Steamy Kitchen Recipes | RSS Feed http://steamykitchen.com Steamy Kitchen Food Blog: fast recipes, simple recipes, with fresh ingredients to create delicious meals. Thu, 30 Apr 2015 14:38:03 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.1 Chinese Steamed Buns http://steamykitchen.com/39943-chinese-steamed-buns-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/39943-chinese-steamed-buns-recipe.html#comments Tue, 21 Apr 2015 17:22:46 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=39943 This Chinese Steamed Buns Recipe features: Simple dough that can be used for many different Chinese steamed buns Step by step photos to show you exactly how to make the buns How to prevent the buns from splitting apart too soon Tips to get your buns smooth, white and puffy A few weeks ago, my parents came to visit from the ...

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chinese steamed buns recipe roasted duck-4194

This Chinese Steamed Buns Recipe features:

  • Simple dough that can be used for many different Chinese steamed buns
  • Step by step photos to show you exactly how to make the buns
  • How to prevent the buns from splitting apart too soon
  • Tips to get your buns smooth, white and puffy

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A few weeks ago, my parents came to visit from the lovely state of Nevada. Even though their stay is just for a week, we are never surprised to see that they’ve brought enough luggage to stay a month.

That’s because the luggage are all packed with goodies for us and the kids! Food goodies! Seaweed crackers, special Chinese sausage, lap cheong, that you can only buy from Canada (the brand is called Happy Meat), salted kumquat for sore throat, dried anchovies with peanuts.

Mom also used a cooler in her carry on to bring fresh roasted duck and crispy roasted pork from a famous restaurant near her home. That’s the dedication of a loving Mom and true food lover!

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Chinese Roast Duck certainly begs for handmade, freshly steamed buns. I’ve shared before our little shortcut secret using store-bought sourdough biscuit dough sold in cans, or a pre-mixed flour found in Asian supermarkets. This time, Mom and I made them from scratch, experimenting with a couple of different recipes and declaring this recipe the winner.

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How to make Chinese Steamed Bun Recipe 

The first step is to make the dough, mixing in warm water, yeast, sugar and cooking oil. Then flour, baking powder, salt. In the photo below, the dough was sticking to the side of the bowl, we added another tablespoon of flour.

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Let your food processor do the work for you, mixing with the paddle first, then switching to the dough hook to knead — or turn out on your counter to knead by hand, which is what my Mom prefers to do.

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Knead until you get a smooth, supple dough.

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You can return this dough back in the same mixer bowl. Cover with plastic wrap or a towel and let it rise in a warm spot for 1-2 hours, until it just about doubles in size.

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After the rise, gently turn out the dough back on your counter that you’ve lightly dusted with flour. Divide the dough into half, roll out each half into a long log. Cover one log with plastic wrap so that it doesn’t dry out. Further divide the log into 6-7 pieces, depending on how big you want your buns.

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Take one piece of dough into your hand.

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Fold the edge of the dough into the center and press down. Do this all the way around. This motion creates a smooth ball and increases the surface tension to help shape the ball.

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See how all the edges of the dough have come into the center? Pinch that center to keep all the edges together.

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Turn the ball over. Now you should have a perfectly smooth, round piece that is nice and taut with surface tension.

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Use your palm to flatten that ball out.

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Use a rolling pin to roll back and forth to create an oval.

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Like this:

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Brush the surface with cooking oil.

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Fold over one edge.

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To create the bun. The cooking oil helps keep that seam, so that when you are ready to eat, you can open the bun. Without the cooking oil, the dough would stick together and be difficult to open the bun.

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However, if you steam the bun after this step, the bun will open up in the steamer. That’s not what you want. You want the bun to stay closed during cooking.

So, what you need to do is roll one more time on top, not too hard, just a little bit of pressure is all that’s needed.

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Place bun on a small square of parchment paper.

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Fill your steamer, but give the buns enough room to expand during cooking without touching. We use 10″ bamboo steamer at our house (I suggest no smaller than 10″). My Mom loves her multi purpose, stainless steel double boiler/steamer set.

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I used to just set my bamboo steamer directly into my wok, but it would sit so low that I would constantly run out of water during steaming. This is a big problem – when you run out of water during steaming, the food will begin to taste burnt and metallic. No water in the wok means no steam…instead, smoke.

I began using Helen Chen’s Steaming Ring set on top of any of my large pots. The Steaming Ring is $9.99 and allows you to transform any of your stockpots or dutch ovens to work with a bamboo steamer. It’s definitely worth every penny!

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Place the ring on top of the pan. Fill pan with about an inch of water.

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Set your bamboo steamer on top. It works perfectly with a 10″ bamboo steamer.

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Next steps:

1. Do not turn on the heat yet. Let the buns rest and rise for 10 minutes, just as-is.

2. After 10 minutes, turn on the heat to high.

3. When you begin seeing steam rise from the top of the bamboo steamer, reduce heat to medium-high and set your timer for 5 minutes.

4. After 5 minutes, turn off heat. Do not open steamer – let the buns rest for 1 minute.

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Secret Tips That Make a Big Difference

Here’s the secret to white, puffy buns that don’t collapse or fall:

I’ve made these buns so many times, and each time, the buns would turn out beautiful and perfect, but then would deflate or flatten after cooling. They also would take on a little yellowish tinge and be a bit chewy.

The secret that I’ve learned from my Mom:

The bamboo steamer needs to be in place before the heat is turned on. This allows the buns to heat up and steam gently and slowly, as the water begins to boil. My old method was to wait for the water to boil before placing the bamboo steamer, which caused the buns to cook too quickly, which resulted in a chewier bun.

Remember, steamed buns should be delicate and light — and so the cooking method needs to be gentle as well.

Turning off the heat (step 4 above) but NOT opening the steamer for 1 minute allows the buns to gradually come down in temperature and also lets the buns sit in gentle steam to finish the cooking process. This helps prevent collapsing buns — and keeps the buns nice and white.

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Take a look at this bun – nice and fluffy. The seam is distinct and easy to open, but stays closed during cooking, which is what you want.

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I hope you have a chance to make these Chinese Steamed Buns, the next time you get a Chinese Roasted Duck on your hands (maybe you are lucky enough to have Mom who will bring you one?) Or you can make your own Chinese Roasted Duck – here’s my easy recipe.

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To Accompany the Chinese Roast Duck

  • Julienned cucumber
  • Thin slivers of green onion (I soak in ice cold water to get them super crispy/crunchy and curly)
  • Hoisin sauce (store-bought)

Chinese Roasted Duck Recipe (with pre-mixed Asian dough for steamed buns)

Chinese Pork Belly with Steamed Buns (with cheater buns recipe from store-bought sourdough biscuit dough in can)

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Chinese Steamed Buns Recipe

Servings: 12-14 buns Prep Time: 30 minutes + 1 hour resting Cook Time: 18 minutes
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Equipment: Steaming basket, pastry brush, parchment paper

Ingredients:

1 cup warm water
1 1/2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 tablespoon cooking oil (canola or vegetable), plus more for brushing
3 tablespoons sugar
3 cups all-purpose flour + more for dusting
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
14 squares parchment paper (4"x4")

Directions:

1. In a mixer bowl, add the warm water, oil, yeast and sugar. Let sit for 1 minute, until the yeast begins to bubble a bit. Next, add in the flour, baking powder and salt, in that order. With the paddle attachment, mix on low for 2 minutes. Add more flour, a tablespoon at a time, if the dough sticks to the sides of the bowl. Change to a dough hook, and on speed 2, knead for 4 minutes, until dough is smooth, supple and clear the sides of the bowl. If the dough sticks to the side of the bowl, add more flour, a tablespoon at a time.

2. Dust your counter with a little flour and turn out your dough. I like to hand knead it a few times, so that I can get a feel for the dough. Shape the dough into a smooth ball. Return the dough ball to the mixing bowl, cover with a clean towel and let rise in a warm, dry spot for 1-2 hours, until it nearly doubles in size.

3. Turn out your dough onto a lightly floured surface. Cut the dough in half. Gently roll each half into a log shape. Cut each log into 6 or 7 little balls. We'll work with one ball at a time, so keep the rest covered with plastic wrap so that they don't dry out. Form each ball by bringing in the sides (see photos above) and pinching the center. Turn ball over to get a nice, taut ball. Roll the dough ball out to a long, oval shape about 6"x3". Brush the top with a little cooking oil. Fold over one side of the oval. Use your rolling pin to gently roll and press one last time. Place bun on a parchment paper square, place into the bamboo steamer and cover with lid to prevent drying. Repeat with the remaining dough balls.

4. Fill your pot or wok with 2" of water. Place the steamer ring (if you have one) bamboo baskets on top. Do not turn on the heat yet. Let rest for 10 minutes. Then, turn on the heat to high. When you begin to see steam coming up from the top of the steamer, reduce heat to medium-high. Let steam for 5 minutes. Turn off the heat, without opening the steamer. Let rest for 1 minute. Open steamer and gently lift the steamer baskets off one another to let the buns cool.

TIP: If you are not eating right away, you can keep the buns in the bamboo steamer, on top of the pot of water. Make sure there is plenty of water in the pot. Turn heat to low, so that you have a gentle mist of steam coming up to keep the buns moist and warm. Make sure you don't run out of water in the pot!

Other recipes for Chinese Steamed Buns

Chinese Mantou Buns (Food 52)

Char Siu Bao (Woks of Life)

Chinese Fold Over Buns (Thirsty for Tea)

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Chinese Stir Fried Pea Shoots http://steamykitchen.com/39585-chinese-stir-fried-pea-shoots.html http://steamykitchen.com/39585-chinese-stir-fried-pea-shoots.html#comments Fri, 20 Feb 2015 17:18:09 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=39585 What you’ll learn in this Pea Shoots Recipe: 15 minute recipe with step by step photos how to stir fry pea shoots, Chinese style How to infuse the garlic flavor into the cooking oil How to grow your own healthy pea shoots! What are Pea Shoots? Pea shoots are the baby plants of peas! We grow them like our microgreens, which ...

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What you’ll learn in this Pea Shoots Recipe:

  • 15 minute recipe with step by step photos how to stir fry pea shoots, Chinese style
  • How to infuse the garlic flavor into the cooking oil
  • How to grow your own healthy pea shoots!

What are Pea Shoots?

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Pea shoots are the baby plants of peas! We grow them like our microgreens, which are so very easy to grow. Here is a post, with step by step photos on how you can grow your own pea shoots at home, even on your windowsill or on your sunny patio.

It only takes 2 weeks from seed to lush pea shoots, ready for stir fry.

Why do we grow our own microgreens and sprouts and shoots? 

  • It’s very easy to grow – no special equipment required.
  • Highly nutritious – microgreens are up to 48x higher in nutrition than its full-grown counterpart. A little sprinkle of microgreens on my salad massive gives a nutritional boost to my meal.
  • I don’t trust store-bought, farm-grown sprouts, shoots or greens. There is too much risk for contamination, especially E. Coli and Salmonella. Small batch, controlled setting is safer.

Learn how to grow pea shoots with our step by step photos.

How to stir fry pea shoots

Pea shoots are delicate, should just be lightly cooked and barely seasoned. The shoots are sweet, tender and light – and should be treated as such!

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The main seasoning is garlicky oil. I add in neutral flavored cooking oil (like canola) and garlic to a cold wok or large pan. Then, turn on the heat to medium-low, and let the garlic and oil heat together slowly. Take your time – this is when the garlicky flavor infuses the oil. Just take care to control your heat and not let the garlic burn or brown too much. When you start smelling that garlic – it is time to add the pea shoots.

Now it’s time to crank up the heat. Turn heat to high.

You’ll have to add the pea shoots in batches – since the tendrils are so light, it looks like a lot of pea shoots, but the shoots will cook down.
As you add the pea shoots, use your tongs to flip, turn, stir all that garlicky oil all over the shoots! Try to get as much garlic in the middle, on top of all of the pea shoots (garlic at bottom of hot wok may burn.) Keep adding more of the pea shoots as the ones on the bottom begin wilting.

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Season with salt and sugar.

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See how the pea shoots are just barely cooked? Everything has wilted down, but the shoots are still a little crunchy and bright green. It’s perfect! Turn off heat, add in the sesame oil and cooking wine (optional.)

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Stir. Done.

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There’s not much more to it than that!

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Chinese Stir Fried Pea Shoots Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 5 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes
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The key to this dish is not to let the pea shoots overcook. Once the shoots begin to wilt, it is almost done! The beauty of this dish is the limited ingredients - let the delicate pea shoots flavor be the star.

Ingredients:

1 pound pea shoots
2 garlic cloves, finely minced
1/4 teaspoon sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon Chinese rice wine (or dry sherry) - optional
1/2 teaspoon roasted sesame oil
neutral flavored cooking oil (like canola or vegetable oil)

Directions:

1. In a wok or large saute pan, add in the garlic. Pour in about 1 1/2 tablespoons of the cooking oil. Turn heat to medium-low and let the garlic heat up slowly, infusing its flavor and fragrance into the cooking oil. Take care not to let the garlic burn - control the heat so that the oil is slightly shimmering and aromatic.

2. Turn the heat to high. Add in the pea shoots, you'll probably have to add them in a couple of batches. Quickly, use your tongs to turn over the pea shoots around in the fragrant oil. Get that garlicky oil all over the shoots!

3. Add in the sugar and the salt. Again, use your tongs to flip, stir, turn the pea shoots. Within a minute or so, the shoots will begin wilting and cooking. Once the shoots begin wilting, the dish is almost done. Don't overcook the delicate shoots. Turn off the heat, pour in the cooking wine and the sesame oil. Toss and serve.

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Slow Cooker Bone Broth – Asian Style http://steamykitchen.com/39418-slow-cooker-bone-broth-asian-style.html http://steamykitchen.com/39418-slow-cooker-bone-broth-asian-style.html#comments Wed, 28 Jan 2015 22:23:46 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=39418 In Asian culture, soups and broths are part of everyday meals. A traditional Japanese breakfast would include a bowl of Miso Soup to warm the body. Chinese restaurants feature a long list of house soups, from an appetite stimulating Hot and Sour Soup to even a light broth served after dinner to cleanse the palate and complete the meal. Growing up, Mom ...

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Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian

In Asian culture, soups and broths are part of everyday meals. A traditional Japanese breakfast would include a bowl of Miso Soup to warm the body. Chinese restaurants feature a long list of house soups, from an appetite stimulating Hot and Sour Soup to even a light broth served after dinner to cleanse the palate and complete the meal.

Growing up, Mom always had soup simmering on the stove. Every night, without doubt, there was a Chinese style soup on the table. I remember saving the soup for last, as a ritual to conclude a delightful home-cooked meal.

I’ve tried to emulate Mom, but we’ve got such an active lifestyle that a pot simmering for hours on the stove isn’t feasible. Instead, we use a large 6-quart slow cooker to make an Asian-style bone broth that will last the entire week for our family.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian

What is bone broth?

Bone broth is often gently simmered for 24 hours (or more!) to extract as much nutrients from the bones of an animal, whether it be fish, chicken, pork or beef. The long cooking time breaks down bone to release vitamins, collagen and calcium phosphate — nutrients that are good for us.

Sure, it’s a trendy thing right now, with restaurants offering drive-through bone broth served in a coffee cup for $9, cookbooks dedicated to the art of bone broths (I highly recommend The Nourished Kitchen Cookbook which features bone broth) and even an entire line of bone broth concentrates that you can buy.

What’s the difference between broth, bone broth and soups?

Generally, soups are made with meats, bones, vegetables, herbs, added grains, sometimes thickened with starches – and simmered for a couple of hours.

Broths are mostly made from meats or vegetables and left clear without very much else added. Broths are also simmered for a couple of hours, resulting in a light colored, light flavored broth.

Bone broths are cooked for a day or even longer. Your favorite Vietnamese restaurant most likely simmer their pho broth overnight, which is why the broth is so rich and flavorful.

The long cooking time extracts so many nutrients and flavor! How do you know when you’ve extracted maximum nutrients and flavor? When the bones literally disintegrate just by giving a little pressure with your fingers.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe Asian Style

Like Nourished Kitchen, we make our bone broth in the slow cooker, and it will last us all week long. The process starts on Sunday night, and the slow cooker will do its magic all night long.

In the morning, we’ll enjoy bone broth as part of our breakfast. Every day, I’ll top off the pot with more water and keep the slow cooker humming along.

Each day, I’ll add a vegetable, switch out for fresh herbs, throw in a couple of umami-boosting Asian ingredients.

As the days progress, the bone broth develops new flavor, gets richer, smoother, fuller. We get the benefit of the valuable nutrition that’s normally locked inside the bones.

Some days, we’ll top off the bone broth with chopped herbs, or shredded seaweed just before serving. Or a spoonful of leftover rice in the bone broth is great too.

Secrets to Clear, Clean Bone Broth

Key to bone broth – be gentle. The cooking process is slow and gentle, coaxing out flavor with very little bubbles (no violent boiling!)

Don’t stir. Especially after the first 2 days. The bones will be come very soft and will crumble if you stir the pot too vigorously, resulting in a gritty broth.

Use cheesecloth or herb/tea bags to contain any herbs, aromatics or spices that are very small (see below.) This avoids having you dig around, stir around to fish these items out.

Use a very fine mesh skimmer to skim the surface of the broth every day, especially during the first 6-8 hours. The “scum” will cloud your broth during these first few hours of cooking. What’s the scum made out of? Proteins, fats, microscopic bone fragments (especially if the bones were cut), oils, impurities. Get rid of it!

Ready for the next batch? Jumpstart your next batch with a little of the last batch of concentrated “liquid gold!” We call this “Infinite Bone Broth.” Restaurants do the same with broths, sauces and sourdough bread too. Seed the next batch with rich flavor you’ve already built.

Bone Broth, Chinese Style

The “holy trinity” of Chinese cooking is garlic, ginger and green onion.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Garlic, Ginger & Green Onion

I’m not a fan of fishing out little pieces of ingredients, so I try to cut herbs so that they are easy to find and spoon out. The garlic head is cut in half. Sometimes, the cloves will separate (like above) but I’ll use a bag made for for DIY teabags or as an herb pouch (100 bags for $5.67)

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian DIY Herb Pouch

Fill it up with the garlic cloves that are loose. Fold the top over and the cloves or anything you put inside will stay put. You can also make your own with cheesecloth. I like to use these teabags for other spices too, like whole peppercorns or star anise – anything that would be hard to find and fish out.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Fill Herb Pouch with loose garlic cloves

The green onions are tied with twine, again for easy removal. The ginger is a big hunk, just sliced in half.  I reserve the other half of the ginger + the garlic cloves in the bag + more green onion  – to add to the bone broth a couple of days later (I’ll discard the spent herbs/aromatics, replace with fresh.)

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Tie green onions with twine and slice ginger in half

This week, I’m making bone broth with spareribs (it was on sale). Pork broth is very popular in Chinese cuisine. It’s just as popular as chicken broth is here in the U.S. Most of the Chinese soups that I make start with pork – for a lighter, more neutral flavor than beef or chicken.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Spareribs for bone broth

Some people like to cut off the excess fat, but I just leave it on. I’ll skim out the fats and oils later with a skimmer.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Everything goes into the slow cooker

Everything goes into the slow cooker, set it on low and let it go. If you plan on making slow cooker bone broth often, I suggest getting the largest slow cooker you can find. This one is a Cuisinart 6 1/2 Quart Slow Cooker ($99) that works really well. It’s never failed us.

After a few hours, I’ll skim the scuzz with a very fine mesh skimmer. This skimmer mesh is so fine that it catches all particles AND surface oils and fats.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian skim skuzz with very fine mesh skimmer

Look how rich this bone broth is the next day! Season with salt, or fish sauce. Season to taste.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian

I’ll discard the spent green onion, garlic and ginger, and add fresh to replace. This time, I’m adding garlic chives and cilantro from the garden – again, tied  up to make it easier to remove.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian discard spent herbs and add garlic chives and cilantro

Top it off with fresh water. The slow cooker stays on all week, on low.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian top off with fresh water

Chinese Bone Broth

After a couple of days, I might throw in some Chinese dried ingredients for a massive flavor and umami-boost:

Dried scallops, dried shrimp or dried black mushrooms (shitake).

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian dried scallops, dried shrimp and black mushrooms

You can also add in sliced daikon and carrots for one of my very favorite home-style soups! Every trip back to my Mom’s house, I request her Daikon Carrot soup.

If you like cilantro, you can also add in a bunch of cilantro stems, which have just as much flavor as the leaves. I often use the stems for soups.

Japanese Bone Broth

If you’d like Japanese flavor for a bone broth, add a small 6-inch piece of dried kombu and a handful of bonito flakes (place these in the tea bag.) By the way, kombu can be used over, and over again. Just rinse, wipe, and let dry completely before storing for next use.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian dried kombu and bonito flakes

My favorite breakfast? Bone broth with a spoonful of leftover rice or grains, top with roasted seaweed. This type of seaweed is called Kizame Nori – or sliced, roasted seaweed.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian with a spoonful of leftover rice or grains and roasted seaweed

By the way, have you ever tried Ochazuke?

Also, if you’d like to fortify the Japanese bone broth with miso paste – do this separately. Miso paste cooked at high heat or for too long will break apart and become gritty. Ladle some bone broth into a separate saucepan. Bring to simmer if you need to, but if it’s coming straight from the slow cooker, there’s no need to heat it up. Turn off heat. Whisk just a couple tablespoons of miso paste into the soup. Be careful of how much miso you add, especially if you’ve already added salt to the bone broth. I prefer shiro miso (white miso paste) as it’s lighter and less salty than the others. Miso paste is always added off heat.

Vietnamese Bone Broth

Add Vietnamese pho spices to a mesh bag or the tea bag (Here’s a recipe for Slow Cooker Vietnamese Pho.)

If you visit an Asian market, you can often find all these spices packaged, ready to go. Look for “Pho Spice Pack.” Instead of seasoning the broth with salt, season the bone broth with fish sauce. Start with 1 tablespoon, taste, and then add 1 teaspoon at a time until perfect.

What’s my favorite fish sauce? Right there in the sidebar is a free “Asian Masters of Flavor” ebook I wrote that includes my favorite brand! There’s a big difference between good quality fish sauce and crap, chemical-laden fish sauce.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Vietnamese Bone Broth Spices

More notes

If you’re concerned with the cost of running a slow cooker throughout the week, it costs pennies per day!

We grow all of our own herbs and most of our own vegetables in our aquaponics garden and greenhouse. Here’s a tip for green onion.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Our aquaphonics garden

You can even start with store-bought green onion. Make sure you buy ones that have nice, wet, strong roots (no dry or wilted!) Just stick’em in soil. The green onions will continue to grow their roots and sprout more leaves. I just snip off what I need (leafy part only) and new ones will continue to grow throughout the entire growing season!

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian grow your own green onion

Recommended Cooking Equipment

More recipes to explore

Vietnamese Pho Pressure Cooker – Paleo Friendly  (Steam Kitchen)

Mom’s Chinese Chicken Soup  (Steam Kitchen)

Vegetable Thai Curry Noodle Soup  (Steam Kitchen)

Tofu and Mushroom Miso Soup  (Steam Kitchen)

Chinese Daikon and Carrot Soup  (Steam Kitchen)

15 Minute Udon Miso Noodle Soup  (Steam Kitchen)

Thai Fish Soup  (Steam Kitchen)

Soba Noodles in Shiitake-Shoyu Broth with Spring Vegetables (Serious Eats)

Spicy Korean Seafood Soup (Serious Eats)

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Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Style

Servings: Prep Time: 5 minutes Cook Time:
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I prefer using pork or chicken for Chinese or Japanese style bone broth. If you'd like to use beef bones (great for Vietnamese bone broth), I suggest roasting the bones (350F for 30 minutes) first before adding them to your slow cooker. Not necessary, but it will give a richer bone broth. I don't normally roast pork or chicken bones - I just add them to the pot. Grassfed, organic is best.

PORK: spareribs, neck, hock, really anything.


CHICKEN: whole, raw chicken, or just the frame of a rotisserie chicken you've already enjoyed. You can also use chicken wings or chicken feet. Turkey works great too.


BEEF: oxtail, knuckle, neck, short ribs. I also use beef bone marrow as well - but after roasting, I"ll spoon out the marrow, spread it on bread and sprinkle with sea salt for a little treat. Basically, too much marrow in the bone broth will make the broth greasy tasting. Short ribs have amazing flavor - I like to add them to any beef bone broth that I make.


FISH: Fish bones and head. I like to do this traditional Chinese style with garlic, lots of ginger and green onion. Remove the fish skin and the thin, silvery lining in the gut area (very fishy taste). If the fish is raw, I prefer to roast the fish bones (350F for 20 minutes) - as this tames the fishiness smell and flavor of the bone broth. Most fish will work except for oily fish like mackerel.

Ingredients:

4 pounds spareribs
1 head garlic, halved
big knob of fresh ginger (about the size of 2 fingers), halved
3-4 stalks green onions, cut in half

Directions:

1. Reserve half of the garlic, ginger and green onion for later in the week. Tie the green onion bundles with twine.

2. In a slow-cooker, add green onion, garlic and ginger. Fill slow cooker with water, up to 1-inch below rim. Set to cook on high heat at first. When the bone broth comes to a simmer after an hour or so, you'll see lots of scum. Skim and discard. Set slow cooker on low and let the bone broth cook for at least 6 hours.

3. Use a skimmer to skim the surface of any particles and oil. Season with salt, to taste.

4. After drinking some of the bone broth, top off the slow cooker with additional fresh water. You can also discard the spent herbs and add the reserved garlic, onion and green onion. Continue to add additional vegetables, aromatics, dried ingredients (see post above for details) as you wish. Keep the setting on low.

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Chinese Soup Dumplings Recipe (with Pork & Crab) http://steamykitchen.com/38446-chinese-soup-dumplings-recipe-pork-crab.html http://steamykitchen.com/38446-chinese-soup-dumplings-recipe-pork-crab.html#comments Tue, 18 Nov 2014 13:58:01 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=38446 Chinese Soup Dumplings, or Xiaolongbao is a MUST TRY at least once! It’s a long recipe, the dumpling skin is hand made and the filling requires several hours of chilling. But it’s so worth it! These are the real deal. This is an authentic Xiaolongbao recipe from Top Chef star Lee Anne Wong from her new book, Dumplings All Day ...

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Chinese Soup Dumplings Recipe - Xiaolongbao | steamyktichen.com

Chinese Soup Dumplings, or Xiaolongbao is a MUST TRY at least once! It’s a long recipe, the dumpling skin is hand made and the filling requires several hours of chilling. But it’s so worth it! These are the real deal. This is an authentic Xiaolongbao recipe from Top Chef star Lee Anne Wong from her new book, Dumplings All Day Wong.

Have you ever tried Xiao Long Bao? These are Chinese Soup Dumplings, steamed dumplings that contain a rich broth trapped inside the parcel of the folded dumpling. This dish should be on your must-try foods!

So, how does the liquid, or soup, get inside the dumpling? It’s gelatin, baby. A concentrated, rich soup made with pork belly and ham is set with gelatin, so that the liquid becomes a solid. Then it is mixed with ground pork, crab and shrimp, along with green onions and ginger.

chinese-soup-dumplings-recipe-

A dough is hand-made, rolled out and filled.

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Then pleated and folded.

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To make little dumplings.

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Once the dumplings are steamed, the soup turns back into liquid. How do you eat such a dumpling? Very carefully! Place a dumpling on a large spoon, preferably a Chinese soup spoon, which is deep enough to capture all of the soup. Take a little nibble, let some of the steam escape (so that you don’t burn your mouth), and also let some of the soup spill out into the spoon. Take small bites of the dumpling, eating and sipping at the same time.


This recipe is from Lee Anne Wong, Top Chef finalist from the very first season. I remember watching Lee Anne, cheering her on from my couch, “Go Asian sister, go!”

After watching Lee Anne, I had serious thoughts about going to culinary school, even filling out the application forms at a brand new culinary center institute up near my home. But instead of spending $60,000 a year in culinary school fees, I started Steamy Kitchen instead.

These days, I’m getting asked by culinary schools to come TEACH their students! I think I made a wise decision.

But, Lee Anne Wong inspired me to move in the right direction – a career in food and cooking. 

 lee-anne-wong-photo

 

Dumplings All Day Wong


Chinese-soup-dumplings-recipe


The recipe for Chinese Soup Dumplings is from Lee Anne’s new book, Dumplings All Day Wong. Included in the book are dozens of Lee Anne’s favorite Asian dumplings, with step-by-step photos (like the ones above.)

Here’s a description:

Folds such as Potstickers, Gyozas, Shumai, Har Gow, Wontons and more, along with countless fillings and different cooking methods such as steaming, pan-frying, baking or deep-frying, allow you to create awe-inspiring dumplings in innumerable ways. With friends and family begging to come over and try a new dumpling recipe from the master again and again, this book will be a go-to in your kitchen for years to come. 

Xiaolongbao

My very first xiaolongbao was at the original Joe’s Shanghai, which resides on Pell Street in New York City’s Chinatown. I had read all about their famously plump and juicy steamed delights in many various local food publications, so I was compelled to try them for myself. Forewarned by many who had devoured before me, I knew to be careful with the first bite, as these dumplings were notorious for the hot broth inside that could easily burn and injure. Whatever your plan of attack is, these will surely become a favorite, as they are mine. No kidding, the sky could be falling, but if I have a dim sum steamer full of xiaolongbao, I’ll be fine. These dumplings take a whole day or two to make, so get the soup stock going first. By sundown, you’ll have fresh soup dumplings in the comfort of your own home—what I consider to be one of the true secret keys to happiness. -Lee Anne Wong

Recommended Equipment




These bamboo steamers are inexpensive and you can set them on top of your wok.


If you don’t have a wok, use this steamer ring! I own one of these and set this on top of a large pot filled with water. Then I set the bamboo steamer stacks on TOP of the ring.
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Chinese Soup Dumplings Recipe (Pork & Crab)

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 2 hours + 3 hours chilling gelatin Cook Time: 8 minutes
chinese-soup-dumplings-recipe--5

Recipe from Dumplings All Day Wong by Lee Anne Wong. Reprinted with Permission. A note on chicken feet: Chicken feet happen to be great for making stock because of the natural gelatin and collagen they contain, and the price is usually pretty low if you can find fresh or frozen chicken feet. Wings are my other option as I find the meat can be pulled from the bones later on and used for a variety of recipes, and the meat adds great flavor to the stock.


Makes 40 dumplings.

Ingredients:

SOUP GELATIN
2 tablespoons (30 ml) Shaoxing rice wine, chilled
1 tablespoon (15 ml) soy sauce
1 tablespoon powdered gelatin or agar agar
2 pounds (900 g) chicken wings and/or feet*
8 ounces (225 g) pork belly, with skin
4 ounces (115 g) Chinese ham or bacon
8 cups (2 quarts) water
3 whole green onions, minced
1-inch (2.5 cm) piece ginger, thinly sliced
3 cloves garlic, lightly crushed


FILLING
8 ounces (225 g) ground pork
4 ounces (115 g) crabmeat, cleaned and picked through, or shrimp, peeled, deveined, minced
1/2 cup (25 g) minced scallion, white and green parts
2 tablespoons (30 ml) soy sauce
1 tablespoon (15 ml) Shaoxing rice wine
1/2 tablespoon (7.5 ml) sesame oil
2 teaspoon (10 g) sugar
1 teaspoon (5 g) salt
1 teaspoon (5 g) finely grated ginger
1/4 teaspoon ground white pepper


SOUP DUMPLING DOUGH
2 cups (200 g) packed all-purpose flour
1 cup (235 ml) boiling water
1 tablespoons (15 ml) sesame oil

DIPPING SAUCE
2-inch piece ginger, peeled
1/4 cup (60ml) red vinegar (or Chinese black vinegar)

Directions:

To make the gelatin:
In a small bowl, combine the wine and the soy sauce and refrigerate. We'll use this later with the gelatin.

Rinse the chicken and pork under cold water, then pat dry with paper towels. Using a large knife or cleaver, chop the chicken wings and feet in half to expose the bone. Dice the pork belly and ham into large chunks. Combine with the water, scallion, ginger and garlic in a large stockpot. Bring the water to a boil and then reduce to a rolling simmer. Skim the foam and impurities that rise to the surface of the stock for a clearer broth. Cook the broth, uncovered, for 2½ hours. Strain the stock through a fine-mesh sieve or colander lined with a lint-free towel into a clean pot. Discard the solids (or pull the braised meat from the wing bones and chop and use for dumpling filling, stir-fry, salad, stew or sandwiches). Place the strained broth back on the burner.

To the chilled wine/soy sauce mixture, stir in the gelatin powder. Pour this mixture into a shallow baking dish. Pour the hot soup into the baking dish and use a fork to stir and whisk. Allow this mixture to cool enough to stop steaming, then cover and place in your refrigerator. Chill the stock for about 2 hours, until it is completely cold and set, like Jell-O. Using a fork, scrape up the gelatin and gently mash it to break it up into small pieces. You can also place in freezer to speed up chilling.


To make the filling:
Combine the ingredients in a bowl. Mix well. Stir in the soup gelatin until it is well distributed. Cover and refrigerate the filling until ready to use.



To make the dough:
Place the flour in a bowl and make a well in the center. Pour the boiling water and sesame oil into the center of the well and stir with a fork or pair of chopsticks until the dough begins to come together. You may need to add more water if it is dry, or if the dough is sticky, a touch more flour. Once the dough comes together, turn it out onto a lightly floured surface and knead lightly for 3 to 4 minutes, until it can be kneaded into a smooth ball.

Working on a lightly floured surface, roll the dough into a 2-inch (5-cm)-thick rope and divide the dough into 10 even pieces. Roll each piece into a 1-inch (2.5-cm)-thick rope and cut into 4 pieces, for a total of 40 pieces. Keep the dough covered in plastic wrap and refrigerate all but just the few pieces you are currently working with.

Using a small rolling pin, roll each piece of dough into a 4-inch (10-cm) circle about 1⁄16 inch (0.2 cm) thick.

To make the dumpling:
Add a heaping tablespoon (12 g) of filling to the center of the wrapper and wet the edges with a pastry brush or your finger. Begin to gather the edge of the wrapper and make tiny overlapping pleats, keeping the center of the dumpling as the focal point, until you have gathered all of the dough and the dumpling is formed. Gently pinch the pleats to seal the dumpling. Store on a lightly floured tray, covered with plastic wrap. Refrigerate the dumplings (as you go) or freeze as needed.


To steam the dumpling:
Arrange the dumplings at least 1½ inches (4 cm) apart in a dim sum steamer lined with blanched napa cabbage leaves or place a 3x3-inch piece of parchment paper under each dumpling. Place the dim sum basket over several inches of water in a wok (the water should reach just below the bottom tier of the first basket). Bring the water to a boil and steam the dumplings for 6 to 8 minutes, adding more water to the bottom pan as necessary. Serve hot with red vinegar dipping sauce.



To make the dipping sauce
Use a vegetable peeler to peel the ginger into very thin strips. Then, use a chef's knife to thinly julienne the strips. Combine with the vinegar.

More Xiaolongbao Recipes

This Xiaolongbal Chinese Soup Dumplings Recipe is one I posted years ago! Warning – it’s sorta porn-ish.

Chinese Soup Dumplings – from Serious Eats

Steamed Shanghai Soup Dumplings – The Woks of Life

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Chinese Boiled Peanuts Recipe http://steamykitchen.com/37341-chinese-boiled-peanuts-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/37341-chinese-boiled-peanuts-recipe.html#comments Tue, 05 Aug 2014 16:33:21 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=37341 Alongside fire-roasted chestnuts, Boiled Chinese Peanuts are sold as cheap street food in China. It’s a cold-weather thing, and I know I’m posting this recipe in the dead heat of the summer, but I am missing real Chinese food….a little nostalgic for humble eats. Raw peanuts are boiled in water with cinnamon sticks, star anise, garlic cloves and a little salt. ...

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Alongside fire-roasted chestnuts, Boiled Chinese Peanuts are sold as cheap street food in China. It’s a cold-weather thing, and I know I’m posting this recipe in the dead heat of the summer, but I am missing real Chinese food….a little nostalgic for humble eats.

Raw peanuts are boiled in water with cinnamon sticks, star anise, garlic cloves and a little salt. Even though there’s no sugar in the mix, you’ll get a molasses-like sweetness just from boiling the peanuts (even if you add NO spices!)

chinese-boiled-peanuts-recipe-2087

Star Anise and cinnamon will add complex flavors, liquorice-like (though please don’t let that scare you – it is NOTHING like black liquorice), rich and sweet-smelling. If you’re a chile-nut, go ahead and add a couple of dried red chiles into the pot.

chinese-boiled-peanuts-recipe-2061

3 sticks of cinnamon, 3 star anise, 3 cloves of garlic, 3 tablespoons of kosher salt. If you’ve got really good quality cinnamon sticks, just use one or two. I had to use 3 sticks, well….because I’m cheap and bought a lower quality of cassia bark.

chinese-boiled-peanuts-recipe-2093

There are 4 ways you can cook this:

  • No soak + pressure cooker for 60 minutes
  • No soak + slow cooker all day
  • No soak + boil on stove for 4 hours
  • Overnight soak + boil on stove 1 hour

chinese-boiled-peanuts-recipe-2095

How to cook Chinese Boiled Peanuts

Step 1: Wash the raw peanuts
Give them a good rinse. Pick out any peanuts that just don’t look right, twigs, roots, etc.

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Step 2: Add in seasonings & water

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Step 3: Weigh down the peanuts
Raw peanuts float to the top of the water, so to make sure that they cook evenly, I like to add a plate into the pot to submerge the peanuts.

chinese-boiled-peanuts-recipe-2074

Step 4: Cook
I am using a pressure cooker (60 minutes under high pressure), but you can use a slow cooker (high for 6-8 hours) or boil on stove (bring to boil, cover and simmer on low for 3-4 hours)

chinese-boiled-peanuts-recipe-2080

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Chinese Boiled Peanuts Recipe

Servings: 8 Prep Time: 5 minutes Cook Time: varies
chinese-boiled-peanuts-recipe-2095

Make sure you buy RAW PEANUTS. If you don't have star anise or cinnamon stick, just use 1 teaspoon of Chinese 5-spice powder instead.

Ingredients:

1 pound raw peanuts (also called green peanuts)
3 cloves garlic, peeled
3 star anise
1-3 cinnamon sticks
3 tablespoons of kosher or sea salt

Directions:

Wash the peanuts. In a large pot, add in all of the ingredients. Fill pot with water, enough to cover the peanuts by 3" when submerged. Optional - use a plate to submerge the peanuts in the water.

FOR PRESSURE COOKER:
Cook under pressure 60 minutes high (it will take time to get up to pressure as well as cool-off period to release steam). Follow manufacturer's instructions.

FOR SLOW COOKER:
Cook high for 6-8 hours

FOR STOVETOP:
Bring to boil, cover and set heat to low. Simmer for 3-4 hours or until desired tenderness.

Alternatively, you can soak the peanuts overnight in cool water. The next day, simmer on stovetop for 1 hour or until desired tenderness.

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Chinese Clay Pot Rice Recipe http://steamykitchen.com/34175-chinese-clay-pot-rice-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/34175-chinese-clay-pot-rice-recipe-video.html#comments Mon, 28 Apr 2014 17:58:12 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=34175   Before my Mom came to visit, she sent a care package full of foodie goodies, and instructed me to save them for when she comes to visit. I knew exactly what that meant – Mama’s gonna cook for me! In the package were Chinese Preserved Pork Belly and Chinese Sausage. Sure enough, Mom announced she was making “Chinese Clay Pot Rice” for dinner ...

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chinese-clay-pot-rice-recipe-pint

Before my Mom came to visit, she sent a care package full of foodie goodies, and instructed me to save them for when she comes to visit.

I knew exactly what that meant – Mama’s gonna cook for me! In the package were Chinese Preserved Pork Belly and Chinese Sausage.

Sure enough, Mom announced she was making “Chinese Clay Pot Rice” for dinner the day after she arrived!

Chinese Clay Pot Rice Recipe

Normally, a clay pot is used (duh! hence the name) but since I didn’t have a clay pot (broke mine during the move) – we decided to experiment with making Chinese Clay Pot Rice in the rice cooker (shortcut cheater method) and also on the stovetop in a heavy-bottomed pot (like cast iron or Le Creuset). This type of pot will ensure that the rice cooks evenly and does not burn.

There’s a a fine line between “crispy” and “burnt” rice! If you’re using a clay pot or a pot on a stove, you can get a really nice bottom crust (the best part!) that all the kids fight over.

The homemade Chinese Sweet Soy Sauce that is poured over the rice. Everything is super-easy to cook. The sauce takes 5 minutes to make. The Chinese Pork Belly and Chinese Sausage cook with the rice in the same pot.

Chinese Clay Pot Rice Recipe

The Chinese Cured Pork Belly or “Chinese Style Cured Pork Strips” by Kam Yen Jan is what we used. It’s actually a preserved and cured ingredient (kind of like Chinese version of smoked bacon!) so just like the Chinese sausage, it keeps for several months in the refrigerator (as long as you don’t open the package).

They are both found at Asian markets.

chinese-pork-belly

Watch the video to learn how to make Mom’s Chinese Lay Pot Rice Recipe with Sweet Soy Sauce!

Chinese Clay Pot Rice with Sweet Soy Sauce Recipe Video

 

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Chinese Clay Pot Rice Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 25 minutes
chinese clay pot rice recipe-1447

Recipe from Mama Ruthie! There are 2 versions of this recipe below - one for cooking on the stovetop and one for cooking in the rice cooker. The rice cooker method won't give you the super-coveted crispy burnt rice on the bottom of the pot - but it is definitely much easier to make.

You can find Chinese pork belly and Chinese sausage at the Asian market - they last for a long time! Buy a couple of packages and keep in the refrigerator. The Chinese rice wine is cooking wine made from rice. Substitute with dry sherry.

Ingredients:

FOR THE SWEET SOY SAUCE
2 tablespoons cooking oil
2 shallots, thinly sliced
1 thumb-sized piece of ginger, peeled and thinly sliced
3 tablespoons brown sugar
1 cup soy sauce
1/4 cup Chinese cooking rice wine
1 tablespoon sesame oil
----------------------------
FOR THE CLAY POT RICE
1 package Chinese sausage
1 package Chinese cured pork belly 
2 cups long-grain raw rice (I like jasmine rice)

Directions:

1. Make the Sweet Soy Sauce:
Heat a small sauce pot over medium heat with cooking oil. When hot, add in the shallot and the ginger and fry until browned but not burnt, approximately 3-5 minutes. The shallots should be shriveled, darker brown (just not black). Remove the shallots and ginger (as much as you can). The remaining oil will now be flavorful. Don't throw away the crispy shallots! Use this as a topping for salad, fried rice, vegetables, etc. The ginger can be discarded.

To the oil, add in the sugar, soy sauce and rice wine. Bring to a simmer and then turn the heat to low. Let simmer for 2 minutes. Turn off heat and pour in the sesame oil. Let cool completely before storing in a jar. Lasts up to 4 months in refrigerator.

2. Make the Clay Pot Rice

IF COOKING IN RICE COOKER
Place the rice in the rice cooker pot. Fill pot halfway with water and use your hands to swish the rice. Carefully pour out the water. Repeat 2-3 more times until the water is just barely cloudy. Pour in water until it reaches your knuckle. Use this Chinese method to measure water. Lay in the Chinese sausage and pork belly strips. Set rice cooker to cook. When cooking complete, remove pork belly and Chinese sausage and slice thinly on the diagonal. Serve with rice Sweet Soy Sauce drizzled on top.

IF COOKING ON STOVETOP
To the pot (preferably clay, cast iron, enameled cast iron or some kind of heavy-bottomed pot), add in the pork belly and Chinese sausage. Turn the heat to medium-high. As the pot heats up, the pork and sausage will slowly begin to release its fats (yum!). Cook for 2 minutes, then flip the pork and sausage and cook the other side. Remove the pork and sausage to a plate. You should have about a tablespoon of delicious fat in your pot! Add in your raw rice to the pot (still on medium-high heat) gently stir the raw rice in the fat for 30 seconds until coated. Pour in 3 cups of water and snuggle in the pork belly and sausage in the rice. Bring to a low boil. Turn heat to low and immediately cover. Cook for 12 minutes. When done cooking, pork belly and Chinese sausage and slice thinly on the diagonal. Serve with rice and Sweet Soy Sauce drizzled on top.

 

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Garlic Ginger Shrimp Stir Fry http://steamykitchen.com/32974-garlic-ginger-shrimp-stirfry-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/32974-garlic-ginger-shrimp-stirfry-recipe-video.html#comments Wed, 19 Mar 2014 15:23:54 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=32974 The love language between my Mom and me is all about food! We share recipes with each other over the phone and email. We swap cookbooks when we see each other a couple times a year. She packs up Chinese cookbooks for me (all of them written in both Chinese and English) and I save the gazillion cookbooks that publishers send to ...

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Garlic Ginger Shrimp Stir Fry Recipe

The love language between my Mom and me is all about food! We share recipes with each other over the phone and email. We swap cookbooks when we see each other a couple times a year.

She packs up Chinese cookbooks for me (all of them written in both Chinese and English) and I save the gazillion cookbooks that publishers send to me for review. She loves it!

Well, this is one of her recipes, though I’ve changed it up just a bit.

Yummy Garlic Ginger Shrimp Stir Fry Recipe

Start to finish – 15 minutes. It’s the easiest stir fry recipe and so tasty with soy sauce and oyster sauce together. The aromatics include the “Chinese Trinity” – garlic, green onion and ginger.

There’s a technique that I use in all of my stir fries – the protein (shrimp, in this case) is seared on both sides first and then removed from the pan. The shrimp isn’t cooked all the way through yet, but it’s got a really nice crunchy sear. You’ll finish cooking the shrimp at the end of the stir fry.

This method does a couple of things:

1) Protein sears at high heat. Searing provides flavor. (boiled shrimp vs. grilled shrimp)

2) The aromatics – ginger, garlic, green onion burn easily – they need to be cooked at medium heat.

So, cooking the protein vs. the aromatics separately allows each and every ingredient to cook perfectly at their own temperatures. The shrimp is added back into the pan at the end to finish cooking. Everyone is happy!

Delicious Garlic Ginger Shrimp Stir Fry Recipe

 

Garlic Ginger Shrimp Stir fry Recipe Video







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Garlic Ginger Shrimp Stir fry Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 5 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes
Garlic Ginger Shrimp Stir Fry Recipe

Ingredients:

2 tablespoons oyster sauce
1 tablespoons soy sauce
handful fresh cilantro, chopped
2 teaspoons cornstarch
1/2 pound shrimp, peeled and deveined (tails left intact optional)
1 tablespoon cooking oil, divided
5 stalks green onion, chopped (white and light green parts)
2 garlic cloves, finely minced
2 teaspoons fresh ginger, finely minced or grated

Directions:

In a small bowl, combine oyster sauce, soy sauce and cilantro and set aside.

Pat the shrimp very dry with paper towels. In a medium bowl, add shrimp and cornstarch and toss to coat.
In a wok or large saute pan over high heat, add half the cooking oil and swirl to coat the bottom of the pan. When the wok is very hot, add the shrimp in a single layer and cook partially until one side is seared brown, about 1 minute. Flip and sear the other side of each shrimp, about one more minute. They don't need to be cooked all the way through yet. Remove them to a plate or bowl and set aside.

Turn the heat down to medium and let wok cool off a bit to prevent the aromatics from burning. Add the remaining cooking oil and add green onion, garlic and ginger and stir fry for a minute until fragrant.

Pour in the sauce mixture and add the shrimp back into the pan. Stir fry for another minute until shrimp is cooked through. Serve immediately.

 

 

 

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Chinese Salted Kumquat Recipe http://steamykitchen.com/30693-chinese-salted-kumquat-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/30693-chinese-salted-kumquat-recipe.html#comments Wed, 26 Feb 2014 18:35:40 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=30693 Many people candy the kumquat — or if you’re Chinese, you may have had it dried or salted. One of my Mom’s favorite remedies for sore throat is salted, preserved kumquat mixed in hot water and a little honey. Basically, it’s just like making Moroccan preserved lemons, but with kumquat. The kumquat is kept whole, but squashed or cut slightly ...

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Screen Shot 2014-02-26 at 1.32.15 PM

Many people candy the kumquat — or if you’re Chinese, you may have had it dried or salted.

Screen Shot 2014-02-18 at 10.52.49 AM

One of my Mom’s favorite remedies for sore throat is salted, preserved kumquat mixed in hot water and a little honey. Basically, it’s just like making Moroccan preserved lemons, but with kumquat. The kumquat is kept whole, but squashed or cut slightly to expose the insides (so that salt can seep in). In a large mason jar, add alternate layers of kumquat and salt until you’ve filled the jar. Cover and let sit for a few days to a month. Refrigerate.

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You can keep this Chinese sore throat remedy for the next time you are sick – just add a couple of kumquats to your mug, mash them with a fork and fill with hot water. Swirl in a bit of honey.

So why does this work? Find out in the video where I talk with my parents!

Chinese Salted Kumquat Recipe Video

 

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Chinese Salted Kumquat

Servings: 10 or more Prep Time: 5 minutes Cook Time:
Screen Shot 2014-02-26 at 1.32.15 PM

Ingredients:

Mason Jar
Kumquats, enough to fully smush into the jar
Kosher Salt, enough to fill in all the cracksFor the Salted Kumquat Tea

Directions:

STEP 1: In a mason jar, add alternating layers of kumquat and salt until the jar is completely filled and the kumquats are somewhat smushed tightly inside. Cover and refrigerate indefinitely, but at least for 2 weeks.

STEP 2: Make tea from the kumquats mixture to help heal a sore throat. In a glass, add 2-3 salted kumquats, some of the salt mixture, hot water and honey until it is drinkable. Choke it down. Feel better.

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Chinese Eggplant with Spicy Garlic Sauce http://steamykitchen.com/30476-chinese-eggplant-with-spicy-garlic-sauce.html http://steamykitchen.com/30476-chinese-eggplant-with-spicy-garlic-sauce.html#comments Mon, 17 Feb 2014 21:36:17 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=30476 I’m not very creative when it comes to cooking eggplant, usually I poke a few holes with a fork and roast until soft. The poking is important – it prevents the eggplant from exploding in the oven. Go ahead, ask me how I know! We grow both Chinese and Japanese eggplant in the garden, both of which are less-bitter than ...

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Chinese Eggplant Stirfry with Spicy Garlic Sauce Recipe

I’m not very creative when it comes to cooking eggplant, usually I poke a few holes with a fork and roast until soft. The poking is important – it prevents the eggplant from exploding in the oven. Go ahead, ask me how I know!

We grow both Chinese and Japanese eggplant in the garden, both of which are less-bitter than the standard fat Globe variety. I’ve heard cooks needing to “salt” the eggplant and let it sit to release its bitter compounds. Not needed for the Asian variety!

Chinese Eggplant Stirfry with Spicy Garlic Sauce Recipe

The skin of Japanese and Chinese eggplant is much thinner as well.

While this is a Chinese stir-fry recipe, I used Japanese eggplant variety (my Chinese plant was towards the end of its life cycle and was only poppin’ out eggplant runts).

Other than just simple roasting, this is really the only other way I cook eggplant often – it’s a wonderful flavor party – chiles, garlic, soy sauce and a touch of black vinegar to balance the flavors out.

The translated Chinese name for this dish is “Fish-Fragrant Eggplant” which is so unfortunate. I’m sure it’s deterred many cooks from even trying the recipe. The reason it’s called this is because the dish originates from Sichuan province of China.

Sichuanese cooking has so many different descriptors for its 56 distinct cooking methods and 23 “official” Sichuanese flavoring combinations. The “Fish-Flavored” refers to the combination: salty+sweet+sour+spicy+garlic+ginger+green onion. Don’t worry – the sauce doesn’t taste fishy, nor the does the recipe contain any fish at all.  It’s a sauce that goes GREAT with many Sichuan fish dishes – thus the funny translated name.

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If you like Sichuanese cooking, pick up “Land of Plenty: Authentic Sichuan Recipes Personally Gathered in the Chinese Province of Sichuan” cookbook by Fushsia Dunlop. Fushsia is a celebrated cookbook author specializing in Chinese cookery. She’s lived in Sichuan and was the first foreigner to study full-time at the province’s famous cooking school.

I’ve been cooking this dish since my college days – my recipe doesn’t include Sichuanese Chili Bean Paste like Fushsia’s recipe – it’s not a common ingredient in standard supermarkets and I have trouble finding the bean paste even today outside of Asian supermarkets.

Chinese Eggplant Stirfry with Spicy Garlic Sauce Recipe

Here are a couple other tips:

1. If you can find Chinese bean paste – add 1 tablespoon to the stir-fry and cut the soy sauce to just 1 teaspoon.

2. The original Chinese recipe uses Chinese Black Vinegar – which is very similar to young balsamic vinegar. You can use either. The balsamic vinegar should be tart, not sweet – so don’t use the expensive super-aged super-thick sweet stuff (save that for your strawberries).

3. If you can’t find Chinese or Japanese eggplants, just use globe eggplant! Cut in similar sized strips. Baby globe eggplant is really good too. No need to salt. Just rinse, cut into thin wedges.

Chinese Eggplant with Spicy Garlic Sauce Recipe Video

Chinese Eggplant Stirfry with Spicy Garlic Sauce Recipe

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Chinese Eggplant with Spicy Garlic Sauce

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes
chinese eggplant stirfry with spicy garlic sauce recipe-0504

Ingredients:

2 tablespoons cooking oil, divided
3 small eggplants cut into long strips
2 cloves garlic, finely minced
1 red chile pepper, finely diced
1 tablespoon ginger, finely minced
1 stalk green onion, chopped
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1 tablespoon black vinegar
1/2 teaspoon sugar

Directions:

In a wok or saucepan over high heat, add 1 tablespoon of the cooking oil and swirl to coat wok. When wok is hot, add eggplant in a single layer. Cook 1 minute and flip over each piece so they cook evenly. Cook another 2-3 minutes, flipping occasionally.

Push eggplant aside in wok and add 1 tablespoon cooking oil. Add garlic, red chile peppers, ginger and green onion. Stir these aromatics until they become fragrant. Combine aromatics with eggplant and stir fry for one minute. Add soy sauce, black vinegar and sugar and stir to combine all. Serve immediately.

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Cauliflower Fried Rice with Bacon http://steamykitchen.com/31325-paleo-cauliflower-bacon-fried-rice-video-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/31325-paleo-cauliflower-bacon-fried-rice-video-recipe.html#comments Mon, 03 Feb 2014 18:18:14 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=31325 Fried rice without rice?! WHAT?! That was exactly my reaction when I first saw this recipe in Nom Nom Paleo Food for Humans by my friends Michelle Tam and Henry Fong. Being the super rice geek that I am: How to cook white rice in microwave How to cook brown rice in microwave Trader Joe’s Quick Cooking Brown rice review ...

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Cauliflower Fried Rice Recipe

Fried rice without rice?! WHAT?! That was exactly my reaction when I first saw this recipe in Nom Nom Paleo Food for Humans by my friends Michelle Tam and Henry Fong.

Being the super rice geek that I am:

How to cook white rice in microwave
How to cook brown rice in microwave
Trader Joe’s Quick Cooking Brown rice review
Vegetable Fried Rice
Shrimp Fried Rice
Spam Fried Rice (!!!!)

I had to try the Paleo version of fried rice without the rice. So I guess that makes it Fried Cauliflower, which sounds like a dish not like this. So I’m keeping the name Cauliflower Fried Rice.

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Truthfully, I hadn’t even planned on doing any research on the Paleo diet – any diet that makes me give up my bread, glorious bread doesn’t interest me. However – after flipping through the volumous Nom Nom Paleo Cookbook, and bookmarking 8 recipes I must try TODAY (we ended up making 3 of them in one day) – I had to know more.

Here’s my conclusion:

If you’re a Paleo, get this book.
If you’re not a Paleo, get this book.

The fad diet name aside, Nom Nom Paleo by Michelle Tam and Henry Fong is just full of good food that’s good for you. Nothing processed. Nothing “refined”, nothing “enriched with.”

Here are the list of my top choices from the book:

10 minute Sriracha (we made this!)
Whole Roasted Fish (stuff ‘em with lemons and herbs)
Mussels in Curry Broth (uses Indian curry powder)
Kabob Koobideh (I love saying this!)
Crispy Roast Pork Belly (need i say more?)

Cauliflower Fried Rice Recipe

This rice. Errr.this “rice” – was bacon-tastic. The process was so easy that it was even faster than cooking rice. Cauliflower is grated on the large holes of a box grater. Even the stem gets grated too.

Cauliflower Fried Rice Recipe

Stir fry with bacon and whatever vegetables you want. Fifteen minutes later, you’ve got Paleo Cauliflower Bacon Fried Rice.

Here’s how to make it:

Cauliflower Fried Rice with Bacon Video Recipe

The recipe is super-easy – 15 minutes total. Below the recipe is a crazy list of options (CAN YOU TELL I’M HUNGRY?!)

 Cauliflower Fried Rice Options

When stir-frying, timing is everything. Overcooked spinach is mushy and undercooked chicken is not good. I’ll divide these options according to Steps 1 – 4 in the recipe.

STEP 1 OPTIONS:
Along with the bacon, you can add more bacon. Just kidding :-)

  • You can add in diced Chinese Lap Cheong (Chinese sausage) which is, um, another form of bacon.
  • Egg – once the bacon gets a good headstart, push it to one side of the pan. Crack an egg into an open spot. Scramble. Remove egg once it’s cooked (leave the bacon in the pan) and put scrambled egg aside. You’ll add it back in to the pan during step 4. This prevents the egg from overcooking – and from coating and mushy-ing up all the vegetables while they cook.

STEP 2 OPTIONS:
Along with the onion, you can add in ground beef, pork, turkey, chicken, buffalo. Throw in minced garlic at the very end of step 2.

How about different vegetables?

  • Diced (like the size of frozen diced carrot) – zucchini, squash, red onion, bell peppers, mushrooms of all kinds
  • Halved at diagonal – sugar peas, snap peas
  • Chopped – cabbage, kale, napa cabbage, green onion, bok choy
  • Matchstick – fresh carrot, broccoli stem (they sell in packages called “broccoli slaw”)
  • Frozen – any diced veg or bean like edamame. Throw it in the pan while frozen, they’ll thaw out and be perfect once you’re done cooking. There’s nothing worse than mushy peas and carrots due to overcooking.

Or more meat/seafood?

  • Diced cooked ham, smoked turkey (anything already cooked)
  • Raw shrimp – shell ‘em and then give ‘em a nice rough chop.
  • Diced salmon

STEP 3 OPTIONS:
Along with adding the cauliflower, you can add in:

  • Chopped fresh spinach leaves or any other delicate leafy greens that don’t require a lot of cooking.
  • Cooked shrimp (the kind you use for cocktail shrimp) – pinch tails off, rough chop.
  • Chopped up – leftover rotisserie chicken

STEP 4 OPTIONS:
As a substitute for Bragg’s Amino:

  • Coconut Amino, fish sauce or soy sauce. For non-Paleo peeps, try a tablespoon of oyster sauce for a slightly sweet/salty combo.
  • Top it off with chopped cashew nuts, peanuts, minced green onion/chives, bean sprouts, cilantro

Alright, now that I’ve bombarded you with a gazillion options for making Paleo Cauliflower Bacon Fried Rice, what are ya gonna cook?

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Cauliflower Fried Rice with Bacon Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 5 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes
cauliflower fried rice recipe featured-0843

Adapted from Nom Nom Paleo Food for Humans by Michele Tam and Henry Fong.
There are so many substitutions you can use! See bottom of post for full list.

Ingredients:

4 slices bacon, chopped
1 small onion, finely minced
1 head cauliflower, grated
1 tablespoon water
1 cup frozen mixed vegetables
1 tablespoon Bragg's Liquid Aminos, Coconut Aminos or fish sauce

Directions:

STEP 1: In a wok or large saute pan over medium heat, cook bacon until almost crispy.

STEP 2: Add the onions and stir fry until translucent.

STEP 3: Turn heat to high. Add the grated cauliflower and stir fry for 1 minute. Add water and mixed vegetables, stir well, cover the pan and let the cauliflower mixture steam for another 3 minutes or until tender.

STEP 4: Uncover and add Bragg's (or your choice of seasoning) to combine. Toss well. Taste and add additional seasoning as desired.

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