Steamy Kitchen Recipes | RSS Feed http://steamykitchen.com Steamy Kitchen Food Blog: fast recipes, simple recipes, with fresh ingredients to create delicious meals. Fri, 26 Jun 2015 12:53:12 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.2 Vietnamese Coffee Ice Cream Recipe http://steamykitchen.com/40320-vietnamese-coffee-ice-cream-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/40320-vietnamese-coffee-ice-cream-recipe.html#comments Fri, 22 May 2015 16:59:01 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=40320 You’ll learn: To create the perfect Vietnamese coffee ice cream, use a mix of evaporated milk, sweetened condensed milk and heavy cream. Coffee of your choice, either caffeinated or decaf. Vanilla extract or pure vanilla bean completes the flavor profile. Vietnamese ice coffee makes you realize that any other weak coffeehouse version of diluted coffee over ice is for wimps. Course-ground ...

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Vietnamese Coffee Ice Cream Recipe

You’ll learn:

  • To create the perfect Vietnamese coffee ice cream, use a mix of evaporated milk, sweetened condensed milk and heavy cream.
  • Coffee of your choice, either caffeinated or decaf.
  • Vanilla extract or pure vanilla bean completes the flavor profile.

Vietnamese ice coffee makes you realize that any other weak coffeehouse version of diluted coffee over ice is for wimps. Course-ground coffee is packed into a metal brewer, and the thick, intense coffee slowly drips down into a tall glass filled with ice cubes and 1/2″ of sweetened condensed milk. As the hot coffee drips down, it melts some of ice and mixes in with the sweet, sticky milk. What you end up with is the perfect concoction of rich, creamy iced coffee.

Seven Spoons by Tara O'BradyTake this formula and make ice cream for an “uncompromising intensity” of coffee flavors, according to Tara O’Brady, author Seven Spoons Cookbook and Seven Spoons food blog.

Seven Spoons Author Tara O'Brady

This is my full-stop favorite ice cream. A voluptuous mix of evaporated milks and cream gets infused with ground coffee, then chilled, churned, and swirled with caramel.Tara O'Brady

This summer, if you have an ice cream maker (and love coffee), give Tara’s Vietnamese Coffee Ice Cream a try!

Tara likes to top her Vietnamese Coffee Ice Cream with homemade Candied Cocoa Nibs and an Espresso Caramel, both of those recipes are found in her cookbook. For us, we made the base Vietnamese Coffee Ice Cream, and topped with a pinch of fine ground coffee and a little store-bought caramel.

About Seven Spoons

I’ve been reading Tara’s blog for as long as I’ve known the word, “blog.” As a silent fan, I’ve followed her adventures through parenthood, learning about her Indian heritage, sipped her Frothy Indian Coffee and drizzled her Simple, Quick Chocolate Sauce over warm banana bread (which also would be great drizzled on this Vietnamese Coffee Ice Cream, too.)

Tara’s site is a true blog, her sometimes deeply personal posts are always thoughtful, poetic and heartfelt. Her cookbook is the same. If you love really reading a cookbook, from beginning to end, you’ll be comfortable nestling right into the pages of Seven Spoons Cookbook.

Thanks for supporting this site!

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Vietnamese Coffee Ice Cream Recipe

Servings: Makes about 1 quart (1 L) Prep Time: Cook Time:
Vietnamese-Coffee-Ice-Cream

Adapted and reprinted with permission from Seven Spoons, by Tara O’Brady, copyright © 2015, published by Ten Speed Press, an imprint of Penguin Random House LLC. Photography copyright © 2015 by Tara O’Brady.Grind regular or decaf coffee beans to a medium grind. For a milder, rounded flavor, use 2 tablespoons of instant espresso powder or 3 tablespoons instant coffee powder instead of ground beans. Original recipe in cookbook includes Candied Cacao Nibs and Espresso Caramel (buy the book!)

Ingredients:

1 (14-ounce/400 g) can evaporated milk
1 (14-ounce/400 g) can sweetened condensed milk
1 1/2 cups (355 ml) heavy cream
2 ounces (60 g) coffee beans, ground (see note above)
Seeds scraped from 1 vanilla bean, or 2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
Generous pinch of fine-grain sea salt
TOPPINGS: Fine ground coffee, sea salt, store-bought caramel

Directions:

Combine the evaporated milk, condensed milk, cream, coffee, vanilla, and salt in a saucepan set over medium heat. Cook, whisking often, until the mixture begins to steam. Remove from the heat and let steep for 20 minutes.
Using a fine-meshed strainer or a coffee filter, strain the liquid into a bowl. Cover and chill for at least 3 hours, but preferably overnight. Freeze according to your ice cream maker’s directions.

To serve, top the Vietnamese Coffee Ice Cream with a pinch of ground coffee, caramel and a pinch of sea salt.

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Slow Cooker Bone Broth – Asian Style http://steamykitchen.com/39418-slow-cooker-bone-broth-asian-style.html http://steamykitchen.com/39418-slow-cooker-bone-broth-asian-style.html#comments Wed, 28 Jan 2015 22:23:46 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=39418 In Asian culture, soups and broths are part of everyday meals. A traditional Japanese breakfast would include a bowl of Miso Soup to warm the body. Chinese restaurants feature a long list of house soups, from an appetite stimulating Hot and Sour Soup to even a light broth served after dinner to cleanse the palate and complete the meal. Growing up, Mom ...

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Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian

In Asian culture, soups and broths are part of everyday meals. A traditional Japanese breakfast would include a bowl of Miso Soup to warm the body. Chinese restaurants feature a long list of house soups, from an appetite stimulating Hot and Sour Soup to even a light broth served after dinner to cleanse the palate and complete the meal.

Growing up, Mom always had soup simmering on the stove. Every night, without doubt, there was a Chinese style soup on the table. I remember saving the soup for last, as a ritual to conclude a delightful home-cooked meal.

I’ve tried to emulate Mom, but we’ve got such an active lifestyle that a pot simmering for hours on the stove isn’t feasible. Instead, we use a large 6-quart slow cooker to make an Asian-style bone broth that will last the entire week for our family.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian

What is bone broth?

Bone broth is often gently simmered for 24 hours (or more!) to extract as much nutrients from the bones of an animal, whether it be fish, chicken, pork or beef. The long cooking time breaks down bone to release vitamins, collagen and calcium phosphate — nutrients that are good for us.

Sure, it’s a trendy thing right now, with restaurants offering drive-through bone broth served in a coffee cup for $9, cookbooks dedicated to the art of bone broths (I highly recommend The Nourished Kitchen Cookbook which features bone broth) and even an entire line of bone broth concentrates that you can buy.

What’s the difference between broth, bone broth and soups?

Generally, soups are made with meats, bones, vegetables, herbs, added grains, sometimes thickened with starches – and simmered for a couple of hours.

Broths are mostly made from meats or vegetables and left clear without very much else added. Broths are also simmered for a couple of hours, resulting in a light colored, light flavored broth.

Bone broths are cooked for a day or even longer. Your favorite Vietnamese restaurant most likely simmer their pho broth overnight, which is why the broth is so rich and flavorful.

The long cooking time extracts so many nutrients and flavor! How do you know when you’ve extracted maximum nutrients and flavor? When the bones literally disintegrate just by giving a little pressure with your fingers.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe Asian Style

Like Nourished Kitchen, we make our bone broth in the slow cooker, and it will last us all week long. The process starts on Sunday night, and the slow cooker will do its magic all night long.

In the morning, we’ll enjoy bone broth as part of our breakfast. Every day, I’ll top off the pot with more water and keep the slow cooker humming along.

Each day, I’ll add a vegetable, switch out for fresh herbs, throw in a couple of umami-boosting Asian ingredients.

As the days progress, the bone broth develops new flavor, gets richer, smoother, fuller. We get the benefit of the valuable nutrition that’s normally locked inside the bones.

Some days, we’ll top off the bone broth with chopped herbs, or shredded seaweed just before serving. Or a spoonful of leftover rice in the bone broth is great too.

Secrets to Clear, Clean Bone Broth

Key to bone broth – be gentle. The cooking process is slow and gentle, coaxing out flavor with very little bubbles (no violent boiling!)

Don’t stir. Especially after the first 2 days. The bones will be come very soft and will crumble if you stir the pot too vigorously, resulting in a gritty broth.

Use cheesecloth or herb/tea bags to contain any herbs, aromatics or spices that are very small (see below.) This avoids having you dig around, stir around to fish these items out.

Use a very fine mesh skimmer to skim the surface of the broth every day, especially during the first 6-8 hours. The “scum” will cloud your broth during these first few hours of cooking. What’s the scum made out of? Proteins, fats, microscopic bone fragments (especially if the bones were cut), oils, impurities. Get rid of it!

Ready for the next batch? Jumpstart your next batch with a little of the last batch of concentrated “liquid gold!” We call this “Infinite Bone Broth.” Restaurants do the same with broths, sauces and sourdough bread too. Seed the next batch with rich flavor you’ve already built.

Bone Broth, Chinese Style

The “holy trinity” of Chinese cooking is garlic, ginger and green onion.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Garlic, Ginger & Green Onion

I’m not a fan of fishing out little pieces of ingredients, so I try to cut herbs so that they are easy to find and spoon out. The garlic head is cut in half. Sometimes, the cloves will separate (like above) but I’ll use a bag made for for DIY teabags or as an herb pouch (100 bags for $5.67)

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian DIY Herb Pouch

Fill it up with the garlic cloves that are loose. Fold the top over and the cloves or anything you put inside will stay put. You can also make your own with cheesecloth. I like to use these teabags for other spices too, like whole peppercorns or star anise – anything that would be hard to find and fish out.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Fill Herb Pouch with loose garlic cloves

The green onions are tied with twine, again for easy removal. The ginger is a big hunk, just sliced in half.  I reserve the other half of the ginger + the garlic cloves in the bag + more green onion  – to add to the bone broth a couple of days later (I’ll discard the spent herbs/aromatics, replace with fresh.)

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Tie green onions with twine and slice ginger in half

This week, I’m making bone broth with spareribs (it was on sale). Pork broth is very popular in Chinese cuisine. It’s just as popular as chicken broth is here in the U.S. Most of the Chinese soups that I make start with pork – for a lighter, more neutral flavor than beef or chicken.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Spareribs for bone broth

Some people like to cut off the excess fat, but I just leave it on. I’ll skim out the fats and oils later with a skimmer.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Everything goes into the slow cooker

Everything goes into the slow cooker, set it on low and let it go. If you plan on making slow cooker bone broth often, I suggest getting the largest slow cooker you can find. This one is a Cuisinart 6 1/2 Quart Slow Cooker ($99) that works really well. It’s never failed us.

After a few hours, I’ll skim the scuzz with a very fine mesh skimmer. This skimmer mesh is so fine that it catches all particles AND surface oils and fats.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian skim skuzz with very fine mesh skimmer

Look how rich this bone broth is the next day! Season with salt, or fish sauce. Season to taste.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian

I’ll discard the spent green onion, garlic and ginger, and add fresh to replace. This time, I’m adding garlic chives and cilantro from the garden – again, tied  up to make it easier to remove.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian discard spent herbs and add garlic chives and cilantro

Top it off with fresh water. The slow cooker stays on all week, on low.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian top off with fresh water

Chinese Bone Broth

After a couple of days, I might throw in some Chinese dried ingredients for a massive flavor and umami-boost:

Dried scallops, dried shrimp or dried black mushrooms (shitake).

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian dried scallops, dried shrimp and black mushrooms

You can also add in sliced daikon and carrots for one of my very favorite home-style soups! Every trip back to my Mom’s house, I request her Daikon Carrot soup.

If you like cilantro, you can also add in a bunch of cilantro stems, which have just as much flavor as the leaves. I often use the stems for soups.

Japanese Bone Broth

If you’d like Japanese flavor for a bone broth, add a small 6-inch piece of dried kombu and a handful of bonito flakes (place these in the tea bag.) By the way, kombu can be used over, and over again. Just rinse, wipe, and let dry completely before storing for next use.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian dried kombu and bonito flakes

My favorite breakfast? Bone broth with a spoonful of leftover rice or grains, top with roasted seaweed. This type of seaweed is called Kizame Nori – or sliced, roasted seaweed.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian with a spoonful of leftover rice or grains and roasted seaweed

By the way, have you ever tried Ochazuke?

Also, if you’d like to fortify the Japanese bone broth with miso paste – do this separately. Miso paste cooked at high heat or for too long will break apart and become gritty. Ladle some bone broth into a separate saucepan. Bring to simmer if you need to, but if it’s coming straight from the slow cooker, there’s no need to heat it up. Turn off heat. Whisk just a couple tablespoons of miso paste into the soup. Be careful of how much miso you add, especially if you’ve already added salt to the bone broth. I prefer shiro miso (white miso paste) as it’s lighter and less salty than the others. Miso paste is always added off heat.

Vietnamese Bone Broth

Add Vietnamese pho spices to a mesh bag or the tea bag (Here’s a recipe for Slow Cooker Vietnamese Pho.)

If you visit an Asian market, you can often find all these spices packaged, ready to go. Look for “Pho Spice Pack.” Instead of seasoning the broth with salt, season the bone broth with fish sauce. Start with 1 tablespoon, taste, and then add 1 teaspoon at a time until perfect.

What’s my favorite fish sauce? Right there in the sidebar is a free “Asian Masters of Flavor” ebook I wrote that includes my favorite brand! There’s a big difference between good quality fish sauce and crap, chemical-laden fish sauce.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Vietnamese Bone Broth Spices

More notes

If you’re concerned with the cost of running a slow cooker throughout the week, it costs pennies per day!

We grow all of our own herbs and most of our own vegetables in our aquaponics garden and greenhouse. Here’s a tip for green onion.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Our aquaphonics garden

You can even start with store-bought green onion. Make sure you buy ones that have nice, wet, strong roots (no dry or wilted!) Just stick’em in soil. The green onions will continue to grow their roots and sprout more leaves. I just snip off what I need (leafy part only) and new ones will continue to grow throughout the entire growing season!

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian grow your own green onion

Recommended Cooking Equipment

More recipes to explore

Vietnamese Pho Pressure Cooker – Paleo Friendly  (Steam Kitchen)

Mom’s Chinese Chicken Soup  (Steam Kitchen)

Vegetable Thai Curry Noodle Soup  (Steam Kitchen)

Tofu and Mushroom Miso Soup  (Steam Kitchen)

Chinese Daikon and Carrot Soup  (Steam Kitchen)

15 Minute Udon Miso Noodle Soup  (Steam Kitchen)

Thai Fish Soup  (Steam Kitchen)

Soba Noodles in Shiitake-Shoyu Broth with Spring Vegetables (Serious Eats)

Spicy Korean Seafood Soup (Serious Eats)

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Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Style

Servings: Prep Time: 5 minutes Cook Time:
slow-cooker-bone-broth-recipe-asian-3832

I prefer using pork or chicken for Chinese or Japanese style bone broth. If you'd like to use beef bones (great for Vietnamese bone broth), I suggest roasting the bones (350F for 30 minutes) first before adding them to your slow cooker. Not necessary, but it will give a richer bone broth. I don't normally roast pork or chicken bones - I just add them to the pot. Grassfed, organic is best.

PORK: spareribs, neck, hock, really anything.


CHICKEN: whole, raw chicken, or just the frame of a rotisserie chicken you've already enjoyed. You can also use chicken wings or chicken feet. Turkey works great too.


BEEF: oxtail, knuckle, neck, short ribs. I also use beef bone marrow as well - but after roasting, I"ll spoon out the marrow, spread it on bread and sprinkle with sea salt for a little treat. Basically, too much marrow in the bone broth will make the broth greasy tasting. Short ribs have amazing flavor - I like to add them to any beef bone broth that I make.


FISH: Fish bones and head. I like to do this traditional Chinese style with garlic, lots of ginger and green onion. Remove the fish skin and the thin, silvery lining in the gut area (very fishy taste). If the fish is raw, I prefer to roast the fish bones (350F for 20 minutes) - as this tames the fishiness smell and flavor of the bone broth. Most fish will work except for oily fish like mackerel.

Ingredients:

4 pounds spareribs
1 head garlic, halved
big knob of fresh ginger (about the size of 2 fingers), halved
3-4 stalks green onions, cut in half

Directions:

1. Reserve half of the garlic, ginger and green onion for later in the week. Tie the green onion bundles with twine.

2. In a slow-cooker, add green onion, garlic and ginger. Fill slow cooker with water, up to 1-inch below rim. Set to cook on high heat at first. When the bone broth comes to a simmer after an hour or so, you'll see lots of scum. Skim and discard. Set slow cooker on low and let the bone broth cook for at least 6 hours.

3. Use a skimmer to skim the surface of any particles and oil. Season with salt, to taste.

4. After drinking some of the bone broth, top off the slow cooker with additional fresh water. You can also discard the spent herbs and add the reserved garlic, onion and green onion. Continue to add additional vegetables, aromatics, dried ingredients (see post above for details) as you wish. Keep the setting on low.

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Asian Rice Noodle Salad with Steak Recipe http://steamykitchen.com/37270-asian-rice-noodle-salad-with-steak-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/37270-asian-rice-noodle-salad-with-steak-recipe.html#comments Fri, 01 Aug 2014 13:03:06 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=37270 Here’s what you’ll learn: Why skirt and flank steak are perfect for this dish How to cut the steak to guarantee most tenderness Nathan’s marinating method How to cook mai-fun (skinny rice noodles) in 30 seconds How to julienne a cucumber in 30 seconds This is a recipe long overdue, the amazing Field to Fork dinner hosted by our local CSA, ...

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asian-noodles-steak-recipe-2407

Here’s what you’ll learn:

  • Why skirt and flank steak are perfect for this dish
  • How to cut the steak to guarantee most tenderness
  • Nathan’s marinating method
  • How to cook mai-fun (skinny rice noodles) in 30 seconds
  • How to julienne a cucumber in 30 seconds

asian-noodles-steak-recipe-3-2

This is a recipe long overdue, the amazing Field to Fork dinner hosted by our local CSA, Geraldson Community Farms, and Sarasota Whole Foods  was months ago! I had wanted to highlight Geraldson’s certified organic produce grown on their 20 acres and the dedication to safe, healthy produce for our small town.

But we’re currently in the middle of our choking-hot summer (so humid and hot that my eyelashes sweat) and that means it’s resting time for our fields. All of our local farms here close down or drastically reduce their growing, and I would like imagine that the teams of farmers and volunteers are off on vacation, enjoying their time off.

However, I know farmers are some of the most hard-working people…and I can’t think of a single farmer I know that takes long vacations. There’s always something that needs attention: equipment to fix, animals to tend to, fields to compost, work to be done.

I’ll have to wait until Fall, when they re-open, to show off their organic vegetables. In the meantime, let’s talk about STEAK!

Screen Shot 2014-07-31 at 12.53.42 PM
photo by the event photographer, B.Lively, at the Field to Fork dinner

asian-noodles-steak-recipe-3While Geraldson Community Farms provided all the produce for the dinner, Whole Foods here in Sarasota brought in the meat and their grillers.

I found out that Whole Foods’ meats are from animals that have never been raised with antibiotics or hormones. Also, their meats have a 5-step Animal Welfare rating system, so that you can easily identify how the animal was raised.

We chose to make this Rice Noodle Salad with Steak recipe from Whole Foods, but changed the recipe up a bit to suit our tastes.

Our family loves skirt steak and flank steak – it’s more tender (when cut properly), soaks up marinade faster (especially skirt), and the thinness of these cuts make for fast cooking.

asian-noodles-steak-recipe-2405

Asian Rice Noodle Salad with Steak Recipe Video

Here’s our video, and Nathan’s tip for the best steak ever.

 

asian-noodles-skirt-steak-2411-bTo make this a 20-Minute Meal

– Buy thin steak (like skirt steak) because it will cook faster. After adding the steak to the marinade, skip the waiting and proceed to grill/broil. You’ll still get a ton of flavor! *Bonus – massage the marinade into the steak like Nathan showed you in the video.

– Buy already-shredded carrots. Use a julienne tool to cut the cucumber.

– Use fine rice noodles (like I did in the video) – it cooks in 30 seconds.

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Asian Rice Noodle Salad with Steak Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes
asian-noodles-steak-recipe-2407

-If you love spicy - add in a spoonful of Asian chile-garlic sauce to the dressing!
-I prefer using flank or skirt steak, 3/4" thickness. Make sure you slice ACROSS the grain (see video)
-Use any type of noodles you want - even thin spaghetti noodles or angel hair noodles. If you are using rice noodles, remember that they cook very quickly.

Ingredients:

2 cloves garlic, minced
1 small nub of fresh ginger, grated
2 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce, divided
4 teaspoons toasted sesame oil
1 teaspoon brown sugar
1 (8-ounce) steak of your choice (skirt, flank, sirloin)
1 tablespoon rice vinegar
1 lime, juiced (1 tablespoon)
1 teaspoon sugar
1 tablespoon sesame seeds
1 cup shredded carrots
1 large cucumber, finely chopped
1 (8-ounce) package rice noodles
1/4 cup chopped peanuts

Directions:

1. To a resealable bag, add most of the minced garlic (reserve the rest for the dressing), grated ginger, just 1 tablespoon soy sauce (reserve rest for dressing), sesame oil and brown sugar. Mix well. Add in the steak, remove as much air as possible and seal. Marinate for up to overnight.

2. To make the dressing, whisk together the remaining soy sauce, remaining garlic, rice vinegar, lime juice, sugar and sesame seeds. Add in 2 tablespoons of water and whisk well. 

3. Cook the noodles according to package instructions. Drain. Taste the noodle to make sure it is done. 

4. Grill or broil steak for 4 minutes per side, or until done to your liking. Let steak rest for 5 minutes, then thinly slice.
5. For each bowl, toss noodles, carrots, cucumbers and steak slices with dressing. Top with chopped peanuts.

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Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Orange-Almond Sauce http://steamykitchen.com/34185-vietnamese-spring-rolls-with-orange-almond-sauce-from-the-blender-girl-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/34185-vietnamese-spring-rolls-with-orange-almond-sauce-from-the-blender-girl-recipe-video.html#comments Wed, 07 May 2014 11:45:54 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=34185 I very rarely veer off my “tried and true” basic recipe for Vietnamese Nuoc Cham (dipping sauce with lime juice, fish sauce, chili peppers, sugar, water) for Vietnamese Spring Rolls. It’s easy, predictable and I can make the sauce just by taste without measuring anything! But just because I *LOVE* something doesn’t mean that my entire family loves it too. My fish-fearing ...

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spring rolls with orange almond sauce recipe-1663

I very rarely veer off my “tried and true” basic recipe for Vietnamese Nuoc Cham (dipping sauce with lime juice, fish sauce, chili peppers, sugar, water) for Vietnamese Spring Rolls. It’s easy, predictable and I can make the sauce just by taste without measuring anything!

spring rolls with orange almond sauce recipe-1654

But just because I *LOVE* something doesn’t mean that my entire family loves it too. My fish-fearing husband won’t touch it….and therefore my kids won’t dip in it either. Sigh. I keep telling the kids that, “Buddha is a happy eater (see his belly!?) and he would want you to eat like Mama, not Dad.”

Screen Shot 2014-04-21 at 2.38.56 PM

My friend, Blender Girl (okay, her name is really Tess) just came out with a cookbook called The Blender Girl: Super-Easy, Super-Healthy Meals, Snacks, Desserts, and Drinks–100 Gluten-Free, Vegan Recipes.

I found a recipe for Orange Almond Sauce for Vietnamese Spring Rolls. Big massive hit all around. It’s creamy, light and made with almond butter and fresh citrus juices for something a little different.

If you vow to cook a little healthier this summer – take a look at Tess’ book with 100 recipes that are good for you. The blender does all the hard work! The book features smoothies you’d expect from a blender book – as well as sauces, soups, marinades, dressings and desserts.

The book is currently #3 cookbook on Amazon!

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Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Orange Almond Sauce Recipe Video

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Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Orange Almond Sauce Recipe

Servings: Makes 16 rolls Prep Time: 15 minutes Cook Time: 15 minutes
spring rolls with orange almond sauce recipe-1654

You can make these rolls up to a day ahead. Here's what you need to remember: Place the rolls on a clean, dry plate in a single layer. If you want to stack multiple layers, place a sheet of plastic wrap between each layer. This prevents the rolls from sticking to each other. When all rolls are done, make sure you cover everything with plastic wrap - this prevents the rice paper from drying out in the refrigerator.

If you can't find almond butter - you can use any type of nut butter.

OPTIONAL: Soak the matchstick carrots and julienned cucumbers in 3 tablespoons of seasoned rice vinegar. It will add the amazing "zing" that you'll love!

Recipe adapted from The Blender Girl by Tess Masters

Ingredients:

FOR THE SPRING ROLLS
6 ounces dried rice vermicelli noodles
16 large dried rice paper wrappers
8 large lettuce leaves, preferably soft ones, halved and hard ribs removed
1 cup, matchstick cut carrots
2 cucumbers, julienned
1-2 avocado, pitted, peeled and sliced
1-2 bell pepper, cored, julienned
1 cup loosely packed cilantro
1 cup loosely packed mint
1 cup loosely packed basil




FOR THE ORANGE ALMOND SAUCE
1/4 cup water, plus more as needed
2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lime juice
3 tablespoons freshly squeezed orange juice
1/2 cup raw almond butter
1/2 teaspoon minced ginger
1 teaspoon honey or coconut nectar
1/2 teaspoon finely chopped garlic
1/2 teaspoon wheat-free tamari or soy sauce
1 teaspoon roasted sesame seeds

Directions:

Soak the noodles in hot water for about 20 minutes, until soft. Drain.

To assemble the rolls, fill a shallow dish half full with hot water (hot to the touch but not boiling. and submerge one rice paper wrapper for 5 seconds, let excess water drop off.  Place wrapper on a clean, dry surface and fold in half to form a half-circle. The wrapper should still be a bit stiff, but will soften by the time you've finished filling with vegetables.

Place a lettuce leaf in the middle of the half-circle and top it with a forkful of noodles, and then add a bit of each of the vegetables and herbs.  Carefully roll up the Vietnamese Spring Roll and set it on a dish, seam-side down in single layer. Repeat with the remaining wrappers and filling. If not serving immediately, chill in the fridge, covered with plastic wrap. 

To make the dipping sauce, throw all of the ingredients into your blender and puree on high for about 1 minute, until well combined. You may want to add an additional tablespoon or two of water to thin out the sauce. Stir in sesame seeds. Serve alongside the rolls.

 

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Vietnamese Pho Pressure Cooker – Paleo Friendly http://steamykitchen.com/31369-vietnamese-pho-pressure-cooker-noodle-soup-paleo-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/31369-vietnamese-pho-pressure-cooker-noodle-soup-paleo-recipe.html#comments Mon, 10 Mar 2014 15:45:10 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=31369 It’s been a loooong time since I’ve made home made pho – much too long! Normally I make beef pho the long and slow way – either in the slow cooker or barely bubbling on the stovetop: Slow Cooker Vietnamese Pho Recipe Vietnamese Beef Pho Recipe Chicken Pho Recipe (Pho Ga) But a very persistent reader has been emailing me ...

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vietnamese-pho-pressure-cooker-noodle-soup-recipe-pinterest.jpg

It’s been a loooong time since I’ve made home made pho – much too long! Normally I make beef pho the long and slow way – either in the slow cooker or barely bubbling on the stovetop:

Slow Cooker Vietnamese Pho Recipe
Vietnamese Beef Pho Recipe
Chicken Pho Recipe (Pho Ga)

But a very persistent reader has been emailing me about creating a Pressure Cooker Vietnamese Pho recipe for the past 2 years. If you can make awesome Pho in the slow cooker, why not a pressure cooker?

Vietnamese Pho Pressure Cooker (Noodle Soup)

The only limitation of using a slow cooker or pressure cooker is space. Both appliances aren’t that big, and if I’m going to take the time to make Vietnamese Pho, I want to make a BIG BATCH of it! Well, enough to serve 4 people and some broth for the freezer too (freeze in quart containers or bags to make the best “instant noodle” broth ever.)

My solution for Pressure Cooker Pho is to treat the pressure cooker as a “pho broth concentrator” – the ingredients in the recipe are sufficient enough to create such a rich pho broth concentrate. You can add water to adjust after the broth is complete.

Vietnamese Pho Pressure Cooker (Noodle Soup)

Paleo Friendly Vietnamese Pho!

Screen Shot 2014-01-28 at 9.11.47 AM

Here’s a bonus. The recipe is Paleo friendly.

Big thanks to Nom Nom Paleo Food for Humans Cookbook by my friends Michelle Tam and Henry Fong for another stellar recipe. LOVE this cookbook, I can’t recommend it enough and have purchased copies for my friends.

If you’re non-Paleo, don’t worry. I’m creating notes for Paleo and non-Paleo recipe the Vietnamese Beef Pho using the pressure cooker.

 

 

20 Minute Sriracha Sauce Recipe

20 Minute Sriracha Sauce Recipe – Paleo Friendly –

Cauliflower Fried Rice Paleo Recipe

Cauliflower Fried Rice Recipe – > – Paleo Friendly

Non-Paleo Notes: Vietnamese Pho is generally Paleo friendly, as-is. The only ingredient substitution is the type of oil and noodles. Paleo grain-free “noodles” can be Shirotaki noodles (slippery little noodles made from Asian mountain potatoes – found in refrigerated section next to tofu at the store), Zucchini noodles (watch my video reviewing different gadgets to cut zucchini noodles), Kelp noodles made from seaweed.

Traditional Vietnamese Pho Ingredients

If you’re regular eatin’ folk, the traditional Vietnamese Pho noodles are rice noodles. You can find fresh rice noodles at Asian markets or you can get dried rice noodles at your grocery store. They come in different widths, just get one that you like. Generally, I can easily find the 1/4″ thick noodles very easily.

Dried rice noodles cook differently from the regular wheat-based Italian style pasta that you’re used to. The great news its that it’s faster! Dried rice noodles cook in as quickly as 1-3 minutes! If you overcook the noodles, they become mushy and pretty much inedible.

Here’s the best way to cook the dried rice noodles:

  1. Soak the dried noodles in hot water (not boiling water, just hot water from tap) for about 10 minutes. This will soften up the rice noodles. Drain.
  2. Bring a small pot of water to a simmer. You don’t really need a ton of water (like you do for pasta) – just enough so that all the noodles can be submerged in the hot water. Turn off heat.
  3. Add drained rice noodles to the hot water. Let it sit for 1 minute. Very thin noodles will be ready after 1 minute. Thicker rice noodles will need a couple of minutes. Drain.

Cooking noodles in the Pho broth?

I know you’re gonna ask me: why not cook the noodles directly in the Pho broth? I never do this. Here’s why:

  1. Because the rice noodles cook so darn quickly, it’s so easy to over cook them. I don’t want to ruin a batch of hard-earned broth with overcooked noodles!
  2. Cooking any type of noodles releases starch. For example, when you cook noodles, the water becomes cloudy from the extra flour. I don’t want that in my Pho broth!
  3. Related to #1 is that because the rice noodles can get mushy if submerged in boiling water too long, I add the noodles to each personal bowl first. When everyone is ready to eat (at the table, all staring at me, impatiently tapping their chopsticks on the table) – I will pour the Pho broth INTO the bowls one by one and serve immediately. Basically, I make the bowls to-serve.

No Pressure Cooker? No problem!

Just follow all instructions and simmer the broth for 4 hours on your stovetop. Put all ingredients into a large pot. Fill with 2-1/2 quarts of water. Bring to a boil, reduce heat so that the water is BARELY simmering – just tiny bubbles here and there. Simmer slightly covered for 3-4 hours. Skim surface of fats and stuff that floats frequently.

Vietnamese Pho Pressure Cooker (Noodle Soup) Recipe Video


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Vietnamese Pho Pressure Cooker (Noodle Soup)

Servings: 6 Prep Time: 15 minutes Cook Time: 2 hours
vietnamese pho pressure cooker noodle soup recipe featured-0888

Adapted from Nom Nom Paleo Cookbook by Henry Fong and Michelle Tam. This recipe makes a Vietnamese Pho Soup concentrate.

A tip for the Beef Eye of Round. The key to this is to very thinly slice. These slices will be added to each person's bowl RAW. When you pour the simmering hot pho broth into each bowl, it will cook the beef perfectly! To slice very thin, space the Eye of Round roast into the freezer for 20 minutes. This will firm up the roast and make it easier to slice very thin.

OR - sometimes you can find already-sliced beef at your grocery store. My store sells pre-sliced beef that you use for cheesesteak sandwiches. Even if it's not eye-of-round roast, just use what they are selling pre-sliced!

Ingredients:

3 whole star anise
2 tablespoons whole coriander seeds
1 cinnamon stick
3 whole cloves
1 green cardamom pod
2 tablespoons butter, divided (Non-Paleo version: cooking oil)
8 slices fresh ginger, unpeeled, 1/2 inch thick
1/2 large yellow onion, peeled
2 pound beef cross shanks, 1-1/2 inches thick
1-1/2 pound oxtails
1-1/2 pound beef brisket
3-1/2 tablespoons fish sauce
1 pound beef eye of round roast, very thinly sliced (keep refrigerated until ready to serve)
8 cups shirotaki noodles (Non-Paleo version: dried rice noodles)FOR THE TABLE:2 limes, cut into wedges
2 jalapeño peppers, sliced
1 bunch fresh cilantro
1 bunch fresh Thai basil (or regular Italian basil)
1 bunch fresh mint
2 cups bean sprouts
Sriracha sauce (store bought or 20 Minute Sriracha Recipe)

Directions:

1. In a large saucepan over medium-high heat, add all spices and toast until they become fragrant. Take care not to burn them! Place them in a coffee filter or piece of cheesecloth and tie it up. Place the sachet into the pressure cooker pot.
2. In the same sauce pan over medium-high heat, add 1 tablespoon butter (or oil) and add onion and ginger pieces. Brown until there is a nice sear on them. Remove them from the pan and place them in the pressure cooker.
3. Sear the meat in batches: add the remaining tablespoon of butter to the pan and sear the shank, oxtail and brisket. You'll do this in batches, all in a single layer. Give everything plenty of space so that they SEAR and brown. Crowding the pan will not brown the meat. Sear each side, remove each meat from the pan and add them to the pressure cooker.

4. Cover the contents of the pressure cooker with water or up to the fill line. Set your pressure cooker to cook for 60 minutes. This means it will cook under pressure for 60 minutes. It will take time to build up pressure (usually 30 minutes) and additional time to release pressure after cooking (usually 30 minutes).
Approximately: 30 minutes to build up pressure + 60 minutes under pressure + 30 minutes to release pressure. Exact timing is really not that important - and also depends on your pressure cooker system. Follow manufacturer instructions.

5. Once finished cooking and safe to open, open the pressure cooker and using a fine mesh or ladle, remove the top layer of fatty liquid that has accumulated on the surface of the broth and discard (there will be lots of it.) Remove the onion, ginger and spice sachet and discard. Remove the meat to your cutting board. Shred the brisket using two forks. Remove any other meat from bone.

6. The resulting broth is a concentrate. Dilute the pho concentrate with 4-6 cups of water. Season the Pho broth with fish sauce. Taste and add additional fish sauce if needed. Bring to a simmer on stovetop right before you are ready to serve.

Assemble the Pho Bowls:
Serve to order. In a large bowl for each person, add shirotaki noodles and meat (including the sliced eye of round). Pour the just-simmering hot broth into each bowl. Hot broth will cook the sliced eye of round. Serve with the remaining sides a la carte so each person can add whatever they'd like to their soup.

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Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork http://steamykitchen.com/23642-vietnamese-spring-rolls-slow-cooker-pork-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/23642-vietnamese-spring-rolls-slow-cooker-pork-recipe.html#comments Wed, 10 Oct 2012 19:41:35 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=23642 (Video) Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Orange Coriander Pork. Simple slow cooker recipe! Watch step by step video on how to roll Vietnamese Spring Rolls.

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Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork Recipe

I’ve been waiting MONTHS to share this video with you! We shot a series of cooking videos in Seattle back in June, when I was in town speaking at the BlogHer Food conference and tickling oysters.  The videos were produced by the National Pork Board and Costco, featuring pork and a few of my blogger friends – Sandy & Paul (Reluctant Entertainer), Diana (Eating Richly), Jenny (Picky Palate), Jessica (The Novice Chef), Lauren (Lauren’s Latest), Amanda (Kevin & Amanda).

I wanted to create a magical day for the gals, so we arranged to have a B-I-G stretch limo pick up all of us.

The limo was complete with sparkling disco lights, rockin’ music, lava lamps (all we were missing was a stripper pole in the middle).

Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork Recipe

Prior to shooting the video, each of us went through hair, makeup, food styling and video talent coaching. Some of the gals had never been on camera before, so it was important to get some tips and guidance from an industry pro.

Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork Recipe

So um, what does a video coach teach you? Well, uh….

Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork Recipe

You don’t realize how much you use these filler words until you tape yourself. I tend to use these fillers when I’m transitioning between finishing one sentence and not knowing what my next sentence would be quite yet.

Coach’s advice to me?

Now.

Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork Recipe

Honestly, I don’t remember what he said. Something about NOW.

Next up, hair and makeup. This is what it takes to make me “camera-ready.”

Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork Recipe

HOLD STILL, JADEN! | That’s the lovely Diana, who’s expecting a BOY!

Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork RecipeVietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork Recipe

Since we were shooting 5 different recipes with multiple bloggers, we also had a couple of food stylists help us cook, prep and pretty up the food. Each dish had to be planned out, including colors of napkins, the type of platter and what ingredient goes where.

Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork Recipe

And…..ACTION! (look closely! It’s an iPad!)

Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork Recipe

The cameras and lights can be a little intimidating if you’re not used to them. There were 3 cameramen, a sound guy, a lighting guy, a producer, food stylists, PR reps, the Pork team and then all of us.

Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork Recipe

In between takes, hair and makeup sneak in to touch up.

Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork Recipe

Put 8 food bloggers in a room, turn on a video camera, and you’re sure to get some bloopers! See end of post for the blooper reel!

Big thanks to Pork Board and to Costco for producing these videos! My dish that I made with pork was Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork. I used Sirloin Tip Roast – a very lean and flavorful cut perfect for roasting and slow cooking. It feeds a big crowd on a small budget! Enjoy the recipe!

Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork Recipe

How to roll Vietnamese Spring Rolls

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Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork Recipe

Servings: 8 to 10 Prep Time: 10 minutes for the pork + 25 minutes for assembly Cook Time: 3 3/4 hours
Vietnamese-Spring-Roll-Pork-Recipe-feature-16

Please watch the video for detailed wrapping instructions. For the dipping sauce, purchase Sweet Chili Sauce, usually found in regular supermarkets, in the Asian section. It's sold in glass bottles and is bright orange/red in color. The Sweet Chili Sauce is sweet, and not too spicy. Alternatively, you could use other sweet sauces like "Duck Sauce" or "Sweet Plum Sauce".

If you don't have a slow cooker - roast the pork in the oven, 275F for 4 hours.

Ingredients:

FOR THE ORANGE CORIANDER PORK
2 pound boneless pork sirloin tip roast
1 teaspoon ground coriander
3/4 teaspoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 onion, cut into thick slices
1 orange, cut into 1/4-inch-thick rounds (do not peel)
1 cup orange juice
1 cup canned chicken broth
2 tablespoons fish sauce or soy sauce
2 teaspoons finely chopped fresh ginger
6 garlic cloves, smashed under a knife & peeled

FOR THE ROLL ASSEMBLY
one 8-oz. package (8-inch-diameter) rice spring roll wrappers (22 wrappers)
2 cups matchstick cut carrots
1 cucumber, cut into matchstick (English or Japanese cucumber preferred)
1 medium red bell pepper, cut into matchsticks
2 cups packed baby spinach leaves
sprigs of fresh mint and basil leaves
1 cup prepared Sweet Chili Sauce

Directions:

FOR THE SLOW COOKER PORK
Season pork roast with coriander, salt and pepper. To the slow cooker, add orange juice, broth, fish sauce, garlic and ginger. Scatter half the onion and orange in the slow cooker, top with pork, then add remaining onion and orange on top of the pork. Cover and cook on low until an instant-read thermometer inserted in the center of the pork registers 160F, about 3-4 hours. Transfer the pork to a carving board. Rest for at least 15 minutes.

FOR THE ASSEMBLY:
Slice pork across the grain into very thin slices. Divide into 22 portions. Half-fill a wide bowl with warm water. For each roll, dip 1 wrapper for 5 seconds. Shake
off the excess water from the wrapper and place on clean and dry surface. The rice paper will still be a little stiff, but don't worry, it will soften up. Fold the rice paper in half to make half-moon shape. Place 1 portion of pork at the bottom of the wrapper and top with carrot, cucumber, bell pepper, spinach leaves and herbs. Roll up the wrapper tightly. Place roll on a platter and cover with a barely damp towel to keep moist. The rolls can be made and refrigerated up to 2 hours ahead. Serve chilled with the Sweet Chili Sauce for dipping.

Our Blooper Reel!

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Vietnamese Barbecued Lemongrass Beef http://steamykitchen.com/14565-vietnamese-barbecued-lemongrass-beef.html http://steamykitchen.com/14565-vietnamese-barbecued-lemongrass-beef.html#comments Mon, 14 Mar 2011 01:09:04 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=14565 I think this is my second favorite Vietnamese dish, right after Pho. It’s light, healthy and incorporates the salty, sweet, tangy, spicy, sour elements that make Vietnamese food so tasty. Recipe for Vietnamese Barbecued Lemongrass Beef, courtesy of Periplus Publishing on my other site, New Asian Cuisine.

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I think this is my second favorite Vietnamese dish, right after Pho. It’s light, healthy and incorporates the salty, sweet, tangy, spicy, sour elements that make Vietnamese food so tasty.

Recipe for Vietnamese Barbecued Lemongrass Beef, courtesy of Periplus Publishing on my other site, New Asian Cuisine.

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Slow Cooker Vietnamese Chicken Pho Ga http://steamykitchen.com/13332-slow-cooker-vietnamese-chicken-pho-ga.html http://steamykitchen.com/13332-slow-cooker-vietnamese-chicken-pho-ga.html#comments Fri, 21 Jan 2011 22:53:54 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=13332 Cook Vietnamese chicken pho in a slow cooker! From cookbook author Jaden Hair.

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Bon Appétit and I are celebrating slow cookers this month — I’ve created three incredible slow cooker recipes for them, Slow Cooker Vietnamese Pho Ga Noodle Soup; Slow Cooker Cedar Planked Salmon and Slow Cooker Moroccan Lamb Stew. Oh, and if you don’t have a slow cooker, guess what? Bon Appétit is giving away a $150 KitchenAid Slow Cooker to one lucky duck.

For the full recipe for Slow Cooker Vietnamese Chicken Pho Ga Noodle Soup, head over to Bon Appetit. I’ll go into more detail about 3 of the secrets to the recipe.

Slow Cooker Vietnamese Chicken Pho Ga Noodle Soup

Vietnamese Slow Cooker Chicken Pho Ga Recipe

Secret #1: The Moist Chicken

See how moist and tender that chicken is? The secret is to separate your chicken. Chicken bones and parts for the broth; and 1 chicken breast reserved for slicing and eating with your Pho Ga.

The chicken bones and parts go into the slow cooker to make the soup.

The chicken breast is thinly sliced and poached just before serving – cooks in 3-4 minutes. If I had cooked the chicken-for-eating in the slow cooker, it would be flavorless and tough. All of the flavor would have transferred into the broth….and chicken cooked for hours on end in a slow cooker ends up chewy and tough.

Secret #2: Size Matters

Let’s talk about the Pho Ga soup for a bit. I add 2 pounds of chicken parts, whole coriander seeds, half an onion, ginger slices, whole cloves, star anise, and a bundle of cilantro.

Of the 2 pounds of chicken, 1/2 pound of that should be wing tips. Most slow cooker have capacity of 7 quarts. The chunkier the chicken, the less room you have left for broth.

Chicken wing TIPS (the section that really has no meat anyways) have maximum flavor, minimum size. That’s why I love using wing tips. Or chicken feet, if you can find them (did I hear someone squeal?! chicken feet is great for soup!) So remember, size matters. A 7-quart slow cooker will make enough Pho Ga soup for 4 big bowls.

After taking out the big chicken parts, I’ll strain through cheesecloth just to ensure that the broth is clean and clear. For cooking noobs, here’s something to remember. Anytime you are cooking raw chicken in simmering water, you’ll get quite a bit of “white stuff” in the water. Don’t be afraid of it, it’s just chicken protein. If you have time on your hands, you could parboil the bones first in a stock pot, discard water (and “white stuff”) and then proceed with the recipe. But if you have time on your hands, you could just make Pho Ga without the slow cooker.

Straining the broth gives you golden, richly colored, clean soup.

Secret # 3: The Noodles

Soak the dried noodles in COOL water first then DRAIN. This helps makes them pliable, soft and cook better.

To cook the noodles, bring a pot of water to boil and then put the cool drained noodles into the hot water and simmer for 1 minute. After 1 minute — the noodles are DONE!!! That’s it. Don’t overcook the rice noodles, they’ll get too soft and soggy.

Oh and a note on why I boil my noodles in water instead of the pho ga broth we made? Well, I always boil my noodles and pasta separately from my precious soup. That’s because dried noodles/pasta tend to have excess starch that boils out into the water (that’s why boiled pasta water is murky) and many times the dried noodles might have itty bitty weevils or dirt particles that I just don’t want in my soup.

Not so secret secret:

I love garnishing with shaved onions, fresh bean sprouts, cilantro and a squeeze of lime. No Sriracha or Hoisin for me, though many people do enjoy those condiments in their Pho Ga, I think it totally overpowers the beautiful broth.

For the full recipe for Slow Cooker Vietnamese Chicken Pho Ga Noodle Soup, head over to Bon Appetit.

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Crock Pot Pho (Vietnamese Beef Noodle Soup) http://steamykitchen.com/3136-crock-pot-pho.html http://steamykitchen.com/3136-crock-pot-pho.html#comments Mon, 04 May 2009 12:00:16 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/?p=3136     It’s no secret that good Pho broth requires a gazillion hours of simmering time. Time that I just don’t have. Tony, a boyfriend from a lifetime ago, told me his Dad used to simmer giant vats of pho broth overnight for his little pho restaurant in Houston. So, one day, I thought it would be really genius to ...

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Crockpot Pho Recipe   

It’s no secret that good Pho broth requires a gazillion hours of simmering time. Time that I just don’t have. Tony, a boyfriend from a lifetime ago, told me his Dad used to simmer giant vats of pho broth overnight for his little pho restaurant in Houston. So, one day, I thought it would be really genius to do the same. Dump a bunch of beefy, tendony, knuckley, marrowey bones into the largest stockpot that I have and let it simmer away while I slept.

Crockpot Pho Recipe

It didn’t quite work out as I had intended:

11:30pm Initial hard boil of the bones to get all the yuck, guck and scum off. Char ginger and onion.

11:38pm Dumped out water, added clean water, the clean bones, spices, ginger and onion. Let the dance begin.

11:45pm Nighty-night

12:35am Is the flame low enough? Maybe I need to check to see.

1:23am Hmmm…I smell something funny. Go check.

2:41am What if it boiled over? Go check.

3:24am What if there’s a gas bubble in the pipe and the the stove spontaneously bursts out in big flames? Maybe I should sleep on the couch closer to the kitchen.

4:45am Gosh I’m hungry. Sneak a big spoonful of Ben & Jerry’s Pistachio Ice Cream.

4:51am Did I forget to put ice cream back in freezer? What if the gas bubble really does happen and stove spontaneously bursts out in flames? Then sleeping on couch is a dumbass idea. Crawl back to bed.

6:00am Kids wake up. Jumps up and down on my belly trying to wake me up.

6:15am PHO-KING TIRED

Enter the Slow Cooker

A few weeks later, I was contacted by the peeps at Crock-Pot® The Original Slow Cooker <- yes, they are insanely paranoid about me using their correct trademarked name, so much that they’ve given me very specific instructions 4 separate times on how to properly spell/mark their product names.) They sent me their new eLume Crock-Pot® Programmable Slow Cooker with Touch Screen Technology to test.

crock-pot-elume <- shiny, pretty and fancy. Oh crap, I forgot the ™ after eLume™.

It’s the perfect size (6.5 quarts) for a big mean mama pot of PHO!!!

Oh yeah, baby! It solves my problem of paranoia when leaving stove on all night.

What I love about the eLume™ Crock Pot® is© its™ lighted™© touchscreen®™©. Just a light tap is all that you need and it’s totally programmable from 30 minutes to 20 hours of cooking time. You can also set it to start cooking at a certain time, but when making my Crock Pot Pho Recipe, I don’t recommend a delayed start time since we are working with raw meat bones.

Crockpot Pho Recipe

How to make Crock Pot Pho

Whether you use the Crock Pot Pho method or the traditional stove top method, there are a couple of steps that you’ll need to do before throwing it all in the Crock Pot or slow cooker. Namely, toasting the spices, grilling the onion/ginger and pre-boiling the bones. These aren’t absolutely necessary steps…you’ll still make great pho…BUT these extra steps will make the difference between good pho and pho-bulous pho.

Toasting the Vietnamese Pho Spices

Toasting spices for Crock pot Vietnamese pho

You can buy Pho spices at most Asian supermarkets – you can buy the spices separately (coriander seeds, cloves, cinnamon, star anise, fennel and cardamom pod) or purchase them already mixed up in a package (which also includes a small mesh bag). The quality of these pre-mixed spices are just okay – but sometimes it’s just convenient to pick up a bag, not to mention much cheaper if you don’t already have many of these spices. A Pho spice pack will typically sell for $1-$3.

This day that I made the Crock Pot Pho, I used individual spices. I didn’t have cardamom pod. So yes, if you are missing one of couple of the spices, it’s okay. To get the best flavor from these spices, you’ll toast them in a dry skillet.

Grilling Ginger and Onion

This is a totally optional step, but it really gives the ginger and the onion a deep, sweet, mellow flavor. When I’m making Pho the traditional stovetop way, I’ll char them in the broiler. But with the crock pot method, I didn’t want to use the oven at all. After toasting the spices (above) in a frying pan, I add a bit of oil and grilled the onion half and thick ginger slices.

crockpot-pho-beef_090418__004_onion-web

Pre-Boiling the Bones

Knuckles, leg bones with lots of marrow are the best for making soup. The marrow will also make the soup rich and thick. The bones are pre-boiled for a few minutes on high heat to clean the bones and get rid of the nasty scum.

You’ll bring a big stockpot of water to a boil on high heat. Add the bones and boil hard for 10 minutes. You’ll see brownish scum rise to the surface. If you hadn’t taken the time to pre-boil the bones, all that scummy stuff ends up in your soup.

crockpot-pho-beef_090418__003_scum-web <– nasty pho-reaky scum

Drain, discard the scummy water and briefly rinse the bones.

Now you’ll add the spices, ginger, onion and bones to the slow cooker.

crockpot-pho-beef_090418__008_pot-web

Fill with fresh, clean, cool water about 1-1/2 inches below the surface. Set your slow cooker on low for 8 hours. I haven’t tried this method on high, but I’m sure it would be just fine.

So let this cook during all day while you’re at work or at night while you sleep and you’ll be rewarded with the cleanest, best tasting pho soups ever. Because the slow cooker doesn’t let the stock boil hard, it’s safe, easy and convenient.

Here’s what the stock looks like when it’s been cooking for 8 hours on low. Notice that the level of the liquid is still pretty high. The low, even setting doesn’t evaporate the precious liquid as much as a stove top can. The stock is strained before serving.

Crock Pot Pho Soup

Other Pho Ingredients

I used different ingredients than my previous version of traditional Vietnamese Pho and I wanted to highlight them. Instead of using dried rice noodles, I used fresh rice noodles found at Asian markets, in the refrigerated section because all these need is a quick dip in boiling water. Very fast!

Crock Pot Pho Noodles

I also bought a package of Vietnamese Beef Balls (called Bo Vien Dan). There are all sorts of balls – beef, pork, chicken, fish, crab, and my favorite – beef tendon. They come frozen in a package and they are pre-cooked, so all you need to do is throw the frozen balls into the same pot of boiling water as you cooked your noodles in. Just boil for a couple of minutes until the beef balls are heated through. I like cutting these beef balls in half, so make them easier to eat. It’s not so pretty trying to stick an entire beef ball in your mouth. Unless…you’re like really into that.

Crock Pot Pho Beef Balls

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Crockpot Pho Recipe

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Crock Pot Pho Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: Cook Time:
crockpot vietnamese pho

This is a recipe for a 6.5 quart (or larger) Crock Pot. Any smaller really isn't that great - you won't get enough stock out of it...because the beef bones are really chunky and big. The thinly sliced meat for the bowls may be easier to slice if you freeze the chunk of meat for 15 minutes prior to slicing. You really want them as thin a possible. You can also do what I do - palm your butcher a $5 bill and he'll slice the meat for you on his fancy slicing machine

Ingredients:

For the Pho Stock:
4 pounds beef bones
1/2 onion
4 inch section of ginger, sliced
1 package Vietnamese Pho Spices (or as many of these spices as you have: 2 cinnamon sticks, 2 teaspoons whole coriander, 1 teaspooon fennel, 3 whole star anise, 3 whole cloves, 1 cardamom pod)
9 cups water
2 1/2 tablespoons fish sauce or to taste
1 teaspoon sugarFor the Pho Bowls
16 ounces fresh or dried rice noodles
1/2 pound flank, london broil, sirloin or eye of round steak, sliced as thinly as possible.
11 ounces Vietnamese beef balls, cut into halfFor the table
1-2 limes, cut into wedges
fresh herbs: cilantro, Thai basil, mint
2-3 chili peppers, sliced
2 big handfuls of bean sprouts
Hoisin sauce
Sriracha hot chili sauce

Directions:

1. Bring a large stockpot with water to boil over high heat. When it comes to a rolling boil, add the beef bones and boil vigourously for 10 minutes.

2. In the meantime, heat a frying pan on medium-low heat. Add the Vietnamese Pho Spices and toast until fragrant, about 2-3 minutes. Dump the spices to the empty Crock Pot or slow cooker immediately. Return frying pan to medium-high heat and add 1 tablespoon of oil. When the oil is hot, add the ginger slices and the onion half. Cook until the ginger is browned on both sides and the onion half is nicely browned and softened. Add the ginger and the onion to the Crock Pot or slow cooker.

3. When the bones have been pre-boiled, drain, discard water and rinse bones briefly to clean them. Add the bones to the Crock Pot or slow cooker. Fill the Crock Pot with fresh, clean, cool water to just 1-1/2 inches below surface, add the fish sauce and sugar. Cover and set the Crock Pot or slow cooker to cook on low for 8 hours. Taste and season with additional fish sauce if needed.

4. When you are just about ready to eat, you'll prep the rest of the ingredients for the Pho bowls. Bring a pot of water to a boil. Add the beef balls and cook until heated through, about 2 minutes. Remove the balls, keeping the water boiling and now cook the noodles according to package instructions. If you are using fresh noodles, all they need is a couple of minutes. Drain immediately.

5. Strain the stock with a fine meshed sieve. Discard the solids.

6. Line up 4 large bowls on counter. Distribute the noodles, beef balls and thin steak slices evenly amongst the bowls. Ladle the hot Pho stock into each bowl. The hot stock should cook the thin steak slices. Serve with lime wedges, fresh herbs, chili peppers, Hoisin sauce and Sriracha hot chili sauce at the table.

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vietnamese-pho-beef-noodle-soup-recipe Vietnamese Pho Recipe (cooked the traditional, long, slow, stovetop method)

vietnamese-chicken-pho-recipe Vietnamese Chicken Pho Recipe (Pho Ga)

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Red Lantern Grilled Sirloin with Chile, Garlic, and Ginger http://steamykitchen.com/2631-red-lantern-grilled-sirloin.html http://steamykitchen.com/2631-red-lantern-grilled-sirloin.html#comments Sun, 22 Feb 2009 16:58:01 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/?p=2631 Photo of Red Lantern’s Grilled Sirloin with Chile, Garlic and Ginger courtesy of Secrets of the Red Lantern Cookbook I love my friends! I needed a few more shots for the cookbook, and asked my good friends Matt and Dannika of MattikaArts if he’d like to take a shot {pun intended..haha i soooo funny! snort.} at photographing some Asian ingredients ...

The post Red Lantern Grilled Sirloin with Chile, Garlic, and Ginger appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

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red-lantern-cookbook-steak1

Photo of Red Lantern’s Grilled Sirloin with Chile, Garlic and Ginger courtesy of Secrets of the Red Lantern Cookbook

I love my friends!

I needed a few more shots for the cookbook, and asked my good friends Matt and Dannika of MattikaArts if he’d like to take a shot {pun intended..haha i soooo funny! snort.} at photographing some Asian ingredients and be published in the Steamy Kitchen Cookbook!

This all happened via email and I swear to Buddha that I heard him giggle.

matt <– this guy…he giggled in his email, I could hear it between the commas!

And look at the beautiful photos he took – they will be in the Ingredients section of the Steamy Kitchen Cookbook!

Click on the photo below for the slideshow – there are a total of 7 photos.

matt-wright-photos-01-2

(click on photo for slideshow of 7 photos)

How could you not fall in love with this man???

***

Cookbook Giveaway Winner

Time sure flies by…one minute I’m posting Red Lantern’s Crisp Parcels or Vietnamese Spring Rolls (Cha Gio) and giving away a copy of the caress-me-now cookbook, secrets-red-lantern Secrets of the Red Lantern by Pauline Nguyen – and then a week passes by. I was supposed to draw a random name as the winner. Oops! Got busy, missed deadline…so what’s another day? Well, then another week passes by and here I am, totally apologizing to you for being late announcing the lucky winner of Secrets of the Red Lantern Cookbook!

So, without further delay (cuz you know I’m good at that!) the winner of the cookbook is

Grace says:

Just by reading your post I’m completely sold and intensely craving spring rolls. I prefer my with bean thread/veggie/pork filling but when necessity and/or boredom strikes I grab just about anything from the fridge.

Congrats Grace! Email me your deets and I’ll have the publisher send the book to you: jaden{at}steamykitchen{dot}com.

Red Lantern’s Grilled Sirloin with Chile, Garlic, and Ginger Recipe

Bo Nuong Toi Gung
Two 1/2 pound sirloin steaks
2 handfuls shredded green papaya
1 small handful mixed herbs (perilla, Vietnamese mint, and basil)
1 tablespoon fried shallots
1 tablespoon dried shrimp, soaked in hot water for 5 minutes and drained
3 tablespoons dipping fish sauce

MARINADE
2 teaspoons pickled chili
2 cloves garlic, finely minced
¾-inch piece of ginger, grated with microplane grater
2 tablespoons Asian fish sauce
1 tablespoon superfine sugar
2 teaspoons vegetable oil
Pinch of salt
Mix all the marinade ingredients together until the sugar dissolves. Add the steaks and marinate for 2 hours in the fridge. Grill the steaks over medium to high heat, to your preference (6 minutes for rare, 10 minutes for medium), then rest the steaks for 5 minutes. Reheat the steaks on the grill pan, then cut into thin slices.
Serve with a salad of green papaya, mixed herbs, fried shallots, and dried shrimp, dressed with dipping fish sauce.
SERVES 4

Dipping Fish Sauce

Nuoc Mam Cham

3 tablespoons Asian fish sauce
3 tablespoons rice vinegar
2 tablespoons sugar
2 cloves garlic
1 bird’s-eye chili
2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lime juice

Combine the fish sauce, rice vinegar, ½ cup of water, and sugar in a saucepan and place over medium heat. Stir well and cook until just before boiling point is reached, then allow to cool. To serve, finely chop the garlic and chile and stir in the lime juice.
MAKES 1 CUP

Fried Shallots

Hanh Phi

½ pound shallots, peeled
4 cups vegetable oil

Finely slice the shallots and wash under cold water. Dry the shallots with a cloth, then set them aside on some paper towel until they are completely dry.
Put the oil in a wok and heat to 350 degrees F, or until a cube of bread dropped in the oil browns in 15 seconds. Fry the shallots in small batches until they turn golden brown, then remove with a slotted spoon to a paper towel.
The fried shallots are best eaten freshly fried but will keep for up to 2 days in an airtight container.

—Recipe from secrets-red-lantern Secrets of the Red Lantern by Pauline Nguyen

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