Steamy Kitchen Recipes | RSS Feed http://steamykitchen.com Steamy Kitchen Food Blog: fast recipes, simple recipes, with fresh ingredients to create delicious meals. Thu, 30 Apr 2015 14:38:03 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.1 Thai Chicken Coconut Soup http://steamykitchen.com/39761-thai-chicken-coconut-soup-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/39761-thai-chicken-coconut-soup-recipe.html#comments Tue, 31 Mar 2015 15:43:48 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=39761 This recipe features: Classic Thai flavors, with a smooth, velvety soup Amp of the intensity of the herbs with a quick sauté of lemongrass, cilantro stems, garlic and ginger Customize soup by adding shrimp or mushroom (canned Asian straw mushrooms work really well) Southeast Asian cuisine features what I call the 5S’s – salty, sweet, sour, spicy, savory. This classic combination is ...

The post Thai Chicken Coconut Soup appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
Thai_Chicken_Soup_Coconut5233

This recipe features:

  • Classic Thai flavors, with a smooth, velvety soup
  • Amp of the intensity of the herbs with a quick sauté of lemongrass, cilantro stems, garlic and ginger
  • Customize soup by adding shrimp or mushroom (canned Asian straw mushrooms work really well)

Southeast Asian cuisine features what I call the 5S’s – salty, sweet, sour, spicy, savory. This classic combination is what makes Thai Chicken Coconut Soup so irresistible – the initial kick of the spicy chile pepper and lime, followed by salty/savory that’s tempered with a touch of sugar. The creamy coconut milk lingers to soothe the spiciness and allows all the distinct flavors to play nicely with each other.

Thai Chicken Coconut Soup Recipe

 

Everyday Easy by Lorraine Pascale

This recipe is from Chef Lorraine Pascale, a #1 bestselling author in the U.K.  Her book, Everyday Easy features elegant, fuss-free cooking for weeknight dinners.

Lorraine Pascale is the undisputed queen of the kitchen, queen of the simple and the simply delicious.Jamie Oliver

Recipes include:

  • Thai Beef Salad with Roasted Peanuts and Chili Dressing
  • Shrimp Caeser Salad
  • Lozza’s Lamb Biryani
  • Goat Cheese, Toasted Hazelnut & Honey Quesadillas with Arugula Salad
  • Crouching Tiger, Hidden Zebra Cake

and many, many more. Each recipe is easy, breezy and complete with a gorgeous color photograph. The Thai Chicken Coconut Soup Recipe is by Lorraine Pascale, photo is also from the cookbook, by Myles New.

Yum
Print

Thai Chicken Coconut Soup Recipe

Servings: Serves 4 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes
Thai_Chicken_Soup_Coconut5233

From Everyday Easy by Lorraine Pascale. Text copyright 2012 by Lorraine Pascale. Photographs copyright 2012 by Myles New. Excerpted by permission of Ecco, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers.

Note: Lemongrass stalk can be found at many large supermarkets (look near where they sell fresh ginger.) If you can't find a whole stalk, look for it in a tube. Many supermarkets carry lemongrass already pulverized, ready to use. Gourmet Garden is a brand I've used before (though fresh is still best.) I've also seen minced lemongrass frozen too. Another option - use a vegetable peeler to cut 2 strips of lemon peel (avoid the white, bitter pith, just the lemon skin.) I like to peel a big piece, use my fingers to twist it about to release its oils.

Same for kaffir lime leaves. If you can't find it fresh, try frozen kaffir lime leaves. Another option - peel 2 strips of lime peel. Lime is already in the recipe, so cut the peel first before juicing for recipe.

Ingredients:

Vegetable oil
1 lemongrass stalk
2 garlic cloves
2-inch piece of fresh ginger
Large handful of fresh cilantro
3 kaffir lime leaves
Two 12-oz cans of coconut milk
1 cup plus 2 tbsp good-quality chicken stock
1 red chili
3 skinless, boneless chicken breasts
1 bunch of green onions
2 limes
2–3 tablespoons fish sauce
1–2 tsp sugar

Directions:

1. Heat a drizzle of oil in a large frying pan or wok on a medium heat.

2. Trim the lemongrass stalk and discard any tough outer leaves before finely chopping the white bit (discard the green bit as it can be quite bitter). Peel and finely chop the garlic and then peel the ginger and cut it into thin slivers. Tear the kaffir lime leaves in several places on the leaf (but keep the leaf intact.) Chop the stalks off the cilantro (in one go) and then finely slice them (keeping the cilantro leaves aside for later).

3. Carefully toss everything in the hot oil with the kaffir lime leaves and stir fry for a couple of minutes, being careful that nothing sticks and burns.

4. Next add the coconut milk and stock and bring to a simmer.

5. Meanwhile, halve the chili lengthwise and then finely slice it, leaving the seeds in if you like it quite fiery. Chop the chicken into bite-size pieces and add both ingredients to the now-simmering soup. Reduce the heat a little and leave it to bubble away for about 8 minutes until the chicken is cooked.

6. Finely slice the onions (both the green and the white bits), juice the limes and roughly chop half of the reserved cilantro leaves. Add these once the chicken is cooked and then leave to simmer for a final minute. Last, add enough fish sauce and sugar to taste.

7. Ladle into four serving bowls, scatter the remaining cilantro leaves over and serve.

The post Thai Chicken Coconut Soup appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/39761-thai-chicken-coconut-soup-recipe.html/feed 10
Slow Cooker Bone Broth – Asian Style http://steamykitchen.com/39418-slow-cooker-bone-broth-asian-style.html http://steamykitchen.com/39418-slow-cooker-bone-broth-asian-style.html#comments Wed, 28 Jan 2015 22:23:46 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=39418 In Asian culture, soups and broths are part of everyday meals. A traditional Japanese breakfast would include a bowl of Miso Soup to warm the body. Chinese restaurants feature a long list of house soups, from an appetite stimulating Hot and Sour Soup to even a light broth served after dinner to cleanse the palate and complete the meal. Growing up, Mom ...

The post Slow Cooker Bone Broth – Asian Style appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian

In Asian culture, soups and broths are part of everyday meals. A traditional Japanese breakfast would include a bowl of Miso Soup to warm the body. Chinese restaurants feature a long list of house soups, from an appetite stimulating Hot and Sour Soup to even a light broth served after dinner to cleanse the palate and complete the meal.

Growing up, Mom always had soup simmering on the stove. Every night, without doubt, there was a Chinese style soup on the table. I remember saving the soup for last, as a ritual to conclude a delightful home-cooked meal.

I’ve tried to emulate Mom, but we’ve got such an active lifestyle that a pot simmering for hours on the stove isn’t feasible. Instead, we use a large 6-quart slow cooker to make an Asian-style bone broth that will last the entire week for our family.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian

What is bone broth?

Bone broth is often gently simmered for 24 hours (or more!) to extract as much nutrients from the bones of an animal, whether it be fish, chicken, pork or beef. The long cooking time breaks down bone to release vitamins, collagen and calcium phosphate — nutrients that are good for us.

Sure, it’s a trendy thing right now, with restaurants offering drive-through bone broth served in a coffee cup for $9, cookbooks dedicated to the art of bone broths (I highly recommend The Nourished Kitchen Cookbook which features bone broth) and even an entire line of bone broth concentrates that you can buy.

What’s the difference between broth, bone broth and soups?

Generally, soups are made with meats, bones, vegetables, herbs, added grains, sometimes thickened with starches – and simmered for a couple of hours.

Broths are mostly made from meats or vegetables and left clear without very much else added. Broths are also simmered for a couple of hours, resulting in a light colored, light flavored broth.

Bone broths are cooked for a day or even longer. Your favorite Vietnamese restaurant most likely simmer their pho broth overnight, which is why the broth is so rich and flavorful.

The long cooking time extracts so many nutrients and flavor! How do you know when you’ve extracted maximum nutrients and flavor? When the bones literally disintegrate just by giving a little pressure with your fingers.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe Asian Style

Like Nourished Kitchen, we make our bone broth in the slow cooker, and it will last us all week long. The process starts on Sunday night, and the slow cooker will do its magic all night long.

In the morning, we’ll enjoy bone broth as part of our breakfast. Every day, I’ll top off the pot with more water and keep the slow cooker humming along.

Each day, I’ll add a vegetable, switch out for fresh herbs, throw in a couple of umami-boosting Asian ingredients.

As the days progress, the bone broth develops new flavor, gets richer, smoother, fuller. We get the benefit of the valuable nutrition that’s normally locked inside the bones.

Some days, we’ll top off the bone broth with chopped herbs, or shredded seaweed just before serving. Or a spoonful of leftover rice in the bone broth is great too.

Secrets to Clear, Clean Bone Broth

Key to bone broth – be gentle. The cooking process is slow and gentle, coaxing out flavor with very little bubbles (no violent boiling!)

Don’t stir. Especially after the first 2 days. The bones will be come very soft and will crumble if you stir the pot too vigorously, resulting in a gritty broth.

Use cheesecloth or herb/tea bags to contain any herbs, aromatics or spices that are very small (see below.) This avoids having you dig around, stir around to fish these items out.

Use a very fine mesh skimmer to skim the surface of the broth every day, especially during the first 6-8 hours. The “scum” will cloud your broth during these first few hours of cooking. What’s the scum made out of? Proteins, fats, microscopic bone fragments (especially if the bones were cut), oils, impurities. Get rid of it!

Ready for the next batch? Jumpstart your next batch with a little of the last batch of concentrated “liquid gold!” We call this “Infinite Bone Broth.” Restaurants do the same with broths, sauces and sourdough bread too. Seed the next batch with rich flavor you’ve already built.

Bone Broth, Chinese Style

The “holy trinity” of Chinese cooking is garlic, ginger and green onion.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Garlic, Ginger & Green Onion

I’m not a fan of fishing out little pieces of ingredients, so I try to cut herbs so that they are easy to find and spoon out. The garlic head is cut in half. Sometimes, the cloves will separate (like above) but I’ll use a bag made for for DIY teabags or as an herb pouch (100 bags for $5.67)

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian DIY Herb Pouch

Fill it up with the garlic cloves that are loose. Fold the top over and the cloves or anything you put inside will stay put. You can also make your own with cheesecloth. I like to use these teabags for other spices too, like whole peppercorns or star anise – anything that would be hard to find and fish out.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Fill Herb Pouch with loose garlic cloves

The green onions are tied with twine, again for easy removal. The ginger is a big hunk, just sliced in half.  I reserve the other half of the ginger + the garlic cloves in the bag + more green onion  – to add to the bone broth a couple of days later (I’ll discard the spent herbs/aromatics, replace with fresh.)

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Tie green onions with twine and slice ginger in half

This week, I’m making bone broth with spareribs (it was on sale). Pork broth is very popular in Chinese cuisine. It’s just as popular as chicken broth is here in the U.S. Most of the Chinese soups that I make start with pork – for a lighter, more neutral flavor than beef or chicken.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Spareribs for bone broth

Some people like to cut off the excess fat, but I just leave it on. I’ll skim out the fats and oils later with a skimmer.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Everything goes into the slow cooker

Everything goes into the slow cooker, set it on low and let it go. If you plan on making slow cooker bone broth often, I suggest getting the largest slow cooker you can find. This one is a Cuisinart 6 1/2 Quart Slow Cooker ($99) that works really well. It’s never failed us.

After a few hours, I’ll skim the scuzz with a very fine mesh skimmer. This skimmer mesh is so fine that it catches all particles AND surface oils and fats.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian skim skuzz with very fine mesh skimmer

Look how rich this bone broth is the next day! Season with salt, or fish sauce. Season to taste.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian

I’ll discard the spent green onion, garlic and ginger, and add fresh to replace. This time, I’m adding garlic chives and cilantro from the garden – again, tied  up to make it easier to remove.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian discard spent herbs and add garlic chives and cilantro

Top it off with fresh water. The slow cooker stays on all week, on low.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian top off with fresh water

Chinese Bone Broth

After a couple of days, I might throw in some Chinese dried ingredients for a massive flavor and umami-boost:

Dried scallops, dried shrimp or dried black mushrooms (shitake).

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian dried scallops, dried shrimp and black mushrooms

You can also add in sliced daikon and carrots for one of my very favorite home-style soups! Every trip back to my Mom’s house, I request her Daikon Carrot soup.

If you like cilantro, you can also add in a bunch of cilantro stems, which have just as much flavor as the leaves. I often use the stems for soups.

Japanese Bone Broth

If you’d like Japanese flavor for a bone broth, add a small 6-inch piece of dried kombu and a handful of bonito flakes (place these in the tea bag.) By the way, kombu can be used over, and over again. Just rinse, wipe, and let dry completely before storing for next use.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian dried kombu and bonito flakes

My favorite breakfast? Bone broth with a spoonful of leftover rice or grains, top with roasted seaweed. This type of seaweed is called Kizame Nori – or sliced, roasted seaweed.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian with a spoonful of leftover rice or grains and roasted seaweed

By the way, have you ever tried Ochazuke?

Also, if you’d like to fortify the Japanese bone broth with miso paste – do this separately. Miso paste cooked at high heat or for too long will break apart and become gritty. Ladle some bone broth into a separate saucepan. Bring to simmer if you need to, but if it’s coming straight from the slow cooker, there’s no need to heat it up. Turn off heat. Whisk just a couple tablespoons of miso paste into the soup. Be careful of how much miso you add, especially if you’ve already added salt to the bone broth. I prefer shiro miso (white miso paste) as it’s lighter and less salty than the others. Miso paste is always added off heat.

Vietnamese Bone Broth

Add Vietnamese pho spices to a mesh bag or the tea bag (Here’s a recipe for Slow Cooker Vietnamese Pho.)

If you visit an Asian market, you can often find all these spices packaged, ready to go. Look for “Pho Spice Pack.” Instead of seasoning the broth with salt, season the bone broth with fish sauce. Start with 1 tablespoon, taste, and then add 1 teaspoon at a time until perfect.

What’s my favorite fish sauce? Right there in the sidebar is a free “Asian Masters of Flavor” ebook I wrote that includes my favorite brand! There’s a big difference between good quality fish sauce and crap, chemical-laden fish sauce.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Vietnamese Bone Broth Spices

More notes

If you’re concerned with the cost of running a slow cooker throughout the week, it costs pennies per day!

We grow all of our own herbs and most of our own vegetables in our aquaponics garden and greenhouse. Here’s a tip for green onion.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Our aquaphonics garden

You can even start with store-bought green onion. Make sure you buy ones that have nice, wet, strong roots (no dry or wilted!) Just stick’em in soil. The green onions will continue to grow their roots and sprout more leaves. I just snip off what I need (leafy part only) and new ones will continue to grow throughout the entire growing season!

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian grow your own green onion

Recommended Cooking Equipment

More recipes to explore

Vietnamese Pho Pressure Cooker – Paleo Friendly  (Steam Kitchen)

Mom’s Chinese Chicken Soup  (Steam Kitchen)

Vegetable Thai Curry Noodle Soup  (Steam Kitchen)

Tofu and Mushroom Miso Soup  (Steam Kitchen)

Chinese Daikon and Carrot Soup  (Steam Kitchen)

15 Minute Udon Miso Noodle Soup  (Steam Kitchen)

Thai Fish Soup  (Steam Kitchen)

Soba Noodles in Shiitake-Shoyu Broth with Spring Vegetables (Serious Eats)

Spicy Korean Seafood Soup (Serious Eats)

Yum
Print

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Style

Servings: Prep Time: 5 minutes Cook Time:
slow-cooker-bone-broth-recipe-asian-3832

I prefer using pork or chicken for Chinese or Japanese style bone broth. If you'd like to use beef bones (great for Vietnamese bone broth), I suggest roasting the bones (350F for 30 minutes) first before adding them to your slow cooker. Not necessary, but it will give a richer bone broth. I don't normally roast pork or chicken bones - I just add them to the pot. Grassfed, organic is best.

PORK: spareribs, neck, hock, really anything.


CHICKEN: whole, raw chicken, or just the frame of a rotisserie chicken you've already enjoyed. You can also use chicken wings or chicken feet. Turkey works great too.


BEEF: oxtail, knuckle, neck, short ribs. I also use beef bone marrow as well - but after roasting, I"ll spoon out the marrow, spread it on bread and sprinkle with sea salt for a little treat. Basically, too much marrow in the bone broth will make the broth greasy tasting. Short ribs have amazing flavor - I like to add them to any beef bone broth that I make.


FISH: Fish bones and head. I like to do this traditional Chinese style with garlic, lots of ginger and green onion. Remove the fish skin and the thin, silvery lining in the gut area (very fishy taste). If the fish is raw, I prefer to roast the fish bones (350F for 20 minutes) - as this tames the fishiness smell and flavor of the bone broth. Most fish will work except for oily fish like mackerel.

Ingredients:

4 pounds spareribs
1 head garlic, halved
big knob of fresh ginger (about the size of 2 fingers), halved
3-4 stalks green onions, cut in half

Directions:

1. Reserve half of the garlic, ginger and green onion for later in the week. Tie the green onion bundles with twine.

2. In a slow-cooker, add green onion, garlic and ginger. Fill slow cooker with water, up to 1-inch below rim. Set to cook on high heat at first. When the bone broth comes to a simmer after an hour or so, you'll see lots of scum. Skim and discard. Set slow cooker on low and let the bone broth cook for at least 6 hours.

3. Use a skimmer to skim the surface of any particles and oil. Season with salt, to taste.

4. After drinking some of the bone broth, top off the slow cooker with additional fresh water. You can also discard the spent herbs and add the reserved garlic, onion and green onion. Continue to add additional vegetables, aromatics, dried ingredients (see post above for details) as you wish. Keep the setting on low.

The post Slow Cooker Bone Broth – Asian Style appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/39418-slow-cooker-bone-broth-asian-style.html/feed 46
Mom’s Chinese Chicken Soup http://steamykitchen.com/37127-moms-chinese-chicken-soup-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/37127-moms-chinese-chicken-soup-recipe-video.html#comments Tue, 22 Jul 2014 14:40:45 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=37127 Hi! I’m Andrew Hair, the older brother. I just turned 11 years old last week and my Mom asked me to pick a recipe to make for you. I chose Mom’s Chinese Chicken Soup. Actually, to tell you the truth, it’s Po-Po’s (grandma) Chinese Chicken Soup. I don’t know why my Mom took credit for it. HAHA. I like this ...

The post Mom’s Chinese Chicken Soup appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
chicken-soup-andrew-2006Hi! I’m Andrew Hair, the older brother. I just turned 11 years old last week and my Mom asked me to pick a recipe to make for you.

I chose Mom’s Chinese Chicken Soup. Actually, to tell you the truth, it’s Po-Po’s (grandma) Chinese Chicken Soup. I don’t know why my Mom took credit for it. HAHA.

I like this soup because it tastes yummy, it’s clear, there’s no vegetables and it reminds me of Po-Po. The difference between Po-Po’s version and Mom’s version is that Po-Po likes to use chopped, itsy-bitsy green onion to garnish. Mom likes to use cilantro leaves.

I DON’T LIKE CILANTRO.

I repeat, I DON’T LIKE CILANTRO.

So, you might want to use green onions.

The recipe is below! Don’t forget to watch the video that I made too! And don’t use cilantro!

andrew--2

moms-chinese-chicken-soup-recipe-2046

Mom Says Don’t use the Liver

Don’t use liver because it changes the taste of the soup and makes the soup cloudy and gritty. Mom learned this from my Po-Po (grandma). Liver is nasty anyways. Blech.

 

Mom’s Chinese Chicken Soup Recipe Video

***

(Mom wrote this part below)

Why I love electric pressure cookers

1) Electronic timer ensures that I don’t overcook, cook delay is convenient

2) Safer than stove-top – lid won’t open unless de-pressurized

3) Frees up stove-top

4) I can set everything up in morning and come home to finished dish that’s ready to eat. I don’t have to babysit the pressure cooker.

5) Keep warm function

6) Release pressure quickly – if you don’t want to wait for the pressure to come down naturally, you can switch the knob to release pressure.

Why I love Fagor 3-in-1 Multicooker

Several years ago, I purchased the Fagor 3-in-1 Multicooker from Amazon. I used it weekly to make soups, roasts and beans. It’s still running strong!

I love this particular model from Fagor because it’s affordable for $99 and it’s multi-functional. Pressure cooker, slow cooker and rice cooker in one. With limited space in my kitchen, I love tools that can do more than one job.

The Fagor 3-in-1 also includes a “BROWN” function which basically is high heat to brown your meats prior to cooking. Previously, I had to brown my meats in a separate pan on the stove, add browned meat into slow cooker. Then wash my pan. Now, all the browning happens in the pot, whether I’m slow cooking or pressure-cooking.

Most of the time, I cook rice in the microwave or in my rice cooker. But the Fagor 3-in-1 includes a function to quickly and accurately cook long grain rice, short grain rice, wild rice, brown rice and risotto in a much shorter time than on the stovetop (or rice cooker).

Two big thumbs up.

 

Yum
Print

Mom's Chinese Chicken Soup Recipe

Servings: 3 quarts Prep Time: 5 minutes Cook Time: varies
andrew--2

Directions for pressure cooker, slow cooker and stovetop below.

Ingredients:

2 pounds chicken parts (not liver)
1 stalk green onion
1 big knob of ginger
4 garlic cloves
bunch of cilantro stems onlysalt or fish sauce
    to taste

Directions:

    PREP

-Clean the chicken parts, trimming excess fat
-Thinly slice ginger (no need to peel), peel and smash garlic, cut green onion into 3" pieces.
-Place all ingredients into a large pot. Fill pot with water to cover ingredients (~14 cups).

    COOK IN PRESSURE COOKER
    Set pressure cooker to cook under high pressure for 30 minutes. (It will take time to bring up to pressure. Once it is at pressure, cook 30 minutes. Let pressure release naturally or release the steam following manufacturer's instructions)


      COOK ON STOVE

    Bring pot to boil, then turn heat to low. Cover pot, leaving a little opening (I use a wooden spoon or spatula to prop up lid). Simmer for 2 hours.


      COOK IN SLOW COOKER

    Set slow cooker to low for 6-8 hours or high 4-6 hours.


      FOR ALL

    When the soup is done, skim the top and discard. Use a slotted spoon to remove the chicken parts, ginger, garlic and green onion (discard). Season with salt or fish sauce to taste (start with 1 tablespoon and add more if needed)

p-chinese-chicken-soup-recipe-2051

The post Mom’s Chinese Chicken Soup appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/37127-moms-chinese-chicken-soup-recipe-video.html/feed 23
Vietnamese Pho Pressure Cooker – Paleo Friendly http://steamykitchen.com/31369-vietnamese-pho-pressure-cooker-noodle-soup-paleo-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/31369-vietnamese-pho-pressure-cooker-noodle-soup-paleo-recipe.html#comments Mon, 10 Mar 2014 15:45:10 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=31369 It’s been a loooong time since I’ve made home made pho – much too long! Normally I make beef pho the long and slow way – either in the slow cooker or barely bubbling on the stovetop: Slow Cooker Vietnamese Pho Recipe Vietnamese Beef Pho Recipe Chicken Pho Recipe (Pho Ga) But a very persistent reader has been emailing me ...

The post Vietnamese Pho Pressure Cooker – Paleo Friendly appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
vietnamese-pho-pressure-cooker-noodle-soup-recipe-pinterest.jpg

It’s been a loooong time since I’ve made home made pho – much too long! Normally I make beef pho the long and slow way – either in the slow cooker or barely bubbling on the stovetop:

Slow Cooker Vietnamese Pho Recipe
Vietnamese Beef Pho Recipe
Chicken Pho Recipe (Pho Ga)

But a very persistent reader has been emailing me about creating a Pressure Cooker Vietnamese Pho recipe for the past 2 years. If you can make awesome Pho in the slow cooker, why not a pressure cooker?

Vietnamese Pho Pressure Cooker (Noodle Soup)

The only limitation of using a slow cooker or pressure cooker is space. Both appliances aren’t that big, and if I’m going to take the time to make Vietnamese Pho, I want to make a BIG BATCH of it! Well, enough to serve 4 people and some broth for the freezer too (freeze in quart containers or bags to make the best “instant noodle” broth ever.)

My solution for Pressure Cooker Pho is to treat the pressure cooker as a “pho broth concentrator” – the ingredients in the recipe are sufficient enough to create such a rich pho broth concentrate. You can add water to adjust after the broth is complete.

Vietnamese Pho Pressure Cooker (Noodle Soup)

Paleo Friendly Vietnamese Pho!

Screen Shot 2014-01-28 at 9.11.47 AM

Here’s a bonus. The recipe is Paleo friendly.

Big thanks to Nom Nom Paleo Food for Humans Cookbook by my friends Michelle Tam and Henry Fong for another stellar recipe. LOVE this cookbook, I can’t recommend it enough and have purchased copies for my friends.

If you’re non-Paleo, don’t worry. I’m creating notes for Paleo and non-Paleo recipe the Vietnamese Beef Pho using the pressure cooker.

 

 

20 Minute Sriracha Sauce Recipe

20 Minute Sriracha Sauce Recipe – Paleo Friendly –

Cauliflower Fried Rice Paleo Recipe

Cauliflower Fried Rice Recipe – > – Paleo Friendly

Non-Paleo Notes: Vietnamese Pho is generally Paleo friendly, as-is. The only ingredient substitution is the type of oil and noodles. Paleo grain-free “noodles” can be Shirotaki noodles (slippery little noodles made from Asian mountain potatoes – found in refrigerated section next to tofu at the store), Zucchini noodles (watch my video reviewing different gadgets to cut zucchini noodles), Kelp noodles made from seaweed.

Traditional Vietnamese Pho Ingredients

If you’re regular eatin’ folk, the traditional Vietnamese Pho noodles are rice noodles. You can find fresh rice noodles at Asian markets or you can get dried rice noodles at your grocery store. They come in different widths, just get one that you like. Generally, I can easily find the 1/4″ thick noodles very easily.

Dried rice noodles cook differently from the regular wheat-based Italian style pasta that you’re used to. The great news its that it’s faster! Dried rice noodles cook in as quickly as 1-3 minutes! If you overcook the noodles, they become mushy and pretty much inedible.

Here’s the best way to cook the dried rice noodles:

  1. Soak the dried noodles in hot water (not boiling water, just hot water from tap) for about 10 minutes. This will soften up the rice noodles. Drain.
  2. Bring a small pot of water to a simmer. You don’t really need a ton of water (like you do for pasta) – just enough so that all the noodles can be submerged in the hot water. Turn off heat.
  3. Add drained rice noodles to the hot water. Let it sit for 1 minute. Very thin noodles will be ready after 1 minute. Thicker rice noodles will need a couple of minutes. Drain.

Cooking noodles in the Pho broth?

I know you’re gonna ask me: why not cook the noodles directly in the Pho broth? I never do this. Here’s why:

  1. Because the rice noodles cook so darn quickly, it’s so easy to over cook them. I don’t want to ruin a batch of hard-earned broth with overcooked noodles!
  2. Cooking any type of noodles releases starch. For example, when you cook noodles, the water becomes cloudy from the extra flour. I don’t want that in my Pho broth!
  3. Related to #1 is that because the rice noodles can get mushy if submerged in boiling water too long, I add the noodles to each personal bowl first. When everyone is ready to eat (at the table, all staring at me, impatiently tapping their chopsticks on the table) – I will pour the Pho broth INTO the bowls one by one and serve immediately. Basically, I make the bowls to-serve.

No Pressure Cooker? No problem!

Just follow all instructions and simmer the broth for 4 hours on your stovetop. Put all ingredients into a large pot. Fill with 2-1/2 quarts of water. Bring to a boil, reduce heat so that the water is BARELY simmering – just tiny bubbles here and there. Simmer slightly covered for 3-4 hours. Skim surface of fats and stuff that floats frequently.

Vietnamese Pho Pressure Cooker (Noodle Soup) Recipe Video


Yum
Print

Vietnamese Pho Pressure Cooker (Noodle Soup)

Servings: 6 Prep Time: 15 minutes Cook Time: 2 hours
vietnamese pho pressure cooker noodle soup recipe featured-0888

Adapted from Nom Nom Paleo Cookbook by Henry Fong and Michelle Tam. This recipe makes a Vietnamese Pho Soup concentrate.

A tip for the Beef Eye of Round. The key to this is to very thinly slice. These slices will be added to each person's bowl RAW. When you pour the simmering hot pho broth into each bowl, it will cook the beef perfectly! To slice very thin, space the Eye of Round roast into the freezer for 20 minutes. This will firm up the roast and make it easier to slice very thin.

OR - sometimes you can find already-sliced beef at your grocery store. My store sells pre-sliced beef that you use for cheesesteak sandwiches. Even if it's not eye-of-round roast, just use what they are selling pre-sliced!

Ingredients:

3 whole star anise
2 tablespoons whole coriander seeds
1 cinnamon stick
3 whole cloves
1 green cardamom pod
2 tablespoons butter, divided (Non-Paleo version: cooking oil)
8 slices fresh ginger, unpeeled, 1/2 inch thick
1/2 large yellow onion, peeled
2 pound beef cross shanks, 1-1/2 inches thick
1-1/2 pound oxtails
1-1/2 pound beef brisket
3-1/2 tablespoons fish sauce
1 pound beef eye of round roast, very thinly sliced (keep refrigerated until ready to serve)
8 cups shirotaki noodles (Non-Paleo version: dried rice noodles)FOR THE TABLE:2 limes, cut into wedges
2 jalapeño peppers, sliced
1 bunch fresh cilantro
1 bunch fresh Thai basil (or regular Italian basil)
1 bunch fresh mint
2 cups bean sprouts
Sriracha sauce (store bought or 20 Minute Sriracha Recipe)

Directions:

1. In a large saucepan over medium-high heat, add all spices and toast until they become fragrant. Take care not to burn them! Place them in a coffee filter or piece of cheesecloth and tie it up. Place the sachet into the pressure cooker pot.
2. In the same sauce pan over medium-high heat, add 1 tablespoon butter (or oil) and add onion and ginger pieces. Brown until there is a nice sear on them. Remove them from the pan and place them in the pressure cooker.
3. Sear the meat in batches: add the remaining tablespoon of butter to the pan and sear the shank, oxtail and brisket. You'll do this in batches, all in a single layer. Give everything plenty of space so that they SEAR and brown. Crowding the pan will not brown the meat. Sear each side, remove each meat from the pan and add them to the pressure cooker.

4. Cover the contents of the pressure cooker with water or up to the fill line. Set your pressure cooker to cook for 60 minutes. This means it will cook under pressure for 60 minutes. It will take time to build up pressure (usually 30 minutes) and additional time to release pressure after cooking (usually 30 minutes).
Approximately: 30 minutes to build up pressure + 60 minutes under pressure + 30 minutes to release pressure. Exact timing is really not that important - and also depends on your pressure cooker system. Follow manufacturer instructions.

5. Once finished cooking and safe to open, open the pressure cooker and using a fine mesh or ladle, remove the top layer of fatty liquid that has accumulated on the surface of the broth and discard (there will be lots of it.) Remove the onion, ginger and spice sachet and discard. Remove the meat to your cutting board. Shred the brisket using two forks. Remove any other meat from bone.

6. The resulting broth is a concentrate. Dilute the pho concentrate with 4-6 cups of water. Season the Pho broth with fish sauce. Taste and add additional fish sauce if needed. Bring to a simmer on stovetop right before you are ready to serve.

Assemble the Pho Bowls:
Serve to order. In a large bowl for each person, add shirotaki noodles and meat (including the sliced eye of round). Pour the just-simmering hot broth into each bowl. Hot broth will cook the sliced eye of round. Serve with the remaining sides a la carte so each person can add whatever they'd like to their soup.

The post Vietnamese Pho Pressure Cooker – Paleo Friendly appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/31369-vietnamese-pho-pressure-cooker-noodle-soup-paleo-recipe.html/feed 33
Kale Kumquat Salad http://steamykitchen.com/30289-kale-kumquat-salad-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/30289-kale-kumquat-salad-recipe-video.html#comments Fri, 27 Dec 2013 17:10:25 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=30289 Have you ever had a kumquat before? It’s a small little thing, and the way you eat a kumquat is somewhat counter-intuitive to any other citrus that you may be familiar with. First off, the skin is the sweetest part of the fruit – and thank goodness too – can you imagine peeling that tiny kumquat with a knife!? The ...

The post Kale Kumquat Salad appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
Kale Kumquat Salad Recipe

Have you ever had a kumquat before? It’s a small little thing, and the way you eat a kumquat is somewhat counter-intuitive to any other citrus that you may be familiar with.

Kale Kumquat Salad Recipe

First off, the skin is the sweetest part of the fruit – and thank goodness too – can you imagine peeling that tiny kumquat with a knife!? The entire kumquat is edible, though I flick out the seeds. The thin skin is sweet with a slight bitter edge and there’s very little flesh involved on the inside.

This salad with sliced kumquat, fresh mushrooms and walnuts with a citrus vinaigrette was inspired by a stop at Los Angeles International Airport! Watch the video to find out what restaurant is a must-stop at LAX.

Kale Kumquat Salad Recipe Video

Yum
Print

Kale Kumquat Salad Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 5 minutes Cook Time:
Kale Kumquat Salad Recipe

Citrus dressing makes enough for recipe plus leftover for another day!

Ingredients:

FOR THE DRESSING
1/2 orange, juiced
2 tablespoons champagne vinegar (or red wine, white wine vinegar)
1 clove garlic, finely minced
freshly ground black pepper
1 1/2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
1 tablespoon honey
2 tablespoons olive oilFOR THE SALAD
1/2 pound kale, chopped, tough stems discarded
1/2 pound arugula
pinch of sea salt
1/2 cup kumquats, thinly sliced and seeds removed
3/4 cup mushrooms, sliced
1/4 cup walnuts, chopped

Directions:

Make the salad dressing by combining the vinaigrette ingredients in a jar with a tight fitting lid (like a mason jar) and shake well to combine.

Place the kale in a large bowl. Sprinkle with salt. Using massaging motion, rub the kale leaves together to break up and soften the kale.

To serve, toss kale with some of the dressing (I used about 1/4 cup of the dressing), nuts, mushrooms and kumquats.

The post Kale Kumquat Salad appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/30289-kale-kumquat-salad-recipe-video.html/feed 9
Kale Salad with Mushroom Omelet http://steamykitchen.com/28933-kale-salad-with-miso-mushroom-omelet-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/28933-kale-salad-with-miso-mushroom-omelet-recipe-video.html#comments Wed, 04 Dec 2013 12:01:02 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=28933 What you’ll learn: A healthy, hearty salad fit for a meal with warm mushroom omelet, crunchy walnuts, salty shavings of parmesan cheese How to transform tough, rough, thick raw kale into soft, buttery lettuce-like texture How to customize salad with different ingredients   I’ve just gotten back from a 48 hour jaunt to Los Angeles to shoot a video for ...

The post Kale Salad with Mushroom Omelet appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
kale-salad

What you’ll learn:

  1. A healthy, hearty salad fit for a meal with warm mushroom omelet, crunchy walnuts, salty shavings of parmesan cheese
  2. How to transform tough, rough, thick raw kale into soft, buttery lettuce-like texture
  3. How to customize salad with different ingredients

 

spicy kale salad with miso mushroom omelette recipe-9823

I’ve just gotten back from a 48 hour jaunt to Los Angeles to shoot a video for my YouTube channel (Dark Chocolate Sea Salt Cookies!) – it’s currently in the magical hands of a professional video editor over at Kin Community.

It’s fun what I can squeeze into a L.A. trip – my must-do’s include staying at the Hotel Erwin right in the heart of Venice Beach – the muscle men, surfers, roller bladers, strange cast of characters, and the gorgeous sunset are free entertainment outside my window. Another must is the downstairs restaurant, Barlo and their breakfast menu which includes Squash Benedict – “poached eggs|Cajun thyme squash pancake|avocado|hollandaise.”

Around the corner and across the street is Hama Sushi, one of the rare L.A. restaurants that have remained in business since I was a Californian (Go Bruins!) over 20 years ago. I managed to snag Gaby of What’s Gaby Cooking for a spontaneous sushi dinner.

The very last “must” is embarrassingly at the airport. I know, I know, it sounds strange. But if you’ve ever flown Delta in/out of LAX, you might recognize Lemonade, a deli that I wish was in every single major airport. Heck, I wish I had one in my hometown. Calling itself “Seasonal Southern California Comfort Food,” they feature nearly 20 super-fresh salads at the bar. Some of my favs:  kale salad with mushrooms and kumquat vinaigrette | Butternut squash, radicchio, scotch bonnet sauce, sriracha pepitas | Sun chokes, fennel, orange, pickled red onions, hazelnut. Check out their menu.

I grab a to-go box and have them fill it up with 6 different salads, order a Watermelon-Rosemary Lemonade and get on the plane. I’m in my own little paradise in seat 19C.

Screen Shot 2013-10-18 at 1.16.43 PMWhen I opened Joe Yonan’s new cookbook, Eat Your Vegetables: Bold Recipes for the Single Cook, and spied the Kale Salad with Miso Mushroom Omelette, I immediately thought, “LEMONADE!” This is just one of those salads that reminds me of the freshness and creativeness of the deli.

Oh gosh, I hope Joe has been to Lemonade before, otherwise would he be offended that I associated airport food with him?!

 

Secret Kale Tip!

I’ve modified his recipe to suit our family’s taste and size (serves 4 instead of 1) – and I urge you to try this salad with a new technique that I learned from Joe….massaging the kale.

Yes. MASSAGE YOUR KALE.

It transforms an otherwise tough, rough, chewy raw leaves into soft, silky, pleasant greens. Watch the video to see the difference!

 

Kale Salad with Miso-Mushroom Omelet Recipe Video

***

Yum
Print

Kale Salad with Mushroom Omelet Recipe

Servings: 5 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 8 minutes
spicy kale salad with miso mushroom omelette recipe featured-9829

Adapted from Eat Your Vegetables: Bold Recipes for the Single Cook by Joe Yonan. Of course, Joe's recipe was a recipe for 1 person, but I've changed the amounts to feed 4 people. This is a perfect salad as a meal!

The Lemon Chile Vinaigrette is AWESOME!!! We've been using this dressing recipe for the past month on nearly all of our salads. Recipe is for 1-cup - enough for this salad PLUS salads for the rest of week. All ingredients go into a mason jar - and then just shake-shake-shake! The recipe also includes a tablespoon of Japanese miso paste - which is a massive flavor boost of umami. However, it's not a must have ingredient in the recipe. Feel free to use or not.

Ingredients:

FOR THE SALAD
1 tablespoon miso paste (or 1 teaspoon soy sauce)
4 eggs
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 cups chopped mushrooms of your choice
8 big handfuls chopped kale, tough stems discarded
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
1/3 cup unsalted chopped raw pecans or walnuts
3 ounces grated Pecorino Romano cheese

FOR THE LEMON-CHILE VINAIGRETTE: (makes about 1 cup)
1 clove garlic, finely minced
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
1/3 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice
1 teaspoon chile oil or chile sauce (optional)
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
2 teaspoons honey
freshly ground black pepper

Directions:

1. Make the salad dressing by combining the vinaigrette ingredients in a jar with a tight fitting lid (like a mason jar) and shake well to combine. Taste and add more salt as needed.
2. Whisk the miso paste with the eggs. Heat a frying pan over medium-high heat and swirl in the olive oil. Add in the mushrooms and sauté for 2 minutes, or until mushrooms softened. Add in the egg and turn the heat to medium. Let cook for 2 minutes. Cover and let cook for an additional 1-2 minutes or until eggs are set.

3. While eggs are cooking, place the kale in a large bowl. Sprinkle with salt. Using massaging motion, rub the kale leaves together to break up and soften the kale.

4. When ready to serve, slice omelet in strips. Toss kale with some of the dressing (I used about 1/4 cup of the dressing), chopped nuts and Pecorino Romano cheese. Serve with omelet.

Reprinted with permission from Eat Your Vegetables by Joe Yonan, copyright © 2013. Published by Ten Speed Press, a division of Random House, Inc. Food Photography credit: Matt Armendariz © 2013

The post Kale Salad with Mushroom Omelet appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/28933-kale-salad-with-miso-mushroom-omelet-recipe-video.html/feed 15
Thai Fish Soup http://steamykitchen.com/29073-thai-fish-soup.html http://steamykitchen.com/29073-thai-fish-soup.html#comments Thu, 14 Nov 2013 18:08:20 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=29073 Ever since our trip to City of Hope in Los Angeles and meeting with top scientists developing cancer cures with herbs, I’ve been focusing on wisely choosing foods for my family that heal, not harm. It’s tough some days, especially when we have boys’ activities that go through the late afternoon and evenings. The unhealthy, fast choices are so tempting. ...

The post Thai Fish Soup appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
Thai Fish Soup Recipe

Ever since our trip to City of Hope in Los Angeles and meeting with top scientists developing cancer cures with herbs, I’ve been focusing on wisely choosing foods for my family that heal, not harm.

Thai Fish Soup Recipe

It’s tough some days, especially when we have boys’ activities that go through the late afternoon and evenings. The unhealthy, fast choices are so tempting. Even at home, I’ll admit to popping frozen bean burritos in the microwave and adding a salad to “even it out” is sometimes an option.

Thai Fish Soup Recipe

My answer to this is to stock the freezer with frozen seafood. I buy shrimp already flash frozen (you can defrost exactly as many shrimp as you need). I also buy fresh fish and then cut them up into 1-inch chunks before freezing. A tip is to freeze the fish chunks in one layer – just flatten the bag and lay flat in the freezer. It makes it so much easier and faster to defrost.

The pantry always holds cans of coconut milk, cartons of broth and dried rice noodles – making this recipe very convenient to cook.

Thai Fish Soup Recipe

This recipe is from my new favorite cookbook, called The Medicinal Chef: Eat Your Way to Better Health, by Dale Pinnock. It’s a must-have book, we’ve already tried 5 recipes, all of them just fabulous. Not only are they tasty, but with the added big benefit of knowing that I’m doing good for my family’s health.

Screen Shot 2013-11-14 at 1.07.32 PM

Take a look at the video for a peek at how this book is structured and how Dale utilizes food to heal and promote healthy living.

9781454910497_TEMP_INT29-163_US.pdf

This Thai Fish Soup has all the flavor elements, typical of South East Asian cuisine.

Thai Fish Soup Recipe Video

 

Yum
Print

Thai Fish Soup Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 20 minutes
thai fish soup recipe featured-0180

Recipe adapted from The Medicinal Chef: Eat Your Way to Better Health by Dale Pinnock.

Make this healthy soup a perfect light meal by adding 1/2 pound of dried rice noodles (cook the rice noodles according to package directions).

You'll season to taste with the balance of fish sauce and lime juice. Adjust with more if needed, for more intense flavor.

If you cannot find lemongrass or kaffir lime leaves, just substitute with the peel of a lemon or lime. Use a vegetable peeler to get thin strips of peel (avoid the bitter white pith) and give each strip a good bruising or twist to release the oils)

The last time we made this soup, we added fresh tomato cut into wedges too - I highly recommend that you do the same!

Ingredients:

1 tablespoon cooking oil
1 clove garlic, finely minced
1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger
1/4 red onion, very sliced
1/2 red chili pepper, sliced (optional)
1 stalk lemongrass, bottom stalk only, bruised (substitute with peel of lemon or lime)
4 kaffir lime leaves, torn (substitute with peel of lemon or lime)
14-ounce can coconut milk
1 cup vegetable broth
juice of 1/2 lime
1 tablespoon fish sauce
6 ounces shrimp, peeled and deveined
8 ounces salmon, cut into 1-inch chunks
assorted vegetables, such as bok choy, spinach, snow peas, kale, tomatoes, bell pepper, etc.
1 tablespoon minced cilantro

Directions:

In a wok or soup pot over medium high heat, add cooking oil and swirl to coat. When hot, add in the garlic, ginger, red onion, chili pepper, lemongrass, kaffir and gently cook for about 2 minutes to release the aromas and flavors.

Pour in the coconut milk and broth and let simmer for 15 minutes. Remove the lemongrass, kaffir (or the lemon/lime peel if using) and discard. Season broth with fish sauce and lime juice to taste.

Add shrimp, salmon, vegetables and cilantro. Cook for 3-4 minutes or until the shrimp and salmon is cooked through.

 

 

Legend image reprinted with permission from The Medicinal Chef © 2013 Dale Pinnock, Sterling Publishing Inc. Co. Photography by Martin Poole.

 

The post Thai Fish Soup appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/29073-thai-fish-soup.html/feed 12
Roasted Tofu and Vegetables http://steamykitchen.com/28469-roasted-tofu-and-vegetables-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/28469-roasted-tofu-and-vegetables-recipe-video.html#comments Wed, 18 Sep 2013 20:08:23 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=28469 I had serious doubts the first time I heard of a recipe for Roasted Tofu. Tofu is made mostly from dried soybeans and water (plus a coagulant like seaweed salt). It’s a pretty serious wiggly jiggly thing with such high water content. Roasting tofu would just dehydrate the water and shrivel up the soy, or so I thought. Several years ...

The post Roasted Tofu and Vegetables appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
Roasted Tofu and Vegetables Recipe

I had serious doubts the first time I heard of a recipe for Roasted Tofu. Tofu is made mostly from dried soybeans and water (plus a coagulant like seaweed salt). It’s a pretty serious wiggly jiggly thing with such high water content. Roasting tofu would just dehydrate the water and shrivel up the soy, or so I thought. Several years ago, I tried it on a whim. With the expiration date on a box of tofu looming, I decided to cut the tofu into cubes and roast them in the oven with some olive oil.

Roasted Tofu and Vegetables Recipe

They turned out crispy, crunchy on the outside and creamy smooth-soft on the inside. What an amazing change in texture! Roasting the tofu changed the ingredient from being a “blank slate with no taste” to a flavor profile of its own – slightly nutty, slightly sea salty. The browned bits are shatteringly crisp from roasting in the olive oil. In this recipe, I used silken tofu from Mori-Nu.

Roasted Tofu and Vegetables Recipe

Even if you “overcook” the tofu, it’s still wonderful with a crunchier, chewier texture. I love it both ways.

Roasted Tofu and Vegetables Recipe

Okay, so not only do I have instructions and a video to show you how to roast tofu and vegetables, but I purposely made the batch bigger in the recipe for leftovers. The leftover tofu and vegetables create a velvety smooth, creamy soup for the following day!

Roasted Tofu and Vegetables Recipe

***

Roasted Tofu and Vegetables Recipe Video

***

Yum
Print

Roasted Tofu and Vegetables

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 40 minutes
roasted tofu and vegetables recipe-9781

You'll need 2 baking sheets for this recipe.

As you are preparing the vegetables for roasting, keep in mind that the vegetables have different cooking times. I like to keep each vegetable in its little spot on the baking sheet, so that I can easily use a spatula to remove any vegetables to cook sooner. Also, try cutting the vegetables according to how quickly they might cook. I'll cut the broccoli in larger florets (they cook faster) and the carrots & parsnips into smaller chunks (takes longer to cook) so that everything is ready at the 35 minute mark. Here's a size guide:
cauliflower - 1" florets
broccoli - 2" florets
carrots & parsnips - 3/4" chunks
brussels sprouts - halved
Feel free to add any additional vegetables to the mix. I also added some Japanese shishito peppers to mine!

Ingredients:

1 package Mori-nu tofu (extra firm or firm)
1/2 head broccoli
1/2 head cauliflower
3 large carrots
3 parsnips, cut in chunks
1/2 pound brussels sprouts
olive oil
sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

Directions:

Preheat oven to 400F.

Drain the tofu and pat very dry with a paper towel to absorb as much moisture as possible. Cut tofu into 1" cubes. Drizzle about 1 tablespoon olive oil on a baking sheet, carefully add in the tofu and shake the baking sheet a bit to coat the tofu. Go ahead and begin roasting the tofu while you work on the vegetables. If your oven does not fit 2 baking sheets side by side, place the tofu on the UPPER rack.

Cut the vegetables (see headnote) and in the other baking sheet, toss vegetables with about 2 tablespoons of olive oil so that they are all evenly coated. If your oven does not fit 2 baking sheets side by side, place the vegetables on the LOWER rack.

Set timer and roast for 30 minutes, then check the vegetables. The carrots & parsnip may need a little more time. Remove any vegetables that are cooked through. Take out the tofu pan and flip the tofu.

Increase oven temperature to 450F to finish off the tofu (and the carrots & parsnips if they need more cooking). Roast for an additional 10-15 minutes. The tofu should be nicely browned on both sides. Season with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper.

TO MAKE ROASTED VEGETABLE SOUP WITH LEFTOVERS:

prep time: 2 minutes
cook time: 5 minutes

Leftover roasted vegetables (reserve a few pieces for garnish)
1 quart prepared stock (vegetable, beef or chicken)
1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
good quality olive oil

Place leftover vegetables and tofu into a blender or food processor with just half of the stock. Blend or process until smooth. Add in the remaining stock, cayenne pepper, and blend until desired consistency. Heat soup in pot. Taste and season with sea salt, freshly ground black pepper and additional cayenne pepper, if needed. Ladle into bowls, finish with a drizzle of olive oil. Garnish with roasted vegetables.

 

The post Roasted Tofu and Vegetables appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/28469-roasted-tofu-and-vegetables-recipe-video.html/feed 28
Thai Hot and Sour Chicken Soup http://steamykitchen.com/28246-thai-hot-and-sour-chicken-soup-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/28246-thai-hot-and-sour-chicken-soup-recipe-video.html#comments Tue, 03 Sep 2013 16:09:11 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=28246 I’m overwhelmed by all the Internet love! You all have made last week so much more bearable, and the healing over the sudden loss of Buster easier. I think the one most affected by Buster’s passing was Coco. There were times when we came home, and Coco would greet us and then immediately looked behind us to see if Buster ...

The post Thai Hot and Sour Chicken Soup appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
Thai Hot and Sour Chicken Soup Recipe

I’m overwhelmed by all the Internet love! You all have made last week so much more bearable, and the healing over the sudden loss of Buster easier. I think the one most affected by Buster’s passing was Coco. There were times when we came home, and Coco would greet us and then immediately looked behind us to see if Buster was following.

Poor Coco – I know it will take time.

coco-5522

Last week called for comfort food and that means soup. We’ve been doing a lot of soups in the electric pressure cooker (just throw everything in a hit a few buttons) or the super-quick 20 minute on the stovetop soups. Basically, I like unfussy soups. What hit the spot last week was hot-spicy-tangy-savory Thai Hot and Sour Chicken Soup. This is the type of soup that Pavlov would love – the flavors are so distinct and powerful, that every time even just think about this soup, certain reactions that I cannot control begin happening. Mouth starts watering from the sharp lime, tip of tongue reacts to the slight sweetness of the fish sauce,  and the warming of the throat from the slow, lingering effects of the steeped chile slices.

Thai Hot and Sour Chicken Soup Recipe

While the soup contains ingredients that are difficult to find outside of an Asian market – don’t worry. I have a simple substitution! The citrusy flavor of the soup comes from lemongrass and kaffir lime leaf. If you can’t find one or both, the peel of the lime will work just fine.

Thai Hot and Sour Chicken Soup Recipe

51ZThkhoybL._SX260_

The ingredients are flexible – I’ve added shrimp, tofu and even spinach to the soup. Make it your own! This is a recipe that I’ve adapted from Katie Chin’s brand new Everyday Thai Cooking cookbook.

I was fortunate enough to receive an advanced copy (and loved the book so much that I wrote a little quote for the back cover!)

If you like Thai food as much as I do, you’ll love Katie’s Thai recipes that are designed for the home cook. Some of the recipes in the book:

  • Steamed Mussels in Lemongrass and Basil
  • Chang Mai Chicken Lettuce Cups
  • Chicken with Cashews and Thai Chilies
  • Grilled Halibut in Mango Coconut Sauce
  • Spicy Peanut Noodles
  • Thai Garlicky Eggplant
  • Pad Thai

Thai Hot and Sour Chicken Soup Recipe Video

 

***

 Thai Hot and Sour Chicken Soup Recipe

Yum
Print

Thai Hot and Sour Chicken Soup

Servings: 15 minutes Prep Time: 4 Cook Time: 5 minutes
Thai Hot and Sour Chicken Soup Recipe featured-9650

Kaffir lime leaves and fresh lemongrass may be difficult to fine outside of an Asian market. You can substitute with lime peel. In the recipe, you'll be using the juice of a fresh lime. Before cutting the lime, take a vegetable peeler and peel long strips of the lime skin. Use your fingers and squeeze/wring the peel a bit to release its flavors and fragrant oil. Adapted from Everyday Thai Cooking by Katie Chin. The more chile slices you use - and the longer you let it steep in the broth, the spicier it will be.'

Other ingredients you can add: spinach leaves, tofu, shrimp, zucchini slices, bean thread noodles or rice noodles, snow peas, bamboo shoots, etc.

Ingredients:

3 cups chicken stock
4 slices fresh ginger
4 kaffir lime leaves, torn (substitute with lime peel)
2 stalks lemongrass, cut into 2" lengths and bruised (substitute with lime peel)
1 fresh hot chile pepper, sliced (I used 2 large slices)
1/2 pound skinless, boneless chicken, cut into bite-sized pieces
1 cup cherry tomato (or 1 whole tomato, cut into wedges)
One 15-oz can straw mushrooms (or handful fresh sliced mushrooms)
3 tablespoons fish sauce
1 lime, squeezed (about 2 tablespoons lime juice)
fresh cilantro leaves

Directions:

In a pot, add the chicken stock, ginger, kaffir lime, lemongrass and chile slices. Bring to a simmer, cover, and then turn the heat to low. Let simmer for 10 minutes. Strain out and discard the spent herbs. (You can taste the soup at this point, if you would like it more spicy, keep the chile pepper slices in the stock and discard just before serving.)

Add in the chicken pieces, cherry tomato and mushrooms. Bring back to a simmer on medium heat and then cook for an additional 5 minutes.

Stir in the fish sauce, lime juice and cilantro leaves.

 

 

The post Thai Hot and Sour Chicken Soup appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/28246-thai-hot-and-sour-chicken-soup-recipe-video.html/feed 24
Chicken Satay with Peanut Noodles http://steamykitchen.com/27510-chicken-satay-with-peanut-noodles-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/27510-chicken-satay-with-peanut-noodles-recipe-video.html#comments Tue, 16 Jul 2013 16:28:31 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=27510 It was just last week that I confessed to wasting a lot of food in my line of work during the process of recipe creating and testing. It’s horrible, I know, but at least you’ll have the comfort of knowing that each recipe IS tested and not just made up randomly in my head AND that the food scraps either go ...

The post Chicken Satay with Peanut Noodles appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
Chicken Satay with Peanut Noodles and Cucumber Salad Recipe

It was just last week that I confessed to wasting a lot of food in my line of work during the process of recipe creating and testing. It’s horrible, I know, but at least you’ll have the comfort of knowing that each recipe IS tested and not just made up randomly in my head AND that the food scraps either go to the chickens or the worm compost. Believe me, the chickens and worms love it.

Chicken Satay with Peanut Noodles and Cucumber Salad Recipe

However, I do have a solution for cutting down on buying too much grocery – The Fresh 20 by my friend, Melissa Lanz. Basically, it goes like this: Every week, The Fresh 20 will send you a grocery list of 20 fresh ingredients (i.e. vegetables, meat, seafood, fruit, dairy). With those 20 fresh ingredients and your pantry staples, you can make 5 meals to feed your family.

Chicken Satay with Peanut Noodles and Cucumber Salad Recipe

Genius, right? This plan eliminates the guesswork of “What’s for dinner?” and “What groceries to buy?”

Screen Shot 2013-07-16 at 12.24.32 PM

While the service is a monthly fee, the cookbook, with 80 recipes (that’s 5 recipes each week for 16 weeks) is on sale at Amazon for less than $20. The week that I chose included 20 fresh ingredients that made this Chicken Satay with Peanut Noodles, along with:

Greek-Style Lamb Tacos with Cucumber Yogurt Sauce & Salad
Orange Jalapeño Shrimp with Broccoli and Brown Rice
Guacamole Tostadas with Fried Eggs
Lamb Penne with Simple Green Salad

There are options for Vegetarians and Gluten Free diets too. Easy peasy.

Chicken Satay with Peanut Noodles Recipe Video

***

Yum
Print

Chicken Satay with Peanut Noodles Recipe

Servings: Prep Time: Cook Time:
chicken-satay-with-peanut-noodles-and-cucumber-salad-featured-9397

Recipe adapted from The Fresh 20 Cookbook by Melissa Lanz.

Ingredients:

FOR THE CHICKEN SATAY
1 tablespoon reduced-sodium soy sauce
2 teaspoons cooking oil
2 garlic cloves, finely minced
1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger
1 teaspoon ground cumin
freshly ground black pepper
2 boneless skinless chicken breasts, cut evenly into bite-sized pieces
wooden skewers, soaked in cold water for at least 10 minutesFOR THE PEANUT NOODLES
1 teaspoon cooking oil
1 garlic cloves, finely minced
1 teaspoon finely minced red chile pepper
1/2 lime, juiced
2 tablespoons honey
1/4 cup peanut butter
2/3 cup hot water
2 tablespoons reduced-sodium soy sauce
8 ounces spaghetti, cookedFOR THE CUCUMBER SALAD
1 medium cucumber, very thinly sliced
1 teaspoon white wine vinegar or rice vinegar
1 tablespoon honey
1/2 teaspoon finely minced red chile pepper

Directions:

For the chicken satay: In a non-aluminum container, combine all ingredients together. Marinate in the refrigerator for 10 minutes or up to 24 hours. Heat the grill to medium-high. Skewer the chicken pieces on the soaked skewers and discard the marinade. Grill the chicken for 3-4 minutes per side, until cooked through. Serve the chicken warm with the peanut noodles.

For the peanut noodles: In a small saucepan over low heat, combine the oil, garlic and peppers and saute for 1-2 minutes or until the garlic becomes fragrant. Add the lime juice, honey, peanut butter, hot water and soy sauce and simmer for 3-5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Toss the pasta with half the peanut sauce. Serve the remaining sauce for dipping the chicken satay.

For the cucumber salad: In a small bowl, toss the cucumber slices, vinegar, honey and peppers. Serve alongside the chicken satay and peanut noodles.

 

Chicken Satay with Peanut Noodles and Cucumber Salad Recipe

Chicken Satay with Peanut Noodles and Cucumber Salad Recipe

 

The post Chicken Satay with Peanut Noodles appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/27510-chicken-satay-with-peanut-noodles-recipe-video.html/feed 39