Steamy Kitchen Recipes | RSS Feed http://steamykitchen.com Steamy Kitchen Food Blog: fast recipes, simple recipes, with fresh ingredients to create delicious meals. Tue, 21 Jul 2015 18:52:51 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.2 Korean BBQ Baby Back Ribs Recipe http://steamykitchen.com/27330-korean-bbq-baby-back-ribs-recipe-video-2.html http://steamykitchen.com/27330-korean-bbq-baby-back-ribs-recipe-video-2.html#comments Sat, 04 Jul 2015 14:03:44 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=27330 The nearest good Korean BBQ restaurant is over an hour drive away, simply too far when the best accompaniment to Korean BBQ is several super-cold OB beer alternating with sips of chilled soju (Korean rice alcohol, like Japanese sake).

That's why we love making Korean food at home, but it also means that I have to . . .

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Korean Kalbi Baby Back Ribs Recipe

 

In this recipe, you’ll learn:

  • Slather ribs with Korean BBQ flavors: sweet, ginger-garlic soy glaze
  • 10 minute prep time for fool-proof baby back ribs
  • Secret trick to the most tender baby back ribs
  • Cooks in oven, easy cleanup

The nearest good Korean BBQ restaurant is over an hour drive away, simply too far when the best accompaniment to Korean BBQ is several super-cold OB beer alternating with sips of chilled soju (Korean rice alcohol, like Japanese sake).

That’s why we love making Korean food at home, but it also means that I have to modify ingredients and cooking methods a bit. You might be more familiar with Bulgogi, a popular Korean BBQ dish that features shaved rib-eye beef slices marinated in mixture of soy sauce, brown sugar and sesame seeds. But the lesser known dish is Kalbi, or thinly sliced bone-in beef short ribs flavored in a similar marinade. Bulgogi and Kalbi are both cooked over an open flame – usually hot charcoal set in the middle of the table!

korean-kalbi-baby-back-ribs-recipe-9356

I’ve modified the Korean BBQ Kalbi recipe to use easy to find pork ribs to make Korean BBQ Baby Back Ribs, since my grocery store doesn’t carry the short ribs cut like this. Regular beef short ribs that are available are too chunky and clunky to eat by hand. Baby back ribs are perfect – tender, flavorful and simple to cook.

Oh, and I’m not about to carve out the middle of my dining table to install a charcoal grill, so we’re going with a simpler technique – the oven.

But firstlearn from my mistake

The first time I played with this recipe, it was a disaster. Not the recipe, but the oven was a crazy mess. I had cooked the baby back ribs on a cookie sheet, thinking it was the perfect size to fit 2 racks of ribs.

Korean Kalbi Baby Back Ribs Recipe

Unfortunately, I failed to remember that baby back ribs are JUICY and release a lot of FAT when cooking. Guess where that all ended up? All over the bottom of my oven where it then sizzled and burned. Burning fat in a hot oven is just not a good combo. While my family enjoyed the ribs for dinner, I spent the better part of the evening trying to scrub off all of the black, burned spots.

So, learn from my hot mess. Use a roasting pan at least 2-inches high.

Korean Kalbi Baby Back Ribs Recipe

 

Korean BBQ Baby Back Ribs Recipe Video

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Korean BBQ Baby Back Ribs

Servings: 4-6 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 95 minutes
korean-kalbi-baby-back-ribs-recipe-9360-640x800

Ingredients:

6-7 pounds baby back ribs
salt & freshly ground black pepper
1/2 onion, grated
3 cloves garlic, finely minced
2 teaspoons grated fresh ginger
2 tablespoons honey
1/4 brown sugar
1/4 cup soy sauce
1 tablespoon sesame seeds
1 teaspoon dark sesame oil
1 stalk green onion, chopped
2 tablespoons rice vinegar (or white/cider vinegar)

Directions:

Heat oven the 375F. (optional) Using a butter knife to pry it up, separate the membrane from the back of the ribs and discard. Generously season both sides of the ribs with salt and pepper. Wrap the ribs in foil, meaty side up and seal completely. Bake for 90 minutes. To make the Korean Kalbi sauce, mix together the remaining ingredients in a bowl. After the ribs are cooked, remove from the oven and carefully open up the foil -- be careful of the hot steam! Slather 3/4 of the Korean Kalbi sauce on the tops of the ribs. Place the oven rack in the top third of the oven and heat the broiler to high. Put the ribs back in the oven, foil still open, and broil until the sauce bubbles and caramelizes, about 3-5 minutes. Keep a watch on the ribs – it's so easy to burn them! Just before serving, pour the remaining Korean Kalbi sauce on top of the ribs.

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Pressure Cooker Ramen Noodle Soup http://steamykitchen.com/40348-pressure-cooker-ramen-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/40348-pressure-cooker-ramen-recipe.html#comments Mon, 01 Jun 2015 18:38:13 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=40348 Pressure Cooker Ramen Recipe Authentic Japanese ramen noodle broths normally take hours of simmering, especially pork based (tonkotsu). We’ve simplified the recipe, without sacrificing an ounce of flavor by using an electric pressure cooker and by using easy-to-find ingredients from your regular grocery store. Traditional tonkotsu broth is fatty, so rich, with almost an oily mouthfeel. While I love pork ...

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Pressure Cooker Ramen Recipe

Pressure Cooker Ramen Recipe

Authentic Japanese ramen noodle broths normally take hours of simmering, especially pork based (tonkotsu). We’ve simplified the recipe, without sacrificing an ounce of flavor by using an electric pressure cooker and by using easy-to-find ingredients from your regular grocery store.

Traditional tonkotsu broth is fatty, so rich, with almost an oily mouthfeel. While I love pork based ramen broth, I’m not a big fan of fatty texture. I really enjoy a smoother soup that I can enjoy from beginning to end, without feeling too-full afterwards. I’ll be showing you 2 recipes, both are a more delicate texture (less fatty) but still with full-flavor.

The two different recipes and techniques for making Japanese Ramen Noodle Soup feature: – one with the traditional pork hock, and the other with pork spareribs.

Why Spareribs? 

Many recipes for tonkotsu broth feature chicken feet/wings + pork hock, or pork feet and leg, cut in several pieces, exposing as much cartilage and bone as possible. This is how tonkotsu gets is creamy, rich, thick broth. The cartilage breaks down during the long simmering and releases gelatin.

Pork hock is difficult to find, outside of Asian supermarkets. Sometimes, you can find them smoked, but that’s not what we want. Instead, my simpler version of tonkotsu ramen broth uses pork spareribs that are cut.

Why Pressure Cooker? 

I love my pressure cooker! Rather than babysit a simmering pot of soup for hours on end, we like to use the power of pressure to shorten the time – from 6 hours to 90 minutes.

We’ve been testing out the Instant Pot electric pressure cooker, side by side with our tried and true, Fagor electric pressure cooker. I’m loving the multi-functionality of both appliances – and the size is just right for a big batch of ramen noodle soup.

Pressure Cooker Ramen Recipe

Batch 1: Pork Hock and Chicken Wings

Pressure Cooker Ramen Recipe pork hock

I bought this pork hock at a Chinese/Vietnamese grocery store. They came frozen and already cut into sections, exposing the bone/cartilage. All I have to do is defrost the hock.  Like the first batch, I also used chicken wings as well.

When I use pork hock, I always harsh boil them off first. This cleans the hocks and the wings (I do this with chicken and beef bones, as well), scrubs off any surface scuzz, dislodges any tiny bone particles (when you cut bone with a saw, there inevitably will be powdery bone particles), removes clotting blood, dirt, surface proteins.

pressure cooker ramen recipe-4416

The hard, harsh boil is only for 5-8 minutes or so, then the water is discarded, the chicken bones/hock is rinsed and we start again with clean, cool water. Don’t worry about “losing any flavor” from  the hard boil, who wants to eat this scum anyways?

Pressure Cooker Ramen Recipe- hard boil bones

This parboiling ensures you have a clean, clear stock. Can you parboil in the pressure cooker? The electric pressure cooker does not get the water hot enough for the rolling, hard boil that is needed for this step. As you can see from the photo above, the rolling, hard boil gives the bones a good scrubbing and forces out the impurities.

This first batch will be cooked in my Fagor Electric Pressure Cooker, with just the hock, chicken wings a little garlic and ginger. My goal is a clean ramen broth, with full meaty flavor.

Pressure Cooker Ramen Recipe- add water

Batch 2: Sparerib Bones for Ramen Soup

This batch features easy-to-find pork spareribs, which contain a lot of cartilage and bone – both of which will provide the beautiful gelatin needed for the broth.

Pressure Cooker Ramen Recipe sparerib bones

I picked up a package of spareribs, and asked the butcher to make several cross-cuts with his saw, to expose more bone and cartilage.

See the cartilage?

Pressure Cooker Ramen Recipe sparerib bones

That’s what is going to make our broth just as rich and flavorful as the pork hock. We also use chicken wings as well. Chicken feet much harder to find. The wings provide a good substitute.

As with the first batch, I like to harsh-boil (or parboil) the bones – both the chicken and the spareribs – for 5 to 8 minutes – done on the stovetop. Drain to get rid of the scummy water, rinse the bones.

In this batch, we’ll also add another dimension of flavor: caramelized onions. The onions, cooked down, will provide depth of flavor, a darker and more aromatic broth.

The Instant Pot has a “sauté” setting, which is perfect for sautéing of the onions. A little cooking oil, onions and patience is what’s needed.

Pressure Cooker Ramen Recipe saute onion

The onions should be a deep brown, but not burnt.

After the onions are done, pour in the water to fill to top and add in the parboiled bones.

Pressure Cooker Ramen Recipe

Cooking the ramen soup

Both pressure cookers are set to go for 90 minutes.

Pressure Cooker Ramen Recipe- instant pot vs fagor

After the 90 minute pressurized cooking, you can let the steam release naturally, without any tinkering, or by releasing the valve. I like to use a pair of tongs and a kitchen towel to prevent the splatter and spitting of steam from burning me.

Pressure Cooker Ramen Recipe - release steam

Batch #1 Results (Pork Hock and Chicken Wings)

Pressure Cooker Ramen Recipe - light broth

Beautiful clean, clear broth. The broth will need to be seasoned with salt. Full meaty flavor, delicate mouthfeel. It’s a thinner soup than I would have liked.

Batch #2 Results (Spareribs, Chicken Wings, Onion)

Pressure Cooker Ramen Recipe - darker broth

Brown, darker, richer stock. Very fragrant, better meaty flavor and thicker consistency.

Pressure Cooker Ramen Recipe - darker broth

After straining, here are the two ramen broths, side by side.

Pressure Cooker Ramen Recipe - clear broth Pressure Cooker Ramen Recipe - darker broth

Pressure Cooker Ramen Recipe - bones

How do you know if you have a good broth? If you refrigerate the broth, the result should be gelatinous. This is nearly the texture of jello and your spoon should almost be able to stand straight up! (This is broth batch #1)

Pressure Cooker Ramen - broth after chilling

There is a very thin layer of fat, which is perfect. I had skimmed a lot of the surface oils prior to refrigeration. As I mentioned earlier, I’m not a big fan of oily, fatty mouthfeel in my soups.

Pressure Cooker Ramen Recipe

Conclusion

The browning of the onions makes a big difference – not just color wise, but also in flavor. The sparerib/onion batch was richer, thicker, more complete in flavor. Both batches in the pressure cooker produced broths rich in gelatin (after refrigeration, both were jello-like consistency) which gives the soup body and satisfying texture. Pork spareribs are much easier to find at grocery stores, and produce similar amount of gelatin and flavor.

I highly recommend using spareribs over pork hock. Make sure you ask your butcher to cut the ribs crosswise to expose more of the bone and collagen.

I seasoned both broths – I prefer seasoning with soy sauce, rather than just salt – but the choice is yours.

Pressure Cooker Recommendation

For the past few years, I’ve been using the Fagor Electric Pressure Cooker exclusively, and was introduced to Instant Pot by William, a Steamy Kitchen reader. He was so impressed with his Instant Pot, that he wanted to connect us with the company. Instant Pot provided us with a test unit.

Both the Fagor Pressure Cooker and the Instant Pot work similarly. While the Fagor looks bigger in size, they both hold 6 quarts. The Fagor includes a thinner, non-stick pot, and the Instant Pot has a 3-ply bottom stainless steel heavy duty cooking pot, which I prefer. You can purchase a stainless steel pot separately, for the Fagor. Both units slow cook, pressure cook and sauté.

Instant Pot IP Duo-60: $132.45

  • 7-in-1 Multi-Functional Cooker–Pressure Cooker, Slow Cooker, Rice Cooker, Sauté/Browning, Yogurt Maker, Steamer & Warmer
  • Large, easy to use control panel with 14 built-in Smart Programs, Dual pressure, Automatic keep-warm and 3 temperatures forsauté and slow cook
  • UL and ULC certified with 10 proven safety mechanisms; Highly energy efficient and kitchen friendly
  • Include 3-ply bottom stainless steel cooking pot, stainless steel steam rack with handle & manual and recipes in English, Spanish, Chinese and French

Fagor: $81.99

  • 6-quart multi-cooker functions as rice cooker, pressure cooker, and slow cooker
  • Low/high pressure; self-locking lid; auto pressure release; 2 pressure-control valves
  • Overheat protection; “brown” and “keep warm” settings; LED screen; 8-hour delay timer
  • Stay-cool handles; recipes included; dishwasher-safe nonstick cooking pot
Both unit’s safety features are comparable. Both units time to pressure were very similar, and both released pressure easily, without problems. Instant Pot’s extra yogurt making feature may be a bonus to those interested.
After using both pressure cookers side by side several times, I would highly recommend the Instant Pot, mainly because of the heavy-duty 3-ply stainless steel pot (vs. Fagor’s nonstick pot) and the ability to adjust heat settings for sauté and slow cooking.

Soy Sauce Eggs

Pressure Cooker Ramen Recipe

I served the ramen with easy to make soy sauce eggs. Don’t just limit these eggs to a bowl of ramen, though. We love them as a snack, or as a side dish along with Japanese pickles. The eggs are soft+ boiled, meaning the yolk is not just firm, not runny, but not powdery like a hard boiled egg.

Pressure Cooker Ramen Recipe - soy sauce eggs

Add 3-6 eggs to a pot, cover with water by 1-inch. Bring water to a rolling boil, remove from heat and cover. Let sit for 6 1/2 minutes. The eggs should be a perfect soft+boiled egg with a custardy yolk that’s still creamy and firm whites.

While the eggs are cooking, you can prepare the sweet soy sauce. Whisk together: 1/2 cup of low-sodium soy sauce + 1/4 cup water + 1 1/2 tablespoons sugar. It’s best to have a skinny, tall container (like my Pyrex measuring cup) or you can use a quart-sized sealable bag.

After the eggs are cooked, immediately rinse in cool water. Peel the eggs, and add the eggs whole into the sweet soy sauce to marinate for 2 hours or overnight in the refrigerator. When ready to eat, remove eggs (reserve sweet soy sauce for another use) and cut each egg in half.

Or – you can soft boil/hard boil eggs with a microwave egg cooker – we’ve been using this one for the past 4 years. Since our hens produce so many eggs are soft or hard boiled by STEAM instead of being submerged in water. The steaming action actually makes the eggs so much easier to peel! This is important for us, since our eggs are same day fresh and are difficult to peel, cooked traditionally on the stovetop. (Older eggs are easier to peel than fresh laid eggs — the moisture evaporates as the eggs get older, leaving more space between the shell and the egg whites as it cooks.

You can reuse the sweet soy sauce again:

  • for another batch of eggs
  • as a dipping sauce for dumplings (I like to also add a spoonful of chile garlic sauce)
  • a couple spoonfuls in a stir fry
  • toss with cooked noodles + scallions for a quick side dish
  • drizzle over steamed vegetables
  • use to season the ramen broth (if you like a slightly sweeter tasting broth)

Other Toppings

Pressure Cooker Ramen Recipe

  • Finely minced green onions (scallions)
  • Fresh bean sprouts
  • Cooked bamboo shoots – from a can is fine. Canned bamboo shoots are pretty bland tasting, so I also marinate them in the sweet soy sauce from the eggs (see above recipe). Actually, I just throw the bamboo shoots in with the eggs and they’ll marinate together.
  • Blanched spinach – Fresh spinach: just a few of seconds in boiling water, or defrost frozen spinach. Make sure you squeeze out as much water from the spinach as possible.
  • Sesame seeds
  • Pieces of nori (seaweed)
  • Shichimi Togaroshi – Japanese 7-pepper blend made of red chili pepper, orange peel, sesame seeds, Japanese pepper, ginger and seaweed. This is also my secret ingredient to the best scrambled eggs :-)
  • Tiny drizzle of Asian sesame oil (don’t use too much or the sesame oil will overpower the soup)
  • shhh…don’t tell anyone, but I also love Chinese preserved bamboo shoots in chile oil in my ramen, too.

Ramen Noodles

japanese ramen noodlesFor these photos in this recipe, I used dried Japanese ramen noodles. Make sure you use noodles that are dried, not fried (like cheap instant ramen).

We’ve been testing out recipes to make ramen noodles all month long, just a few more batches of testing and we’ll be sharing our ramen recipe. I bought my mom a Philips Noodle Maker.

She raved about it so much that I bought myself one, too. WE LOVE IT! It’s fun making fresh pastas in different shapes. Our ramen recipe still needs a little tweaking and testing, but we’ll publish soon.

If you’re up to making ramen noodles from scratch, Not So Ancient Chinese Secrets can show you how! They also like using the Philips Noodle Maker.

 

Thank you for supporting Steamy Kitchen!

Pressure Cooker Ramen Recipe

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Pressure Cooker Ramen Recipe

Servings: 8 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 90 minutes
Pressure Cooker Ramen Recipe

We recommend the Instant Pot 6-Quart electric pressure cooker. Always follow the manufacturer's instruction for use. To serve, see list above for topping ideas. Try the soy sauce eggs!

Ingredients:

2 1/2 pounds pork spareribs, cut into 2" pieces
1 1/2 pounds chicken wings
2 tablespoons cooking oil
2 large onions, peeled, thick sliced
3 cloves garlic, smashed
thumb-sized nub of ginger
soy sauce or salt, to taste

Directions:

1. Bring a big stockpot filled with water to a boil (If your electric pressure cooker pot is stovetop-safe, feel free to use that instead of dirtying another pot.) Add in the ribs and the wings. Return to boil, let cook for 5-8 minutes at a hard boil on high heat. Drain and discard the water. Rinse the ribs and wings with clean water, getting rid of any scum clinging to meat.

2. Following the manufacturer's directions, turn the electric pressure cooker to saute or brown, on high heat. Swirl in the cooking oil and add in the onions. Brown the onions, about 8 minutes. Take your time!

3. Add in the garlic and the ginger into the pot, then add ribs and wings. Fill pot with water up to the "MAX" line. Close lid of pressure cooker, set to cook on high pressure for 90 minutes.

4. After cooking, let pressure release naturally, or use a kitchen towel and tongs to manually release pressure, being very careful of splatters.

5. Strain broth with fine mesh strainer, discarding the solids. Skim any surface oils on the broth, if desired. Season broth with soy sauce or salt, to taste.

More Ramen!

Miso Ramen Recipe
Steamy Kitchen Miso Ramen

Serious Eats Ramen Recipe

Lucky Peach Tonkotsu Ramen Recipe

No Recipes Chicken Ramen

Chow Slow Cooker Ramen

 

 

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Sous Vide Pork Belly Recipe http://steamykitchen.com/40432-sous-vide-pork-belly-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/40432-sous-vide-pork-belly-recipe.html#comments Fri, 15 May 2015 18:51:55 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=40432 What is Sous Vide? Sous Vide (pronounced “soo veed”) is a method of cooking that allows you to create foods that are perfectly cooked, at an exact temperature in a water bath. That means the most perfect steaks, impossibly tender, yet juicy brisket, and velvety smooth pork belly that melts in your mouth. Here’s a video to explain: Recommended Sous ...

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Sous Vide Pork Belly Tacos Recipe

What is Sous Vide?

Sous Vide (pronounced “soo veed”) is a method of cooking that allows you to create foods that are perfectly cooked, at an exact temperature in a water bath. That means the most perfect steaks, impossibly tender, yet juicy brisket, and velvety smooth pork belly that melts in your mouth.

Here’s a video to explain:

Recommended Sous Vide Class

I can’t say enough good things about ChefSteps. I’ve known about ChefSteps for awhile, from Tim Ferriss’ book, The 4-Hour Chef (btw, Tim mentions us in his book in the steak chapter – he features our steak salting method.) But it wasn’t until last week that I watched a class online. This is not a paid endorsement — I’m just a massive fan.

You can watch their free beginner Sous Vide class or for $10 enroll in their Cooking Sous Vide: Beyond the Basics – it’s worth every penny, and more. I’ve already learned better sous vide techniques beyond the steak and salmon.

Anova Sous Vide Review

Anova sous vide review

Anova Sous Vide ReviewWe have been cooking sous vide for over 6 years, starting with a Sous Vide Supreme Machine (here’s our review + the perfect 146F egg.) and have been using the first version of the Anova Sous Vide for the past couple of years. A month ago, we upgraded to the newer bluetooth enabled Anova Culinary Precision Cooker (fancy name for a sous vide appliance) and love the easier to use interface and dials.

Pros:

  • It’s a fantastic price point and affordable for home cooks. At $179 (Amazon.com), it is $100 cheaper than the Nomiku and $120 cheaper than Sous Vide Supreme. I don’t know enough about the new kid on the block, $199 Sansaire, to comment. The $699 PolyScience creates powerful sous vide machines for restaurants.
  • Simple to use: One button + one wheel to rotate for temperature selection. You don’t need the phone app to run the Anova. In fact, I installed the free app, used it once and just deleted it, as I didn’t find much use for the app.
  • Small size: The Anova works with any large stockpot, you just clip the Anova onto the side of the pot. This makes the Anova very easy to store in a drawer. Our old Sous Vide Supreme needed an entire deep shelf!
  • Reliability: Anova actually specializes in water bath equipment for laboratory, biotech, analytical
    equipment control, industry processes cooling, and culinary industries. They are based in Stafford, Texas and specialize in precision machines. If scientists trust their equipment, I can trust them to cook my steak.

Anova sous vide review

Cons:

  • While it does connect to my iPhone via bluetooth, I found that the app was just a “fun to have” and really see no need to be connected. Once you input the Anova temperature, you’re all set.
  • What I did like about my old Sous Vide Supreme unit was that it was a contained appliance with a lid vs. the Anova that clips to a pot. But that means a lid won’t fit. This doesn’t matter if you are cooking sous vide for just a couple of hours, but if you are cooking the perfect pork belly (hey, this recipe!) for 16 hours, a lot of water is lost through evaporation. Our sous vide runs overnight, and the last thing I want to do is to wake up in the middle of the night to check on my water level. There are polycarbonate boxes that chefs use, but you’ll need a plastic cutter to cut a hole for your Anova. You’ll see below how I tried to cover my stockpot (and failed!) Others have used ping pong balls or these very expensive balls that float on top of the water to prevent water loss. Yesterday, I actually considered cutting a hole in the lid of a small cooler, but not sure of the dangers of hot water sitting long periods of time in the plastic cooler.

Conclusion:

If you’re interested in giving sous vide cooking a try, this is the unit to buy. Paired with the ChefSteps online class, you’ll be on your way to cooking restaurant quality meals with minimal fuss.

How to Sous Vide Pork Belly

Sous Vide Pork Belly Recipe

Buy a nice piece of pork belly (this is where bacon comes from!) I like to use a handful kosher salt and “exfoliate” the pork skin. Here’s why you should do this, especially with chicken. It’s not a must, but I like to get the skin clean and scrubbed.

Char Siu sauce for sous vide pork belly recipe

I made two versions of this pork belly. One with garlic, ginger, green onion, orange peel, soy sauce and honey:

Anova sous vide review

And the other with prepared Char Siu (Chinese BBQ) sauce.

Char Siu sauce for sous vide pork belly recipe

With either sauce, the cooking. method is the same. Add the pork belly and sauce into a vacuum bag.

Anova sous vide review

Seal the vacuum bag. Schmush the sauce to evenly distribute on both sides of the pork belly.

Anova sous vide reviewAnova sous vide review

Fill pot with water, set the Anova Sous Vide to 158F. Place the bags into pot. Use clips to secure the bags so that they don’t move around too much and to ensure each bag has enough room for water to circulate. Cook for 16 hours.

Anova sous vide review

Don’t do this

In an effort to minimize water loss through evaporation, I covered the pot with tin foil.

Anova sous vide review

I threw a couple of dishtowels on top to keep the tin foil in place. Bad idea. After 8 hours, enough condensation had built up on the underside and edges of the tin foil, that the towel began absorbing that water. Then, the towels became soaked and water started dripping down on my counter.

Instead, use tin foil, but fit it INSIDE the pot, just crumple the edges so that it fits on top of the water and inside the pot. It won’t be a perfect, snug fit, but it will help minimize water loss.

A Few Tips

  • When cooking sous vide for a long time period, anything over 8 hours, I like to use a vacuum seal bag. You can also use a heavy duty sealable freezer bag, but double-bag.
  • Cut your vacuum bag 6″ larger than you need, use the excess bag to clip to the side of your pot, so that the bag stays put — and just in case the seal is not completely tight, prevent spillage.
  • Check your water level periodically. Top off as needed. If the water level is too low, the pork belly will not cook evenly or properly.
  • Is cooking 16 hours per the recipe absolutely necessary? No! The longer you sous vide, the more the collagen will break apart and meat will be fork tender. Cook too long: and you’ll get a mushy mess. Cook too short: the meat will be chewy and tough. For example, do you enjoy a nice, meaty strip steak that you can dig into? Then 1 hour per inch is about right. If you cook the same strip steak for 12 hours, you’ll be able to cut the steak with a fork, not quite the texture I enjoy for a steak, but one that I would like for pork shoulder. So, timing and temperature depends on the cut of meat AND the desired texture. For pork belly, 16 hours for pork belly falls right in the middle of that spectrum. Delicate and tender, yet retains its structure so that you can slice and sear without breaking apart. The wiggle room for cooking time is pretty lax, anywhere between 12-20 hours will still be good.

After 16 hours, remove pork belly from bag. I like to reserve the tasty juices. Slice thinly, about 1/4″. The pork belly is smooth, still firm in structure, yet unbelievably tender. You want pork belly that you can gently bite into, not just instantly melt in your mouth.

Sous Vide Pork Belly Recipe

The last step is to heat a sauté pan or frying pan (I prefer the high sides of a sauté pan – you’ll contain the fatty splatter better.) and sear both sides before serving. The full recipe is below at the end of this post.

To serve, I like to keep it simple. Pork belly is very rich, fatty and savory. You need to pair it with something light, bright and acidic, otherwise, like the rich, dense chocolate cake, you can only have a few bite before it’s overwhelming.

Sous Vide Pork Belly Recipe

I like serving pork belly with a super quick pickle – julienned bell pepper and cucumber tossed in a little seasoned rice vinegar. Warm flour or corn tortillas make it a simple hand-food. Super curly, crisp-crunchy green onion is made by soaking slivers of green onion in ice water. On the side, chili sauce and pickled ginger.

Sous Vide Pork Belly Tacos Recipe

Do you love these eco-friendly bamboo plates? It’s from RestaurantWare. The plates and dishes are sturdy – and reusable when you hand wash.

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Sous Vide Pork Belly Recipe (Taco)

Servings: 8 Prep Time: 15 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes active, 16 hours sous vide
Sous Vide Pork Belly Tacos Recipe

Char Siu sauce can be found on Amazon, many well-stocked grocery stores or any Asian market.

Serve with Asian chili sauce and pickled ginger, if desired

Ingredients:

1 pound pork belly
16 small flour tortillas
1 cucumber, julienned
1 bell pepper, cored and julienned
2 tablespoons seasoned rice vinegar
2 stalks, green onion (scallion)

VERSION 1:
1/4 cup prepared Char Siu sauce

VERSION 2: (combine)
2 stalks green onion, minced
2 teaspoons grated fresh ginger
2 garlic cloves, minced
2 tablespoons soy sauce
2 tablespoons honey

Directions:

Place pork belly in a vacuum seal bag. Slather your desired sauce (Char Siu or Soy/Honey) on both sides of the pork belly. Seal the bag and prepare your sous vide machine to run at 158F for 16 hours. Make sure you have enough water in the pot, topping off as needed. When done, open bag, reserving the Char Siu sauce in the bag. Slice the pork belly into 1/4".

To make the slaw, mix the cucumber and the bell pepper in a bowl, and toss with seasoned rice vinegar. For the green onion, slice as thinly as possible at a steep angle. Fill a small bowl with ice water, and add the sliced green onion.

When ready to serve, add the pork belly to a frying pan, then turn on the heat to medium. The pork belly will slowly caramelize, and fat will render as it heats up with the pan. Cook until browned, about 2 minutes. Flip and brown other side.

Drain the green onion from the ice water. Assemble tacos with warmed flour tortillas, pork belly, slaw and curly, crunchy green onion.

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Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Chinese Sausage http://steamykitchen.com/40257-roasted-brussels-sprouts-chinese-sausage-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/40257-roasted-brussels-sprouts-chinese-sausage-recipe.html#comments Tue, 05 May 2015 13:44:11 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=40257 What you’ll learn: Savory-sweet, smoky and intensely flavorful Chinese sausage (lap cheong) pairs well with roasted Brussels sprouts. Only 5 ingredients, less than 20 minute recipe Cooks in one pan, all in the oven What is Chinese Sausage? Chinese sausage is unlike any meat you’ve ever eaten before. “Lap Cheong” 臘腸 is made from pork and is marinated and smoked. You ...

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brussels sprouts chinese sausage recipe-4356-2

What you’ll learn:

  • Savory-sweet, smoky and intensely flavorful Chinese sausage (lap cheong) pairs well with roasted Brussels sprouts.
  • Only 5 ingredients, less than 20 minute recipe
  • Cooks in one pan, all in the oven

Roasted Brussels Sprouts Chinese Sausage Recipe

What is Chinese Sausage?

Chinese sausage is unlike any meat you’ve ever eaten before. “Lap Cheong” 臘腸 is made from pork and is marinated and smoked. You can also find Chinese sausage made from duck liver or pork liver too (darker deep reddish/brown color).

Flavor:  sweet-salty, smokey, savory and unctuous with little pockets of fat that just melt during cooking. Think of candied bacon. Or when maple syrup from your pancake pools onto your thick bacon. That’s about the closest I can get to a description.

How to store Chinese sausage

Most Asian supermarkets will stock Chinese sausage – since it’s dried, cured and smoked, the package will last for over a year if unopened (also check the expiration date on package). You can also freeze the package for a long time If you’ve opened a package and only use a few links, wrap the remaining tightly in plastic wrap and refrigerate for up to 6 months or store in freezer.

Roasted Brussels Sprouts Chinese Sausage Recipe

I like to keep at least 1 package in my pantry at all times, it’s so easy to just throw a few links into my steaming rice (see below for recipes and instructions).

chinese-sausage-lap-cheong

Kam Yen Jan (see photo) is the brand that’s the most popular (and it’s a product of U.S.A.) If you’re not near an Asian market, you can buy Chinese sausage on Amazon for about the same price as the markets.

Since Chinese sausage stores very well in the pantry, refrigerator or freezer, don’t be afraid to buy the 3-pack from Amazon. In addition to this recipe, here are more ways you can use Chinese sausage.

Recipes with Chinese Sausage

Chinese Sausage Rice with Sweet Soy Sauce

Crab and Chinese Sausage Fried Rice

Chinese Steamed Buns Make the bun dough, wrap the dough around a Chinese sausage (like pigs in a blanket! Then steam.

Cooking with rice: If you are cooking your rice,

How to Cook

First, preheat your oven to 400F. Wash and trim your Brussels sprouts, cut them into quarters for faster cooking.

Roasted Brussels Sprouts Chinese Sausage Recipe

Cut the Chinese sausage into 1/2″ pieces. Keep the ingredients separated on a baking sheet. The Chinese sausage cooks faster than the Brussels sprouts, so this will make it easier to remove from pan. Toss ONLY the Brussels sprouts with a little cooking oil. The sausage does not need oil (it’s got plenty of fat!)

Roasted Brussels Sprouts Chinese Sausage Recipe

Roast in oven for 7 minutes, or until the Chinese sausage is slightly browned, and you can see the fat sizzling on its surface. Remove pan from oven and scoop out the Chinese sausage to a plate.

Roasted Brussels Sprouts Chinese Sausage Recipe

Return Brussels sprouts to oven to finish roasting for another 5-10 minutes (depending on the size of your Brussels sprouts).

Roasted Brussels Sprouts Chinese Sausage Recipe

The Brussels sprouts are done when they are lightly browned and tender. Season the Brussels sprouts with the fish sauce (or soy sauce).  You an also you Bragg’s Liquid Aminos, Tamari (Gluten Free) or Coconut Aminos (Paleo friendly). The Chinese sausage do not need any seasoning.

Roasted Brussels Sprouts Chinese Sausage Recipe

Toss with the Chinese sausage and serve.

Roasted Brussels Sprouts Chinese Sausage Recipe

Recommended Products

Here is the Chinese sausage that I buy, and my favorite brand of fish sauce. Did you know not all fish sauce is the same? Here’s a free guide to my favorite brands of Chinese sauces.

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Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Chinese Sausage Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 8 minutes Cook Time: 15 minutes
Roasted Brussels Sprouts Chinese Sausage Recipe

Tips: Chinese sausage is very flavorful! Be careful of how much fish sauce or soy sauce you add to the brussels sprouts. Just a touch is enough.

Do not toss the Chinese sausage with any cooking oil. The sausage cooks faster than the Brussels sprouts, so make sure you keep them separate on the baking sheet.

If you don't have Fish Sauce, substitute with soy sauce, Bragg's Liquid Aminos, Tamari (Gluten Free) or Coconut Aminos (Paleo friendly).

Ingredients:

1 pound Brussels sprouts, trimmed and quartered
1 tablespoon cooking oil
4 links, Chinese sausage, cut into 1/2" pieces
1/2 teaspoon fish sauce (or soy sauce)
freshly ground black pepper, to taste

Directions:

Preheat oven to 400F. On a baking sheet, toss the quartered Brussels sprouts with the cooking oil. Make some space on the baking sheet for the Chinese sausage. The Chinese sausage will cook next to the Brussels sprouts, but do not mix them together.

Add the Chinese sausage on the baking sheet. Bake for 7-10 minutes (make sure the sausage does not burn). Remove baking sheet from oven, remove Chinese sausage to a serving bowl, set aside. Give the Brussels sprouts a toss, and return them to the oven to bake for an additional 5-10 minutes, until tender and lightly browned. Timing depends on size of Brussels sprouts - pierce with fork to see if tender.

Drizzle the fish sauce over the Brussels sprouts, season with black pepper and toss well. Add the Brussels sprouts to the serving bowl with the Chinese sausage and mix well.

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Singapore Chili Crab http://steamykitchen.com/40175-singapore-chili-crab-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/40175-singapore-chili-crab-recipe.html#comments Tue, 28 Apr 2015 14:13:04 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=40175 What you’ll learn: Singapore Chili Crab is one of the most popular Asian crab dishes. Simmer crab in a thick, sweet, savory and spicy sauce. Simple authentic recipe, with a homemade Chili-Ginger Sauce that heightens the flavor Substitute jumbo-sized shrimp for the crab, if desired Recipe fromSoutheast Asia’s Best Recipes Cookbook by Wendy Hutton This famous Singapore Chili Crab has ...

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Singapore Chili Crab Recipe

What you’ll learn:

  • Singapore Chili Crab is one of the most popular Asian crab dishes. Simmer crab in a thick, sweet, savory and spicy sauce.
  • Simple authentic recipe, with a homemade Chili-Ginger Sauce that heightens the flavor
  • Substitute jumbo-sized shrimp for the crab, if desired
  • Recipe fromSoutheast Asia’s Best Recipes Cookbook by Wendy Hutton

This famous Singapore Chili Crab has been named a “national dish” of Singapore, and named #35 on the list of CNN’s list of “World’s 50 Best Foods.”

Fresh crab is simmered in a base of sweet chili sauce, fresh chilies, ginger, garlic and tomato sauce — it can be made as spicy as you wish! Another signature element of this dish is the delicate ribbons of egg to thicken and add body to the sauce.

This is a messy dish, to be eaten with a stack of napkins and crusty French bread or steamed Chinese buns to mop up all of the sauce.

Singapore Chili Crab RecipeThe recipe is from Southeast Asia’s Best Recipes Cookbook by Wendy Hutton, featuring the most popular and best-known recipes from Thailand, Vietnam, Malaysia, Indonesia, Cambodia and all across the region.

Hutton has spent more than four decades traveling and and eating her way through Asia, collecting the best recipes from simple country homes to elegant restaurant kitchens. In her signature, expert prose, Hutton explores the glorious splendor of Southeast Asia’s rich and varied cuisine, from Singapore’s fascinating cosmopolitan offerings to Thailand’s sinfully spicy dishes to Vietnam’s refreshingly healthful recipes. Hutton is based in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo.

Each of the authentic Southeast Asian recipes in this book is accompanied by a luscious color photograph shot by the award-winning photographer, Masano Kawana, who won a James Beard Award for Best Cookbook Photography for his Shunju: New Japanese Cuisine Cookbook.

What is Hot Bean Paste?

Chili bean sauce for singapore chili crab recipeChinese Hot Bean Paste or Chili Bean Sauce is made from fresh chilies and fermented broad (fava) beans and soy beans.

This Sichuan style sauce adds a spicy, salty, umami-rich flavor to any dish. A spoonful of the sauce into any Chinese noodle dish will spice it up! We also use a spoonful in Mapo Tofu as well.

Other names:
Hot Bean Paste
Broad Bean Paste
Chili Soy Bean Paste
Toban Djan
Dou Ban Jiang
辣豆瓣酱

You can find this Hot Bean Sauce in most Asian grocery stores and online. If you find “Bean Sauce” (basically, the sauce without the chilies, you can substitute 3 tablespoons + minced red chilies in this Singapore Chili Crab recipe. The Bean Sauce without the chilies is saltier, that’s why we decrease the amount used.

Recipes using Hot Bean Sauce

Recommended Equipment

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Singapore Chili Crab Recipe

Servings: 4-6 Prep Time: 40 minutes Cook Time: 20 minutes
Singapore Chili Crab Recipe

Reprinted with Permission from Tuttle Publishing. Recipe from Southeast Asia's Best Recipes by Wendy Hutton. Photography by Masano Kawana.

If you do not have fresh crab, substitute with 1 1/2 pounds of jumbo shell-on shrimp -- but only cook for 5-7 minutes in Step 3.

In Singapore, mud crabs are used in this dish, but substitute with any fresh crab - my favorite is Dungeness or blue crab - though blue crab is so small, it may be difficult to tease out the meat if you're not accustomed to it! You can even use soft-shelled crab.

The perfect accompaniment to this Singapore Chili Crab Recipe is crusty French bread to mop up the sauce.

Ingredients:

3-4 pounds live crab
2 tablespoons oil
6 shallots, minced
6 large cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons finely minced ginger
3 red bird's eye chilies, minced
3 1/2 cups (875 ml) chicken stock
4 tablespoons hot bean paste
1/4 cup (60 ml) bottled chili sauce
1/2 cup (125ml) canned tomato sauce
1 tablespoon sugar
2 tablespoons Chinese rice wine (or dry sherry)
2 teaspoons salt
1 teaspoon white pepper (or black pepper)
2 tablespoons cornstarch, mixed with 3 tablespoons water
2 eggs, lightly beatenFOR THE CHILI GINGER SAUCE:
6 red finger-length chilies, minced
5 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons finely minced ginger
2 teaspoons sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon rice vinegar
1 tablespoon water

Directions:

1. Place the live crabs in the freezer for 15 minutes to immobilize them. Cut in half, lengthwise with a cleaver or large chef's knife and remove the back and discard the spongy grey matter. Take off the claws and crack in several places with a cleaver. Cut each body half into two to three pieces, leaving the legs attached.

2. Make the Chili-Ginger Sauce by whisking all the ingredients in a bowl. Set aside.

3. Heat the oil in a wok over medium-low heat and add the shallots, garlic, ginger and chilies. Stir-fry until fragrant, about 3 minutes, then add the Chili-Ginger Sauce, chicken stock, hot bean paste, chili sauce, tomato sauce, sugar, rice wine, salt and pepper. Bring to a boil, then lower the heat and simmer for 2 minutes. Add the crab pieces and simmer, uncovered, turning several times, until the shells are bright red and the crabs are cooked, about 10 minutes.

4. Add the cornstarch/water mixture and stir until the sauce thickens, about 30 seconds. Add the eggs and stir until set, then transfer the chili crab to a serving dish and serve with crusty bread.

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Chinese Steamed Buns http://steamykitchen.com/39943-chinese-steamed-buns-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/39943-chinese-steamed-buns-recipe.html#comments Tue, 21 Apr 2015 17:22:46 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=39943 This Chinese Steamed Buns Recipe features: Simple dough that can be used for many different Chinese steamed buns Step by step photos to show you exactly how to make the buns How to prevent the buns from splitting apart too soon Tips to get your buns smooth, white and puffy A few weeks ago, my parents came to visit from the ...

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chinese steamed buns recipe roasted duck-4194

This Chinese Steamed Buns Recipe features:

  • Simple dough that can be used for many different Chinese steamed buns
  • Step by step photos to show you exactly how to make the buns
  • How to prevent the buns from splitting apart too soon
  • Tips to get your buns smooth, white and puffy

chinese steamed buns recipe roasted duck-4205

A few weeks ago, my parents came to visit from the lovely state of Nevada. Even though their stay is just for a week, we are never surprised to see that they’ve brought enough luggage to stay a month.

That’s because the luggage are all packed with goodies for us and the kids! Food goodies! Seaweed crackers, special Chinese sausage, lap cheong, that you can only buy from Canada (the brand is called Happy Meat), salted kumquat for sore throat, dried anchovies with peanuts.

Mom also used a cooler in her carry on to bring fresh roasted duck and crispy roasted pork from a famous restaurant near her home. That’s the dedication of a loving Mom and true food lover!

chinese steamed buns recipe roasted duck-4206

Chinese Roast Duck certainly begs for handmade, freshly steamed buns. I’ve shared before our little shortcut secret using store-bought sourdough biscuit dough sold in cans, or a pre-mixed flour found in Asian supermarkets. This time, Mom and I made them from scratch, experimenting with a couple of different recipes and declaring this recipe the winner.

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How to make Chinese Steamed Bun Recipe 

The first step is to make the dough, mixing in warm water, yeast, sugar and cooking oil. Then flour, baking powder, salt. In the photo below, the dough was sticking to the side of the bowl, we added another tablespoon of flour.

chinese steamed buns recipe roasted duck-4101

Let your mixer do the work for you, mixing with the paddle first, then switching to the dough hook to knead — or turn out on your counter to knead by hand, which is what my Mom prefers to do.

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Knead until you get a smooth, supple dough.

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You can return this dough back in the same mixer bowl. Cover with plastic wrap or a towel and let it rise in a warm spot for 1-2 hours, until it just about doubles in size.

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After the rise, gently turn out the dough back on your counter that you’ve lightly dusted with flour. Divide the dough into half, roll out each half into a long log. Cover one log with plastic wrap so that it doesn’t dry out. Further divide the log into 6-7 pieces, depending on how big you want your buns.

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Take one piece of dough into your hand.

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Fold the edge of the dough into the center and press down. Do this all the way around. This motion creates a smooth ball and increases the surface tension to help shape the ball.

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See how all the edges of the dough have come into the center? Pinch that center to keep all the edges together.

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Turn the ball over. Now you should have a perfectly smooth, round piece that is nice and taut with surface tension.

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Use your palm to flatten that ball out.

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Use a rolling pin to roll back and forth to create an oval.

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Like this:

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Brush the surface with cooking oil.

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Fold over one edge.

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To create the bun. The cooking oil helps keep that seam, so that when you are ready to eat, you can open the bun. Without the cooking oil, the dough would stick together and be difficult to open the bun.

chinese steamed buns recipe roasted duck-4142

However, if you steam the bun after this step, the bun will open up in the steamer. That’s not what you want. You want the bun to stay closed during cooking.

So, what you need to do is roll one more time on top, not too hard, just a little bit of pressure is all that’s needed.

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Place bun on a small square of parchment paper.

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Fill your steamer, but give the buns enough room to expand during cooking without touching. We use 10″ bamboo steamer at our house (I suggest no smaller than 10″). My Mom loves her multi purpose, stainless steel double boiler/steamer set.

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I used to just set my bamboo steamer directly into my wok, but it would sit so low that I would constantly run out of water during steaming. This is a big problem – when you run out of water during steaming, the food will begin to taste burnt and metallic. No water in the wok means no steam…instead, smoke.

I began using Helen Chen’s Steaming Ring set on top of any of my large pots. The Steaming Ring is $9.99 and allows you to transform any of your stockpots or dutch ovens to work with a bamboo steamer. It’s definitely worth every penny!

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Place the ring on top of the pan. Fill pan with about an inch of water.

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Set your bamboo steamer on top. It works perfectly with a 10″ bamboo steamer.

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Next steps:

1. Do not turn on the heat yet. Let the buns rest and rise for 10 minutes, just as-is.

2. After 10 minutes, turn on the heat to high.

3. When you begin seeing steam rise from the top of the bamboo steamer, reduce heat to medium-high and set your timer for 5 minutes.

4. After 5 minutes, turn off heat. Do not open steamer – let the buns rest for 1 minute.

chinese steamed buns recipe roasted duck-4169

Secret Tips That Make a Big Difference

Here’s the secret to white, puffy buns that don’t collapse or fall:

I’ve made these buns so many times, and each time, the buns would turn out beautiful and perfect, but then would deflate or flatten after cooling. They also would take on a little yellowish tinge and be a bit chewy.

The secret that I’ve learned from my Mom:

The bamboo steamer needs to be in place before the heat is turned on. This allows the buns to heat up and steam gently and slowly, as the water begins to boil. My old method was to wait for the water to boil before placing the bamboo steamer, which caused the buns to cook too quickly, which resulted in a chewier bun.

Remember, steamed buns should be delicate and light — and so the cooking method needs to be gentle as well.

Turning off the heat (step 4 above) but NOT opening the steamer for 1 minute allows the buns to gradually come down in temperature and also lets the buns sit in gentle steam to finish the cooking process. This helps prevent collapsing buns — and keeps the buns nice and white.

chinese steamed buns recipe roasted duck-4174

Take a look at this bun – nice and fluffy. The seam is distinct and easy to open, but stays closed during cooking, which is what you want.

chinese steamed buns recipe roasted duck-4177

I hope you have a chance to make these Chinese Steamed Buns, the next time you get a Chinese Roasted Duck on your hands (maybe you are lucky enough to have Mom who will bring you one?) Or you can make your own Chinese Roasted Duck – here’s my easy recipe.

chinese steamed buns recipe roasted duck-4203

 

To Accompany the Chinese Roast Duck

  • Julienned cucumber
  • Thin slivers of green onion (I soak in ice cold water to get them super crispy/crunchy and curly)
  • Hoisin sauce (store-bought)

Chinese Roasted Duck Recipe (with pre-mixed Asian dough for steamed buns)

How about Pork Belly with the Chinese Steamed Buns?

Chinese Pork Belly with Steamed Buns (with cheater buns recipe from store-bought sourdough biscuit dough in can)

Sous Vide Pork Belly Recipe (WOW – we love this recipe!)

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Chinese Steamed Buns Recipe

Servings: 12-14 buns Prep Time: 30 minutes + 1 hour resting Cook Time: 18 minutes
chinese steamed buns recipe roasted duck-4194

Equipment: Steaming basket, pastry brush, parchment paper

Ingredients:

1 cup warm water
1 1/2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 tablespoon cooking oil (canola or vegetable), plus more for brushing
3 tablespoons sugar
3 cups all-purpose flour + more for dusting
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
14 squares parchment paper (4"x4")

Directions:

1. In a mixer bowl, add the warm water, oil, yeast and sugar. Let sit for 1 minute, until the yeast begins to bubble a bit. Next, add in the flour, baking powder and salt, in that order. With the paddle attachment, mix on low for 2 minutes. Add more flour, a tablespoon at a time, if the dough sticks to the sides of the bowl. Change to a dough hook, and on speed 2, knead for 4 minutes, until dough is smooth, supple and clear the sides of the bowl. If the dough sticks to the side of the bowl, add more flour, a tablespoon at a time.

2. Dust your counter with a little flour and turn out your dough. I like to hand knead it a few times, so that I can get a feel for the dough. Shape the dough into a smooth ball. Return the dough ball to the mixing bowl, cover with a clean towel and let rise in a warm, dry spot for 1-2 hours, until it nearly doubles in size.

3. Turn out your dough onto a lightly floured surface. Cut the dough in half. Gently roll each half into a log shape. Cut each log into 6 or 7 little balls. We'll work with one ball at a time, so keep the rest covered with plastic wrap so that they don't dry out. Form each ball by bringing in the sides (see photos above) and pinching the center. Turn ball over to get a nice, taut ball. Roll the dough ball out to a long, oval shape about 6"x3". Brush the top with a little cooking oil. Fold over one side of the oval. Use your rolling pin to gently roll and press one last time. Place bun on a parchment paper square, place into the bamboo steamer and cover with lid to prevent drying. Repeat with the remaining dough balls.

4. Fill your pot or wok with 2" of water. Place the steamer ring (if you have one) bamboo baskets on top. Do not turn on the heat yet. Let rest for 10 minutes. Then, turn on the heat to high. When you begin to see steam coming up from the top of the steamer, reduce heat to medium-high. Let steam for 5 minutes. Turn off the heat, without opening the steamer. Let rest for 1 minute. Open steamer and gently lift the steamer baskets off one another to let the buns cool.

TIP: If you are not eating right away, you can keep the buns in the bamboo steamer, on top of the pot of water. Make sure there is plenty of water in the pot. Turn heat to low, so that you have a gentle mist of steam coming up to keep the buns moist and warm. Make sure you don't run out of water in the pot!

Other recipes for Chinese Steamed Buns

Chinese Mantou Buns (Food 52)

Char Siu Bao (Woks of Life)

Chinese Fold Over Buns (Thirsty for Tea)

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Slow Cooker Bone Broth – Asian Style http://steamykitchen.com/39418-slow-cooker-bone-broth-asian-style.html http://steamykitchen.com/39418-slow-cooker-bone-broth-asian-style.html#comments Wed, 28 Jan 2015 22:23:46 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=39418 In Asian culture, soups and broths are part of everyday meals. A traditional Japanese breakfast would include a bowl of Miso Soup to warm the body. Chinese restaurants feature a long list of house soups, from an appetite stimulating Hot and Sour Soup to even a light broth served after dinner to cleanse the palate and complete the meal. Growing up, Mom ...

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Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian

In Asian culture, soups and broths are part of everyday meals. A traditional Japanese breakfast would include a bowl of Miso Soup to warm the body. Chinese restaurants feature a long list of house soups, from an appetite stimulating Hot and Sour Soup to even a light broth served after dinner to cleanse the palate and complete the meal.

Growing up, Mom always had soup simmering on the stove. Every night, without doubt, there was a Chinese style soup on the table. I remember saving the soup for last, as a ritual to conclude a delightful home-cooked meal.

I’ve tried to emulate Mom, but we’ve got such an active lifestyle that a pot simmering for hours on the stove isn’t feasible. Instead, we use a large 6-quart slow cooker to make an Asian-style bone broth that will last the entire week for our family.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian

What is bone broth?

Bone broth is often gently simmered for 24 hours (or more!) to extract as much nutrients from the bones of an animal, whether it be fish, chicken, pork or beef. The long cooking time breaks down bone to release vitamins, collagen and calcium phosphate — nutrients that are good for us.

Sure, it’s a trendy thing right now, with restaurants offering drive-through bone broth served in a coffee cup for $9, cookbooks dedicated to the art of bone broths (I highly recommend The Nourished Kitchen Cookbook which features bone broth) and even an entire line of bone broth concentrates that you can buy.

What’s the difference between broth, bone broth and soups?

Generally, soups are made with meats, bones, vegetables, herbs, added grains, sometimes thickened with starches – and simmered for a couple of hours.

Broths are mostly made from meats or vegetables and left clear without very much else added. Broths are also simmered for a couple of hours, resulting in a light colored, light flavored broth.

Bone broths are cooked for a day or even longer. Your favorite Vietnamese restaurant most likely simmer their pho broth overnight, which is why the broth is so rich and flavorful.

The long cooking time extracts so many nutrients and flavor! How do you know when you’ve extracted maximum nutrients and flavor? When the bones literally disintegrate just by giving a little pressure with your fingers.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe Asian Style

Like Nourished Kitchen, we make our bone broth in the slow cooker, and it will last us all week long. The process starts on Sunday night, and the slow cooker will do its magic all night long.

In the morning, we’ll enjoy bone broth as part of our breakfast. Every day, I’ll top off the pot with more water and keep the slow cooker humming along.

Each day, I’ll add a vegetable, switch out for fresh herbs, throw in a couple of umami-boosting Asian ingredients.

As the days progress, the bone broth develops new flavor, gets richer, smoother, fuller. We get the benefit of the valuable nutrition that’s normally locked inside the bones.

Some days, we’ll top off the bone broth with chopped herbs, or shredded seaweed just before serving. Or a spoonful of leftover rice in the bone broth is great too.

Secrets to Clear, Clean Bone Broth

Key to bone broth – be gentle. The cooking process is slow and gentle, coaxing out flavor with very little bubbles (no violent boiling!)

Don’t stir. Especially after the first 2 days. The bones will be come very soft and will crumble if you stir the pot too vigorously, resulting in a gritty broth.

Use cheesecloth or herb/tea bags to contain any herbs, aromatics or spices that are very small (see below.) This avoids having you dig around, stir around to fish these items out.

Use a very fine mesh skimmer to skim the surface of the broth every day, especially during the first 6-8 hours. The “scum” will cloud your broth during these first few hours of cooking. What’s the scum made out of? Proteins, fats, microscopic bone fragments (especially if the bones were cut), oils, impurities. Get rid of it!

Ready for the next batch? Jumpstart your next batch with a little of the last batch of concentrated “liquid gold!” We call this “Infinite Bone Broth.” Restaurants do the same with broths, sauces and sourdough bread too. Seed the next batch with rich flavor you’ve already built.

Bone Broth, Chinese Style

The “holy trinity” of Chinese cooking is garlic, ginger and green onion.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Garlic, Ginger & Green Onion

I’m not a fan of fishing out little pieces of ingredients, so I try to cut herbs so that they are easy to find and spoon out. The garlic head is cut in half. Sometimes, the cloves will separate (like above) but I’ll use a bag made for for DIY teabags or as an herb pouch (100 bags for $5.67)

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian DIY Herb Pouch

Fill it up with the garlic cloves that are loose. Fold the top over and the cloves or anything you put inside will stay put. You can also make your own with cheesecloth. I like to use these teabags for other spices too, like whole peppercorns or star anise – anything that would be hard to find and fish out.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Fill Herb Pouch with loose garlic cloves

The green onions are tied with twine, again for easy removal. The ginger is a big hunk, just sliced in half.  I reserve the other half of the ginger + the garlic cloves in the bag + more green onion  – to add to the bone broth a couple of days later (I’ll discard the spent herbs/aromatics, replace with fresh.)

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Tie green onions with twine and slice ginger in half

This week, I’m making bone broth with spareribs (it was on sale). Pork broth is very popular in Chinese cuisine. It’s just as popular as chicken broth is here in the U.S. Most of the Chinese soups that I make start with pork – for a lighter, more neutral flavor than beef or chicken.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Spareribs for bone broth

Some people like to cut off the excess fat, but I just leave it on. I’ll skim out the fats and oils later with a skimmer.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Everything goes into the slow cooker

Everything goes into the slow cooker, set it on low and let it go. If you plan on making slow cooker bone broth often, I suggest getting the largest slow cooker you can find. This one is a Cuisinart 6 1/2 Quart Slow Cooker ($99) that works really well. It’s never failed us.

After a few hours, I’ll skim the scuzz with a very fine mesh skimmer. This skimmer mesh is so fine that it catches all particles AND surface oils and fats.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian skim skuzz with very fine mesh skimmer

Look how rich this bone broth is the next day! Season with salt, or fish sauce. Season to taste.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian

I’ll discard the spent green onion, garlic and ginger, and add fresh to replace. This time, I’m adding garlic chives and cilantro from the garden – again, tied  up to make it easier to remove.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian discard spent herbs and add garlic chives and cilantro

Top it off with fresh water. The slow cooker stays on all week, on low.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian top off with fresh water

Chinese Bone Broth

After a couple of days, I might throw in some Chinese dried ingredients for a massive flavor and umami-boost:

Dried scallops, dried shrimp or dried black mushrooms (shitake).

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian dried scallops, dried shrimp and black mushrooms

You can also add in sliced daikon and carrots for one of my very favorite home-style soups! Every trip back to my Mom’s house, I request her Daikon Carrot soup.

If you like cilantro, you can also add in a bunch of cilantro stems, which have just as much flavor as the leaves. I often use the stems for soups.

Japanese Bone Broth

If you’d like Japanese flavor for a bone broth, add a small 6-inch piece of dried kombu and a handful of bonito flakes (place these in the tea bag.) By the way, kombu can be used over, and over again. Just rinse, wipe, and let dry completely before storing for next use.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian dried kombu and bonito flakes

My favorite breakfast? Bone broth with a spoonful of leftover rice or grains, top with roasted seaweed. This type of seaweed is called Kizame Nori – or sliced, roasted seaweed.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian with a spoonful of leftover rice or grains and roasted seaweed

By the way, have you ever tried Ochazuke?

Also, if you’d like to fortify the Japanese bone broth with miso paste – do this separately. Miso paste cooked at high heat or for too long will break apart and become gritty. Ladle some bone broth into a separate saucepan. Bring to simmer if you need to, but if it’s coming straight from the slow cooker, there’s no need to heat it up. Turn off heat. Whisk just a couple tablespoons of miso paste into the soup. Be careful of how much miso you add, especially if you’ve already added salt to the bone broth. I prefer shiro miso (white miso paste) as it’s lighter and less salty than the others. Miso paste is always added off heat.

Vietnamese Bone Broth

Add Vietnamese pho spices to a mesh bag or the tea bag (Here’s a recipe for Slow Cooker Vietnamese Pho.)

If you visit an Asian market, you can often find all these spices packaged, ready to go. Look for “Pho Spice Pack.” Instead of seasoning the broth with salt, season the bone broth with fish sauce. Start with 1 tablespoon, taste, and then add 1 teaspoon at a time until perfect.

What’s my favorite fish sauce? Right there in the sidebar is a free “Asian Masters of Flavor” ebook I wrote that includes my favorite brand! There’s a big difference between good quality fish sauce and crap, chemical-laden fish sauce.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Vietnamese Bone Broth Spices

More notes

If you’re concerned with the cost of running a slow cooker throughout the week, it costs pennies per day!

We grow all of our own herbs and most of our own vegetables in our aquaponics garden and greenhouse. Here’s a tip for green onion.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Our aquaphonics garden

You can even start with store-bought green onion. Make sure you buy ones that have nice, wet, strong roots (no dry or wilted!) Just stick’em in soil. The green onions will continue to grow their roots and sprout more leaves. I just snip off what I need (leafy part only) and new ones will continue to grow throughout the entire growing season!

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian grow your own green onion

Recommended Cooking Equipment

More recipes to explore

Vietnamese Pho Pressure Cooker – Paleo Friendly  (Steam Kitchen)

Mom’s Chinese Chicken Soup  (Steam Kitchen)

Vegetable Thai Curry Noodle Soup  (Steam Kitchen)

Tofu and Mushroom Miso Soup  (Steam Kitchen)

Chinese Daikon and Carrot Soup  (Steam Kitchen)

15 Minute Udon Miso Noodle Soup  (Steam Kitchen)

Thai Fish Soup  (Steam Kitchen)

Soba Noodles in Shiitake-Shoyu Broth with Spring Vegetables (Serious Eats)

Spicy Korean Seafood Soup (Serious Eats)

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Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Style

Servings: Prep Time: 5 minutes Cook Time:
slow-cooker-bone-broth-recipe-asian-3832

I prefer using pork or chicken for Chinese or Japanese style bone broth. If you'd like to use beef bones (great for Vietnamese bone broth), I suggest roasting the bones (350F for 30 minutes) first before adding them to your slow cooker. Not necessary, but it will give a richer bone broth. I don't normally roast pork or chicken bones - I just add them to the pot. Grassfed, organic is best.

PORK: spareribs, neck, hock, really anything.


CHICKEN: whole, raw chicken, or just the frame of a rotisserie chicken you've already enjoyed. You can also use chicken wings or chicken feet. Turkey works great too.


BEEF: oxtail, knuckle, neck, short ribs. I also use beef bone marrow as well - but after roasting, I"ll spoon out the marrow, spread it on bread and sprinkle with sea salt for a little treat. Basically, too much marrow in the bone broth will make the broth greasy tasting. Short ribs have amazing flavor - I like to add them to any beef bone broth that I make.


FISH: Fish bones and head. I like to do this traditional Chinese style with garlic, lots of ginger and green onion. Remove the fish skin and the thin, silvery lining in the gut area (very fishy taste). If the fish is raw, I prefer to roast the fish bones (350F for 20 minutes) - as this tames the fishiness smell and flavor of the bone broth. Most fish will work except for oily fish like mackerel.

Ingredients:

4 pounds spareribs
1 head garlic, halved
big knob of fresh ginger (about the size of 2 fingers), halved
3-4 stalks green onions, cut in half

Directions:

1. Reserve half of the garlic, ginger and green onion for later in the week. Tie the green onion bundles with twine.

2. In a slow-cooker, add green onion, garlic and ginger. Fill slow cooker with water, up to 1-inch below rim. Set to cook on high heat at first. When the bone broth comes to a simmer after an hour or so, you'll see lots of scum. Skim and discard. Set slow cooker on low and let the bone broth cook for at least 6 hours.

3. Use a skimmer to skim the surface of any particles and oil. Season with salt, to taste.

4. After drinking some of the bone broth, top off the slow cooker with additional fresh water. You can also discard the spent herbs and add the reserved garlic, onion and green onion. Continue to add additional vegetables, aromatics, dried ingredients (see post above for details) as you wish. Keep the setting on low.

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Korean Beef Jerky http://steamykitchen.com/38897-korean-beef-jerky-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/38897-korean-beef-jerky-recipe.html#comments Sun, 28 Dec 2014 13:00:42 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=38897 Our friends, Darrin and Sylvia Isaacs, introduced us to their love of homemade beef jerky several months ago. If you are an avid fisherman, you might have heard of Darrin before. He co-hosted and co-produced several ESPN fishing shows – Big Game Fishing the World, BXRL-Billfishing Xtreme Release League, Inside Big Game Fishing Hawaii and Big Game Bites – with his ...

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Korean Beef Jerky Recipe

Our friends, Darrin and Sylvia Isaacs, introduced us to their love of homemade beef jerky several months ago. If you are an avid fisherman, you might have heard of Darrin before. He co-hosted and co-produced several ESPN fishing shows – Big Game Fishing the World, BXRL-Billfishing Xtreme Release League, Inside Big Game Fishing Hawaii and Big Game Bites – with his father, Norm Isaacs.

The Isaacs family lives nearby – and in a twist of fate (or is it kismet?) – Scott and Darrin met at an aquaponics shop. Darrin was there, asking questions to the stop owner, looking for some equipment to set up his system. Scott overheard the conversation. Once outside the shop, as both were leaving, Scott offered to give Darrin some of our equipment that we weren’t using.

Here’s where it gets strange:

-Darrin and Sylvia met on the big island in Hawaii. So did Scott and I. In fact, they were living on the big island the same time we were there, too.
-Our sets of boys are the exact same ages, same number of months apart, same grades. They are a mixed race of Caucasian and Chinese.
-Sylvia used to work in the wine industry. So did I. Sylvia and I are both Chinese.
-They live an hour away currently, all the way on the very opposite side of the county — but it turns out Darrin and Sylvia just bought some property and it’s a stone’s throw from our home.

If I list out any more similarities, it might even give me chills. When we get together, it’s like a gaggle of dark-brown haired boys – You can’t tell them apart from each other unless you really look closely.

We’ve become good friends with the Isaacs, how could we not feel like “instant old friends” given all the crazy similarities? They’ve just launched a new website and podcast, Boats and Billfish, for sport fishing.

Anyways, we also now love making our own beef jerky, just like the Isaacs. We’ve purchased a dehydrator (though to be honest, this is the 3rd dehydrator I have ever owned, but the FIRST dehydrator to be used more than twice and not bought from a TV infomercial.)

Rather than go the traditional American style of beef jerky, I opted to try a Korean flavor, inspired by another good family friend, Diana of Eating Richly. I modified my go-to recipe for Korean Bulgogi BBQ, omitting the sesame seeds, green onion, and grated fresh pear. The grated pear is meant as a tenderizer (the enzymes break down the meat), but since we’re making jerky, there’s not tenderizing needed! Instead of the normal grated onion and fresh garlic, we used onion powder and garlic powder. Fresh grated onion would add too much moisture to the marinade.

Previously, we had the butchers slice the beef for us with their fancy machinery (we love the Publix butchers, always so kind and helpful.) But recently received a Kalorik Meat and Deli Slicer for review that’s designed specifically for the home market. The unit is affordable at $79.00, and small enough to tuck away in the pantry. We’re also giving away a unit (see end of this recipe for details.)

 

Korean Beef Jerky Recipe

How to make Korean Beef Jerky

Start with the right meat. After several tests, we’ve found London Broil to be the best cut. Actually, “London Broil” is a term used to describe a method of cooking, not necessarily a butcher’s cut. However, many American supermarkets label Top Round Steak that’s cut even and flat as London Broil. Some butchers also label Flank Steak as London Broil as well, but I’m not as fond of Flank Steak for beef jerky as it’s often too thin and flat. Your beef jerky will turn out to be 1/2-inch wide strips. If you use Flank Steak for beef jerky, make sure you slice ACROSS the grain.

TopRoundSteakThe London Broil a.k.a. Top Round Steak that I like to use is about 1.75-inches thick, which makes nice-sized beef jerky slices. Also, take a look at the meat. It is even in thickness and lean – very little visible fat is what you want, as dehydrated fat doesn’t taste very good. Photo source

I’ve turned the beef on its side so that you can see how nice and even this steak is.

Korean Beef Jerky Recipe - use london broil

We set up the Kalorik meat slicer on our counter, it was already assembled out of the box. The unit is surprisingly light and has suction feet on the bottom to prevent sliding or shifting. Though you really have to push down to make the suction cup stick to my counter top, which is quartz, matte and not-so-easily suction-cuppable (nice word!)

Korean Beef Jerky Recipe - different thickness

Like the Isaacs, we like our beef jerky sliced very thin. While thick hunks of beef jerky certainly gives your jaws a workout, the thinner beef jerky wins in taste, texture, ease of enjoying and marinating time.

 

Korean Beef Jerky Recipe - Kalorik meat slicer

It’s best to test out which thickness you like best. Our meat slicer has a knob numbered 0 to 10. The top photo is beef sliced at 0.5, obviously too thin. The bottom meat was sliced at 1.5. We chose 1.25.

Korean Beef Jerky Recipe - different thickness

Oh, just a quick note – if you look above at the photo of sliced meat, you’ll see a very thin stripe of fat on the bottom – I would normally trim off ALL visible fat from the steak before slicing. As I mentioned, dried fat is not appealing to eat.

The Kalorik meat slicer has nice safety features – your fingers stay safely out of the way. The unit is made of mostly plastic on the base, the area that you place the meat and the handle.

Korean Beef Jerky Recipe - slice thinly

Slice at an even pace and take your time. This is the back of the unit, where the sliced meat falls.

Korean Beef Jerky Recipe - slice thinly

After slicing, prepare the marinade (garlic, soy, sesame oil, sugar, grated onion) in a freezer or storage bag. Add in your meat, seal. Massage and shake the bag to get the marinade incorporated throughout. I then unseal a tiny opening in the bag, squeeze as much air out from the bag as possible and quickly reseal. This helps the marinade stay put on the meat, instead of settling back down on the bottom of the bag.

The marinade recipe for Korean Beef Jerky is below, at the end of this post.

Because the meat is sliced so thinly, I marinate only 30 minutes. I also like lightly seasoned beef jerky, not beef jerky that’s so salty you need a gallon of water to rehydrate yourself! However, if you are using thicker slices of meat, marinate for an hour or up to overnight.

We bought the Nesco SnackMaster Pro Dehydrator $69.99 and have no complaints. It works very well, it does its job. I wish the unit would have a timer built in. Tip: don’t try to wash the drying racks by hand – you’ll go crazy just trying to scrub off all the dried bits. Instead, throw the racks into the dishwasher. The hot water will help soften the bits and clean them off. Also, during the summer, place the dehydrator outside on the patio so you don’t heat up your house with all that hot air!

Lay the beef slices in a single layer, spread them out so that there are no curls or folds in the meat.

Korean Beef Jerky Recipe - lay on dehydrator

Right about now, the dogs GO NUTS. Steak? Steak? Steak? I smell STEAK!

Korean Beef Jerky Recipe - dehydrator

After 4 hours-ish, the beef jerky is ready.

Korean Beef Jerky Recipe - done drying

Final thoughts on the Kalorik Meat Slicer:

PROS: It’s affordable, less than $100. The unit is lightweight, already-assembled out of the box. Good safety features – turn the knob dial for blade to “P” to make the blade flush with the unit for storage. The handle design keeps your fingers out of the way of the blade. The blade is simple to clean, the unit wipes down easily. It also comes with a silicone blade safety cover to keep the blade edge partly covered.

CONS: Because it is so lightweight, the suction cups are necessarily to keep the unit from shifting. The suction cups didn’t work very well on my counter, and I got a little nervous until I got the hang of it. The key is to not PUSH the meat forward towards the blade (which would move the meat slicer), but rather, gently glide the meat forward while applying pressure to the left to keep the meat sandwiched against the blade area. Sorry, it’s so difficult to explain in words! I wish the suction feet would be larger, more sturdier. Removing the very sharp blade from the unit is almost too easy – just twist this little knob and the blade is loose. It is difficult to tell whether the blade is securely set in from the little black knob. Take care when removing and washing the blade – I use my trusty Pitt Mitts to handle the blade.

If you are starting out on this beef jerky adventure, have your butcher slice the meat for you. Go during non-peak hours, and kindly ask for a very thin slice for beef jerky. Most butchers will know how to slice the steak correctly, though in my opinion, they’ll slice it too thick. Once you get the slices exactly how you want them, ask the butcher, “What setting did you use?” and just remember that magic number. Next time, just say, “Slice for beef jerky, at setting number ___.”

Make a couple of batches before investing in a slicer. It’s a big appliance to store in your house. However, if you’re really into beef jerky like we are, it’s really worth it to slice the meat exactly how we like it, without bothering or waiting for the butcher. It’s a nice-to-have appliance for the serious beef jerky aficionado!

That being said, we make beef jerky a lot. It’s a healthy snack, nutritious, gives me energy, and best of all, it’s real food. The kids love it and will pack beef jerky in their backpack for a snack instead of crackers or a granola bar.

We’re giving a Kalorik Meat Slicer away! Enter the giveaway here.

Retail beef jerky “Jack Links Teriyaki Flavored” 

Jerky_Teriyaki

-Ingredients: Beef, water, sugar, dried soy suace (soybeans, salt, wheat), maltodextrin, fructos, monosodium glutamate, flavorings, hydrolyzed corn protein, sodium erythorbate, paprika extract, sodium nitrate.
-Not sure what type of beef
-Contains MSG and other chemicals I can’t pronounce
-$5.99 for 3.5 ounces


Homemade Beef Jerky

korean-beef-jerky-recipe-3498
-Ingredients: Top Round steak, Soy sauce (soybeans, salt, wheat), sesame oil, garlic powder, onion powder, brown sugar
-Substitute soy sauce with Coconut Aminos (we love this sauce!) for a wheat and soy free alternative
-London Broil (Top Round Steak) – you can choose to use organic, free range beef
-$5.29 per pound for the meat (on sale), each pound makes approx 6-8 ounces beef jerky

Korean Beef Jerky Recipe

More recipes to explore

Steak Recipe: Turning Cheap “Choice” Steak into Gucci “Prime” Steak (Steamy Kitchen)

Flank Steak with Bloody Mary Tomato Salad Recipe (Steamy Kitchen)

1-Step, Fail Proof Prime Rib Roast Recipe on the Rotisserie (Steamy Kitchen)

Korean Kalbi Baby Back Ribs (Steamy Kitchen)

Black Pepper Jerky (Food & Wine)

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Korean Beef Jerky Recipe

Servings: Prep Time: 30 minutes Cook Time: 4 hours in dehydrator
Korean Beef Jerky Recipe

I've had best results using London Broil (Top Round Steak) meat. In my Nesco dehydrator, I can fit 4 pounds of sliced meat on the trays. Your unit may be smaller or larger. The recipe calls for 2 pounds of meat, so if you have a similar sized dehydrator, make 2 batches of the marinade side by side in separate bags. To clarify, don't try to stuff 4 pounds of sliced meat into 1 bag of marinade. It won't fit.

Ingredients:

3 tablespoons low sodium soy sauce
3 tablespoons brown sugar
1 teaspoon onion powder
1 teaspoon garlic powder
1 teaspoon Asian sesame oil
2 pounds London broil, very thinly sliced

Directions:

1. In a resealable freezer bag, combine all ingredients except for the meat.

2. Add the sliced meat, seal bag and massage gently to incorporate the marinade throughout the meat. Unseal just a small section, push as much air out of the bag as possible, and reseal. Let marinate for 30 minutes (on counter-top at room temperature is fine) or refrigerate up to overnight.

3. Lay out the meat in a single layer (as neat as possible) on the dehydrator racks. Set dehydrator according to manufacturer's instructions.

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1-Step, Fail Proof Prime Rib Roast Recipe on the Rotisserie http://steamykitchen.com/38718-one-step-fail-proof-prime-rib-roast-recipe-on-rotisserie.html http://steamykitchen.com/38718-one-step-fail-proof-prime-rib-roast-recipe-on-rotisserie.html#comments Wed, 10 Dec 2014 14:40:18 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=38718 Have you ever tried to make a Prime Rib Roast at home? The normal process involves multiple steps and kitchen acrobatics: I would fire up my large cast-iron pan, heat it up to near-smoking, and then wrangle the prime rib roast onto the pan, searing each side. If the roast is extra large and heavy, I’d have to use 2 ...

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Prime Rib Roast Recipe

Have you ever tried to make a Prime Rib Roast at home? The normal process involves multiple steps and kitchen acrobatics: I would fire up my large cast-iron pan, heat it up to near-smoking, and then wrangle the prime rib roast onto the pan, searing each side. If the roast is extra large and heavy, I’d have to use 2 tongs to lift, rotate and hold the roast. Then transfer the burning-hot seared hunk into a roasting pan (without dropping it) to slow-roast in the oven. While the recipe produces my perfect, steakhouse-quality Prime Rib Roast, it is a multi-step process.

But I now rely on my 1-Step, Fail Proof Prime Rib Roast Recipe, which produces even BETTER results than anything I’ve ever tried.

The solution is to use a rotisserie. We’ve had this Ronco bad boy for about four years. It gets used more often than my oven, because it’s easy to clean, easy to operate (just turn the timer knob) and provides excellent results 100% of the time.

prime rib roast rotisserie

(Here’s my Amazon affiliate link if you’d like to purchase one)

Rotisserie for Prime Rib???

Most people associate rotisserie for chickens, but we use it for lamb roasts, pork tenderloin and prime rib roasts too.

The rotisserie’s turning mechanism ensures the prime rib roast recipe cooks evenly and has a nice crust on all sides, while keeping the center medium to medium-rare. With a built-in timer that automatically shuts off the oven, you are guaranteed perfect prime rib.  The timing is based on the weight of the prime rib.

Prime Rib Roast Recipe - Rotiserrie

Standing Prime Rib Roast

What is a rib roast, a.k.a. Standing Rib Roast a.k.a. Prime Rib? It’s basically the same cut as a rib eye steak. But instead of cutting individual steaks, the meat is left uncut and often tied to keep its nice shape during cooking.

This one is from the fine folks at Lobel’s in New York. For the past 60 years, five generations of the Lobel family have run the most well-known meat market in New York. They ship  their exceptional meats nationwide. This is a USDA Prime Dry Aged Rib Roast (they also have Wagyu Prime Dry Aged Rib Roast.) But no need to get all fancy if you don’t want to. Just a nice hunk of rib roast with good marbling. Most rib-eyes have that nice band of fat around what I call the “collar” of the ribeye, which is my #2 favorite part of a ribeye. My #1 favorite part is the BONE (hey, I’m Asian. I like to gnaw and nibble all that juicy meat on the bones to the dismay of my dogs!)

Prime Rib Roast Recipe

Let’s season this prime rib!

I love rubbing the prime rib with Kansas City Steak Seasoning from Two Snooty Chefs (fun name!)

Prime Rib Roast Recipe on Rotisserie

Fill the pan with some veggies. These veggies will roast along with the prime rib, and we’ll use this to make the Red Wine Au Jus.

Prime Rib Roast Recipe - Fresh Vegetables

Here’s your one-step, fail-proof method

With the rotisserie, this Prime Rib Roast becomes super simple, one-step and fail-proof. Load ‘er up!

Prime Rib Roast Recipe - Rotiserrie

Turn it on. 16-18 minutes per pound, depending if you want it rare or medium-rare. We went with 18 minutes per pound. Set the timer on the rotisserie.

Prime Rib Roast Recipe - Rotiserrie

The dripping fall conveniently into a pan that I’ve loaded with vegetables. This all gets collected to make the Red Wine Au Jus. Oh, I forgot, I threw in a few sprigs of fresh thyme in there too.

To check doneness, use an instant-read meat thermometer; 125 degrees F for rare; 160 degrees F for well done; insert at thickest part of roast and away from bone

Prime Rib Roast Recipe - Rotiserrie

When it’s done, let it rest while you make the Red Wine Au Jus. YUM! Can you smell that? Isn’t this one-step process on the rotisserie so easy?

Prime Rib Roast Recipe

Red Wine Au Jus

Carefully pour the contents of the pan into a small saucepan.

Prime Rib Roast Recipe

Pour in 1 cup of good quality red wine (yeah, that was from my wine glass)

Prime Rib Roast Recipe

1 cup of beef broth.

Prime Rib Roast Recipe

Pan drippings + Roasted Vegetables + Red Wine + Beef Broth = Red Wine Au Jus.

Prime Rib Roast Recipe

Let it simmer for 8 minutes.

Prime Rib Roast Recipe

Strain.

Prime Rib Roast Recipe

 

Cut the Prime Rib Roast

The first step is to cut the bones off.

Prime Rib Roast Recipe

Prime Rib Roast Recipe

The bones will then get cut further and all go on MY plate (heehee!)

Then slice the prime rib roast into desired thickness. You can also carve this at the table, if you wish.

Prime Rib Roast Recipe

Serve with the Red Wine Au Jus.

Prime Rib Roast Recipe

 

Big thanks to Lobel’s for sending me a big, fat, USDA Prime Rib Roast. The meat was exceptional, the best we’ve ever had, perfectly aged. We’ve been spoiled now!

More Recipes to Explore

Perfect Prime Rib Recipe with Red Wine Jus (Steamy Kitchen)

Roasted Garlic Mashed Potatoes (Steamy Kitchen)

Yorkshire Pudding (Steamy Kitchen)

Ruth’s Chris Sweet Potato Casserole Recipe (Steamy Kitchen)

Dr. BBQ’s Famous Baby Back Ribs (Steamy Kitchen)

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1-Step, Fail Proof Prime Rib Roast Recipe on Rotisserie

Servings: 6 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: varies
Prime Rib Roast Recipe

A 4-pound roast (with 3 bones) will feed 6 people. Purchase whatever size roast you need, adjust cooking time based on size. Please read the instructions that comes with your rotisserie on how to load the rib roast and cooking times. Our rotisserie instructions were 16-18 minutes per pound.

Ingredients:

One bone-in prime rib roast
salt and pepper (or seasoning blend of your choice)
3 carrots, peeled, cut in big chunks
3 stalks celery, cut in big chunks
1 large onion, quartered
several sprigs of thyme
1 cup red wine
1 cup beef broth

Directions:

Season the rib roast generously on all sides. Load the rib roast onto the rotisserie, with spikes between the bones.

Scatter the carrots, celery, onion and thyme in the roasting tray. Insert roasting tray into rotisserie.

Set rotisserie to cook according to manufacturer's instructions. Please read the manual and find cooking time chart, as your machine may be different from mine.

When done, let roast rest while you make the Red Wine Au Jus. Pour the contents of the roasting pan into a medium saucepan set on medium-high heat. Add the red wine and beef broth. Simmer on low for 8 minutes, uncovered. Strain and serve with the Prime Rib Roast.

To carve the Prime Rib Roast, first, cut off the bones. Cut each bone apart. Then slice the rib roast into desired thickness.

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Ruth’s Chris Sweet Potato Casserole Recipe http://steamykitchen.com/38468-ruths-chris-sweet-potato-casserole-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/38468-ruths-chris-sweet-potato-casserole-recipe.html#comments Sun, 30 Nov 2014 18:51:49 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=38468 Years ago, we dined at Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse in Sarasota. The kids were itty bitty, but they got dressed up with fancy new clothes. The special occassion, none, other than my in-laws were visiting from Clarence, New York for the holidays. My late father-in-law, George, was a lover of steak. Super-seared, almost burnt on the outside, but red-rare on the ...

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Sweet Potato Casserole Recipe

Years ago, we dined at Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse in Sarasota. The kids were itty bitty, but they got dressed up with fancy new clothes. The special occassion, none, other than my in-laws were visiting from Clarence, New York for the holidays.

My late father-in-law, George, was a lover of steak. Super-seared, almost burnt on the outside, but red-rare on the inside. If it wasn’t cold and moo-ing in the middle, it wasn’t cooked right.

In Sarasota, there were only two restaurants that knew how to do steak “George’s way” and wouldn’t give a fuss if he sent it back: Ruth’s Chris and Flemings.

We each ordered our favorites: my husband and mother-in-law love the delicate filet mignon. I can go to any steakhouse, and without even cracking open the menu, just call for a rib-eye, medium-rare

The kids just poached off everyone’s plates, except for George a.k.a.”Papa’s,” as their little nubby teeth couldn’t chew rare cow.

The one dish we all agreed on was the Ruth’s Chris Sweet Potato Casserole, a creamy-sweet dish served individual ramekins, topped with a crunchy, brown-sugar and pecan crust.

Sweet Potato Casserole Recipe

This will be our second Christmas without “Papa.” We will enjoy a charred-on-the-outside steak in his honor (but medium-rare for us) and this Ruth’s Chris Sweet Potato Casserole.

We’ll dine together and remember Papa, fondly. Scott will tell stories of how Papa would rig his BBQ grill at home to produce exactly the steak he liked.

And perhaps, in heaven, there are angels who grill Papa’s steaks perfectly, every time.

This sweet potato casserole recipe comes directly from Ruth’s Chris Restaurants – they’ve generously allowed us to reprint and adapt their recipe.

The homemade version is perfect to serve with a traditional steak dinner. We normally pair it with our Perfect Prime Rib Recipe with Red Wine Au Jus.

The two distinct textures of this Sweet Potato Casserole go so well together that we decided to go a little overboard on the topping so that each bite of mashed sweet potato could be accompanied by a generous scoop of the crunchy, sweet, nutty topping.

Right before publishing this post, I went to my computer to see if I could possibly find a photo of that night at Ruth’s Chris, out of the 32,051 photos in my archive (life of a food blogger.)

Within seconds, I spotted the photo. From 2007, after our amazing dinner, waiting for the valet in front of Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse. By this time, the kids had enough of good behavior. They were DONE! :-)

Sweet Potato Casserole Recipe

How to make Ruth’s Chris Sweet Potato Casserole

Note: You can use CANNED sweet potato, to save this step.

Peel and cut each sweet potato in half. If it’s a really large/thick sweet potato, you might want to cut into thirds. The key is to keep the pieces relatively the same size.

Sweet Potato Casserole Recipe - Peel & Cut Sweet Potatoes

Boil the sweet potatoes for 20 minutes, until easily pierced with a sharp paring knife (no resistance)

Sweet Potato Casserole Recipe - Boil Sweet Potatoes

The sweet potatoes are mashed and mixed with just a bit of vanilla extract for extra flavor.

Sweet Potato Casserole Recipe - Mash Sweet Potatoes

The Pecan Crumb Topping is so simple to make, we added extra pecans.

Sweet Potato Casserole Recipe - Pecan Crumb Topping

All that’s left is to to do is fill individual ramekins and top with spoonfuls of the crunchy pecan topping. Bake at 350F.

More recipes to explore

How to turn “cheap choice steak” into “Gucci Prime” steak (Steamy Kitchen)

Perfect Prime Rib with Red Wine Au Jus Recipe (Steamy Kitchen)

Jim Lahey’s No Knead Baguette (Steamy Kitchen)

Flank Steak with Bloody Mary Salsa (Steamy Kitchen)

Creamed Spinach Recipe (Tyler Florence)

Cauliflower and Broccoli Au Gratin (NY Times)

NY Style Chopped Salad (The Pioneer Woman)

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Ruth's Chris Sweet Potato Casserole Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 15 minutes Cook Time: 45 minutes
ruths-chris-sweet-potato-casserole-recipe-3358

Recipe adapted from Ruth's Chris with permission. Instead of boiling sweet potatoes, you can microwave the potatoes, whole. Poke several holes in each sweet potato. Microwave, uncovered, on high for 5 minutes. Rotate and turn the potatoes, microwave again for 3-5 minutes (depending on thickness of potato.) Check for doneness.

BONUS TIP: To save time, use cooked, canned sweet potatoes! Another idea, use half cooked pumpkin/half sweet potatoes.

Ingredients:

1.5 pounds sweet potatoes, peeled (about 4 medium-sized)
Crust Topping Mixture:
3/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup flour
3/4 cup chopped nuts (pecans preferred)
1/4 cup melted butter
Sweet Potato Mixture:
3/4 cup sugar
1/4 tsp salt
1/2 tsp vanilla
1 egg, well beaten
1/4 cup butter

Directions:

1. Cut the sweet potatoes half and add them to a pot of salted water. Bring the pot to a boil, and cook for 20 minutes, or until the sweet potatoes are cooked through. They should be easily pierced with a fork. Drain.

2. Preheat the oven to 350F. Mash the sweet potatoes with the Sweet Potato Mixture ingredients. Combine thoroughly and pour into a baking dish.

3. In a separate bowl, combine Crust Topping Mixture, and sprinkle Crust Mixture evenly onto the surface of the sweet potatoes.

4. Bake for 30 minutes at 350°.

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