Steamy Kitchen Recipes | RSS Feed http://steamykitchen.com Steamy Kitchen Food Blog: fast recipes, simple recipes, with fresh ingredients to create delicious meals. Fri, 26 Jun 2015 12:53:12 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.2 Thai Steak Salad Recipe http://steamykitchen.com/40566-thai-steak-salad-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/40566-thai-steak-salad-recipe.html#comments Tue, 23 Jun 2015 18:43:05 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=40566 Thinly sliced, perfectly seared steak tops a Thai salad of crunchy cabbage, fresh bean sprouts and fragrant basil and mint herbs.  Salad as a main dish is combines so many textures and flavor profiles: crunchy, healthy vegetables, tangy dressing, and a warm, grilled meat or roasted vegetable. This Thai Steak Salad also has one additional element – fresh, fragrant herbs. What ...

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Thai Steak Salad Recipe

Thinly sliced, perfectly seared steak tops a Thai salad of crunchy cabbage, fresh bean sprouts and fragrant basil and mint herbs. 

Salad as a main dish is combines so many textures and flavor profiles: crunchy, healthy vegetables, tangy dressing, and a warm, grilled meat or roasted vegetable. This Thai Steak Salad also has one additional element – fresh, fragrant herbs.

What makes this Thai Steak Salad recipe so appealing is the 5-S’s of flavor: spicy, salty, sour, savory and sweet. Toss in perfectly grilled, sliced flank steak, and you have a meal that only takes 20 minutes to prepare and pleases just about everyone.

This recipe is from The Great Cook Cookbook, by James Briscione, the Culinary Director of the Institute of Culinary Education in NYC, and two-time champion of Food Network’s Chopped.

About The Great Cook Cookbook

Thai Steak Salad RecipeWhile most cookbook feature stories or a journey + recipes, The Great Cook Essential Techniques and Inspired Flavors to Make Every Dish Better is built differently. The book is like a master cooking class, with author James Briscione and the team of editors at Cooking Light at your side.

The book is organized in 35 main cooking lessons, like “Steamed Mussels,” teaching you how to debeard mussels, test for freshness and how to cook mussels with different flavor profiles. Each lesson is followed by a few variations that build upon what you’ve just learned: Mussels Steamed with Bacon, Beer and Fennel, Curried Coconut Mussels and Fettucine with Mussels.

This is a perfect book for those learning to cook, but enjoy the freedom of variations upon a theme. With over 400 gorgeously styled color photographs throughout the book, you’re sure to understand the lessons.

The Thai Steak Salad recipe is featured in the lesson on “Leafy Main Salads” which also includes French Frisee Salad with Bacon and Poached Eggs (learn how to poach an egg and make homemade croutons) and a Greek Salad Bowl (with artichoke hearts and olives).

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Thai Steak Salad Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 15 minutes Cook Time: 8 minutes
Thai Steak Salad Recipe

Recipe adapted from The Great Cook by James Briscione. Reprinted with permission. (c) 2015 Time Home Entertainment, Inc. Photo by Helene Dujardin

Make sure you cut the steak ACROSS the grain - here are detailed instructions on how.

Ingredients:

1 pound flank steak (about 3/4" in thickness)
salt and pepper, to taste
1⁄4 cup fresh lime juice
2 teaspoons brown sugar
1 1/4 tablespoons low sodium soy sauce
2 teaspoons fish sauce
2 teaspoons minced fresh garlic
1 teaspoon Sriracha (or other hot chile sauce)
1 1⁄2 cups very thinly sliced cabbage or any salad greens
1 cup fresh bean sprouts
1/2 cup julienne-cut carrots
1⁄4 cup fresh mint leaves
1⁄4 cup fresh cilantro leaves
1⁄4 cup fresh basil leaves

Directions:

1. Heat a large grill pan over medium-high heat. Coat pan with cooking spray. Season steak evenly with salt and pepper on both sides. Add steak to pan, cook 4 minutes on each side or until desired degree of doneness. Remove steak from pan; let stand 5 minutes. Cut steak diagonally across grain into thin slices.

2. In a small bowl, whisk together lime juice and next 5 ingredients (through Sriracha) for the dressing.

3. In a large bowl, combine cabbage and remaining ingredients. Add 6 tablespoons dressing to cabbage mixture; toss well. Toss steak in remaining 2 tablespoons dressing. Add steak to cabbage mixture; toss to combine.

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Sushi Rice Bowl Recipe http://steamykitchen.com/40343-sushi-rice-bowl-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/40343-sushi-rice-bowl-recipe.html#comments Wed, 13 May 2015 14:45:56 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=40343 Are you a sushi lover? Sushi rice bowls are a great way to enjoy the Japanese flavors without the fuss of rolling or hand-shaping rice. If your supermarket carries sushi-grade fish, you’re halfway to making this dish. The sushi-grade tuna is accompanied by the normal sushi players: seasoned Japanese short-grained rice, bite-sized chunks of crunchy cucumber and creamy avocado. The dish is ...

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Sushi Rice Bowl Recipe

Are you a sushi lover? Sushi rice bowls are a great way to enjoy the Japanese flavors without the fuss of rolling or hand-shaping rice. If your supermarket carries sushi-grade fish, you’re halfway to making this dish.

The sushi-grade tuna is accompanied by the normal sushi players: seasoned Japanese short-grained rice, bite-sized chunks of crunchy cucumber and creamy avocado. The dish is adorned with slivers of seaweed. To serve, top with a dollop of the spicy mayonnaise and drizzle with a little wasabi-soy sauce that I like to dilute with a few drops of water. I find that straight soy sauce is too thick and salty poured directly on rice.

Sushi Rice Bowl Recipe

This recipe comes from a fellow Tuttle Publishing author, Debra Samuels (my first cookbook, The Steamy Kitchen Cookbook was published by Tuttle.) Debra has lived in Japan for periods totaling over 10 years since the 1970’s, and studied Japanese cuisine throughout her stays.

Debra is also a food journalist for The Boston Globe and also authored My Korean Table Cookbook. Her recipes are simple and comforting. You won’t find fancy techniques or exotic ingredients in Debra’s books, just honest, homestyle cooking based on ingredients you’ll find at most well-stocked grocery stores.

 
The book we are featuring today is My Japanese Table. Featured recipes include:

  • Spicy Tuna Tartar
  • Step by step how to roll sushi
  • Fried Cabbage and Pork Noodles (Yakisoba)
  • How to host a Yakitori party
  • Succulent Salmon Teriyaki
  • How to make a Bento box

I chose this Sushi rice bowl recipe, featuring fresh tuna, cucumber, avocado and spicy mayonnaise, because it’s a simple way to enjoy “sushi” without having to learn how to roll sushi. All ingredients can be found at most grocery stores, so no need to visit an Asian market.

This recipe is a combination of two of my favorite fresh tuna dishes. The first is the tuna tartar set on top of rice under a coating of grated Japanese yam (yamakake); and the second is a striking appetizer of layered fresh tuna and avocado cubes with Spicy Mayonnaise dressing that I discovered with Miho Nakajima, once a teenaged neighbor and now an elegant banker in central Tokyo. Think of this tuna-topped rice as a deconstructed Spicy Tuna Roll. The rice is not seasoned, and the seaweed, instead of wrapped around the rice, is cut into shreds and placed directly on the tuna.Debra Samuels

How to Choose Sushi Tuna


How to choose sushi tuna
(Tuna image from Monterey Bay Seafood Watch)


Choose your fish carefully – the tuna should be labelled “sushi-grade” and ask your fishmonger questions:
  • When was this fish defrosted? (all tuna arrives frozen)
  • Ask to smell the fish (it should smell “fresh from the ocean”, not “fishy”)
  • Ask your fishmonger to gently press the flesh of the fish, it should spring back up (old fish will be tacky, sticky and stay indented)
  • Ask where is the fish from and how was it caught? Choose environmentally friendly tuna, like troll/pole caught Albacore from the U.S. See Monterey Bay’s Seafood Watch Guide for an entire list of fish, graded by sustainability metrics. Here is the tuna page.
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Sushi Rice Bowl Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 30 minutes Cook Time: 30 minutes
Fresh Tuna Rice Bowl Recipe

Recipe adapted from My Japanese Table by Debra Samuels. Reprinted with Permission, Tuttle Publishing. Recipe photo by Heath Robbins.

Debra's cookbook includes instructions for the traditional way of cooking rice and sushi rice, using kombu (kelp). I've modified her recipe to include my version of a simplified sushi rice, using seasoned rice vinegar found at most grocery stores. Make sure you buy "Seasoned Rice Vinegar" or "Sushi Rice Vinegar" -- which includes sugar in the ingredients.

Tips: For the seaweed, I just buy regular sushi seaweed and use kitchen shears to cut into shreds. English and Japanese cucumbers have less seeds than regular cucumber and are crunchier. If using regular cucumber, it's best to get rid of the watery seeds. Slice cucumber in half, lengthwise and use a small spoon to scrape out the seeds. I prefer to dilute the soy sauce with just a few drops of water, but I'll leave that up to you!

Ingredients:

1 English cucumber
1 pound sushi-grade tuna
2 small avocados
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
Roasted seaweed shreds (kizami nori)
Soy sauce, preferably low sodium, for drizzling
Wasabi, to taste

FOR THE SPICY MAYONNAISE
1/4 cup mayonnaise
2 teaspoon Sriracha sauce (or other spicy chili sauce)
1/2 teaspoon Asian sesame oil
2 teaspoons low-sodium soy sauce


FOR THE SUSHI RICE (makes 4 cups cooked)
2 cups short-grain white rice
3-4 tablespoons seasoned rice vinegar

Directions:

Cook the rice: Put the rice into a medium saucepan. Run cold water into the saucepan, and with your hand, swish the rice around. Drain water into the sink. Repeat 3 more times, until water is more clear. Fill saucepan with 2 1/4 cups of water. Cover with lid. Cook rice over medium heat for 10 minutes. Lower heat to low and cook for an additional 10 minutes. Remove from heat, do not open lid. Let rice sit for 5 minutes or more.

While the rice is cooking, prepare the Spicy Mayonnaise. In a small bowl, whisk together the ingredients and set aside.

Cut the cucumber, tuna and avocado into 1/2" dice. In a small bowl, toss the avocado with the lemon juice, and cover with plastic wrap until ready to eat.

When the rice has cooked and rested, open lid and transfer the rice to a large bowl. Using a spatula, gently fold and lift the rice to allow steam to escape and to cool. Do not mash the rice or mix too vigorously (try not to break the rice kernels). After much of the steam has been released, dribble in a little of the seasoned rice vinegar, fold and lift rice to distribute. Repeat with rest of rice vinegar. Keep rice covered with a damp cloth until ready to serve. Do not refrigerate.

To serve, divide the rice between 4 bowls. Top with cucumber, avocado, then tuna. Spoon a dollop of the Spicy Mayonnaise. Top with shredded seaweed. Serve with soy sauce and wasabi at the table.

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Korean Bibimbap Recipe – Paleo and Low-Carb http://steamykitchen.com/39704-korean-bibimbap-recipe-paleo-low-carb-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/39704-korean-bibimbap-recipe-paleo-low-carb-recipe.html#comments Fri, 06 Mar 2015 22:30:24 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=39704 What you’ll learn: Bibimbap is a Korean dish with rice, mixed vegetables, meats and topped with an egg Low-carb & Paleo friendly dish, replacing the rice with spiralized & diced daikon radish Sizzling, savory dish with the classic ginger, scallions, garlic, soy sauce and sesame oil combination 30 minute meal from “Inspiralized Cookbook” by Ali Maffucci Bibimbap (BEE-beem-bop) is a classic Korean dish of steamed ...

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Bibimbap Recipe from Inspiralized

What you’ll learn:

  • Bibimbap is a Korean dish with rice, mixed vegetables, meats and topped with an egg
  • Low-carb & Paleo friendly dish, replacing the rice with spiralized & diced daikon radish
  • Sizzling, savory dish with the classic ginger, scallions, garlic, soy sauce and sesame oil combination
  • 30 minute meal from “Inspiralized Cookbook” by Ali Maffucci

Bibimbap (BEE-beem-bop) is a classic Korean dish of steamed rice served with ground meat (pork, beef, turkey or chicken), colorful vegetables, and a fried egg on top. It’s a savory, filling, hearty dish that is served in a big bowl.

Inspiralized by Ali MaffucciSome of the more traditional Korean restaurants will serve Bibimbap in a heavy, thick stone or cast iron bowl. The bowl is heated up first, the a little oil is drizzled in the bowl. Rice is added and pressed down into the hot oil – which then makes the rice delightfully crunchy and crispy on the bottom. Instead of a fried egg, sometimes a raw egg will be cracked on top, and when mixed in with the sizzling rice, coats every grain and cooks gently.

For those looking for a Paleo friendly or low-carb option for this Korean dish, Ali Maffuci, author of Inspiralized: Turn Vegetables into Healthy, Creative, Satisfying Meals and the blog, has created a brilliant alternative for the rice.

Replace the rice with the humble Asian daikon radish. Headshot

Surprisingly, when the “minced” daikon radish (using a spiralizer then pulsing in a food processor) is stir fried with ginger and garlic, it transforms into tender, aromatic morsels that easily tags along with accompanying ingredients in the bowl — just like rice.

If you’re living the Paleo lifestyle, or just want to steer clear of rice, pasta and breads, Ali’s Inspiralized Cookbook offers creative recipes that go beyond the normal, “replace spiralized zucchini for the noodles” shtick.

My favorite recipes are the ones that replace the rice – Spicy Seafood-Chorizo Paella and Sweet Potato Fried Rice are next on my list to try.

What spiralizer should I use?

Do you have a vegetable spiralizer? Create ribbons of “noodles” from all types of vegetables including zucchini (we call these zoodles), cucumber, daikon, sweet potatoes and more.

If you don’t know which one to buy, Watch my video review of different vegetable spiralizers and how to use them.





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Korean Bibimbap Recipe - Paleo and Low-Carb

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 15 minutes Cook Time: 20 minutes
Bibimbap_INSPIRALIZED

Reprinted with permission. Photo by Evan Sung/Recipe adapted from Inspiralized: Turn Vegetables into Healthy, Creative, Satisfying Meals

Gochujang is a Korean red pepper paste made from red chiles, glutinous rice and soybeans, found at Asian markets and many supermarkets. If you prefer your Bibimbap to not be spicy, look for Doenjang, which is a soybean paste without the chiles.

If you cannot find Doenjang, a suitable substitute would be miso paste, both are made from beans and will provide a umami-rich, savory flavor to the dish. Gochujang, Doenjang and Miso paste all store well in the refrigerator. If covered well (I press a piece of plastic wrap over the paste to minimize air), it will last for a year.

If you are a strict Paleo - replace the soy sauce with coconut aminos. Gochujang has a bit of sugar in it - so you can omit and replace with Asian red pepper powder or cayenne pepper powder.

Ingredients:

1 large cucumber
2-3 large daikon radishes, peeled
1 tablespoon low-sodium soy sauce
1 1/2 teaspoons rice vinegar
2 tablespoons gochujang (Korean red pepper paste)
1 teaspoon Asian sesame oil
2 teaspoons roasted sesame seeds
8 ounces lean ground pork
1/2 cup diced scallions, green and white parts
2 tablespoons finely minced garlic
1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger
salt, to taste
3 packed cups fresh spinach
4 large eggs
Cooking oil (vegetable, canola, coconut)

Directions:

1. Spiralize the cucumber, medium thickness, then set aside in refrigerator to keep cold. Spiralize the daikon radish, thin thickness (blade d). Place the spiralized daikon in a food processor and pulse until resembles size of rice grains. You should have approximately 3 cups of daikon rice.

2. In a medium bowl, whisk together the soy sauce, rice vinegar, gochujang, sesame oil and sesame seeds. Add in the ground pork to the bowl and let marinate on counter while you continue with recipe.

3. Heat a wok or large saute pan over medium-high heat. When hot, drizzle in cooking oil and swirl to coat pan. Add in the scallions, ginger and garlic. Stir fry for 15 seconds until fragrant. Add in the daikon "rice" and stir fry for about 5 minutes, until the daikon turns transluscent. Season salt to taste and toss well. Remove "rice" from pan, and cover to keep warm.

4. Wipe the pan clean. Return pan to medium-high heat. When hot, drizzle in just a little cooking oil. Add in the spinach and stir fry, tossing frequently, for 2 minutes, until spinach is wilted. Remove spinach to plate and set aside.

5. Wipe pan clean. Return same pan to medium heat. When hot, swirl in cooking oil. Crack in the eggs and cook without stirring for 3 minutes or until the egg whites are set on the edges. Cover pan, reduce heat to medium-low and cook for an additional 1-2 minutes until the egg whites are cooked through and the yolks still runny. Remove from pan to a plate, and set aside.

6. Return same pan to stove, set on high heat. When hot, swirl in cooking oil. Add in the marinated pork, breaking up the pork with your spatula. Cook pork for 4-5 minutes, until no longer pink and pork is cooked through.

7. Evenly divide the daikon rice, pork, spinach and cucumber noodles between four bowls. Top each bowl with a fried egg.

More Spiralized Vegetable Recipes

Pad Thai Zoodles (Steamy Kitchen)

Vegetables Spiralizer Comparison Video (Steamy Kitchen)

Cauliflower Fried Rice (Steamy Kitchen)

Zucchini Spaghetti, Crispy Prosciutto and Roasted Cauliflower with Lemon-Parmesan Sauce (Inspiralized)

Zucchini Noodles (Zoodles) with Lemon-Garlic Spicy Shrimp (Skinny Taste)

Zucchini “Noodles” with Sesame-Peanut Sauce (Fat Free Vegan)

Spiralized Zucchini Pasta with Creamy Avocado Sauce Recipe (The Watering Mouth)

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Chinese Stir Fried Pea Shoots http://steamykitchen.com/39585-chinese-stir-fried-pea-shoots.html http://steamykitchen.com/39585-chinese-stir-fried-pea-shoots.html#comments Fri, 20 Feb 2015 17:18:09 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=39585 What you’ll learn in this Pea Shoots Recipe: 15 minute recipe with step by step photos how to stir fry pea shoots, Chinese style How to infuse the garlic flavor into the cooking oil How to grow your own healthy pea shoots! What are Pea Shoots? Pea shoots are the baby plants of peas! We grow them like our microgreens, which ...

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chinese stir fried pea sprouts recipe-3947

What you’ll learn in this Pea Shoots Recipe:

  • 15 minute recipe with step by step photos how to stir fry pea shoots, Chinese style
  • How to infuse the garlic flavor into the cooking oil
  • How to grow your own healthy pea shoots!

What are Pea Shoots?

chinese stir fried pea sprouts recipe-3902

Pea shoots are the baby plants of peas! We grow them like our microgreens, which are so very easy to grow. Here is a post, with step by step photos on how you can grow your own pea shoots at home, even on your windowsill or on your sunny patio.

It only takes 2 weeks from seed to lush pea shoots, ready for stir fry.

Why do we grow our own microgreens and sprouts and shoots? 

  • It’s very easy to grow – no special equipment required.
  • Highly nutritious – microgreens are up to 48x higher in nutrition than its full-grown counterpart. A little sprinkle of microgreens on my salad massive gives a nutritional boost to my meal.
  • I don’t trust store-bought, farm-grown sprouts, shoots or greens. There is too much risk for contamination, especially E. Coli and Salmonella. Small batch, controlled setting is safer.

Learn how to grow pea shoots with our step by step photos.

How to stir fry pea shoots

Pea shoots are delicate, should just be lightly cooked and barely seasoned. The shoots are sweet, tender and light – and should be treated as such!

chinese stir fried pea sprouts recipe-3914

The main seasoning is garlicky oil. I add in neutral flavored cooking oil (like canola) and garlic to a cold wok or large pan. Then, turn on the heat to medium-low, and let the garlic and oil heat together slowly. Take your time – this is when the garlicky flavor infuses the oil. Just take care to control your heat and not let the garlic burn or brown too much. When you start smelling that garlic – it is time to add the pea shoots.

Now it’s time to crank up the heat. Turn heat to high.

You’ll have to add the pea shoots in batches – since the tendrils are so light, it looks like a lot of pea shoots, but the shoots will cook down.
As you add the pea shoots, use your tongs to flip, turn, stir all that garlicky oil all over the shoots! Try to get as much garlic in the middle, on top of all of the pea shoots (garlic at bottom of hot wok may burn.) Keep adding more of the pea shoots as the ones on the bottom begin wilting.

chinese stir fried pea sprouts recipe-3915

Season with salt and sugar.

chinese stir fried pea sprouts recipe-3918

See how the pea shoots are just barely cooked? Everything has wilted down, but the shoots are still a little crunchy and bright green. It’s perfect! Turn off heat, add in the sesame oil and cooking wine (optional.)

chinese stir fried pea sprouts recipe-3919

Stir. Done.

chinese stir fried pea sprouts recipe-3932

There’s not much more to it than that!

chinese stir fried pea sprouts recipe-3936

 

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Chinese Stir Fried Pea Shoots Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 5 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes
chinese stir fried pea sprouts recipe-3932

The key to this dish is not to let the pea shoots overcook. Once the shoots begin to wilt, it is almost done! The beauty of this dish is the limited ingredients - let the delicate pea shoots flavor be the star.

Ingredients:

1 pound pea shoots
2 garlic cloves, finely minced
1/4 teaspoon sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon Chinese rice wine (or dry sherry) - optional
1/2 teaspoon roasted sesame oil
neutral flavored cooking oil (like canola or vegetable oil)

Directions:

1. In a wok or large saute pan, add in the garlic. Pour in about 1 1/2 tablespoons of the cooking oil. Turn heat to medium-low and let the garlic heat up slowly, infusing its flavor and fragrance into the cooking oil. Take care not to let the garlic burn - control the heat so that the oil is slightly shimmering and aromatic.

2. Turn the heat to high. Add in the pea shoots, you'll probably have to add them in a couple of batches. Quickly, use your tongs to turn over the pea shoots around in the fragrant oil. Get that garlicky oil all over the shoots!

3. Add in the sugar and the salt. Again, use your tongs to flip, stir, turn the pea shoots. Within a minute or so, the shoots will begin wilting and cooking. Once the shoots begin wilting, the dish is almost done. Don't overcook the delicate shoots. Turn off the heat, pour in the cooking wine and the sesame oil. Toss and serve.

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Slow Cooker Bone Broth – Asian Style http://steamykitchen.com/39418-slow-cooker-bone-broth-asian-style.html http://steamykitchen.com/39418-slow-cooker-bone-broth-asian-style.html#comments Wed, 28 Jan 2015 22:23:46 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=39418 In Asian culture, soups and broths are part of everyday meals. A traditional Japanese breakfast would include a bowl of Miso Soup to warm the body. Chinese restaurants feature a long list of house soups, from an appetite stimulating Hot and Sour Soup to even a light broth served after dinner to cleanse the palate and complete the meal. Growing up, Mom ...

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Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian

In Asian culture, soups and broths are part of everyday meals. A traditional Japanese breakfast would include a bowl of Miso Soup to warm the body. Chinese restaurants feature a long list of house soups, from an appetite stimulating Hot and Sour Soup to even a light broth served after dinner to cleanse the palate and complete the meal.

Growing up, Mom always had soup simmering on the stove. Every night, without doubt, there was a Chinese style soup on the table. I remember saving the soup for last, as a ritual to conclude a delightful home-cooked meal.

I’ve tried to emulate Mom, but we’ve got such an active lifestyle that a pot simmering for hours on the stove isn’t feasible. Instead, we use a large 6-quart slow cooker to make an Asian-style bone broth that will last the entire week for our family.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian

What is bone broth?

Bone broth is often gently simmered for 24 hours (or more!) to extract as much nutrients from the bones of an animal, whether it be fish, chicken, pork or beef. The long cooking time breaks down bone to release vitamins, collagen and calcium phosphate — nutrients that are good for us.

Sure, it’s a trendy thing right now, with restaurants offering drive-through bone broth served in a coffee cup for $9, cookbooks dedicated to the art of bone broths (I highly recommend The Nourished Kitchen Cookbook which features bone broth) and even an entire line of bone broth concentrates that you can buy.

What’s the difference between broth, bone broth and soups?

Generally, soups are made with meats, bones, vegetables, herbs, added grains, sometimes thickened with starches – and simmered for a couple of hours.

Broths are mostly made from meats or vegetables and left clear without very much else added. Broths are also simmered for a couple of hours, resulting in a light colored, light flavored broth.

Bone broths are cooked for a day or even longer. Your favorite Vietnamese restaurant most likely simmer their pho broth overnight, which is why the broth is so rich and flavorful.

The long cooking time extracts so many nutrients and flavor! How do you know when you’ve extracted maximum nutrients and flavor? When the bones literally disintegrate just by giving a little pressure with your fingers.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe Asian Style

Like Nourished Kitchen, we make our bone broth in the slow cooker, and it will last us all week long. The process starts on Sunday night, and the slow cooker will do its magic all night long.

In the morning, we’ll enjoy bone broth as part of our breakfast. Every day, I’ll top off the pot with more water and keep the slow cooker humming along.

Each day, I’ll add a vegetable, switch out for fresh herbs, throw in a couple of umami-boosting Asian ingredients.

As the days progress, the bone broth develops new flavor, gets richer, smoother, fuller. We get the benefit of the valuable nutrition that’s normally locked inside the bones.

Some days, we’ll top off the bone broth with chopped herbs, or shredded seaweed just before serving. Or a spoonful of leftover rice in the bone broth is great too.

Secrets to Clear, Clean Bone Broth

Key to bone broth – be gentle. The cooking process is slow and gentle, coaxing out flavor with very little bubbles (no violent boiling!)

Don’t stir. Especially after the first 2 days. The bones will be come very soft and will crumble if you stir the pot too vigorously, resulting in a gritty broth.

Use cheesecloth or herb/tea bags to contain any herbs, aromatics or spices that are very small (see below.) This avoids having you dig around, stir around to fish these items out.

Use a very fine mesh skimmer to skim the surface of the broth every day, especially during the first 6-8 hours. The “scum” will cloud your broth during these first few hours of cooking. What’s the scum made out of? Proteins, fats, microscopic bone fragments (especially if the bones were cut), oils, impurities. Get rid of it!

Ready for the next batch? Jumpstart your next batch with a little of the last batch of concentrated “liquid gold!” We call this “Infinite Bone Broth.” Restaurants do the same with broths, sauces and sourdough bread too. Seed the next batch with rich flavor you’ve already built.

Bone Broth, Chinese Style

The “holy trinity” of Chinese cooking is garlic, ginger and green onion.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Garlic, Ginger & Green Onion

I’m not a fan of fishing out little pieces of ingredients, so I try to cut herbs so that they are easy to find and spoon out. The garlic head is cut in half. Sometimes, the cloves will separate (like above) but I’ll use a bag made for for DIY teabags or as an herb pouch (100 bags for $5.67)

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian DIY Herb Pouch

Fill it up with the garlic cloves that are loose. Fold the top over and the cloves or anything you put inside will stay put. You can also make your own with cheesecloth. I like to use these teabags for other spices too, like whole peppercorns or star anise – anything that would be hard to find and fish out.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Fill Herb Pouch with loose garlic cloves

The green onions are tied with twine, again for easy removal. The ginger is a big hunk, just sliced in half.  I reserve the other half of the ginger + the garlic cloves in the bag + more green onion  – to add to the bone broth a couple of days later (I’ll discard the spent herbs/aromatics, replace with fresh.)

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Tie green onions with twine and slice ginger in half

This week, I’m making bone broth with spareribs (it was on sale). Pork broth is very popular in Chinese cuisine. It’s just as popular as chicken broth is here in the U.S. Most of the Chinese soups that I make start with pork – for a lighter, more neutral flavor than beef or chicken.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Spareribs for bone broth

Some people like to cut off the excess fat, but I just leave it on. I’ll skim out the fats and oils later with a skimmer.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Everything goes into the slow cooker

Everything goes into the slow cooker, set it on low and let it go. If you plan on making slow cooker bone broth often, I suggest getting the largest slow cooker you can find. This one is a Cuisinart 6 1/2 Quart Slow Cooker ($99) that works really well. It’s never failed us.

After a few hours, I’ll skim the scuzz with a very fine mesh skimmer. This skimmer mesh is so fine that it catches all particles AND surface oils and fats.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian skim skuzz with very fine mesh skimmer

Look how rich this bone broth is the next day! Season with salt, or fish sauce. Season to taste.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian

I’ll discard the spent green onion, garlic and ginger, and add fresh to replace. This time, I’m adding garlic chives and cilantro from the garden – again, tied  up to make it easier to remove.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian discard spent herbs and add garlic chives and cilantro

Top it off with fresh water. The slow cooker stays on all week, on low.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian top off with fresh water

Chinese Bone Broth

After a couple of days, I might throw in some Chinese dried ingredients for a massive flavor and umami-boost:

Dried scallops, dried shrimp or dried black mushrooms (shitake).

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian dried scallops, dried shrimp and black mushrooms

You can also add in sliced daikon and carrots for one of my very favorite home-style soups! Every trip back to my Mom’s house, I request her Daikon Carrot soup.

If you like cilantro, you can also add in a bunch of cilantro stems, which have just as much flavor as the leaves. I often use the stems for soups.

Japanese Bone Broth

If you’d like Japanese flavor for a bone broth, add a small 6-inch piece of dried kombu and a handful of bonito flakes (place these in the tea bag.) By the way, kombu can be used over, and over again. Just rinse, wipe, and let dry completely before storing for next use.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian dried kombu and bonito flakes

My favorite breakfast? Bone broth with a spoonful of leftover rice or grains, top with roasted seaweed. This type of seaweed is called Kizame Nori – or sliced, roasted seaweed.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian with a spoonful of leftover rice or grains and roasted seaweed

By the way, have you ever tried Ochazuke?

Also, if you’d like to fortify the Japanese bone broth with miso paste – do this separately. Miso paste cooked at high heat or for too long will break apart and become gritty. Ladle some bone broth into a separate saucepan. Bring to simmer if you need to, but if it’s coming straight from the slow cooker, there’s no need to heat it up. Turn off heat. Whisk just a couple tablespoons of miso paste into the soup. Be careful of how much miso you add, especially if you’ve already added salt to the bone broth. I prefer shiro miso (white miso paste) as it’s lighter and less salty than the others. Miso paste is always added off heat.

Vietnamese Bone Broth

Add Vietnamese pho spices to a mesh bag or the tea bag (Here’s a recipe for Slow Cooker Vietnamese Pho.)

If you visit an Asian market, you can often find all these spices packaged, ready to go. Look for “Pho Spice Pack.” Instead of seasoning the broth with salt, season the bone broth with fish sauce. Start with 1 tablespoon, taste, and then add 1 teaspoon at a time until perfect.

What’s my favorite fish sauce? Right there in the sidebar is a free “Asian Masters of Flavor” ebook I wrote that includes my favorite brand! There’s a big difference between good quality fish sauce and crap, chemical-laden fish sauce.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Vietnamese Bone Broth Spices

More notes

If you’re concerned with the cost of running a slow cooker throughout the week, it costs pennies per day!

We grow all of our own herbs and most of our own vegetables in our aquaponics garden and greenhouse. Here’s a tip for green onion.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Our aquaphonics garden

You can even start with store-bought green onion. Make sure you buy ones that have nice, wet, strong roots (no dry or wilted!) Just stick’em in soil. The green onions will continue to grow their roots and sprout more leaves. I just snip off what I need (leafy part only) and new ones will continue to grow throughout the entire growing season!

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian grow your own green onion

Recommended Cooking Equipment

More recipes to explore

Vietnamese Pho Pressure Cooker – Paleo Friendly  (Steam Kitchen)

Mom’s Chinese Chicken Soup  (Steam Kitchen)

Vegetable Thai Curry Noodle Soup  (Steam Kitchen)

Tofu and Mushroom Miso Soup  (Steam Kitchen)

Chinese Daikon and Carrot Soup  (Steam Kitchen)

15 Minute Udon Miso Noodle Soup  (Steam Kitchen)

Thai Fish Soup  (Steam Kitchen)

Soba Noodles in Shiitake-Shoyu Broth with Spring Vegetables (Serious Eats)

Spicy Korean Seafood Soup (Serious Eats)

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Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Style

Servings: Prep Time: 5 minutes Cook Time:
slow-cooker-bone-broth-recipe-asian-3832

I prefer using pork or chicken for Chinese or Japanese style bone broth. If you'd like to use beef bones (great for Vietnamese bone broth), I suggest roasting the bones (350F for 30 minutes) first before adding them to your slow cooker. Not necessary, but it will give a richer bone broth. I don't normally roast pork or chicken bones - I just add them to the pot. Grassfed, organic is best.

PORK: spareribs, neck, hock, really anything.


CHICKEN: whole, raw chicken, or just the frame of a rotisserie chicken you've already enjoyed. You can also use chicken wings or chicken feet. Turkey works great too.


BEEF: oxtail, knuckle, neck, short ribs. I also use beef bone marrow as well - but after roasting, I"ll spoon out the marrow, spread it on bread and sprinkle with sea salt for a little treat. Basically, too much marrow in the bone broth will make the broth greasy tasting. Short ribs have amazing flavor - I like to add them to any beef bone broth that I make.


FISH: Fish bones and head. I like to do this traditional Chinese style with garlic, lots of ginger and green onion. Remove the fish skin and the thin, silvery lining in the gut area (very fishy taste). If the fish is raw, I prefer to roast the fish bones (350F for 20 minutes) - as this tames the fishiness smell and flavor of the bone broth. Most fish will work except for oily fish like mackerel.

Ingredients:

4 pounds spareribs
1 head garlic, halved
big knob of fresh ginger (about the size of 2 fingers), halved
3-4 stalks green onions, cut in half

Directions:

1. Reserve half of the garlic, ginger and green onion for later in the week. Tie the green onion bundles with twine.

2. In a slow-cooker, add green onion, garlic and ginger. Fill slow cooker with water, up to 1-inch below rim. Set to cook on high heat at first. When the bone broth comes to a simmer after an hour or so, you'll see lots of scum. Skim and discard. Set slow cooker on low and let the bone broth cook for at least 6 hours.

3. Use a skimmer to skim the surface of any particles and oil. Season with salt, to taste.

4. After drinking some of the bone broth, top off the slow cooker with additional fresh water. You can also discard the spent herbs and add the reserved garlic, onion and green onion. Continue to add additional vegetables, aromatics, dried ingredients (see post above for details) as you wish. Keep the setting on low.

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Korean Beef Jerky http://steamykitchen.com/38897-korean-beef-jerky-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/38897-korean-beef-jerky-recipe.html#comments Sun, 28 Dec 2014 13:00:42 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=38897 Our friends, Darrin and Sylvia Isaacs, introduced us to their love of homemade beef jerky several months ago. If you are an avid fisherman, you might have heard of Darrin before. He co-hosted and co-produced several ESPN fishing shows – Big Game Fishing the World, BXRL-Billfishing Xtreme Release League, Inside Big Game Fishing Hawaii and Big Game Bites – with his ...

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Korean Beef Jerky Recipe

Our friends, Darrin and Sylvia Isaacs, introduced us to their love of homemade beef jerky several months ago. If you are an avid fisherman, you might have heard of Darrin before. He co-hosted and co-produced several ESPN fishing shows – Big Game Fishing the World, BXRL-Billfishing Xtreme Release League, Inside Big Game Fishing Hawaii and Big Game Bites – with his father, Norm Isaacs.

The Isaacs family lives nearby – and in a twist of fate (or is it kismet?) – Scott and Darrin met at an aquaponics shop. Darrin was there, asking questions to the stop owner, looking for some equipment to set up his system. Scott overheard the conversation. Once outside the shop, as both were leaving, Scott offered to give Darrin some of our equipment that we weren’t using.

Here’s where it gets strange:

-Darrin and Sylvia met on the big island in Hawaii. So did Scott and I. In fact, they were living on the big island the same time we were there, too.
-Our sets of boys are the exact same ages, same number of months apart, same grades. They are a mixed race of Caucasian and Chinese.
-Sylvia used to work in the wine industry. So did I. Sylvia and I are both Chinese.
-They live an hour away currently, all the way on the very opposite side of the county — but it turns out Darrin and Sylvia just bought some property and it’s a stone’s throw from our home.

If I list out any more similarities, it might even give me chills. When we get together, it’s like a gaggle of dark-brown haired boys – You can’t tell them apart from each other unless you really look closely.

We’ve become good friends with the Isaacs, how could we not feel like “instant old friends” given all the crazy similarities? They’ve just launched a new website and podcast, Boats and Billfish, for sport fishing.

Anyways, we also now love making our own beef jerky, just like the Isaacs. We’ve purchased a dehydrator (though to be honest, this is the 3rd dehydrator I have ever owned, but the FIRST dehydrator to be used more than twice and not bought from a TV infomercial.)

Rather than go the traditional American style of beef jerky, I opted to try a Korean flavor, inspired by another good family friend, Diana of Eating Richly. I modified my go-to recipe for Korean Bulgogi BBQ, omitting the sesame seeds, green onion, and grated fresh pear. The grated pear is meant as a tenderizer (the enzymes break down the meat), but since we’re making jerky, there’s not tenderizing needed! Instead of the normal grated onion and fresh garlic, we used onion powder and garlic powder. Fresh grated onion would add too much moisture to the marinade.

Previously, we had the butchers slice the beef for us with their fancy machinery (we love the Publix butchers, always so kind and helpful.) But recently received a Kalorik Meat and Deli Slicer for review that’s designed specifically for the home market. The unit is affordable at $79.00, and small enough to tuck away in the pantry. We’re also giving away a unit (see end of this recipe for details.)

 

Korean Beef Jerky Recipe

How to make Korean Beef Jerky

Start with the right meat. After several tests, we’ve found London Broil to be the best cut. Actually, “London Broil” is a term used to describe a method of cooking, not necessarily a butcher’s cut. However, many American supermarkets label Top Round Steak that’s cut even and flat as London Broil. Some butchers also label Flank Steak as London Broil as well, but I’m not as fond of Flank Steak for beef jerky as it’s often too thin and flat. Your beef jerky will turn out to be 1/2-inch wide strips. If you use Flank Steak for beef jerky, make sure you slice ACROSS the grain.

TopRoundSteakThe London Broil a.k.a. Top Round Steak that I like to use is about 1.75-inches thick, which makes nice-sized beef jerky slices. Also, take a look at the meat. It is even in thickness and lean – very little visible fat is what you want, as dehydrated fat doesn’t taste very good. Photo source

I’ve turned the beef on its side so that you can see how nice and even this steak is.

Korean Beef Jerky Recipe - use london broil

We set up the Kalorik meat slicer on our counter, it was already assembled out of the box. The unit is surprisingly light and has suction feet on the bottom to prevent sliding or shifting. Though you really have to push down to make the suction cup stick to my counter top, which is quartz, matte and not-so-easily suction-cuppable (nice word!)

Korean Beef Jerky Recipe - different thickness

Like the Isaacs, we like our beef jerky sliced very thin. While thick hunks of beef jerky certainly gives your jaws a workout, the thinner beef jerky wins in taste, texture, ease of enjoying and marinating time.

 

Korean Beef Jerky Recipe - Kalorik meat slicer

It’s best to test out which thickness you like best. Our meat slicer has a knob numbered 0 to 10. The top photo is beef sliced at 0.5, obviously too thin. The bottom meat was sliced at 1.5. We chose 1.25.

Korean Beef Jerky Recipe - different thickness

Oh, just a quick note – if you look above at the photo of sliced meat, you’ll see a very thin stripe of fat on the bottom – I would normally trim off ALL visible fat from the steak before slicing. As I mentioned, dried fat is not appealing to eat.

The Kalorik meat slicer has nice safety features – your fingers stay safely out of the way. The unit is made of mostly plastic on the base, the area that you place the meat and the handle.

Korean Beef Jerky Recipe - slice thinly

Slice at an even pace and take your time. This is the back of the unit, where the sliced meat falls.

Korean Beef Jerky Recipe - slice thinly

After slicing, prepare the marinade (garlic, soy, sesame oil, sugar, grated onion) in a freezer or storage bag. Add in your meat, seal. Massage and shake the bag to get the marinade incorporated throughout. I then unseal a tiny opening in the bag, squeeze as much air out from the bag as possible and quickly reseal. This helps the marinade stay put on the meat, instead of settling back down on the bottom of the bag.

The marinade recipe for Korean Beef Jerky is below, at the end of this post.

Because the meat is sliced so thinly, I marinate only 30 minutes. I also like lightly seasoned beef jerky, not beef jerky that’s so salty you need a gallon of water to rehydrate yourself! However, if you are using thicker slices of meat, marinate for an hour or up to overnight.

We bought the Nesco SnackMaster Pro Dehydrator $69.99 and have no complaints. It works very well, it does its job. I wish the unit would have a timer built in. Tip: don’t try to wash the drying racks by hand – you’ll go crazy just trying to scrub off all the dried bits. Instead, throw the racks into the dishwasher. The hot water will help soften the bits and clean them off. Also, during the summer, place the dehydrator outside on the patio so you don’t heat up your house with all that hot air!

Lay the beef slices in a single layer, spread them out so that there are no curls or folds in the meat.

Korean Beef Jerky Recipe - lay on dehydrator

Right about now, the dogs GO NUTS. Steak? Steak? Steak? I smell STEAK!

Korean Beef Jerky Recipe - dehydrator

After 4 hours-ish, the beef jerky is ready.

Korean Beef Jerky Recipe - done drying

Final thoughts on the Kalorik Meat Slicer:

PROS: It’s affordable, less than $100. The unit is lightweight, already-assembled out of the box. Good safety features – turn the knob dial for blade to “P” to make the blade flush with the unit for storage. The handle design keeps your fingers out of the way of the blade. The blade is simple to clean, the unit wipes down easily. It also comes with a silicone blade safety cover to keep the blade edge partly covered.

CONS: Because it is so lightweight, the suction cups are necessarily to keep the unit from shifting. The suction cups didn’t work very well on my counter, and I got a little nervous until I got the hang of it. The key is to not PUSH the meat forward towards the blade (which would move the meat slicer), but rather, gently glide the meat forward while applying pressure to the left to keep the meat sandwiched against the blade area. Sorry, it’s so difficult to explain in words! I wish the suction feet would be larger, more sturdier. Removing the very sharp blade from the unit is almost too easy – just twist this little knob and the blade is loose. It is difficult to tell whether the blade is securely set in from the little black knob. Take care when removing and washing the blade – I use my trusty Pitt Mitts to handle the blade.

If you are starting out on this beef jerky adventure, have your butcher slice the meat for you. Go during non-peak hours, and kindly ask for a very thin slice for beef jerky. Most butchers will know how to slice the steak correctly, though in my opinion, they’ll slice it too thick. Once you get the slices exactly how you want them, ask the butcher, “What setting did you use?” and just remember that magic number. Next time, just say, “Slice for beef jerky, at setting number ___.”

Make a couple of batches before investing in a slicer. It’s a big appliance to store in your house. However, if you’re really into beef jerky like we are, it’s really worth it to slice the meat exactly how we like it, without bothering or waiting for the butcher. It’s a nice-to-have appliance for the serious beef jerky aficionado!

That being said, we make beef jerky a lot. It’s a healthy snack, nutritious, gives me energy, and best of all, it’s real food. The kids love it and will pack beef jerky in their backpack for a snack instead of crackers or a granola bar.

We’re giving a Kalorik Meat Slicer away! Enter the giveaway here.

Retail beef jerky “Jack Links Teriyaki Flavored” 

Jerky_Teriyaki

-Ingredients: Beef, water, sugar, dried soy suace (soybeans, salt, wheat), maltodextrin, fructos, monosodium glutamate, flavorings, hydrolyzed corn protein, sodium erythorbate, paprika extract, sodium nitrate.
-Not sure what type of beef
-Contains MSG and other chemicals I can’t pronounce
-$5.99 for 3.5 ounces


Homemade Beef Jerky

korean-beef-jerky-recipe-3498
-Ingredients: Top Round steak, Soy sauce (soybeans, salt, wheat), sesame oil, garlic powder, onion powder, brown sugar
-Substitute soy sauce with Coconut Aminos (we love this sauce!) for a wheat and soy free alternative
-London Broil (Top Round Steak) – you can choose to use organic, free range beef
-$5.29 per pound for the meat (on sale), each pound makes approx 6-8 ounces beef jerky

Korean Beef Jerky Recipe

More recipes to explore

Steak Recipe: Turning Cheap “Choice” Steak into Gucci “Prime” Steak (Steamy Kitchen)

Flank Steak with Bloody Mary Tomato Salad Recipe (Steamy Kitchen)

1-Step, Fail Proof Prime Rib Roast Recipe on the Rotisserie (Steamy Kitchen)

Korean Kalbi Baby Back Ribs (Steamy Kitchen)

Black Pepper Jerky (Food & Wine)

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Korean Beef Jerky Recipe

Servings: Prep Time: 30 minutes Cook Time: 4 hours in dehydrator
Korean Beef Jerky Recipe

I've had best results using London Broil (Top Round Steak) meat. In my Nesco dehydrator, I can fit 4 pounds of sliced meat on the trays. Your unit may be smaller or larger. The recipe calls for 2 pounds of meat, so if you have a similar sized dehydrator, make 2 batches of the marinade side by side in separate bags. To clarify, don't try to stuff 4 pounds of sliced meat into 1 bag of marinade. It won't fit.

Ingredients:

3 tablespoons low sodium soy sauce
3 tablespoons brown sugar
1 teaspoon onion powder
1 teaspoon garlic powder
1 teaspoon Asian sesame oil
2 pounds London broil, very thinly sliced

Directions:

1. In a resealable freezer bag, combine all ingredients except for the meat.

2. Add the sliced meat, seal bag and massage gently to incorporate the marinade throughout the meat. Unseal just a small section, push as much air out of the bag as possible, and reseal. Let marinate for 30 minutes (on counter-top at room temperature is fine) or refrigerate up to overnight.

3. Lay out the meat in a single layer (as neat as possible) on the dehydrator racks. Set dehydrator according to manufacturer's instructions.

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Juicy, Savory, Grilled Kebabs http://steamykitchen.com/38272-grilled-kebab-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/38272-grilled-kebab-recipe.html#comments Fri, 07 Nov 2014 12:24:05 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=38272 Grilled Kebabs Recipe You’ll learn: The 1 secret ingredient that guarantees juicy, flavorful grilled kebabs Less than 30 minutes, Costs $12 for four servings Use any type of meat – beef, pork, lamb, bison, turkey, chicken 5-minute Minty Cucumber Raita I’ve been fairly tame in my adventures in Indian cooking, mainly because the mix of spices always seemed a little ...

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Grilled Kebabs Recipe

Grilled Kebabs Recipe

You’ll learn:

  • The 1 secret ingredient that guarantees juicy, flavorful grilled kebabs
  • Less than 30 minutes, Costs $12 for four servings
  • Use any type of meat – beef, pork, lamb, bison, turkey, chicken
  • 5-minute Minty Cucumber Raita

I’ve been fairly tame in my adventures in Indian cooking, mainly because the mix of spices always seemed a little intimidating. Many of my favorite Indian dishes include a long list of seven or eight different spices!

That’s why the Indian inspired recipes on Steamy Kitchen usually use a pre-made spice mix, like Garam Masala, which adds a beautiful, warm, Indian flavor to the dish. If I want real Indian food, I head out to my local “Tandoori Restaurant” to load up on the lunch buffet.

Other Indian-Inspired Recipes

Green Beans with Garam Masala & Toasted Hazelnuts
Indian Chickpea Dal with Coconut Broth
Ketchup from Scratch: Indian Spiced Ketchup Chutney
Indian Cabbage with Crispy, Crunchy Chickpeas
Indian Fish Coconut Curry

It’s a shame that up until now, I lumped all my Indian-inspired recipes into, “Hey, just throw in some GM!” Because Indian food has so much complexity in flavors, I’ve been missing out on this at home.

What’s my solution? Well, most Indian families have a spice box that holds fresh several different kinds of the most-used spices, and I found one that I really love.

Come take a look:

how-to-make-kebab-recipe-video-3201

This is the Kitchen Curry Master. A sealed tin set with spice packs that are refillable! I’d like to introduce you to the beautiful woman who created this product.

kebab-recipe This is Neena and her Mom. Look at those happy smiles! Here’s a little note from Neena:Hello Steamy Kitchen readers!

I’ve had a love for cooking from such a young age, stemming from the kitchen of my parents Indian restaurant in London. I put the Kitchen Master recipe book and spice collection together to help introduce more people to the simple and joyful world of authentic Indian home cooking. I hope you enjoy it!
-Neena

I decided to make a Juicy, Savory, Spice-tastic, Meaty Grilled Kebabs, using one of Neena’s recipes. You don’t need her Kitchen Curry Master – just cumin, coriander, garam masala and chili pepper.

And seriously, if you don’t have cumin or coriander – uh, hey, do what I used to do and BAM it up with just the GM (garam masala.)

The Secret Ingredient!

The secret ingredient to making these kebabs always delicious, nearly foolproof is sweet onion. Specifically, grated sweet onion. Grating a small sweet onion gives the kebabs so much wonderful flavor and keep the meat very moist. Don’t worry about any strong onion flavor – when you GRATE the onion, it breaks the onion’s cellular walls, releasing all of its stinging, spicy gas.

What’s left is a more mellow, liquid-like onion that’s tame in flavor. This is what keeps the kebabs juicy. Also, since the kebabs are made of GROUND meat, the grated onion just melts and incorporates wonderfully in the mixture. If you use chopped or minced onion, you won’t get the same effect.

If you’re worried about the onion’s gasses stinging your eyes, put on your favorite pair of sunglasses. Or a tip from Martha Stewart – place a burning candle right next to your cutting board.

secret ingredient grilled onion

Give it a try. Use the large holes of a box grater and grate an onion. This is also my secret ingredient to meatballs and meatloaf as well!

My favorite grater? The Wonder Grater set made in the USA by Jacob Bromwell, who has been making these Wonder Graters since 1930.

How to Make Grilled Kebabs Recipe Video

Here’s a superhero tip for you – add a big handful of chopped kale (leaves only, no stem) or chopped frozen spinach (defrost, squeeze & discard all water out) to add a little something extra to the Kebabs.

If you’re cooking for kids, omit the chili powder, or just add a pinch. Serve these Kebabs with a cool cucumber raita, which is really simple to make – plain yogurt + minced fresh mint + diced cucumber.

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Juicy, Savory, Grilled Kebabs

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 20 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes
grilled-kebab-recipe-3192-640x800

Soak the wooden skewers in water for 30 minutes. If you are using Kitchen Curry Master, one of the spices is a mix of coriander and cumin. Just use 1.5 tablespoons of the mix instead of separating it out in the recipe.

Neena suggests making the mix and letting it marinate in the refrigerator up to overnight. I've made these kebabs without marinating - and they are just as delicious! Neena's original recipes includes 1/4 teaspoon baking soda, however I did not include that in my version. You are welcome to add the baking soda, Neena says that it helps keep the meat tender.

A bonus - add a bunch of chopped kale or spinach to the kebab mix!

Ingredients:

FOR THE KEBABS
1 medium onion, peeled
1 1/2 pounds ground pork, beef or lamb (or any combination)
2 cloves garlic, finely minced
2 teaspoons salt
2 teaspoons ground coriander
2 teaspoons ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon chili powder (optional)
16 long wooden skewers, soaked in water


FOR THE RAITA
2 cups plain yogurt
1 cucumber, very small diced
1 teaspoon minced fresh mint

Directions:

Preheat the grill or preheat the oven by turning your broiler on high.

To make the Raita - combine the ingredients in a bowl.

To make the Kebabs, using the large holes of a box grater, grate the onion. In a large bowl, combine all of the ingredients and mix well with your hands.

Divide the meat into 8 equal sized balls and shape the ball around 2 bamboo skewers. (Using 2 bamboo skewers will make handling the kebabs and the grilling easier.)

Shape the meat along the stick to form the kebab, which should be approximately 1-inch (2.5 cm) in diameter.

Grill instructions: Grill over medium-high heat for a total of 6-7 minutes, turning the kebabs occasionally to cook all sides.

Broiler instructions: Broil under high heat for 10-12 minutes, turning the kebabs over once halfway during cooking.

Kitchen Curry Master and Giveaway

How to make juicy kebabs recipeGuess what? I’m giving a set away! Head over to the giveaway page to throw your name in.

The Kitchen Curry Master comes with a really good quality metal tin with rubber seal that’s designed to lock in all of the freshness, flavor and aroma of the spices. Each spice pack is refillable, for just a few dollars. It also comes with a cookbook that incluees 25 different recipes from Neena’s family. For less than $60, this makes a perfect gift for the holidays or a wedding present.

Buy Kitchen Curry Master from Neena’s website.

Don’t forget – I’m giving a Kitchen Curry Master away!

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Pad Thai Zoodles Recipe http://steamykitchen.com/37769-pad-thai-zoodles-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/37769-pad-thai-zoodles-recipe.html#comments Wed, 01 Oct 2014 18:23:41 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=37769   Before I get into the recipe, I wanted to give you a quick peek at the Daytime TV studios where I tape cooking segments at. It’s a show that’s syndicated in nearly 200 markets in the US with hosts Cyndi Edwards and the incredibly funny Jerry Penacoli (formerly of EXTRA.) My cooking segments are around 4 minutes-ish long. We tape ...

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Before I get into the recipe, I wanted to give you a quick peek at the Daytime TV studios where I tape cooking segments at. It’s a show that’s syndicated in nearly 200 markets in the US with hosts Cyndi Edwards and the incredibly funny Jerry Penacoli (formerly of EXTRA.) My cooking segments are around 4 minutes-ish long. We tape the segment and then it gets aired 2 or 3 days after that, depending on the market.

The studio is HUGE. This is just a picture of the back half.

 

pad-thai-zoodles-recipe-7791

 

Here’s another angle. I’m fascinated by the ceiling – every available inch is covered by cables that hold up lights, speakers and I have no idea what else is hidden up there.

 

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This is from the kitchen, looking out towards the cameras. There are 3 cameras, but I pretty much don’t look straight at the camera, except for at the beginning (intro and saying hi) and at the end (saying goodbye.) My focus is on the food and cooking alongside and chatting with the co-host.

The cooking segment is divided into 4 parts:

Hello
Demo/Cook
Taste
Goodbye

 

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But just because I’m not LOOKING at the camera, doesn’t mean that I ignore them! Quite the contrary. I always know with my peripheral vision which camera is on (see that red light on top of the middle camera?)

When I’m cooking and need to show something, I have to keep in mind to stop, make sure the camera gets it and hold my hands still while I’m still talking and cooking. That prevents you, the viewer, from getting all dizzy trying to follow my hands!

Whether or not my cooking is done, time over is time over! Daytime doesn’t like to re-record or “cut” – we go with the flow and do it all in one take. Unless there’s a oopsie with a camera. Even if *I* make a mistake or don’t finish cooking in time – there’s no re-do!

That’s what I love, though. Learning to tape cooking segments this way has trained me to let go of perfection. In fact, if you happen to see the segment tomorrow or Friday, you’ll see that not only did I forget an ingredient (cilantro) but also made a MASSIVE mess trying to get the Pad Thai Zoodles on the stupid plate! LOL. The co-host, Cyndi and I laughed about it on-camera and just let it slide.

It makes the show a lot more natural, less “scripted” (nothing is scripted and there is no teleprompter other than the intro and the exit.) I’ve also trained myself to mentally walk through the recipe backwards to see what I have to prep or cook beforehand, so that we end up perfectly on time. For this recipe, I had to pre-cook the tofu. I also pre-spiralized the “zoodles” so we had a batch ready to go into the wok. So I started cooking while Cyndi was zoodling away with the zoodle-maker, called the Paderno 4-Blade Spiralizer magical machine.

If for some reason, Rob waves his 2-minute fingers at us, and there’s NO WAY that I’ll be done in those 2 minutes, I’ll either:

  • Cut out steps or some ingredients, just get something to taste*
  • Freak out

Just kidding. I don’t freak out. One time, the chicken was not cooked through, it was obvious that it wasn’t cooked through, but time was up and it was the “taste” time. I ended up saying, “So Jerry, we are running out of time, the chicken needs to cook for another couple of minutes. Here. take a fork and give the vegetables and the sauce a try!” We proceeded to dip into the pan (it was a one-pan dish) and tasted NOT-CHICKEN. This way, Jerry had something to say about the flavor for the camera. I hope I didn’t give him salmonella or gastroenteritis.

Sooooo, enough about the TV! What about the food that I came here for????

This was the recipe I made on-air, but I had to re-create it for the photo shoot on a little camping stove in my backyard (Less than 1 week before I get a real kitchen back!)

By the way, my cilantro looks very parsley-ish, We grow both. I wonder if they cross-pollinate and now I’ve just created Cilantrey or Partro. Or, as my friend, Cheri, would call it, “You-Ruined-The-Parsley.”

PAD THAI

 

The JERF Analysis

JERF is “Just Eat Real Food”

JERF

Tofu
Eggs
Green Onion
Garlic
Ginger
Carrots
Zucchini
Lime
Peanuts
Cilantro

Not-JERF

Thai Kitchen Pad Thai Sauce (though we are only using 3 tablespoons of the sauce)

__

 

*I haven’t done enough research on cooking oils yet to put them in a category.

I don’t mind using Prepared Pad Thai Sauce – or any shortcut sauce as long as the JERF column is significant. This recipe serves four, so 3 tablespoons of the sauce isn’t a deal-breaker. HOWEVER, if you want to stay JERF, go check out Todd and Diane’s version of Pad Thai Zoodles! They make their sauce from scratch, with ketchup, fish sauce, vinegar, etc.

The Zoodle Machine a.k.a. Spiralizer

This is what I used to make the zucchini noodles: the Paderno 4-Blade Vegetable Spiralizer

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I had previously done a video review of the Paderno 3-Blade (earlier model) and other options – here’s the Spiralizer Review Video. This new 4-Blader is even better – extra blade to cut angelhair sized zoodles and a metal rod so that you can make those carnival-style potato chips on a stick.

The Paderno 4-Blade Spiralizer price is $49.95 on Amazon. It’s a must-by if you plan on making a lot of zoodles. If you think it’s a once-in-a-while thing, you might want to consider one of my most-used tools in the kitchen – the Oxo Julienne Peeler for $10 – it’s smaller, fits in a drawer, cheaper.

 

How to cook Pad Thai Zoodles

I’m a crispy-crunchy tofu-lover. To make sure they stay crispy-crunchy, you have to cook them separately and remove the tofu from the pan so that they don’t drown in the sauce or vegetables.

Toss them in a little oil, add to hot pan, Brown on each side. This takes 1-2 minutes per side. But it’s worth the wait.

 

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Remove them from the pan

Next up, the eggs! Look how beautiful our hens’ eggs are. The yolks are so bright, vivid, vibrant.

 

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Give ’em a good scramble. Then remove them from the pan.

 

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Why remove the eggs? Good question:

1. I like my eggs to be perfectly cooked, firm, separate from the rest of the stir-fry.

2. If I cook the eggs first, and then add everything else, the eggs will be overcooked. Plus, the “everything else” will be drowned by the wetness of the eggs. I want the “everything else” to have its own time in the wok, its own chance to fry in the cooking oil. Eggs are oil-hoggers.

3. If I cook all the vegetables first, then add the egg, then the raw egg will just “coat” the vegetables, making giant, soggy mess.

4. I could do this: Cook the aromatics (ginger, garlic, green onion), then cook the carrots, then zucchini. Then make a nice big hole in middle of wok, dribble in just a bit of cooking oil. Add eggs and scramble the eggs in that empty space. Once the eggs firm up, thoroughly mix all of the stir fry together and incorporate the cooked eggs.

HOWEVER – zucchini noodles cook way too fast. They are best cooked 80% of the way so that you still get some nice texture and bite. Soggy, overcooked zucchini becomes watery. Bad.

So to be on the safe side, I cook the eggs separate. You’ll see when I add them back into the pan later.

Once eggs are out, use a paper towel and just do a couple of swipes to clean the wok. Swirl in the remaining cooking oil, just a tiny bit, and add in the aromatics: ginger, garlic, green onion. Let that stir fry in the oil until crazy fragrant. This takes about 15-30 seconds.

 

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By the way, the reason we only use 3 tablespoons of prepared Pad Thai sauce (and not the entire jar) is because we’re amping up the “aromatics” and flavor with the garlic, ginger and green onion.

Add in the carrots to the pan and stir fry. *NOTE I didn’t use the Paderno Spiralizer to cut these carrots (I chose to just buy a bag of matchstick cut carrots to save time) – because in order to use the spiralizer effectively, the carrots have to be FAT. My store carries wimpy organic carrots. The carrots from our garden are too skinny.

 

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Cook for a minute or so – carrots take longer than zucchini to cook, so I add carrots in first. The secret to wok-cooking is knowing when to add ingredients. If I had added in the zucchini at the same time as the carrots, the zucchini would be overcooked while waiting for the carrots to catch up.

Now add in the zucchini zoodles.

 

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Toss very well, let it stir fry for a bit until you start seeing the zucchini change color from opaque to just beginning stages of slightly transluscent. Zucchini cooks fast, so this doesn’t take long.

Add in the Pad Thai sauce – I use Thai Kitchen Pad Thai Sauce (gluten free, dairy free, but it does contain fish sauce, so not vegetarian.) It’s on the sweet side, so if you feel like you need more salty flavor but not sweetness, try adding a few sprinkles of fish sauce or soy sauce.

 

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Add in the tofu and the eggs. Toss! Toss! Toss!

 

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To finish, squeeze in some fresh lime juice. (Toss again), Top with peanuts and cilantro. Serve with more lime wedges and some hot sauce!

On the TV segment that I taped, I used a new product that I just got from Rodelle. Sriracha Seasoning!!

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It is like an explosion of spice, garlic, salty, sweet, tangy. When we did our “taste” on air, both Cyndi and I said, “WOW!”

The good: Adds a POW of flavor. Ingredients that I can pronounce: sugar, salt, spices, garlic, vinegar powder (maltodextrin + distilled white vinegar), citric acid, soybean oil.

The bad: Sugar is the first ingredient, but since it’s a spice, you’re only using 1/4 teaspoon per serving.

I can’t wait to try this as a dry rub for shrimp on the grill, well….anything on the grill. I’m sure it will be wonderful on a roast too!

What I used to make Pad Thai Zoodles

Thank you for using my affiliate links! :-)

The magical Paderno zoodle machine. See my video review of different spiralizers here

The highly recommended Oxo Julienne Peeler that I love, love, love

The Sriracha spice blend:

My favorite wok:

Pad Thai Zoodles Recipe

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Pad Thai Zoodles

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 20 minutes
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The prepared Pad Thai sauce is sweet. Start with 3 tablespoons of the sauce and if you feel like you need more salty (but not sweet), add a teaspoon of fish sauce or soy sauce. If you enjoy more sweet, add another tablespoon of the Pad Thai sauce.

Ingredients:

8 ounces extra firm tofu, cubed
2 tablespoons cooking oil, divided
2 eggs, beaten
1 stalk green onion, cut into 2" lengths
1 clove garlic
1 teaspoon fresh grated ginger
1 cup matchstick cut carrots
3 large zucchini, cut into noodle spirals
3 tablespoons prepared Pad Thai sauce (or more, depending on taste)
1 lime, halved (use 1 half for step 5, cut other half into wedges for serving)
1/4 cup chopped peanuts
sprigs of cilantro, minced

Directions:

1. Pat the tofu very dry with paper towels. Toss just 1 tablespoon of the cooking oil with the tofu. Heat a wok over high heat. When hot, carefully slide the tofu (be careful of any splatters). Brown all sides of tofu, about 1-2 minutes each side. Remove tofu to plate and set aside.

2. With a paper towel, wipe the wok clean. Swirl in just half of the remaining cooking oil and turn the heat to medium-high. When hot, add in the eggs and scramble. Remove the eggs to to the tofu plate and set aside.

3. Return wok to medium-high heat. Swirl in the last of the cooking oil and turn heat to medium-high. When hot, add in the green onion, garlic and ginger. Cook for 15 seconds, until fragrant.

4. Turn heat to high and add in the carrots. Toss and stir fry for 1 minute. Then add in the zucchini noodles. Toss well and when zucchini begins to soften (about 1 minute), then stir in the Pad Thai sauce. Add in the eggs and the tofu. Toss, cook for 2 minutes. Taste and add additional sauce if desired.

5. Squeeze a little lime on top, top with chopped peanuts and cilantro. Serve with additional lime wedges.

 

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Asian Rice Noodle Salad with Steak Recipe http://steamykitchen.com/37270-asian-rice-noodle-salad-with-steak-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/37270-asian-rice-noodle-salad-with-steak-recipe.html#comments Fri, 01 Aug 2014 13:03:06 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=37270 Here’s what you’ll learn: Why skirt and flank steak are perfect for this dish How to cut the steak to guarantee most tenderness Nathan’s marinating method How to cook mai-fun (skinny rice noodles) in 30 seconds How to julienne a cucumber in 30 seconds This is a recipe long overdue, the amazing Field to Fork dinner hosted by our local CSA, ...

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asian-noodles-steak-recipe-2407

Here’s what you’ll learn:

  • Why skirt and flank steak are perfect for this dish
  • How to cut the steak to guarantee most tenderness
  • Nathan’s marinating method
  • How to cook mai-fun (skinny rice noodles) in 30 seconds
  • How to julienne a cucumber in 30 seconds

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This is a recipe long overdue, the amazing Field to Fork dinner hosted by our local CSA, Geraldson Community Farms, and Sarasota Whole Foods  was months ago! I had wanted to highlight Geraldson’s certified organic produce grown on their 20 acres and the dedication to safe, healthy produce for our small town.

But we’re currently in the middle of our choking-hot summer (so humid and hot that my eyelashes sweat) and that means it’s resting time for our fields. All of our local farms here close down or drastically reduce their growing, and I would like imagine that the teams of farmers and volunteers are off on vacation, enjoying their time off.

However, I know farmers are some of the most hard-working people…and I can’t think of a single farmer I know that takes long vacations. There’s always something that needs attention: equipment to fix, animals to tend to, fields to compost, work to be done.

I’ll have to wait until Fall, when they re-open, to show off their organic vegetables. In the meantime, let’s talk about STEAK!

Screen Shot 2014-07-31 at 12.53.42 PM
photo by the event photographer, B.Lively, at the Field to Fork dinner

asian-noodles-steak-recipe-3While Geraldson Community Farms provided all the produce for the dinner, Whole Foods here in Sarasota brought in the meat and their grillers.

I found out that Whole Foods’ meats are from animals that have never been raised with antibiotics or hormones. Also, their meats have a 5-step Animal Welfare rating system, so that you can easily identify how the animal was raised.

We chose to make this Rice Noodle Salad with Steak recipe from Whole Foods, but changed the recipe up a bit to suit our tastes.

Our family loves skirt steak and flank steak – it’s more tender (when cut properly), soaks up marinade faster (especially skirt), and the thinness of these cuts make for fast cooking.

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Asian Rice Noodle Salad with Steak Recipe Video

Here’s our video, and Nathan’s tip for the best steak ever.

 

asian-noodles-skirt-steak-2411-bTo make this a 20-Minute Meal

– Buy thin steak (like skirt steak) because it will cook faster. After adding the steak to the marinade, skip the waiting and proceed to grill/broil. You’ll still get a ton of flavor! *Bonus – massage the marinade into the steak like Nathan showed you in the video.

– Buy already-shredded carrots. Use a julienne tool to cut the cucumber.

– Use fine rice noodles (like I did in the video) – it cooks in 30 seconds.

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Asian Rice Noodle Salad with Steak Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes
asian-noodles-steak-recipe-2407

-If you love spicy - add in a spoonful of Asian chile-garlic sauce to the dressing!
-I prefer using flank or skirt steak, 3/4" thickness. Make sure you slice ACROSS the grain (see video)
-Use any type of noodles you want - even thin spaghetti noodles or angel hair noodles. If you are using rice noodles, remember that they cook very quickly.

Ingredients:

2 cloves garlic, minced
1 small nub of fresh ginger, grated
2 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce, divided
4 teaspoons toasted sesame oil
1 teaspoon brown sugar
1 (8-ounce) steak of your choice (skirt, flank, sirloin)
1 tablespoon rice vinegar
1 lime, juiced (1 tablespoon)
1 teaspoon sugar
1 tablespoon sesame seeds
1 cup shredded carrots
1 large cucumber, finely chopped
1 (8-ounce) package rice noodles
1/4 cup chopped peanuts

Directions:

1. To a resealable bag, add most of the minced garlic (reserve the rest for the dressing), grated ginger, just 1 tablespoon soy sauce (reserve rest for dressing), sesame oil and brown sugar. Mix well. Add in the steak, remove as much air as possible and seal. Marinate for up to overnight.

2. To make the dressing, whisk together the remaining soy sauce, remaining garlic, rice vinegar, lime juice, sugar and sesame seeds. Add in 2 tablespoons of water and whisk well. 

3. Cook the noodles according to package instructions. Drain. Taste the noodle to make sure it is done. 

4. Grill or broil steak for 4 minutes per side, or until done to your liking. Let steak rest for 5 minutes, then thinly slice.
5. For each bowl, toss noodles, carrots, cucumbers and steak slices with dressing. Top with chopped peanuts.

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Mom’s Chinese Chicken Soup http://steamykitchen.com/37127-moms-chinese-chicken-soup-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/37127-moms-chinese-chicken-soup-recipe-video.html#comments Tue, 22 Jul 2014 14:40:45 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=37127 Hi! I’m Andrew Hair, the older brother. I just turned 11 years old last week and my Mom asked me to pick a recipe to make for you. I chose Mom’s Chinese Chicken Soup. Actually, to tell you the truth, it’s Po-Po’s (grandma) Chinese Chicken Soup. I don’t know why my Mom took credit for it. HAHA. I like this ...

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chicken-soup-andrew-2006Hi! I’m Andrew Hair, the older brother. I just turned 11 years old last week and my Mom asked me to pick a recipe to make for you.

I chose Mom’s Chinese Chicken Soup. Actually, to tell you the truth, it’s Po-Po’s (grandma) Chinese Chicken Soup. I don’t know why my Mom took credit for it. HAHA.

I like this soup because it tastes yummy, it’s clear, there’s no vegetables and it reminds me of Po-Po. The difference between Po-Po’s version and Mom’s version is that Po-Po likes to use chopped, itsy-bitsy green onion to garnish. Mom likes to use cilantro leaves.

I DON’T LIKE CILANTRO.

I repeat, I DON’T LIKE CILANTRO.

So, you might want to use green onions.

The recipe is below! Don’t forget to watch the video that I made too! And don’t use cilantro!

andrew--2

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Mom Says Don’t use the Liver

Don’t use liver because it changes the taste of the soup and makes the soup cloudy and gritty. Mom learned this from my Po-Po (grandma). Liver is nasty anyways. Blech.

 

Mom’s Chinese Chicken Soup Recipe Video

***

(Mom wrote this part below)

Why I love electric pressure cookers

1) Electronic timer ensures that I don’t overcook, cook delay is convenient

2) Safer than stove-top – lid won’t open unless de-pressurized

3) Frees up stove-top

4) I can set everything up in morning and come home to finished dish that’s ready to eat. I don’t have to babysit the pressure cooker.

5) Keep warm function

6) Release pressure quickly – if you don’t want to wait for the pressure to come down naturally, you can switch the knob to release pressure.

Why I love Fagor 3-in-1 Multicooker

Several years ago, I purchased the Fagor 3-in-1 Multicooker from Amazon. I used it weekly to make soups, roasts and beans. It’s still running strong!

I love this particular model from Fagor because it’s affordable for $99 and it’s multi-functional. Pressure cooker, slow cooker and rice cooker in one. With limited space in my kitchen, I love tools that can do more than one job.

The Fagor 3-in-1 also includes a “BROWN” function which basically is high heat to brown your meats prior to cooking. Previously, I had to brown my meats in a separate pan on the stove, add browned meat into slow cooker. Then wash my pan. Now, all the browning happens in the pot, whether I’m slow cooking or pressure-cooking.

Most of the time, I cook rice in the microwave or in my rice cooker. But the Fagor 3-in-1 includes a function to quickly and accurately cook long grain rice, short grain rice, wild rice, brown rice and risotto in a much shorter time than on the stovetop (or rice cooker).

Two big thumbs up.

 

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Mom's Chinese Chicken Soup Recipe

Servings: 3 quarts Prep Time: 5 minutes Cook Time: varies
andrew--2

Directions for pressure cooker, slow cooker and stovetop below.

Ingredients:

2 pounds chicken parts (not liver)
1 stalk green onion
1 big knob of ginger
4 garlic cloves
bunch of cilantro stems onlysalt or fish sauce
    to taste

Directions:

    PREP

-Clean the chicken parts, trimming excess fat
-Thinly slice ginger (no need to peel), peel and smash garlic, cut green onion into 3" pieces.
-Place all ingredients into a large pot. Fill pot with water to cover ingredients (~14 cups).

    COOK IN PRESSURE COOKER
    Set pressure cooker to cook under high pressure for 30 minutes. (It will take time to bring up to pressure. Once it is at pressure, cook 30 minutes. Let pressure release naturally or release the steam following manufacturer's instructions)


      COOK ON STOVE

    Bring pot to boil, then turn heat to low. Cover pot, leaving a little opening (I use a wooden spoon or spatula to prop up lid). Simmer for 2 hours.


      COOK IN SLOW COOKER

    Set slow cooker to low for 6-8 hours or high 4-6 hours.


      FOR ALL

    When the soup is done, skim the top and discard. Use a slotted spoon to remove the chicken parts, ginger, garlic and green onion (discard). Season with salt or fish sauce to taste (start with 1 tablespoon and add more if needed)

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