups finely chopped kale (leaf only) or vegetables of your choice
1/2 cup water
1 egg
50 wonton wrappers, defrosted
cooking oil for frying

Directions:

In a large bowl, add the meat, ginger, garlic, green onions, soy sauce, oyster sauce, curry powder and kale and mix well to combine. To make the egg wash, in a small bowl, add the water and egg and whisk with a fork.

To assemble the wontons, place a wonton wrapper flat in the palm of your hand. If frying, add 1 teaspoon of mixture to the center of the wrapper. If boiling, add 1 tablespoon of the mixture. Dip a finger in the egg wash, and paint all 4 edges with the wash. Fold the wonton in half, corner to opposite corner to make a triangle. Seal tightly all around. Make sure there are no air pockets or holes in the wonton. Fold the longer two triangle points together and seal to make the wonton shape.

Place folded wonton on a clean, dry plate or baking sheet and cover with plastic wrap to avoid drying out. When wontons are all folded, you can store or freeze.

To fry wontons, add 1 to 1 1/2 inches of cooking oil to a wok or pot. Heat the oil until it reaches 375F. Add a few wontons to the oil to fry, turning occasionally until they are golden brown. Remove them to a draining rack placed over a baking sheet so they can drain excess oil.

To boil wontons, see the recipe direction #6 from the Pork and Spinach Wontons recipe.

TO STORE:

- If you want to freeze the wonton, place all the UNCOOKED wonton flat on a plate. Do not crowd. Cover with plastic wrap and freeze. Once the wonton are frozen, you can gather them up and store in freezer bag. This ensures that the wonton freeze individually (otherwise if the wonton froze and stuck together, it would be nearly impossible to cook.

- When ready to cook frozen wonton, they can go from freezer to simmering broth. Follow exact same cooking instructions. Since the wonton is frozen, it will take longer time for the broth to return to a simmer -- so it's self timing!

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Chinese Fried Wontons Recipe

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Chinese Egg Drop Soup http://steamykitchen.com/25746-chinese-egg-drop-soup-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/25746-chinese-egg-drop-soup-recipe-video.html#comments Wed, 13 Feb 2013 15:28:45 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=25746 Chinese Egg Drop Soup is one of those dishes that can be made incredibly well as a warming start to a meal…..or done terribly, horribly, no-no wrong. There’s an Asian restaurant near my house, not naming names but *cough* on 53rd Avenue *cough*, who serves Egg Drop Soup that has so much food coloring that it practically glows in the ...

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Chinese Egg Drop Soup Recipe

Chinese Egg Drop Soup is one of those dishes that can be made incredibly well as a warming start to a meal…..or done terribly, horribly, no-no wrong. There’s an Asian restaurant near my house, not naming names but *cough* on 53rd Avenue *cough*, who serves Egg Drop Soup that has so much food coloring that it practically glows in the dark. In fact, when the server comes out with it, the lights flicker with a low *ddzzzzddzzz* sound due to the soup’s radioactive contents.

Chinese Egg Drop Soup Recipe

You know what I mean, right?

So let me show you how to make the soup right. Chinese Egg Drop Soup should be savory, soothing, a little warming heat from the white pepper. The eggs should be delicate, floating, whisper-thin silky strands. Do I have you craving for a bowl now?

Chinese Egg Drop Soup Recipe

This recipe is from Diana Kuan’s new book, The Chinese Takeout Cookbook. Diana and I have not only gotten to know each other through blogging about Asian food (go Chinese sistahs!) but we’ve also shared a meal together early on, when she came to visit in Tampa. We also share the same literary agent (hi Janis!) and I’m proud to share with you her recipe for Egg Drop Soup.

The Chinese Takeout Cookbook by Diana Kuan

Chinese Egg Drop Soup Recipe

A note about ground white pepper: Buy it! Ground while pepper is lovely. Ignore anyone who claims it tastes strange. white peppercorn is basically a regular peppercorn, with the black outer coating removed. It’s less pungent, and the effect is more of an all-over warming than hot. Plus, since it’s a powder, it dissolves well in soup (no harsh black flakes to bite on).

Chinese Egg Drop Soup Recipe Video

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Chinese Egg Drop Soup

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 5 Cook Time: 10
Chinese Egg Drop Soup Recipe

Adapted from The Chinese Takeout Cookbook by Diana Kuan

You can use either dried Chinese black mushrooms or fresh shiitake mushrooms. If you use dried - soak them in water overnight or in very hot water for an hour. Drain, cut off and discard tough stems.

Ingredients:

6 shiitake mushrooms, thinly sliced
6 cups chicken or vegetable stock
1 tablespoon Chinese rice wine or dry sherry
1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger
1/2 teaspoon salt (or to taste)
1/4 teaspoon ground white pepper (or to taste)
1 tablespoon cornstarch, dissolved in 3 tablespoons water
1 large egg
handful thinly sliced green onion

Directions:

In a medium saucepan over high heat, add the mushrooms, chicken stock, rice wine and ginger and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer and stir in the salt and pepper.

Add the cornstarch mixture to the simmering soup and stir until the soup has slightly thickened (enough to coat the back of a spoon).

In a small bowl, whisk the egg lightly with a fork. Slowly pour the egg into the soup in a steady stream while continuouslly stirring with a ladle. The egg should cook immediately Turn off the heat to prevent from overcooking the egg. Sprinkle the green onions on top and serve.

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Steamy Kitchen's Healthy Asian Favorites cookbook cover

My new cookbook is available for purchase now wherever books are sold!

You can also pick up a copy on Amazon for $13.98!

 

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Vegetable Spring Rolls Recipe (Egg Rolls) http://steamykitchen.com/25778-vegetable-egg-rolls-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/25778-vegetable-egg-rolls-recipe-video.html#comments Fri, 08 Feb 2013 17:35:54 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=25778 This Sunday is Chinese New Year, the year of the s-s-s-snake! I haven’t fully researched what the forecast for the year will look like, but according to Chinese feng shui master, it’s best to wear a monkey around your neck to avoid getting bit by the snake. Here is a great infographic I created to show what to and not ...

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Vegetable Spring Rolls Recipe

This Sunday is Chinese New Year, the year of the s-s-s-snake! I haven’t fully researched what the forecast for the year will look like, but according to Chinese feng shui master, it’s best to wear a monkey around your neck to avoid getting bit by the snake. Here is a great infographic I created to show what to and not to eat:

Screen Shot 2013-02-08 at 12.28.35 PM

Vegetable Spring Rolls Recipe

Those crazy Chinese superstitions!


Vegetable Spring Rolls Recipe

Along with celebrating Chinese New Year, I’m also celebrating that Steamy Kitchen’s Healthy Asian Favorites debuting as the #1 Asian cookbook on Amazon! whoop! whoop! Did you get your copy yet?! :-)

Vegetable Spring Rolls Recipe

We’ll be enjoying these Vegetable Spring Rolls (or what I call Egg Rolls) on Chinese New Year – they represent wealth and prosperity.  As you can see, I tend to only believe in the Chinese superstitions that are beneficial.

Vegetable Spring Rolls Recipe

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Vegetable Spring Rolls Recipe Video (Egg Rolls)

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Vegetable Egg Rolls Recipe

Servings: 50 egg rolls Prep Time: 25 minutes Cook Time: 30 minutes
Vegetable Egg Rolls Recipe

Ingredients:

8 fresh shiitake mushroom caps or Chinese dried mushroom* caps, julienned
1/2 small cabbage (about 3 cups), shredded (napa or regular cabbage)
2 medium carrots, julienned
8-ounce can bamboo shoots, drained and julienned
cooking oil
2 cloves garlic, finely minced
2 teaspoons grated fresh ginger
1 stalk green onion, finely chopped
2 handfuls of fresh bean sprouts
1 tablespoon low sodium soy sauce
1 teaspoon dark sesame oil
1 tablespoon cornstarch
50 spring roll wrappers, defrosted
cooking oil, for frying

Directions:

*If using Chinese dried mushrooms, soak them in very hot water for 20 minutes to rehydrate. Cut off and discard the stem.

In a large saute pan or wok, swirl in 1 tablespoon of the cooking oil. Turn on the heat to medium-high and immediately add garlic, ginger and green onion, stirring frequently. By the time the oil is hot, add the mushrooms, cabbage, carrots and bamboo shoots.

Turn heat to high and stir-fry the vegetables for about 2 minutes. and then toss in the bean sprouts. Add in the soy sauce and sesame oil. Cook for another minute. Then spread the filling out onto a large baking sheet. Prop the baking sheet up on one side to allow any sauce or oil to accumulate at the bottom (and discard)

In a small bowl, whisk together the cornstarch and 1/4 cup of cool water to form a slurry.

Place a wonton or spring roll wrapper on a flat surface, add 1 tablespoon of the vegetable mixture into a corner of the wrapper, and then roll the edge of the wrapper tightly around the mixture. Fold the two side corners towards the middle of the wrapper while continuing to roll up. Paint the top edge with the cornstarch slurry mixture and wrap tightly the rest of the way. Make sure all edges are tightly sealed. Place seam side down. Cover with plastic wrap to avoid drying out.

In a large wok or saucepan over high heat, add about 1-2 inches of cooking oil

Slide several egg rolls into the oil and allow them to cook for 2-3 minutes, turning them over a couple times, or until the wonton wrappers are golden brown. Remove the egg rolls to a cooling rack or paper-towel-covered plate to allow them to drain. Serve hot.

 

  Vegetable Spring Rolls Recipe

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Steamy Kitchen's Healthy Asian Favorites cookbook cover

My new cookbook is available for purchase now wherever books are sold!

You can also pick up a copy on Amazon for $13.98!

More recipes to explore:

My Mother’s Famous Chinese Egg Rolls Recipe (Steamy Kitchen)

Chinese Spring Rolls with Chicken Recipe  (Steamy Kitchen)

Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Orange-Almond Sauce (Steamy Kitchen)

Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork (Steamy Kitchen)

Thai Shrimp Spring Rolls (Food Network)

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Taiwanese Noodles with Meat Sauce Recipe (Taiwanese Spaghetti!) http://steamykitchen.com/22974-taiwanese-noodles-meat-sauce-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/22974-taiwanese-noodles-meat-sauce-recipe.html#comments Tue, 21 Aug 2012 20:30:58 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=22974 Short 2-minute video with step by step to make what my kids call "Taiwanese Spaghetti" - Taiwanese Noodles with Meat Sauce Recipe

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Taiwanese Noodle Recipe

Despite having an embarrassing amount of cookbooks on my shelves, my family’s favorite recipes are the ones I’ve riffed on from my Mom’s cooking. Earlier this summer, when we took a little vacation to visit parents, Mom made a Taiwanese noodle dish with a hearty meat sauce. To “sell” it to my kids, she called  it, “Taiwanese Spaghetti.” Though, in all honesty, meat + noodles need no selling to my kids, they’ll happily eat without reservation.

Taiwanese meat sauce is something nearly every Taiwanese mama cooks in weekly rotation, and it’s served over rice or noodles. It’s traditionally made with ground pork, Chinese black mushrooms and lots of shallots. The seasonings include warm Chinese five-spice powder, both dark and light soy sauce, black vinegar and a touch of brown sugar.

To make an easy version with everyday ingredients from the local supermarket, I’ve made a few substitutions.

How to cook Taiwanese Noodles with Meat Sauce (video)

Short 2 minute video on how to make this recipe.

Full written recipe is below!

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Taiwanese Noodles with Meat Sauce Recipe (Taiwanese Spaghetti)

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes
taiwanese-noodle-recipe-8932.jpg

For Gluten free version - substitute the regular soy sauce with gluten-free soy sauce and substitute the dark soy sauce with gluten free oyster sauce (Lee Kum Kee Panda Brand)

Ingredients:

1 pound noodles or rice of your choice
1/2 cup chicken broth
2 tablespoons dark soy sauce (or oyster sauce)
2 teaspoon light (regular) soy sauce
1 teaspoon Chinese black vinegar (or young balsamic vinegar)
1/2 teaspoon Chinese five-spice powder
1 tablespoon brown sugar
2 teaspoons cooking oil
1/2 onion, chopped
1 pound ground pork (or ground beef/chicken/turkey)
2 cloves garlic, finely minced
One 8-ounce can bamboo shoots, drained and diced
4 ounces fresh shiitake mushrooms, diced
1 stalk green onion, chopped

Directions:

1. Cook the noodles or rice according to package instructions. Drain.

2. In a small bowl, combine the chicken broth, dark soy sauce, regular soy sauce, vinegar, five spice powder and brown sugar. Set aside.

3. Heat a wok over medium-high heat. When hot, swirl in the cooking oil. Add in the onion and cook for 1 minute. Stir in the ground meat and cook for 2 minutes. Push aside the onion and ground beef to one side of the wok to create a small spot to fry the garlic. Add in the garlic and stir fry for a few seconds or until you begin smelling the garlic. Add in the bamboo shoots and mushrooms. Toss everything in the wok together.

4. Pour in the broth/soy sauce mixture and bring to a simmer. Cook for 2 minutes. Stir in the green onions. Serve the ground beef mixture over the noodles or rice.

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