Steamy Kitchen Recipes | RSS Feed http://steamykitchen.com Steamy Kitchen Food Blog: fast recipes, simple recipes, with fresh ingredients to create delicious meals. Thu, 16 Apr 2015 20:35:08 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.1.1 Thai Chicken Coconut Soup http://steamykitchen.com/39761-thai-chicken-coconut-soup-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/39761-thai-chicken-coconut-soup-recipe.html#comments Tue, 31 Mar 2015 15:43:48 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=39761 This recipe features: Classic Thai flavors, with a smooth, velvety soup Amp of the intensity of the herbs with a quick sauté of lemongrass, cilantro stems, garlic and ginger Customize soup by adding shrimp or mushroom (canned Asian straw mushrooms work really well) Southeast Asian cuisine features what I call the 5S’s – salty, sweet, sour, spicy, savory. This classic combination is ...

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Thai_Chicken_Soup_Coconut5233

This recipe features:

  • Classic Thai flavors, with a smooth, velvety soup
  • Amp of the intensity of the herbs with a quick sauté of lemongrass, cilantro stems, garlic and ginger
  • Customize soup by adding shrimp or mushroom (canned Asian straw mushrooms work really well)

Southeast Asian cuisine features what I call the 5S’s – salty, sweet, sour, spicy, savory. This classic combination is what makes Thai Chicken Coconut Soup so irresistible – the initial kick of the spicy chile pepper and lime, followed by salty/savory that’s tempered with a touch of sugar. The creamy coconut milk lingers to soothe the spiciness and allows all the distinct flavors to play nicely with each other.

Thai Chicken Coconut Soup Recipe

 

Everyday Easy by Lorraine Pascale

This recipe is from Chef Lorraine Pascale, a #1 bestselling author in the U.K.  Her book, Everyday Easy features elegant, fuss-free cooking for weeknight dinners.

Lorraine Pascale is the undisputed queen of the kitchen, queen of the simple and the simply delicious.Jamie Oliver

Recipes include:

  • Thai Beef Salad with Roasted Peanuts and Chili Dressing
  • Shrimp Caeser Salad
  • Lozza’s Lamb Biryani
  • Goat Cheese, Toasted Hazelnut & Honey Quesadillas with Arugula Salad
  • Crouching Tiger, Hidden Zebra Cake

and many, many more. Each recipe is easy, breezy and complete with a gorgeous color photograph. The Thai Chicken Coconut Soup Recipe is by Lorraine Pascale, photo is also from the cookbook, by Myles New.

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Thai Chicken Coconut Soup Recipe

Servings: Serves 4 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes
Thai_Chicken_Soup_Coconut5233

From Everyday Easy by Lorraine Pascale. Text copyright 2012 by Lorraine Pascale. Photographs copyright 2012 by Myles New. Excerpted by permission of Ecco, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers.

Note: Lemongrass stalk can be found at many large supermarkets (look near where they sell fresh ginger.) If you can't find a whole stalk, look for it in a tube. Many supermarkets carry lemongrass already pulverized, ready to use. Gourmet Garden is a brand I've used before (though fresh is still best.) I've also seen minced lemongrass frozen too. Another option - use a vegetable peeler to cut 2 strips of lemon peel (avoid the white, bitter pith, just the lemon skin.) I like to peel a big piece, use my fingers to twist it about to release its oils.

Same for kaffir lime leaves. If you can't find it fresh, try frozen kaffir lime leaves. Another option - peel 2 strips of lime peel. Lime is already in the recipe, so cut the peel first before juicing for recipe.

Ingredients:

Vegetable oil
1 lemongrass stalk
2 garlic cloves
2-inch piece of fresh ginger
Large handful of fresh cilantro
3 kaffir lime leaves
Two 12-oz cans of coconut milk
1 cup plus 2 tbsp good-quality chicken stock
1 red chili
3 skinless, boneless chicken breasts
1 bunch of green onions
2 limes
2–3 tablespoons fish sauce
1–2 tsp sugar

Directions:

1. Heat a drizzle of oil in a large frying pan or wok on a medium heat.

2. Trim the lemongrass stalk and discard any tough outer leaves before finely chopping the white bit (discard the green bit as it can be quite bitter). Peel and finely chop the garlic and then peel the ginger and cut it into thin slivers. Tear the kaffir lime leaves in several places on the leaf (but keep the leaf intact.) Chop the stalks off the cilantro (in one go) and then finely slice them (keeping the cilantro leaves aside for later).

3. Carefully toss everything in the hot oil with the kaffir lime leaves and stir fry for a couple of minutes, being careful that nothing sticks and burns.

4. Next add the coconut milk and stock and bring to a simmer.

5. Meanwhile, halve the chili lengthwise and then finely slice it, leaving the seeds in if you like it quite fiery. Chop the chicken into bite-size pieces and add both ingredients to the now-simmering soup. Reduce the heat a little and leave it to bubble away for about 8 minutes until the chicken is cooked.

6. Finely slice the onions (both the green and the white bits), juice the limes and roughly chop half of the reserved cilantro leaves. Add these once the chicken is cooked and then leave to simmer for a final minute. Last, add enough fish sauce and sugar to taste.

7. Ladle into four serving bowls, scatter the remaining cilantro leaves over and serve.

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Korean Bibimbap Recipe – Paleo and Low-Carb http://steamykitchen.com/39704-korean-bibimbap-recipe-paleo-low-carb-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/39704-korean-bibimbap-recipe-paleo-low-carb-recipe.html#comments Fri, 06 Mar 2015 22:30:24 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=39704 What you’ll learn: Bibimbap is a Korean dish with rice, mixed vegetables, meats and topped with an egg Low-carb & Paleo friendly dish, replacing the rice with spiralized & diced daikon radish Sizzling, savory dish with the classic ginger, scallions, garlic, soy sauce and sesame oil combination 30 minute meal from “Inspiralized Cookbook” by Ali Maffucci Bibimbap (BEE-beem-bop) is a classic Korean dish of steamed ...

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Bibimbap Recipe from Inspiralized

What you’ll learn:

  • Bibimbap is a Korean dish with rice, mixed vegetables, meats and topped with an egg
  • Low-carb & Paleo friendly dish, replacing the rice with spiralized & diced daikon radish
  • Sizzling, savory dish with the classic ginger, scallions, garlic, soy sauce and sesame oil combination
  • 30 minute meal from “Inspiralized Cookbook” by Ali Maffucci

Bibimbap (BEE-beem-bop) is a classic Korean dish of steamed rice served with ground meat (pork, beef, turkey or chicken), colorful vegetables, and a fried egg on top. It’s a savory, filling, hearty dish that is served in a big bowl.

Inspiralized by Ali MaffucciSome of the more traditional Korean restaurants will serve Bibimbap in a heavy, thick stone or cast iron bowl. The bowl is heated up first, the a little oil is drizzled in the bowl. Rice is added and pressed down into the hot oil – which then makes the rice delightfully crunchy and crispy on the bottom. Instead of a fried egg, sometimes a raw egg will be cracked on top, and when mixed in with the sizzling rice, coats every grain and cooks gently.

For those looking for a Paleo friendly or low-carb option for this Korean dish, Ali Maffuci, author of Inspiralized: Turn Vegetables into Healthy, Creative, Satisfying Meals and the blog, has created a brilliant alternative for the rice.

Replace the rice with the humble Asian daikon radish. Headshot

Surprisingly, when the “minced” daikon radish (using a spiralizer then pulsing in a food processor) is stir fried with ginger and garlic, it transforms into tender, aromatic morsels that easily tags along with accompanying ingredients in the bowl — just like rice.

If you’re living the Paleo lifestyle, or just want to steer clear of rice, pasta and breads, Ali’s Inspiralized Cookbook offers creative recipes that go beyond the normal, “replace spiralized zucchini for the noodles” shtick.

My favorite recipes are the ones that replace the rice – Spicy Seafood-Chorizo Paella and Sweet Potato Fried Rice are next on my list to try.

What spiralizer should I use?

Do you have a vegetable spiralizer? Create ribbons of “noodles” from all types of vegetables including zucchini (we call these zoodles), cucumber, daikon, sweet potatoes and more.

If you don’t know which one to buy, Watch my video review of different vegetable spiralizers and how to use them.





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Korean Bibimbap Recipe - Paleo and Low-Carb

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 15 minutes Cook Time: 20 minutes
Bibimbap_INSPIRALIZED

Reprinted with permission. Photo by Evan Sung/Recipe adapted from Inspiralized: Turn Vegetables into Healthy, Creative, Satisfying Meals

Gochujang is a Korean red pepper paste made from red chiles, glutinous rice and soybeans, found at Asian markets and many supermarkets. If you prefer your Bibimbap to not be spicy, look for Doenjang, which is a soybean paste without the chiles.

If you cannot find Doenjang, a suitable substitute would be miso paste, both are made from beans and will provide a umami-rich, savory flavor to the dish. Gochujang, Doenjang and Miso paste all store well in the refrigerator. If covered well (I press a piece of plastic wrap over the paste to minimize air), it will last for a year.

If you are a strict Paleo - replace the soy sauce with coconut aminos. Gochujang has a bit of sugar in it - so you can omit and replace with Asian red pepper powder or cayenne pepper powder.

Ingredients:

1 large cucumber
2-3 large daikon radishes, peeled
1 tablespoon low-sodium soy sauce
1 1/2 teaspoons rice vinegar
2 tablespoons gochujang (Korean red pepper paste)
1 teaspoon Asian sesame oil
2 teaspoons roasted sesame seeds
8 ounces lean ground pork
1/2 cup diced scallions, green and white parts
2 tablespoons finely minced garlic
1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger
salt, to taste
3 packed cups fresh spinach
4 large eggs
Cooking oil (vegetable, canola, coconut)

Directions:

1. Spiralize the cucumber, medium thickness, then set aside in refrigerator to keep cold. Spiralize the daikon radish, thin thickness (blade d). Place the spiralized daikon in a food processor and pulse until resembles size of rice grains. You should have approximately 3 cups of daikon rice.

2. In a medium bowl, whisk together the soy sauce, rice vinegar, gochujang, sesame oil and sesame seeds. Add in the ground pork to the bowl and let marinate on counter while you continue with recipe.

3. Heat a wok or large saute pan over medium-high heat. When hot, drizzle in cooking oil and swirl to coat pan. Add in the scallions, ginger and garlic. Stir fry for 15 seconds until fragrant. Add in the daikon "rice" and stir fry for about 5 minutes, until the daikon turns transluscent. Season salt to taste and toss well. Remove "rice" from pan, and cover to keep warm.

4. Wipe the pan clean. Return pan to medium-high heat. When hot, drizzle in just a little cooking oil. Add in the spinach and stir fry, tossing frequently, for 2 minutes, until spinach is wilted. Remove spinach to plate and set aside.

5. Wipe pan clean. Return same pan to medium heat. When hot, swirl in cooking oil. Crack in the eggs and cook without stirring for 3 minutes or until the egg whites are set on the edges. Cover pan, reduce heat to medium-low and cook for an additional 1-2 minutes until the egg whites are cooked through and the yolks still runny. Remove from pan to a plate, and set aside.

6. Return same pan to stove, set on high heat. When hot, swirl in cooking oil. Add in the marinated pork, breaking up the pork with your spatula. Cook pork for 4-5 minutes, until no longer pink and pork is cooked through.

7. Evenly divide the daikon rice, pork, spinach and cucumber noodles between four bowls. Top each bowl with a fried egg.

More Spiralized Vegetable Recipes

Pad Thai Zoodles (Steamy Kitchen)

Vegetables Spiralizer Comparison Video (Steamy Kitchen)

Cauliflower Fried Rice (Steamy Kitchen)

Zucchini Spaghetti, Crispy Prosciutto and Roasted Cauliflower with Lemon-Parmesan Sauce (Inspiralized)

Zucchini Noodles (Zoodles) with Lemon-Garlic Spicy Shrimp (Skinny Taste)

Zucchini “Noodles” with Sesame-Peanut Sauce (Fat Free Vegan)

Spiralized Zucchini Pasta with Creamy Avocado Sauce Recipe (The Watering Mouth)

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Chinese Stir Fried Pea Shoots http://steamykitchen.com/39585-chinese-stir-fried-pea-shoots.html http://steamykitchen.com/39585-chinese-stir-fried-pea-shoots.html#comments Fri, 20 Feb 2015 17:18:09 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=39585 What you’ll learn in this Pea Shoots Recipe: 15 minute recipe with step by step photos how to stir fry pea shoots, Chinese style How to infuse the garlic flavor into the cooking oil How to grow your own healthy pea shoots! What are Pea Shoots? Pea shoots are the baby plants of peas! We grow them like our microgreens, which ...

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chinese stir fried pea sprouts recipe-3947

What you’ll learn in this Pea Shoots Recipe:

  • 15 minute recipe with step by step photos how to stir fry pea shoots, Chinese style
  • How to infuse the garlic flavor into the cooking oil
  • How to grow your own healthy pea shoots!

What are Pea Shoots?

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Pea shoots are the baby plants of peas! We grow them like our microgreens, which are so very easy to grow. Here is a post, with step by step photos on how you can grow your own pea shoots at home, even on your windowsill or on your sunny patio.

It only takes 2 weeks from seed to lush pea shoots, ready for stir fry.

Why do we grow our own microgreens and sprouts and shoots? 

  • It’s very easy to grow – no special equipment required.
  • Highly nutritious – microgreens are up to 48x higher in nutrition than its full-grown counterpart. A little sprinkle of microgreens on my salad massive gives a nutritional boost to my meal.
  • I don’t trust store-bought, farm-grown sprouts, shoots or greens. There is too much risk for contamination, especially E. Coli and Salmonella. Small batch, controlled setting is safer.

Learn how to grow pea shoots with our step by step photos.

How to stir fry pea shoots

Pea shoots are delicate, should just be lightly cooked and barely seasoned. The shoots are sweet, tender and light – and should be treated as such!

chinese stir fried pea sprouts recipe-3914

The main seasoning is garlicky oil. I add in neutral flavored cooking oil (like canola) and garlic to a cold wok or large pan. Then, turn on the heat to medium-low, and let the garlic and oil heat together slowly. Take your time – this is when the garlicky flavor infuses the oil. Just take care to control your heat and not let the garlic burn or brown too much. When you start smelling that garlic – it is time to add the pea shoots.

Now it’s time to crank up the heat. Turn heat to high.

You’ll have to add the pea shoots in batches – since the tendrils are so light, it looks like a lot of pea shoots, but the shoots will cook down.
As you add the pea shoots, use your tongs to flip, turn, stir all that garlicky oil all over the shoots! Try to get as much garlic in the middle, on top of all of the pea shoots (garlic at bottom of hot wok may burn.) Keep adding more of the pea shoots as the ones on the bottom begin wilting.

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Season with salt and sugar.

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See how the pea shoots are just barely cooked? Everything has wilted down, but the shoots are still a little crunchy and bright green. It’s perfect! Turn off heat, add in the sesame oil and cooking wine (optional.)

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Stir. Done.

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There’s not much more to it than that!

chinese stir fried pea sprouts recipe-3936

 

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Chinese Stir Fried Pea Shoots Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 5 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes
chinese stir fried pea sprouts recipe-3932

The key to this dish is not to let the pea shoots overcook. Once the shoots begin to wilt, it is almost done! The beauty of this dish is the limited ingredients - let the delicate pea shoots flavor be the star.

Ingredients:

1 pound pea shoots
2 garlic cloves, finely minced
1/4 teaspoon sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon Chinese rice wine (or dry sherry) - optional
1/2 teaspoon roasted sesame oil
neutral flavored cooking oil (like canola or vegetable oil)

Directions:

1. In a wok or large saute pan, add in the garlic. Pour in about 1 1/2 tablespoons of the cooking oil. Turn heat to medium-low and let the garlic heat up slowly, infusing its flavor and fragrance into the cooking oil. Take care not to let the garlic burn - control the heat so that the oil is slightly shimmering and aromatic.

2. Turn the heat to high. Add in the pea shoots, you'll probably have to add them in a couple of batches. Quickly, use your tongs to turn over the pea shoots around in the fragrant oil. Get that garlicky oil all over the shoots!

3. Add in the sugar and the salt. Again, use your tongs to flip, stir, turn the pea shoots. Within a minute or so, the shoots will begin wilting and cooking. Once the shoots begin wilting, the dish is almost done. Don't overcook the delicate shoots. Turn off the heat, pour in the cooking wine and the sesame oil. Toss and serve.

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Thai Grilled Shrimp with Black Pepper Sauce http://steamykitchen.com/37993-thai-grilled-shrimp-with-black-pepper-sauce-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/37993-thai-grilled-shrimp-with-black-pepper-sauce-recipe.html#comments Tue, 14 Oct 2014 13:39:57 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=37993 Patience is what we’ve been practicing for the last two months in our house. Going into a major kitchen remodel is never a “fun” thing (well, except picking out wall colors, flooring options and kitchen bling), but I never expected a 2-week stall. So close, yet so far away. We’re currently hung up on the granite cutter. Counters need to ...

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Thai-Grilled-Shrimp-with-Black-Pepper-SaucePatience is what we’ve been practicing for the last two months in our house. Going into a major kitchen remodel is never a “fun” thing (well, except picking out wall colors, flooring options and kitchen bling), but I never expected a 2-week stall. So close, yet so far away.

We’re currently hung up on the granite cutter. Counters need to be cut and installed before anything else happens. So, I’m being extra patient and resisting the urge to drive to the granite cutter’s shop and doing my Asian mother nagging magic on his team to hurry up!

kitchen-remodel-2779

In the meantime, with no kitchen, I’ve asked Top Chef Harold Dieterle to write a quick little note and share a recipe from his brand new book, Harold Dieterle’s Kitchen Notebook.  I asked him, “Harold, I can’t wait to try your contemporary Thai restaurant next time I’m in NY. Tell us your love for Thai food!”

 

haroldHi Steamy Kitchen readers! My love of southeast Asian cuisine is pretty straightforward, actually.  I’ve always loved the flavors, spices, and freshness of the ingredients and dishes from that part of the world.   I also spent some time in Thailand before I opened Perilla Restaurant, and so a lot of the flavors and influences from that trip ended up being worked into the menu.

I traveled to Thailand a few more times before opening Kin Shop (and a few times since), because I realized I had so much to learn about balancing flavor and heat, as well as an endless variety of techniques.  It’s such a rich culinary culture, and really, I’m still learning something new every day.

Have fun cooking! Harold.

 

The recipe that Harold is sharing is a powerhouse of Thai flavors!  You’ll love how the smoky, grilled shrimp pairs so well with Harold’s Phuket-Style Black Pepper Sauce that comes easily together in one pot. While I’ve adapted the grilled shrimp to make it simpler for a weeknight meal, I’ve kept the Phuket-Style Black Pepper Sauce as-is, because that’s where the recipe really shines.

We made this recipe in 30 minutes even without a kitchen! We used our BBQ grill for the shrimp and a little camping stove for the sauce.

About the Phuket-Style Black Pepper Sauce:

From Harold Dieterle’s Kitchen Notebook:

“The sauce never fails to remind me of my first trip to Thailand, during which I visited a marketplace on Phuket, an island off the southern coast, where you picked out your own fresh fish and shellfish at various stalls, and the proprietor would cook it for you. I asked on purveyor if I could pay extra and cook my own food. The woman who owned the stall was reluctant, telling me it was dangerous, but after I showed her my burn-covered arms, the pride and joy of every cook, she figured I could take care of myself.

I started making a Phuket-sauce based on ones I’ve eaten on the trip. She didn’t like the direction I was going – she especially didn’t appreciate my tossing black peppercorns into her wok – so she began trying to course-correct for me, adding this like coconut milk and hoisin sauce. This recipe is for the sauce we ended up with. I thought it was delicious; she didn’t.

Serve this sauce over poached or grilled shellfish, white-fleshed fish such as halibut or cod, grilled pork, and grilled chicken dishes or fried chicken.”

Thai Grilled Shrimp with Black Pepper Sauce Recipe 2

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Thai Grilled Shrimp with Black Pepper Sauce Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 20 minutes
Thai Grilled Shrimp with Black Pepper Sauce Recipe

Recipe adapted from Harold Dieterle, "Harold Dieterle's Kitchen Notebook." Reprinted with permission.

Here are some tips for the Black Pepper Sauce:
-Instead of mincing ginger, I peel the ginger and grate it with a microplane grater.
-If you can't find lemongrass, use a microplane grater and lightly rub the lime in the recipe (before juicing) to zest.
-A great substitute for shallot is red onion

Shrimp tips:
This basic recipe can be used for shrimp, fish, scallops and even lobster. I like to use the largest shrimp I can find, and thread on bamboo or metal skewers to make easy to grill.

Serve with white rice if desired.

Ingredients:

FOR THE PICKLED CUCUMBER:

2 tablespoons very hot water
1/2 teaspoon sea or kosher salt
1 tablespoon sugar
1/2 cup rice vinegar
1 hothouse cucumber, seeded, sliced



FOR THE BLACK PEPPER SAUCE
2 tablespoons neutral cooking oil (like canola)
1 tablespoon minced garlic
1 tablespoon peeled, minced fresh ginger
1 tablespoon minced shallot
1 tablespoon minced lemongrass
2 tablespoons coarsely ground black pepper
2 cups unsweetened coconut milk
1 cup hoisin sauce
1/4 cup rice vinegar
2 tablespoons fish sauce
juice of 1 lime



FOR THE SHRIMP
1 pound large or jumbo shrimp, on skewers
1 tablespoon neutral cooking oil
salt and pepper

Directions:

1. MAKE THE PICKLED CUCUMBERS: In a bowl, whisk together the hot water, salt and sugar until dissolved. Stir in the rice vinegar. Toss with the sliced cucumber. Refrigerate while preparing the rest of the recipe or up to overnight.

2. MAKE THE BLACK PEPPER SAUCE: Heat the oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. When the oil is shimmering, add the garlic, ginger, shallot, and lemongrass and cook, stirring until the vegetables are softened but not browned, about 2 minutes. Add the pepper and cook, stirring, until fragrant, about 2 minutes.Pour in the coconut milk, hoisin, vinegar and fish sauce. Stir, bring to a boil and then lower the heat and simmer for 15 minutes to develop the flavor. Stir in the lime juice. The sauce can be refrigerated in an airtight container for up to 3 days.

3. GRILL THE SHRIMP (while the sauce is simmering): Heat a grill to high. Brush shrimp with the cooking oil, season with salt and pepper. Grill shrimp 2 minutes, flip and grill an additional minute or two until cooked through.

Serve with black pepper sauce, pickled cucumber and rice.

Other Thai Inspired Recipes from Around the Web

Thai Shrimp Halibut Curry – Bon Appetit

Steamy Kitchen Pinterest Board on Asian Seafood

Thai Shrimp and Pineapple Curry – RasaMalaysia

Thai Chicken with Sweet Chili Jam – David Lebovitz

 

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Pad Thai Zoodles Recipe http://steamykitchen.com/37769-pad-thai-zoodles-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/37769-pad-thai-zoodles-recipe.html#comments Wed, 01 Oct 2014 18:23:41 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=37769   Before I get into the recipe, I wanted to give you a quick peek at the Daytime TV studios where I tape cooking segments at. It’s a show that’s syndicated in nearly 200 markets in the US with hosts Cyndi Edwards and the incredibly funny Jerry Penacoli (formerly of EXTRA.) My cooking segments are around 4 minutes-ish long. We tape ...

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Before I get into the recipe, I wanted to give you a quick peek at the Daytime TV studios where I tape cooking segments at. It’s a show that’s syndicated in nearly 200 markets in the US with hosts Cyndi Edwards and the incredibly funny Jerry Penacoli (formerly of EXTRA.) My cooking segments are around 4 minutes-ish long. We tape the segment and then it gets aired 2 or 3 days after that, depending on the market.

The studio is HUGE. This is just a picture of the back half.

 

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Here’s another angle. I’m fascinated by the ceiling – every available inch is covered by cables that hold up lights, speakers and I have no idea what else is hidden up there.

 

pad-thai-zoodles-recipe-7792

 

This is from the kitchen, looking out towards the cameras. There are 3 cameras, but I pretty much don’t look straight at the camera, except for at the beginning (intro and saying hi) and at the end (saying goodbye.) My focus is on the food and cooking alongside and chatting with the co-host.

The cooking segment is divided into 4 parts:

Hello
Demo/Cook
Taste
Goodbye

 

pad-thai-zoodles-recipe-7795

 

But just because I’m not LOOKING at the camera, doesn’t mean that I ignore them! Quite the contrary. I always know with my peripheral vision which camera is on (see that red light on top of the middle camera?)

When I’m cooking and need to show something, I have to keep in mind to stop, make sure the camera gets it and hold my hands still while I’m still talking and cooking. That prevents you, the viewer, from getting all dizzy trying to follow my hands!

Whether or not my cooking is done, time over is time over! Daytime doesn’t like to re-record or “cut” – we go with the flow and do it all in one take. Unless there’s a oopsie with a camera. Even if *I* make a mistake or don’t finish cooking in time – there’s no re-do!

That’s what I love, though. Learning to tape cooking segments this way has trained me to let go of perfection. In fact, if you happen to see the segment tomorrow or Friday, you’ll see that not only did I forget an ingredient (cilantro) but also made a MASSIVE mess trying to get the Pad Thai Zoodles on the stupid plate! LOL. The co-host, Cyndi and I laughed about it on-camera and just let it slide.

It makes the show a lot more natural, less “scripted” (nothing is scripted and there is no teleprompter other than the intro and the exit.) I’ve also trained myself to mentally walk through the recipe backwards to see what I have to prep or cook beforehand, so that we end up perfectly on time. For this recipe, I had to pre-cook the tofu. I also pre-spiralized the “zoodles” so we had a batch ready to go into the wok. So I started cooking while Cyndi was zoodling away with the zoodle-maker, called the Paderno 4-Blade Spiralizer magical machine.

If for some reason, Rob waves his 2-minute fingers at us, and there’s NO WAY that I’ll be done in those 2 minutes, I’ll either:

  • Cut out steps or some ingredients, just get something to taste*
  • Freak out

Just kidding. I don’t freak out. One time, the chicken was not cooked through, it was obvious that it wasn’t cooked through, but time was up and it was the “taste” time. I ended up saying, “So Jerry, we are running out of time, the chicken needs to cook for another couple of minutes. Here. take a fork and give the vegetables and the sauce a try!” We proceeded to dip into the pan (it was a one-pan dish) and tasted NOT-CHICKEN. This way, Jerry had something to say about the flavor for the camera. I hope I didn’t give him salmonella or gastroenteritis.

Sooooo, enough about the TV! What about the food that I came here for????

This was the recipe I made on-air, but I had to re-create it for the photo shoot on a little camping stove in my backyard (Less than 1 week before I get a real kitchen back!)

By the way, my cilantro looks very parsley-ish, We grow both. I wonder if they cross-pollinate and now I’ve just created Cilantrey or Partro. Or, as my friend, Cheri, would call it, “You-Ruined-The-Parsley.”

PAD THAI

 

The JERF Analysis

JERF is “Just Eat Real Food”

JERF

Tofu
Eggs
Green Onion
Garlic
Ginger
Carrots
Zucchini
Lime
Peanuts
Cilantro

Not-JERF

Thai Kitchen Pad Thai Sauce (though we are only using 3 tablespoons of the sauce)

__

 

*I haven’t done enough research on cooking oils yet to put them in a category.

I don’t mind using Prepared Pad Thai Sauce – or any shortcut sauce as long as the JERF column is significant. This recipe serves four, so 3 tablespoons of the sauce isn’t a deal-breaker. HOWEVER, if you want to stay JERF, go check out Todd and Diane’s version of Pad Thai Zoodles! They make their sauce from scratch, with ketchup, fish sauce, vinegar, etc.

The Zoodle Machine a.k.a. Spiralizer

This is what I used to make the zucchini noodles: the Paderno 4-Blade Vegetable Spiralizer

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I had previously done a video review of the Paderno 3-Blade (earlier model) and other options – here’s the Spiralizer Review Video. This new 4-Blader is even better – extra blade to cut angelhair sized zoodles and a metal rod so that you can make those carnival-style potato chips on a stick.

The Paderno 4-Blade Spiralizer price is $49.95 on Amazon. It’s a must-by if you plan on making a lot of zoodles. If you think it’s a once-in-a-while thing, you might want to consider one of my most-used tools in the kitchen – the Oxo Julienne Peeler for $10 – it’s smaller, fits in a drawer, cheaper.

 

How to cook Pad Thai Zoodles

I’m a crispy-crunchy tofu-lover. To make sure they stay crispy-crunchy, you have to cook them separately and remove the tofu from the pan so that they don’t drown in the sauce or vegetables.

Toss them in a little oil, add to hot pan, Brown on each side. This takes 1-2 minutes per side. But it’s worth the wait.

 

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Remove them from the pan

Next up, the eggs! Look how beautiful our hens’ eggs are. The yolks are so bright, vivid, vibrant.

 

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Give ‘em a good scramble. Then remove them from the pan.

 

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Why remove the eggs? Good question:

1. I like my eggs to be perfectly cooked, firm, separate from the rest of the stir-fry.

2. If I cook the eggs first, and then add everything else, the eggs will be overcooked. Plus, the “everything else” will be drowned by the wetness of the eggs. I want the “everything else” to have its own time in the wok, its own chance to fry in the cooking oil. Eggs are oil-hoggers.

3. If I cook all the vegetables first, then add the egg, then the raw egg will just “coat” the vegetables, making giant, soggy mess.

4. I could do this: Cook the aromatics (ginger, garlic, green onion), then cook the carrots, then zucchini. Then make a nice big hole in middle of wok, dribble in just a bit of cooking oil. Add eggs and scramble the eggs in that empty space. Once the eggs firm up, thoroughly mix all of the stir fry together and incorporate the cooked eggs.

HOWEVER – zucchini noodles cook way too fast. They are best cooked 80% of the way so that you still get some nice texture and bite. Soggy, overcooked zucchini becomes watery. Bad.

So to be on the safe side, I cook the eggs separate. You’ll see when I add them back into the pan later.

Once eggs are out, use a paper towel and just do a couple of swipes to clean the wok. Swirl in the remaining cooking oil, just a tiny bit, and add in the aromatics: ginger, garlic, green onion. Let that stir fry in the oil until crazy fragrant. This takes about 15-30 seconds.

 

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By the way, the reason we only use 3 tablespoons of prepared Pad Thai sauce (and not the entire jar) is because we’re amping up the “aromatics” and flavor with the garlic, ginger and green onion.

Add in the carrots to the pan and stir fry. *NOTE I didn’t use the Paderno Spiralizer to cut these carrots (I chose to just buy a bag of matchstick cut carrots to save time) – because in order to use the spiralizer effectively, the carrots have to be FAT. My store carries wimpy organic carrots. The carrots from our garden are too skinny.

 

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Cook for a minute or so – carrots take longer than zucchini to cook, so I add carrots in first. The secret to wok-cooking is knowing when to add ingredients. If I had added in the zucchini at the same time as the carrots, the zucchini would be overcooked while waiting for the carrots to catch up.

Now add in the zucchini zoodles.

 

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Toss very well, let it stir fry for a bit until you start seeing the zucchini change color from opaque to just beginning stages of slightly transluscent. Zucchini cooks fast, so this doesn’t take long.

Add in the Pad Thai sauce – I use Thai Kitchen Pad Thai Sauce (gluten free, dairy free, but it does contain fish sauce, so not vegetarian.) It’s on the sweet side, so if you feel like you need more salty flavor but not sweetness, try adding a few sprinkles of fish sauce or soy sauce.

 

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Add in the tofu and the eggs. Toss! Toss! Toss!

 

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To finish, squeeze in some fresh lime juice. (Toss again), Top with peanuts and cilantro. Serve with more lime wedges and some hot sauce!

On the TV segment that I taped, I used a new product that I just got from Rodelle. Sriracha Seasoning!!

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It is like an explosion of spice, garlic, salty, sweet, tangy. When we did our “taste” on air, both Cyndi and I said, “WOW!”

The good: Adds a POW of flavor. Ingredients that I can pronounce: sugar, salt, spices, garlic, vinegar powder (maltodextrin + distilled white vinegar), citric acid, soybean oil.

The bad: Sugar is the first ingredient, but since it’s a spice, you’re only using 1/4 teaspoon per serving.

I can’t wait to try this as a dry rub for shrimp on the grill, well….anything on the grill. I’m sure it will be wonderful on a roast too!

What I used to make Pad Thai Zoodles

Thank you for using my affiliate links! :-)

The magical Paderno zoodle machine. See my video review of different spiralizers here

The highly recommended Oxo Julienne Peeler that I love, love, love

The Sriracha spice blend:

My favorite wok:

Pad Thai Zoodles Recipe

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Pad Thai Zoodles

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 20 minutes
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The prepared Pad Thai sauce is sweet. Start with 3 tablespoons of the sauce and if you feel like you need more salty (but not sweet), add a teaspoon of fish sauce or soy sauce. If you enjoy more sweet, add another tablespoon of the Pad Thai sauce.

Ingredients:

8 ounces extra firm tofu, cubed
2 tablespoons cooking oil, divided
2 eggs, beaten
1 stalk green onion, cut into 2" lengths
1 clove garlic
1 teaspoon fresh grated ginger
1 cup matchstick cut carrots
3 large zucchini, cut into noodle spirals
3 tablespoons prepared Pad Thai sauce (or more, depending on taste)
1 lime, halved (use 1 half for step 5, cut other half into wedges for serving)
1/4 cup chopped peanuts
sprigs of cilantro, minced

Directions:

1. Pat the tofu very dry with paper towels. Toss just 1 tablespoon of the cooking oil with the tofu. Heat a wok over high heat. When hot, carefully slide the tofu (be careful of any splatters). Brown all sides of tofu, about 1-2 minutes each side. Remove tofu to plate and set aside.

2. With a paper towel, wipe the wok clean. Swirl in just half of the remaining cooking oil and turn the heat to medium-high. When hot, add in the eggs and scramble. Remove the eggs to to the tofu plate and set aside.

3. Return wok to medium-high heat. Swirl in the last of the cooking oil and turn heat to medium-high. When hot, add in the green onion, garlic and ginger. Cook for 15 seconds, until fragrant.

4. Turn heat to high and add in the carrots. Toss and stir fry for 1 minute. Then add in the zucchini noodles. Toss well and when zucchini begins to soften (about 1 minute), then stir in the Pad Thai sauce. Add in the eggs and the tofu. Toss, cook for 2 minutes. Taste and add additional sauce if desired.

5. Squeeze a little lime on top, top with chopped peanuts and cilantro. Serve with additional lime wedges.

 

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Asian Rice Noodle Salad with Steak Recipe http://steamykitchen.com/37270-asian-rice-noodle-salad-with-steak-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/37270-asian-rice-noodle-salad-with-steak-recipe.html#comments Fri, 01 Aug 2014 13:03:06 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=37270 Here’s what you’ll learn: Why skirt and flank steak are perfect for this dish How to cut the steak to guarantee most tenderness Nathan’s marinating method How to cook mai-fun (skinny rice noodles) in 30 seconds How to julienne a cucumber in 30 seconds This is a recipe long overdue, the amazing Field to Fork dinner hosted by our local CSA, ...

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Here’s what you’ll learn:

  • Why skirt and flank steak are perfect for this dish
  • How to cut the steak to guarantee most tenderness
  • Nathan’s marinating method
  • How to cook mai-fun (skinny rice noodles) in 30 seconds
  • How to julienne a cucumber in 30 seconds

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This is a recipe long overdue, the amazing Field to Fork dinner hosted by our local CSA, Geraldson Community Farms, and Sarasota Whole Foods  was months ago! I had wanted to highlight Geraldson’s certified organic produce grown on their 20 acres and the dedication to safe, healthy produce for our small town.

But we’re currently in the middle of our choking-hot summer (so humid and hot that my eyelashes sweat) and that means it’s resting time for our fields. All of our local farms here close down or drastically reduce their growing, and I would like imagine that the teams of farmers and volunteers are off on vacation, enjoying their time off.

However, I know farmers are some of the most hard-working people…and I can’t think of a single farmer I know that takes long vacations. There’s always something that needs attention: equipment to fix, animals to tend to, fields to compost, work to be done.

I’ll have to wait until Fall, when they re-open, to show off their organic vegetables. In the meantime, let’s talk about STEAK!

Screen Shot 2014-07-31 at 12.53.42 PM
photo by the event photographer, B.Lively, at the Field to Fork dinner

asian-noodles-steak-recipe-3While Geraldson Community Farms provided all the produce for the dinner, Whole Foods here in Sarasota brought in the meat and their grillers.

I found out that Whole Foods’ meats are from animals that have never been raised with antibiotics or hormones. Also, their meats have a 5-step Animal Welfare rating system, so that you can easily identify how the animal was raised.

We chose to make this Rice Noodle Salad with Steak recipe from Whole Foods, but changed the recipe up a bit to suit our tastes.

Our family loves skirt steak and flank steak – it’s more tender (when cut properly), soaks up marinade faster (especially skirt), and the thinness of these cuts make for fast cooking.

asian-noodles-steak-recipe-2405

Asian Rice Noodle Salad with Steak Recipe Video

Here’s our video, and Nathan’s tip for the best steak ever.

 

asian-noodles-skirt-steak-2411-bTo make this a 20-Minute Meal

– Buy thin steak (like skirt steak) because it will cook faster. After adding the steak to the marinade, skip the waiting and proceed to grill/broil. You’ll still get a ton of flavor! *Bonus – massage the marinade into the steak like Nathan showed you in the video.

– Buy already-shredded carrots. Use a julienne tool to cut the cucumber.

– Use fine rice noodles (like I did in the video) – it cooks in 30 seconds.

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Asian Rice Noodle Salad with Steak Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes
asian-noodles-steak-recipe-2407

-If you love spicy - add in a spoonful of Asian chile-garlic sauce to the dressing!
-I prefer using flank or skirt steak, 3/4" thickness. Make sure you slice ACROSS the grain (see video)
-Use any type of noodles you want - even thin spaghetti noodles or angel hair noodles. If you are using rice noodles, remember that they cook very quickly.

Ingredients:

2 cloves garlic, minced
1 small nub of fresh ginger, grated
2 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce, divided
4 teaspoons toasted sesame oil
1 teaspoon brown sugar
1 (8-ounce) steak of your choice (skirt, flank, sirloin)
1 tablespoon rice vinegar
1 lime, juiced (1 tablespoon)
1 teaspoon sugar
1 tablespoon sesame seeds
1 cup shredded carrots
1 large cucumber, finely chopped
1 (8-ounce) package rice noodles
1/4 cup chopped peanuts

Directions:

1. To a resealable bag, add most of the minced garlic (reserve the rest for the dressing), grated ginger, just 1 tablespoon soy sauce (reserve rest for dressing), sesame oil and brown sugar. Mix well. Add in the steak, remove as much air as possible and seal. Marinate for up to overnight.

2. To make the dressing, whisk together the remaining soy sauce, remaining garlic, rice vinegar, lime juice, sugar and sesame seeds. Add in 2 tablespoons of water and whisk well. 

3. Cook the noodles according to package instructions. Drain. Taste the noodle to make sure it is done. 

4. Grill or broil steak for 4 minutes per side, or until done to your liking. Let steak rest for 5 minutes, then thinly slice.
5. For each bowl, toss noodles, carrots, cucumbers and steak slices with dressing. Top with chopped peanuts.

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Mom’s Chinese Chicken Soup http://steamykitchen.com/37127-moms-chinese-chicken-soup-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/37127-moms-chinese-chicken-soup-recipe-video.html#comments Tue, 22 Jul 2014 14:40:45 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=37127 Hi! I’m Andrew Hair, the older brother. I just turned 11 years old last week and my Mom asked me to pick a recipe to make for you. I chose Mom’s Chinese Chicken Soup. Actually, to tell you the truth, it’s Po-Po’s (grandma) Chinese Chicken Soup. I don’t know why my Mom took credit for it. HAHA. I like this ...

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chicken-soup-andrew-2006Hi! I’m Andrew Hair, the older brother. I just turned 11 years old last week and my Mom asked me to pick a recipe to make for you.

I chose Mom’s Chinese Chicken Soup. Actually, to tell you the truth, it’s Po-Po’s (grandma) Chinese Chicken Soup. I don’t know why my Mom took credit for it. HAHA.

I like this soup because it tastes yummy, it’s clear, there’s no vegetables and it reminds me of Po-Po. The difference between Po-Po’s version and Mom’s version is that Po-Po likes to use chopped, itsy-bitsy green onion to garnish. Mom likes to use cilantro leaves.

I DON’T LIKE CILANTRO.

I repeat, I DON’T LIKE CILANTRO.

So, you might want to use green onions.

The recipe is below! Don’t forget to watch the video that I made too! And don’t use cilantro!

andrew--2

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Mom Says Don’t use the Liver

Don’t use liver because it changes the taste of the soup and makes the soup cloudy and gritty. Mom learned this from my Po-Po (grandma). Liver is nasty anyways. Blech.

 

Mom’s Chinese Chicken Soup Recipe Video

***

(Mom wrote this part below)

Why I love electric pressure cookers

1) Electronic timer ensures that I don’t overcook, cook delay is convenient

2) Safer than stove-top – lid won’t open unless de-pressurized

3) Frees up stove-top

4) I can set everything up in morning and come home to finished dish that’s ready to eat. I don’t have to babysit the pressure cooker.

5) Keep warm function

6) Release pressure quickly – if you don’t want to wait for the pressure to come down naturally, you can switch the knob to release pressure.

Why I love Fagor 3-in-1 Multicooker

Several years ago, I purchased the Fagor 3-in-1 Multicooker from Amazon. I used it weekly to make soups, roasts and beans. It’s still running strong!

I love this particular model from Fagor because it’s affordable for $99 and it’s multi-functional. Pressure cooker, slow cooker and rice cooker in one. With limited space in my kitchen, I love tools that can do more than one job.

The Fagor 3-in-1 also includes a “BROWN” function which basically is high heat to brown your meats prior to cooking. Previously, I had to brown my meats in a separate pan on the stove, add browned meat into slow cooker. Then wash my pan. Now, all the browning happens in the pot, whether I’m slow cooking or pressure-cooking.

Most of the time, I cook rice in the microwave or in my rice cooker. But the Fagor 3-in-1 includes a function to quickly and accurately cook long grain rice, short grain rice, wild rice, brown rice and risotto in a much shorter time than on the stovetop (or rice cooker).

Two big thumbs up.

 

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Mom's Chinese Chicken Soup Recipe

Servings: 3 quarts Prep Time: 5 minutes Cook Time: varies
andrew--2

Directions for pressure cooker, slow cooker and stovetop below.

Ingredients:

2 pounds chicken parts (not liver)
1 stalk green onion
1 big knob of ginger
4 garlic cloves
bunch of cilantro stems onlysalt or fish sauce
    to taste

Directions:

    PREP

-Clean the chicken parts, trimming excess fat
-Thinly slice ginger (no need to peel), peel and smash garlic, cut green onion into 3" pieces.
-Place all ingredients into a large pot. Fill pot with water to cover ingredients (~14 cups).

    COOK IN PRESSURE COOKER
    Set pressure cooker to cook under high pressure for 30 minutes. (It will take time to bring up to pressure. Once it is at pressure, cook 30 minutes. Let pressure release naturally or release the steam following manufacturer's instructions)


      COOK ON STOVE

    Bring pot to boil, then turn heat to low. Cover pot, leaving a little opening (I use a wooden spoon or spatula to prop up lid). Simmer for 2 hours.


      COOK IN SLOW COOKER

    Set slow cooker to low for 6-8 hours or high 4-6 hours.


      FOR ALL

    When the soup is done, skim the top and discard. Use a slotted spoon to remove the chicken parts, ginger, garlic and green onion (discard). Season with salt or fish sauce to taste (start with 1 tablespoon and add more if needed)

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Indian Chickpea Dal with Coconut Broth http://steamykitchen.com/34664-indian-chickpea-dal-with-coconut-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/34664-indian-chickpea-dal-with-coconut-recipe-video.html#comments Tue, 24 Jun 2014 14:22:10 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=34664 How to cook 15 Minute vegetarian and gluten-free Indian Chickpea Dal (garbanzo bean) with Basmati Rice. From Silk Road Vegetarian Cookbook. Recipe + Video

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When we first moved to Florida, we weathered through big hurricanes like Charley, Andrew, Wilma, Jeanne…I can’t even remember all of their names! At the start of every hurricane season, (right now) I take inventory proceed to stockpile on food, water, cash, batteries and gas for the generator. As a foodie, I mentally prepare a list of “gourmet” recipes that I can prepare if and when disaster strikes. I know, it’s stupid and silly, but we’ve been through 3 days without electricity (Hurricane Charley) and it’s not fun. Might as well make the best of the situation and eat well.

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It’s been about 8 years since we’ve experienced a big one – I keep saying that, “we’re long overdue.” But each of the 8 years past, each time the season passes without a hurricane, we have to deal with the glut of canned foods and dry goods in the pantry.

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This one is a perfect recipe that I’ll keep in the “storm gourmet” file – nearly every ingredient is found in the pantry or will keep well (garlic and onion). It’s an Indian dish from the cookbook, Silk Road Vegetarian: Vegan, Vegetarian and Gluten Free Recipes for the Mindful Cook by Dahlia Abraham-Klein. The Silk Road is a network of trade routes spanning between China, Tibet, Persian Empire and Mediterranean countries. Silk and spices were the most popular trading commodities.

Silk Road Vegetarian cookbook will take you on a journey along that route, highlighting Dahlia’s family stories (she traces her family’s roots back to the Babylonian Exile of the Jewish people in sixth century BCE), and food traditions in Central Asia. silk road vegetarian dahlia

A quote from Dr. Jean M. Layton sums the book up best, “Imagine a vegetarian and gluten-free excursion along the Silk Road that is drdolent with spices and scented with roses, oranges, and herbs. Silk Road Vegetarian will bring you along on a journey through Asia, Africa, Europe and India – with a bit of Latin influence as well.”

A sample of recipes from the book: Lentil Tomato Soup Mushroom Wild Rice Persian Green Frittata Afghan Cauliflowre Curry Bukharian Tomato Salad Hamentashen Cookies Indian Spiced Coconut Cardamom Tapioca Sweet Potato & Lentil Soup and…Chickpea Dal with Coconut Broth.

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I’ve modified Dahlia’s original recipe to use canned chickpeas (garbanzo) instead of dried to cut down on the soaking/cooking time. Dahlia approved of my using a Garam Masala spice blend instead of the separate 11 spices in the original recipe (see very end of post for the list of the spices in original recipe). Chickpea Dal with Coconut Broth and Basmati Rice ‘s a wonderfully fragrant, 15 minute, “storm gourmet” recipe that you’ll love. The dal is nutty, creamy, and beautifully spiced. Pair with basmati rice.

 

Indian Chickpea Dal with Coconut Broth Recipe Video

 

LINKS TO PRODUCTS IN VIDEO

– Full Recipe: http://www.steamykitchen.com/183

– Microwave Pressure Cooker http://amzn.to/1iBMhfi

– Cheaper Microwave Rice Cooker http://amzn.to/1nZVRI9

– Full Circle Composter http://amzn.to/Vae6kD

– Nextrend Garlic Twister http://amzn.to/1lNQD3A

 

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Indian Chickpea Dal with Coconut Broth and Basmati Rice Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 5 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes
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Adapted from Silk Road Vegetarian by Dahlia Abraham-Klein

If you do not have fresh tomatoes, use 1 can of chopped tomatoes, drained.
Substitute any rice of your choice for the basmati rice - however cooking times for wild rice or brown rice will be different. I have a recipe for cooking brown rice in the microwave - just search on Steamy Kitchen for the recipe.

Microwave-safe vessels for cooking rice can be found in any kitchen shop or Amazon. They are worth the ~$20! I also have a post on Steamy Kitchen on cooking regular rice in the microwave - lots of tips and links to products.

Ingredients:

1 cup dried basmati rice
1 medium onion
3 cloves garlic
2 medium tomatoes
15-ounce can chickpeas (garbanzo beans)
1 tablespoon cooking oil
1 tablespoon garam masala
1 teaspoon kosher salt
8 ounces coconut milk1 sprig parsley

Directions:

Cook the rice:
pour the 1 cup of rice and 2 cups of cold water into a 2-quart microwave-safe dish. Cover. Microwave high for 12 minutes. Let rest for 3 minutes.

Prep the ingredients While the rice is cooking:
-chop onion
-mince garlic
-chop tomatoes
-canned chickpeas- drain, rinse and drain again

-chop parsley (leaves only)

Cook:
1. Heat a large saute pan with the cooking oil over medium-high heat. When hot, add in the onions and saute for 2-3 minutes until translucent and soft. Add in the garlic and saute for 30 seconds until fragrant. Add in the garam masala and cook an additional 30 seconds.

2. Add in the chopped tomatoes, drained chickpeas, salt and the coconut milk. Stir well, and simmer, covered, for 10 minutes, or until thick and creamy. Top with parsley. Serve with basmati rice.

 

 

*The original recipe from the Silk Road Vegetarian Cookbook includes these spices (use in place of garam masala)  1 teaspoon of each: mustard seeds, cumin seeds, ground cardamom, ground coriander, ground cinnamon, ground cumin, paprika, ground turmeric 1/2 teaspoon of each: chili powder, grated nutmeg 1 thread saffron Instead of sauteing the spice blend for only 30 seconds, Dahlia recommends letting all of the spices simmer for 10 minutes (along with the onion and garlic).

 

PIN THIS RECIPE!

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Vegetarian Korean Japchae Noodle Recipe http://steamykitchen.com/36179-vegetarian-korean-japchae-noodle-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/36179-vegetarian-korean-japchae-noodle-recipe.html#comments Thu, 12 Jun 2014 13:53:18 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=36179 Make Korean Japchae Noodles (Glass Noodles) - Recipe and how-to video from cookbook author Jaden Hair of Steamy Kitchen. This recipe is vegetarian and includes sweet potato, kale and swiss chard providing a nutrient rich meal!

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Korean Japchae Noodles Recipe Vegetarian

Scott’s garden yielded a bucket of sweet potatoes and my raised beds finished the Spring growing season sputtering out the last of the kale and swiss chard. Summer is when we put the raised beds to rest – it’s just too darn hot to grow anything except hot chile peppers and okra (which sounds kinda good together too!)

We decided on making one of Korea’s most popular dishes, Japchae, or Glass Noodles. If you have friends or family on this or that diet, this is a dish that just might please everyone (well, except for meat-only eaters).

Korean Japchae Noodles Recipe Vegetarian

So what are dang myung noodles??

Dang Myung noodles are made from sweet potato starch, so they are vegan, gluten-free, paleo-friendly, dairy-free, soy-free and peanut-free. The back of every package that I’ve found at the Asian market states that the only ingredient is Sweet Potato Starch. I’m not so sure of that. There’s got to be some other ingredient in these noodles – can anyone confirm?

The noodles are stretchy, neutral flavored (duh!), slightly chewy and springy in texture. What they are great for is soaking up all of the flavors in the dish. Not much seasoning is needed because the noodles really act like a sponge.

FOOD FIGHT!!!

The other thing these noodles are fantastic for is FOOD FIGHT! Because they are so elastic, you can flick your wrist and SLAP your opponents face with a tangle mess of stinging wet noodles. Watch the recipe video…and at the end and see how well this works. I let the boys go at it with each other!

But beware….10 Minutes of food fighting fun, 40 minutes of cleanup. But the boys said it was all worth it. My camera lens….not so happy. I got hit too!

Korean Japchae Noodle Recipe Video

 

 

Korean Japchae Noodles Recipe Vegetarian

 

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Korean Japchae Glass Noodles Recipe - Super Foods Version!

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 15 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes
Korean Japchae Noodles Recipe Vegetarian

The key to this recipe is adding each ingredient separately - in the video, the sweet potato takes the longest to cook, so it goes in first.

Feel free to customize! Add mushrooms (add with the onions); matchstick carrots or fresh spinach leaves (add them the same time as the kale/swiss chard).

Ingredients:

6 ounces dried Korean glass noodles (sweet potato)
1 medium sweet potato
4 big handfuls kale and swiss chard
1 onion
1 stalk green onion
3-4 cloves garlic
1/2 cup soy sauce
2 tablespoons brown sugar
1 tablespoon sesame oil
1 tablespoon roasted sesame seeds
1 tablespoon cooking oil

Directions:

PREP INGREDIENTS:
1. Boil a pot of water (about 2 quarts). Turn off heat and add in the glass noodles. Let sit for 10 minutes.
2. Vegetables:
-Kale/Swiss Chard: Fold leaves in half, tear away the leafy part from tough stem (discard stem). Cut or tear leaves into bite sized pieces.
-Dice the sweet potatoes into 1/2" dice (the smaller you dice, the quicker it will cook)
-Onion: Slice onion into thin slices.
-Green Onion: chop.
-Finely mince the garlic.
3. In bowl, whisk together soy sauce, brown sugar and sesame oil.
4. If 10 minutes have passed for the noodles, drain the noodles.

COOK:
1. Heat wok with cooking oil over medium heat. Add in the sweet potatoes and cook for 3 minutes each side. The sweet potatoes should be lightly browned, darker orange and just nearly cooked through.
2. Turn heat to medium-high and add in the onions. Stir-fry for 2 minutes, until onions become translucent.
3. Add in the garlic and green onion. Toss well and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute.
4. Add in the leafy vegetables. Use tongs to toss well and cook for 1 1/2 minutes or until the vegetables are wilting.
5. Add in the noodles and pour in the sauce. Toss well again to combine everything. Finish off with sesame seeds.

 

Items I use (and love!)

This baby is my favorite way to mince garlic. It can do up to 4 cloves at the same time!
Since we’ve sold out of the Steamy Kitchen Woks (thank you to all the customers!) I’ve been using and loving this Anolon Wok – it’s got a flat bottom, hard-anodized aluminum with nonstick, a great lid that you can see through and heat resistant handles. And, the price is amazing! Great for gas or electric.

The post Vegetarian Korean Japchae Noodle Recipe appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

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Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Orange-Almond Sauce http://steamykitchen.com/34185-vietnamese-spring-rolls-with-orange-almond-sauce-from-the-blender-girl-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/34185-vietnamese-spring-rolls-with-orange-almond-sauce-from-the-blender-girl-recipe-video.html#comments Wed, 07 May 2014 11:45:54 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=34185 I very rarely veer off my “tried and true” basic recipe for Vietnamese Nuoc Cham (dipping sauce with lime juice, fish sauce, chili peppers, sugar, water) for Vietnamese Spring Rolls. It’s easy, predictable and I can make the sauce just by taste without measuring anything! But just because I *LOVE* something doesn’t mean that my entire family loves it too. My fish-fearing ...

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spring rolls with orange almond sauce recipe-1663

I very rarely veer off my “tried and true” basic recipe for Vietnamese Nuoc Cham (dipping sauce with lime juice, fish sauce, chili peppers, sugar, water) for Vietnamese Spring Rolls. It’s easy, predictable and I can make the sauce just by taste without measuring anything!

spring rolls with orange almond sauce recipe-1654

But just because I *LOVE* something doesn’t mean that my entire family loves it too. My fish-fearing husband won’t touch it….and therefore my kids won’t dip in it either. Sigh. I keep telling the kids that, “Buddha is a happy eater (see his belly!?) and he would want you to eat like Mama, not Dad.”

Screen Shot 2014-04-21 at 2.38.56 PM

My friend, Blender Girl (okay, her name is really Tess) just came out with a cookbook called The Blender Girl: Super-Easy, Super-Healthy Meals, Snacks, Desserts, and Drinks–100 Gluten-Free, Vegan Recipes.

I found a recipe for Orange Almond Sauce for Vietnamese Spring Rolls. Big massive hit all around. It’s creamy, light and made with almond butter and fresh citrus juices for something a little different.

If you vow to cook a little healthier this summer – take a look at Tess’ book with 100 recipes that are good for you. The blender does all the hard work! The book features smoothies you’d expect from a blender book – as well as sauces, soups, marinades, dressings and desserts.

The book is currently #3 cookbook on Amazon!

spring rolls with orange almond sauce recipe-1658

 

Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Orange Almond Sauce Recipe Video

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Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Orange Almond Sauce Recipe

Servings: Makes 16 rolls Prep Time: 15 minutes Cook Time: 15 minutes
spring rolls with orange almond sauce recipe-1654

You can make these rolls up to a day ahead. Here's what you need to remember: Place the rolls on a clean, dry plate in a single layer. If you want to stack multiple layers, place a sheet of plastic wrap between each layer. This prevents the rolls from sticking to each other. When all rolls are done, make sure you cover everything with plastic wrap - this prevents the rice paper from drying out in the refrigerator.

If you can't find almond butter - you can use any type of nut butter.

OPTIONAL: Soak the matchstick carrots and julienned cucumbers in 3 tablespoons of seasoned rice vinegar. It will add the amazing "zing" that you'll love!

Recipe adapted from The Blender Girl by Tess Masters

Ingredients:

FOR THE SPRING ROLLS
6 ounces dried rice vermicelli noodles
16 large dried rice paper wrappers
8 large lettuce leaves, preferably soft ones, halved and hard ribs removed
1 cup, matchstick cut carrots
2 cucumbers, julienned
1-2 avocado, pitted, peeled and sliced
1-2 bell pepper, cored, julienned
1 cup loosely packed cilantro
1 cup loosely packed mint
1 cup loosely packed basil




FOR THE ORANGE ALMOND SAUCE
1/4 cup water, plus more as needed
2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lime juice
3 tablespoons freshly squeezed orange juice
1/2 cup raw almond butter
1/2 teaspoon minced ginger
1 teaspoon honey or coconut nectar
1/2 teaspoon finely chopped garlic
1/2 teaspoon wheat-free tamari or soy sauce
1 teaspoon roasted sesame seeds

Directions:

Soak the noodles in hot water for about 20 minutes, until soft. Drain.

To assemble the rolls, fill a shallow dish half full with hot water (hot to the touch but not boiling. and submerge one rice paper wrapper for 5 seconds, let excess water drop off.  Place wrapper on a clean, dry surface and fold in half to form a half-circle. The wrapper should still be a bit stiff, but will soften by the time you've finished filling with vegetables.

Place a lettuce leaf in the middle of the half-circle and top it with a forkful of noodles, and then add a bit of each of the vegetables and herbs.  Carefully roll up the Vietnamese Spring Roll and set it on a dish, seam-side down in single layer. Repeat with the remaining wrappers and filling. If not serving immediately, chill in the fridge, covered with plastic wrap. 

To make the dipping sauce, throw all of the ingredients into your blender and puree on high for about 1 minute, until well combined. You may want to add an additional tablespoon or two of water to thin out the sauce. Stir in sesame seeds. Serve alongside the rolls.

 

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