Steamy Kitchen Recipes | RSS Feed http://steamykitchen.com Steamy Kitchen Food Blog: fast recipes, simple recipes, with fresh ingredients to create delicious meals. Thu, 16 Apr 2015 20:35:08 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.1.1 Lemon, Cinnamon and Curry Leaf Basmati Rice http://steamykitchen.com/39725-lemon-cinnamon-curry-leaf-basmati-rice-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/39725-lemon-cinnamon-curry-leaf-basmati-rice-recipe.html#comments Mon, 13 Apr 2015 17:03:29 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=39725 In this Lemon, Cinnamon and Curry Leaf Basmati Rice recipe: Flavoring plain basmati rice with fragrant cinnamon, curry leaf and lemon Stunning presentation, rice baked in a pan Customize with your own spice and herb combination Recipe from award-winning chef, Yotam Ottolenghi This past week, my parents came to visit for a few days, to see the family, relax from the ...

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Lemon and Curry Leaf Rice Recipe

In this Lemon, Cinnamon and Curry Leaf Basmati Rice recipe:

  • Flavoring plain basmati rice with fragrant cinnamon, curry leaf and lemon
  • Stunning presentation, rice baked in a pan
  • Customize with your own spice and herb combination
  • Recipe from award-winning chef, Yotam Ottolenghi

This past week, my parents came to visit for a few days, to see the family, relax from the bustle of Las Vegas, where they reside, and to cook for their daughter (me!) My Mom is a cookbook collector of all cuisines, with an entire room in the house dedicated to her glorious collection.

During this visit, I let my Mom have a go at my own glut of cookbooks that I’ve collected over the years, many of which come directly from publishers, pitching their latest releases. In what I would describe as one of the greatest gifts that I could bestow upon my Mother, I told her, “You may have any of my cookbooks – take as many as you’d like!”

My Mom gleefully spent hours sitting in front of my bookshelf, sliding one cookbook off at a time, flipping through them, and sorting which she would like. Mom doesn’t have many hobbies, but cooking and cookbooks are one of them.

I didn’t peek. I didn’t tell her which books were hands off, and I didn’t even hide any of my favorites! Mom was thrilled and even sent me a photo after she arrived back home – of her haul.

It wasn’t until today, writing this post, that I panicked a little. “What if she took Plenty More Cookbook?!”

I’m not ashamed to tell you that I did run back to the bookshelves, scanned quickly but didn’t find it on my first pass – and my heart sank. My second pass on the shelves spotted the book, sitting safe and sound right in front of me. “Whew!”

Plenty MoreI’m not the only who loves this book, Plenty More: Vibrant Vegetable Cooking from London’s Ottolenghi was nominated as a finalist in the James Beard Awards. It’s well deserved, with 150 recipes featuring vegetables, and stunning, earthy photographs that highlight creative cooking techniques beyond the simple braise, boil and bake.

Yotam Ottolenghi HeadshotWhy I cherish Plenty More Cookbook:
We’re thrilled to be sharing with you a recipe from the book, Lemon, Cinnamon and Curry Leaf Rice.

With all the fun gadgets at my disposal for making rice (I love to use the microwave to cook rice or my ultra fancy, technology wizard Zojurishi Rice Cooker), I rarely bake rice.

Such a shame, because the technique produces rice that is cooked more evenly and produces a nuttier, more flavorful rice. If you add aromatics, like lemon, cinnamon sticks and curry leaf, “this will be a revelation…” notes Ottolenghi.

What is curry leaf?

Curry leaf are the leaves of a South Asian curry tree, often used in Southern Indian, Cambodian and Malaysian cooking. The flavor is complex, pungently lemon, and is added to dishes as a whole leaf. The curry leaf is deeply aromatic, just a few leaves can flavor an entire dish. It’s called curry leaf, because the leaf is most often added into Indian curries, though I really love stir frying with whole curry leaves too.

We used have a curry tree growing at our old house, but sadly, it died after being forgotten in a corner of our garden. These days, when I need curry leaves, I head to a local Indian grocery store. If you can’t find the leaves fresh, they will probably have them frozen. The leaves freeze really well! If you buy a bunch, feel free to freeze the rest. The color of the leave will darken when frozen, but the flavor will be preserved.

More about Curry Leaves

What if I don’t have curry leaves?

No problem! Use any herb that you love – from basil, parsley, bay leaves….to sage, oregano, cilantro and dill. Of course, the flavor profile of the rice will be different from the intended recipe, but use any spice/herb combination with this same exact cooking technique.

Learn more about Plenty More and Yotam Ottolenghi

Plenty More: Vibrant Vegetable Cooking from London’s Ottolenghi

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Lemon, Cinnamon and Curry Leaf Basmati Rice Recipe

Servings: Serves 4 Prep Time: 5 minutes Cook Time: 40 minutes
Lemon and Curry Leaf Rice Recipe

Reprinted with permission from Plenty More: Vibrant Vegetable Cooking from London's Ottolenghi, copyright © 2014. Published by Ten Speed Press, an imprint of Random House LLC. Photography credit: Jonathan Lovekin © 2014

This will be a revelation to those who tend toward plain steamed basmati. The method is fail-safe, and the result is stunning. Serve this rice with an Asian savory pickle to make a vegetarian meal, or next to a freshly roasted chicken. Try to look for fresh curry leaves for this dish, using them on the stem. They freeze well, so don’t worry if you end up getting a large bunch.

Ingredients:

5 short cinnamon sticks
10 whole cloves
1 lemon
3 stems fresh curry leaves (about 25 leaves)
2 cups basmati rice
1/4 cup unsalted butter
salt and pepper

Directions:

Prep:
In a large bowl, add the basmati rice. Fill bowl with water, swish the rice around a bit, drain the water (just use your hands to cup the rice and keep from spilling out), and repeat again. Fill again with water and let rice soak for 15 minutes.

In the meantime, heat your oven to 400F. Using a vegetable peeler, peel the rind off of the lemon in large strips (yellow part only). Cut lemon in half, squeeze out 1 tablespoon of the lemon juice.

Cook:
Put the cinnamon sticks, cloves, lemon rind, curry leaves, 1-1/2 teaspoons salt, and 1/2 teaspoon pepper in a saucepan. Cover with 2-3/4 cups of water and place over high heat. As soon as the water boils, remove the pan from the heat.

Spread the rice out in a baking dish or roasting pan approximately 9-1/2 by 12 inches, cover with the boiled water and aromatics, and stir well. Lay a piece of waxed paper over the surface of the water and cover the dish with aluminum foil. Cook in the oven for 25 minutes, then remove and leave to sit, covered, for 8 to 10 minutes.

Just before serving, melt the butter in a small saucepan. Once it’s melted and very hot, carefully add the lemon juice and swirl together to mix. Pour this over the hot rice and fluff up the rice with a fork. Transfer to a serving bowl and serve at once (you can remove the curry stems and cinnamon sticks or keep for the look).

 

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Thai Chicken Coconut Soup http://steamykitchen.com/39761-thai-chicken-coconut-soup-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/39761-thai-chicken-coconut-soup-recipe.html#comments Tue, 31 Mar 2015 15:43:48 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=39761 This recipe features: Classic Thai flavors, with a smooth, velvety soup Amp of the intensity of the herbs with a quick sauté of lemongrass, cilantro stems, garlic and ginger Customize soup by adding shrimp or mushroom (canned Asian straw mushrooms work really well) Southeast Asian cuisine features what I call the 5S’s – salty, sweet, sour, spicy, savory. This classic combination is ...

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Thai_Chicken_Soup_Coconut5233

This recipe features:

  • Classic Thai flavors, with a smooth, velvety soup
  • Amp of the intensity of the herbs with a quick sauté of lemongrass, cilantro stems, garlic and ginger
  • Customize soup by adding shrimp or mushroom (canned Asian straw mushrooms work really well)

Southeast Asian cuisine features what I call the 5S’s – salty, sweet, sour, spicy, savory. This classic combination is what makes Thai Chicken Coconut Soup so irresistible – the initial kick of the spicy chile pepper and lime, followed by salty/savory that’s tempered with a touch of sugar. The creamy coconut milk lingers to soothe the spiciness and allows all the distinct flavors to play nicely with each other.

Thai Chicken Coconut Soup Recipe

 

Everyday Easy by Lorraine Pascale

This recipe is from Chef Lorraine Pascale, a #1 bestselling author in the U.K.  Her book, Everyday Easy features elegant, fuss-free cooking for weeknight dinners.

Lorraine Pascale is the undisputed queen of the kitchen, queen of the simple and the simply delicious.Jamie Oliver

Recipes include:

  • Thai Beef Salad with Roasted Peanuts and Chili Dressing
  • Shrimp Caeser Salad
  • Lozza’s Lamb Biryani
  • Goat Cheese, Toasted Hazelnut & Honey Quesadillas with Arugula Salad
  • Crouching Tiger, Hidden Zebra Cake

and many, many more. Each recipe is easy, breezy and complete with a gorgeous color photograph. The Thai Chicken Coconut Soup Recipe is by Lorraine Pascale, photo is also from the cookbook, by Myles New.

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Thai Chicken Coconut Soup Recipe

Servings: Serves 4 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes
Thai_Chicken_Soup_Coconut5233

From Everyday Easy by Lorraine Pascale. Text copyright 2012 by Lorraine Pascale. Photographs copyright 2012 by Myles New. Excerpted by permission of Ecco, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers.

Note: Lemongrass stalk can be found at many large supermarkets (look near where they sell fresh ginger.) If you can't find a whole stalk, look for it in a tube. Many supermarkets carry lemongrass already pulverized, ready to use. Gourmet Garden is a brand I've used before (though fresh is still best.) I've also seen minced lemongrass frozen too. Another option - use a vegetable peeler to cut 2 strips of lemon peel (avoid the white, bitter pith, just the lemon skin.) I like to peel a big piece, use my fingers to twist it about to release its oils.

Same for kaffir lime leaves. If you can't find it fresh, try frozen kaffir lime leaves. Another option - peel 2 strips of lime peel. Lime is already in the recipe, so cut the peel first before juicing for recipe.

Ingredients:

Vegetable oil
1 lemongrass stalk
2 garlic cloves
2-inch piece of fresh ginger
Large handful of fresh cilantro
3 kaffir lime leaves
Two 12-oz cans of coconut milk
1 cup plus 2 tbsp good-quality chicken stock
1 red chili
3 skinless, boneless chicken breasts
1 bunch of green onions
2 limes
2–3 tablespoons fish sauce
1–2 tsp sugar

Directions:

1. Heat a drizzle of oil in a large frying pan or wok on a medium heat.

2. Trim the lemongrass stalk and discard any tough outer leaves before finely chopping the white bit (discard the green bit as it can be quite bitter). Peel and finely chop the garlic and then peel the ginger and cut it into thin slivers. Tear the kaffir lime leaves in several places on the leaf (but keep the leaf intact.) Chop the stalks off the cilantro (in one go) and then finely slice them (keeping the cilantro leaves aside for later).

3. Carefully toss everything in the hot oil with the kaffir lime leaves and stir fry for a couple of minutes, being careful that nothing sticks and burns.

4. Next add the coconut milk and stock and bring to a simmer.

5. Meanwhile, halve the chili lengthwise and then finely slice it, leaving the seeds in if you like it quite fiery. Chop the chicken into bite-size pieces and add both ingredients to the now-simmering soup. Reduce the heat a little and leave it to bubble away for about 8 minutes until the chicken is cooked.

6. Finely slice the onions (both the green and the white bits), juice the limes and roughly chop half of the reserved cilantro leaves. Add these once the chicken is cooked and then leave to simmer for a final minute. Last, add enough fish sauce and sugar to taste.

7. Ladle into four serving bowls, scatter the remaining cilantro leaves over and serve.

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Steak with Kimchi Butter http://steamykitchen.com/20773-steak-with-kimchi-butter.html http://steamykitchen.com/20773-steak-with-kimchi-butter.html#comments Mon, 23 Mar 2015 17:07:00 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=20773 A couple of years ago, Todd, Diane and I flew to NYC to work on a small video project with the French Culinary Institute. We met up at the hotel on the first day and after a 14.63 second hello, we jumped into a cab and headed to Momofuku Saäm Bar. If you know us, food is on our minds ...

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A couple of years ago, Todd, Diane and I flew to NYC to work on a small video project with the French Culinary Institute. We met up at the hotel on the first day and after a 14.63 second hello, we jumped into a cab and headed to Momofuku Saäm Bar. If you know us, food is on our minds – ALL THE TIME. We’d rather stay in a clean hotel in the crappy part of town to save money — so that we could spend it on food…..which we did.

Our hotel….err….motel was nice, tidy but sooo small. If I wanted to stretch out my arms, I’d have to open the door to so. And I’d probably even hit the elevator button in the same motion.

But enough about the hotel, back to the food.

At Momofuku Milk Bar, we saw little jars of Kimchi Butter for sale (see DL’s mention and photo of the jar), and I was so tempted to buy a gallon to bring home with me, but I don’t think TSA would appreciate a vat of butter in my carry on.

Kimchi butter is spicy, savory, a touch of sour and is awwwwwesome on steak, burgers, vegetables or eggs. Psssstttt…..great hangover breakfast: scrambled eggs cooked with kimchi butter and a side of bacon.

Here’s my version that includes chopped kimchi, a spoonful of miso (for savory) and some good butter. Other things you can add to make your own – a few shakes of fish sauce, finely minced garlic, finely grated fresh ginger and Korean chili powder to make it more spicy.

Add everything to your food processor and whiz, whirl until everything has come together nicely. Or, if you like, just chop everything by hand and mix in a bowl.

You can put this in a jar and refrigerate, but I like to make Kimchi Butter logs that I can refrigerate or freeze. When I need some, I just cut off a piece of the log and return the rest to the freezer.

Kimchi Butter Logs

I use a sushi mat to make rolling a lot easier, but you really don’t need to if you don’t have one.

Lay the sushi mat on the counter with the slats going horizontal. Lay a large piece of plastic wrap on top.

Spoon the Kimchi Butter onto the plastic wrap.

Wrap the bottom edge of the plastic wrap up and over and shape loosely into a log shape. Try to keep a 1.5″ edge of plastic wrap  on both sides.

Grab the bottom of the sushi mat and roll on top of the log.

Now use two hands – right hand is pulling back on the mat to tighen the log. The other hand is holding the edge of the mat out. Notice that the edge of the mat (in my left hand) stays on top – do not let that edge tuck under the Kimchi Butter. Keep tugging and tightening until the Kimchi Butter is a nice, solid, evenly sized log. (this is also the way to make sushi rolls too)

Ta-da! Twist the ends and refrigerate or freeze.

Or you could just skip all this fancy rolling and place the Kimchi Butter in a jar or plastic tub to refrigerate.

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Steak with Kimchi Butter Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 15 minutes Cook Time: 20 minutes
Steak-Mushroom-Kimchi-Butter-Recipe-4916.jpg

Use this savory kimchi butter for so many things! Mix with steamed or roasted vegetables; cook with scrambled eggs; on a burger.

You can also store kimchi butter log in the freezer and just cut off what you need. For a spicier version, you can add a 1/4 teaspoon of Korean chili powder (or cayenne powder).

Ingredients:

FOR THE KIMCHI BUTTER:
1/4 cup prepared kimchi, finely chopped
1 teaspoon miso paste
1/2 cup butter, softened
FOR THE STEAKS:
4 steaks of your choice
12 ounces fresh mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons soy sauce
1 tablespoons fresh chives, minced
1/4 cup prepared kimchi, for garnish (optional)

Directions:

1. To make the Kimchi Butter - combine the kimchi, miso paste and butter (you can chop the kimchi by hand or add everything in a food processor give it a good whiz). Store Kimchi Butter in a jar or make a log (see photos above).

2. Preheat a large grill pan and grill the steaks to your liking. For 1" steaks medium-rare, I like to grill each side for 5 minutes on high heat. Then turn the heat to low, cover steaks loosely with tin foil and let finish cooking for an additional 3 minutes.

3. Remove the steaks to a plate to let rest. Return the same pan to the stove and turn heat to medium-high. Add 2 tablespoons of Kimchi Butter to the pan. When the butter is bubbling, add in the sliced mushrooms and cook for 5-7 minutes until tender. Stir in the soy sauce and the fresh chives. Serve mushrooms on top of the steaks with a side of kimchi.

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Guinness Corned Beef with Cabbage http://steamykitchen.com/14556-guinness-corned-beef-with-cabbage-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/14556-guinness-corned-beef-with-cabbage-recipe.html#comments Sat, 14 Mar 2015 13:13:27 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=14556 Guinness Corned Beef with Cabbage Recipe with step by step photos.

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What you’ll learn:

  • Using Guinness beer or an Irish Stout instead of water dramatically increases the flavor of the corned beef. The resulting sauce is dark, rich, complex flavor.
  • Beef brisket is usually packed in a solution of salts and preservatives – discard the solution and rinse beef before cooking.
  • Cooking in the oven, low and slow guarantees moist, flavorful, incredibly tender corned beef recipe.
  • Cooking the vegetables separately prevents the vegetable from overcooking and becoming mushy.

For several years, I used to work for Guinness, based in the San Francisco offices. Actually, I worked for their parent company, Diageo, working on a top-secret technology project and then moving on to their wine portfolio, helping them build their Internet strategy.

One of the perks of working for Diageo, was a trip to Scotland and London, and being immersed in the world of Guinness – from culture to dozens of recipes featuring Guinness as an integral ingredient. Unfortunately, we didn’t have time to make a side trip to Dublin, but perhaps in the near future, with my family.

Since that time, I’ve learned to use Guinness in place of water, stock and wine in recipes. It adds a deep, rich, earthy flavor profile to the dish. Naturally, Corned Beef with Cabbage featuring Guinness was a no-brainer to test.

We normally associate eating Corned Beef with Cabbage during St. Patrick’s Day, and ironically, the dish isn’t distinctly Irish — it’s more an Irish-American tradition, something we made up to go great with copious amounts of beer.

So I thought it would be fitting to braise this Corned Beef in Guinness Beer, instead of water or the “stuff” that the brisket is magically suspended in inside the package.

The “stuff” is a solution of salt, seasoning and other preservatives that I really don’t care for. It’s also incredibly salty. I always rinse the corned beef well, getting rid of the solution and then pat dry.

Why is it called “Corned Beef”?

After all these years of enjoying Corned Beef several times a year, I finally had the bright idea to actually look up why it was called “corned” beef.  Is there corn involved in the pickling process? Did a “Mr Corned” exist and it was named after him?

It turns out after a simple search, it’s an easy explanation. The beef brisket used in making Corned Beef is salt and pickle cured and the salt pellets used resemble corn kernals.

Okay, that makes sense.

How to Cook Corned Beef Recipe with Guinness and Cabbage

For the Corned Beef – you’ll need dark brown sugar, 2 bottles of Guinness, pickling spice (only if it doesn’t come in your corned beef package, onion, garlic and of course the corned beef meat that’s been rinsed very well and then patted dry.

This recipe works well either on the stove, oven or slow cooker.

Cut the onion and the garlic in half lengthwise. You’ll just need these halves.

In a large pot, combine the brown sugar and the Guinness.

Add the pickling spice, either that you’ve purchased (recommended) or the packet that comes with the meat.

Add the onion and garlic.

Then slide and snuggle in the beef.

Look at that beer froth!

We’re going to slow cook the Corned Beef in the oven, but first, let’s give it a head start on the stove and bring the beer to a simmer. Keep an eye on this – beer easily bubbles over and it’s a pain to clean. Of course, you could completely skip this route and throw this baby in the slow cooker.

After the liquid begins simmering, we’ll cover and slip it into the oven at 300F for 4-5 hours. Low ‘n slow.

I flip the meat once during the half-way point.

For the vegetables, here’s what you’ll need: cabbage, red potatoes, carrots and *whispers* Mangalitsa Pig Lard!!! Okay, you don’t need Mangalitsa Pig Lard — you could use bacon lardons (a la Michael Ruhlman, which I’ve borrowed his technique for the cabbage). But if either option just seems over the top, regular ol’ cooking oil will do just fine.

Why not throw the vegetable in with the corned beef? Well, two very good reasons:

1) The vegetables really don’t need that long to cook – I want my carrots to taste like carrots, not overcooked corned beef sauce.

2) Vegetables cooked with the meat always end up looking all brown and sad. I want my carrots to look like carrots!

Cooking them separately allows me to cook the vegetables perfectly. I add in some of the corned beef sauce to flavor the vegetables – just enough for nice flavor.

Cut the cabbage into 8 wedges, the potatoes and carrots into 3/4-inch chunks.

You’ll brown the cabbage wedges on each side. Medium heat, just a few minutes per side.

Then flip to brown the other side.

Next add the potatoes and the carrots.

Pour in 2 cups of the Corned Beef cooking liquid into the pot. The liquid is incredibly flavorful and will do wonders for the vegetables. I promise you, this is way better than just boiling cabbage in water!

Cover and cook for 15 minutes. Carefully remove the cabbage (it should be done by now) and leave the carrots and potatoes to cook for another 5-7 minutes, until they are cooked through. You can check by piercing with a paring knife or fork.

The last step is to sprinkle with freshly minced parsley.

Slice the corned beef and serve with the vegetables. Spoon some of the cooking liquid over the meat.

 

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Guinness Corned Beef with Cabbage Recipe

Servings: 6 Prep Time: 5 minutes Cook Time: 4 hours
guinness-corned-beef-cabbage-recipe-7725-2

Normally, brisket for corned beef is packaged suspended in some kind of brine loaded with preservatives and may come with a small pickling spice already. You want to make sure you rinse the brisket well, removing the thick brine. Pat very dry. You can use the small seasoning pickling spice in the package, or you can use your own spices.

You can use a slow cooker instead of cooking in oven.

Ingredients:

For the Corned Beef
2 bottles Guinness beer (or other stout beer)
2 tablespoons brown sugar
3 1/2 pound uncooked brisket for corned beef, rinsed well and patted dry
1 tablespoon pickling spice
1/2 onion
1 head garlic, halvedFor the Vegetables
1 head cabbage
1 tablespoon cooking oil
4-5 carrots, cut into 3/4-inch chunks
1 pound of red potatoes, cut into 3/4-inch chunks
2 tablespoons freshly minced fresh parsley

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 300F. In a large pot, whisk together the beer and the brown sugar. Snuggle in the brisket, it should almost be completely covered by the beer (see photo). Add the pickling spice, onion and the garlic. Bring to a simmer on the stovetop, uncovered is best so you can keep an eye on it. Boiled-over beer is no fun to clean.

2. Once it begins simmering, cover the pot and place in oven to roast for 4-6 hours, flipping meat once during halfway point. Remove from oven. Spoon out 2 cups of the corned beef braising liquid to cook the cabbage.

3. To make the vegetables, cut the cabbage into 8 wedges. In a separate large, wide pot, heat up oil on medium-high heat. When hot, add the cabbage wedges and cook until browned, about a 3-4 minutes. Turn to brown the other side. Add in the carrots and potatoes. Pour in the reserved corned beef cooking liquid, bring to a simmer and cover the pot. Turn the heat to low and let cook for 10-15 minutes. Use tongs or a large spoon to carefully remove the cabbage and reserve. Continue cooking the carrots and potato another 5-10 minutes or cooked though (pierce with fork to check doneness). Sprinkle with parsley and plate up with the cabbage.

4. Slice up the corned beef and serve with the cabbage and vegetables. Pour a bit of the sauce over the corned beef just before serving.

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Korean Bibimbap Recipe – Paleo and Low-Carb http://steamykitchen.com/39704-korean-bibimbap-recipe-paleo-low-carb-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/39704-korean-bibimbap-recipe-paleo-low-carb-recipe.html#comments Fri, 06 Mar 2015 22:30:24 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=39704 What you’ll learn: Bibimbap is a Korean dish with rice, mixed vegetables, meats and topped with an egg Low-carb & Paleo friendly dish, replacing the rice with spiralized & diced daikon radish Sizzling, savory dish with the classic ginger, scallions, garlic, soy sauce and sesame oil combination 30 minute meal from “Inspiralized Cookbook” by Ali Maffucci Bibimbap (BEE-beem-bop) is a classic Korean dish of steamed ...

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Bibimbap Recipe from Inspiralized

What you’ll learn:

  • Bibimbap is a Korean dish with rice, mixed vegetables, meats and topped with an egg
  • Low-carb & Paleo friendly dish, replacing the rice with spiralized & diced daikon radish
  • Sizzling, savory dish with the classic ginger, scallions, garlic, soy sauce and sesame oil combination
  • 30 minute meal from “Inspiralized Cookbook” by Ali Maffucci

Bibimbap (BEE-beem-bop) is a classic Korean dish of steamed rice served with ground meat (pork, beef, turkey or chicken), colorful vegetables, and a fried egg on top. It’s a savory, filling, hearty dish that is served in a big bowl.

Inspiralized by Ali MaffucciSome of the more traditional Korean restaurants will serve Bibimbap in a heavy, thick stone or cast iron bowl. The bowl is heated up first, the a little oil is drizzled in the bowl. Rice is added and pressed down into the hot oil – which then makes the rice delightfully crunchy and crispy on the bottom. Instead of a fried egg, sometimes a raw egg will be cracked on top, and when mixed in with the sizzling rice, coats every grain and cooks gently.

For those looking for a Paleo friendly or low-carb option for this Korean dish, Ali Maffuci, author of Inspiralized: Turn Vegetables into Healthy, Creative, Satisfying Meals and the blog, has created a brilliant alternative for the rice.

Replace the rice with the humble Asian daikon radish. Headshot

Surprisingly, when the “minced” daikon radish (using a spiralizer then pulsing in a food processor) is stir fried with ginger and garlic, it transforms into tender, aromatic morsels that easily tags along with accompanying ingredients in the bowl — just like rice.

If you’re living the Paleo lifestyle, or just want to steer clear of rice, pasta and breads, Ali’s Inspiralized Cookbook offers creative recipes that go beyond the normal, “replace spiralized zucchini for the noodles” shtick.

My favorite recipes are the ones that replace the rice – Spicy Seafood-Chorizo Paella and Sweet Potato Fried Rice are next on my list to try.

What spiralizer should I use?

Do you have a vegetable spiralizer? Create ribbons of “noodles” from all types of vegetables including zucchini (we call these zoodles), cucumber, daikon, sweet potatoes and more.

If you don’t know which one to buy, Watch my video review of different vegetable spiralizers and how to use them.





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Korean Bibimbap Recipe - Paleo and Low-Carb

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 15 minutes Cook Time: 20 minutes
Bibimbap_INSPIRALIZED

Reprinted with permission. Photo by Evan Sung/Recipe adapted from Inspiralized: Turn Vegetables into Healthy, Creative, Satisfying Meals

Gochujang is a Korean red pepper paste made from red chiles, glutinous rice and soybeans, found at Asian markets and many supermarkets. If you prefer your Bibimbap to not be spicy, look for Doenjang, which is a soybean paste without the chiles.

If you cannot find Doenjang, a suitable substitute would be miso paste, both are made from beans and will provide a umami-rich, savory flavor to the dish. Gochujang, Doenjang and Miso paste all store well in the refrigerator. If covered well (I press a piece of plastic wrap over the paste to minimize air), it will last for a year.

If you are a strict Paleo - replace the soy sauce with coconut aminos. Gochujang has a bit of sugar in it - so you can omit and replace with Asian red pepper powder or cayenne pepper powder.

Ingredients:

1 large cucumber
2-3 large daikon radishes, peeled
1 tablespoon low-sodium soy sauce
1 1/2 teaspoons rice vinegar
2 tablespoons gochujang (Korean red pepper paste)
1 teaspoon Asian sesame oil
2 teaspoons roasted sesame seeds
8 ounces lean ground pork
1/2 cup diced scallions, green and white parts
2 tablespoons finely minced garlic
1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger
salt, to taste
3 packed cups fresh spinach
4 large eggs
Cooking oil (vegetable, canola, coconut)

Directions:

1. Spiralize the cucumber, medium thickness, then set aside in refrigerator to keep cold. Spiralize the daikon radish, thin thickness (blade d). Place the spiralized daikon in a food processor and pulse until resembles size of rice grains. You should have approximately 3 cups of daikon rice.

2. In a medium bowl, whisk together the soy sauce, rice vinegar, gochujang, sesame oil and sesame seeds. Add in the ground pork to the bowl and let marinate on counter while you continue with recipe.

3. Heat a wok or large saute pan over medium-high heat. When hot, drizzle in cooking oil and swirl to coat pan. Add in the scallions, ginger and garlic. Stir fry for 15 seconds until fragrant. Add in the daikon "rice" and stir fry for about 5 minutes, until the daikon turns transluscent. Season salt to taste and toss well. Remove "rice" from pan, and cover to keep warm.

4. Wipe the pan clean. Return pan to medium-high heat. When hot, drizzle in just a little cooking oil. Add in the spinach and stir fry, tossing frequently, for 2 minutes, until spinach is wilted. Remove spinach to plate and set aside.

5. Wipe pan clean. Return same pan to medium heat. When hot, swirl in cooking oil. Crack in the eggs and cook without stirring for 3 minutes or until the egg whites are set on the edges. Cover pan, reduce heat to medium-low and cook for an additional 1-2 minutes until the egg whites are cooked through and the yolks still runny. Remove from pan to a plate, and set aside.

6. Return same pan to stove, set on high heat. When hot, swirl in cooking oil. Add in the marinated pork, breaking up the pork with your spatula. Cook pork for 4-5 minutes, until no longer pink and pork is cooked through.

7. Evenly divide the daikon rice, pork, spinach and cucumber noodles between four bowls. Top each bowl with a fried egg.

More Spiralized Vegetable Recipes

Pad Thai Zoodles (Steamy Kitchen)

Vegetables Spiralizer Comparison Video (Steamy Kitchen)

Cauliflower Fried Rice (Steamy Kitchen)

Zucchini Spaghetti, Crispy Prosciutto and Roasted Cauliflower with Lemon-Parmesan Sauce (Inspiralized)

Zucchini Noodles (Zoodles) with Lemon-Garlic Spicy Shrimp (Skinny Taste)

Zucchini “Noodles” with Sesame-Peanut Sauce (Fat Free Vegan)

Spiralized Zucchini Pasta with Creamy Avocado Sauce Recipe (The Watering Mouth)

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Chinese Stir Fried Pea Shoots http://steamykitchen.com/39585-chinese-stir-fried-pea-shoots.html http://steamykitchen.com/39585-chinese-stir-fried-pea-shoots.html#comments Fri, 20 Feb 2015 17:18:09 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=39585 What you’ll learn in this Pea Shoots Recipe: 15 minute recipe with step by step photos how to stir fry pea shoots, Chinese style How to infuse the garlic flavor into the cooking oil How to grow your own healthy pea shoots! What are Pea Shoots? Pea shoots are the baby plants of peas! We grow them like our microgreens, which ...

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chinese stir fried pea sprouts recipe-3947

What you’ll learn in this Pea Shoots Recipe:

  • 15 minute recipe with step by step photos how to stir fry pea shoots, Chinese style
  • How to infuse the garlic flavor into the cooking oil
  • How to grow your own healthy pea shoots!

What are Pea Shoots?

chinese stir fried pea sprouts recipe-3902

Pea shoots are the baby plants of peas! We grow them like our microgreens, which are so very easy to grow. Here is a post, with step by step photos on how you can grow your own pea shoots at home, even on your windowsill or on your sunny patio.

It only takes 2 weeks from seed to lush pea shoots, ready for stir fry.

Why do we grow our own microgreens and sprouts and shoots? 

  • It’s very easy to grow – no special equipment required.
  • Highly nutritious – microgreens are up to 48x higher in nutrition than its full-grown counterpart. A little sprinkle of microgreens on my salad massive gives a nutritional boost to my meal.
  • I don’t trust store-bought, farm-grown sprouts, shoots or greens. There is too much risk for contamination, especially E. Coli and Salmonella. Small batch, controlled setting is safer.

Learn how to grow pea shoots with our step by step photos.

How to stir fry pea shoots

Pea shoots are delicate, should just be lightly cooked and barely seasoned. The shoots are sweet, tender and light – and should be treated as such!

chinese stir fried pea sprouts recipe-3914

The main seasoning is garlicky oil. I add in neutral flavored cooking oil (like canola) and garlic to a cold wok or large pan. Then, turn on the heat to medium-low, and let the garlic and oil heat together slowly. Take your time – this is when the garlicky flavor infuses the oil. Just take care to control your heat and not let the garlic burn or brown too much. When you start smelling that garlic – it is time to add the pea shoots.

Now it’s time to crank up the heat. Turn heat to high.

You’ll have to add the pea shoots in batches – since the tendrils are so light, it looks like a lot of pea shoots, but the shoots will cook down.
As you add the pea shoots, use your tongs to flip, turn, stir all that garlicky oil all over the shoots! Try to get as much garlic in the middle, on top of all of the pea shoots (garlic at bottom of hot wok may burn.) Keep adding more of the pea shoots as the ones on the bottom begin wilting.

chinese stir fried pea sprouts recipe-3915

Season with salt and sugar.

chinese stir fried pea sprouts recipe-3918

See how the pea shoots are just barely cooked? Everything has wilted down, but the shoots are still a little crunchy and bright green. It’s perfect! Turn off heat, add in the sesame oil and cooking wine (optional.)

chinese stir fried pea sprouts recipe-3919

Stir. Done.

chinese stir fried pea sprouts recipe-3932

There’s not much more to it than that!

chinese stir fried pea sprouts recipe-3936

 

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Chinese Stir Fried Pea Shoots Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 5 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes
chinese stir fried pea sprouts recipe-3932

The key to this dish is not to let the pea shoots overcook. Once the shoots begin to wilt, it is almost done! The beauty of this dish is the limited ingredients - let the delicate pea shoots flavor be the star.

Ingredients:

1 pound pea shoots
2 garlic cloves, finely minced
1/4 teaspoon sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon Chinese rice wine (or dry sherry) - optional
1/2 teaspoon roasted sesame oil
neutral flavored cooking oil (like canola or vegetable oil)

Directions:

1. In a wok or large saute pan, add in the garlic. Pour in about 1 1/2 tablespoons of the cooking oil. Turn heat to medium-low and let the garlic heat up slowly, infusing its flavor and fragrance into the cooking oil. Take care not to let the garlic burn - control the heat so that the oil is slightly shimmering and aromatic.

2. Turn the heat to high. Add in the pea shoots, you'll probably have to add them in a couple of batches. Quickly, use your tongs to turn over the pea shoots around in the fragrant oil. Get that garlicky oil all over the shoots!

3. Add in the sugar and the salt. Again, use your tongs to flip, stir, turn the pea shoots. Within a minute or so, the shoots will begin wilting and cooking. Once the shoots begin wilting, the dish is almost done. Don't overcook the delicate shoots. Turn off the heat, pour in the cooking wine and the sesame oil. Toss and serve.

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Slow Cooker Bone Broth – Asian Style http://steamykitchen.com/39418-slow-cooker-bone-broth-asian-style.html http://steamykitchen.com/39418-slow-cooker-bone-broth-asian-style.html#comments Wed, 28 Jan 2015 22:23:46 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=39418 In Asian culture, soups and broths are part of everyday meals. A traditional Japanese breakfast would include a bowl of Miso Soup to warm the body. Chinese restaurants feature a long list of house soups, from an appetite stimulating Hot and Sour Soup to even a light broth served after dinner to cleanse the palate and complete the meal. Growing up, Mom ...

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Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian

In Asian culture, soups and broths are part of everyday meals. A traditional Japanese breakfast would include a bowl of Miso Soup to warm the body. Chinese restaurants feature a long list of house soups, from an appetite stimulating Hot and Sour Soup to even a light broth served after dinner to cleanse the palate and complete the meal.

Growing up, Mom always had soup simmering on the stove. Every night, without doubt, there was a Chinese style soup on the table. I remember saving the soup for last, as a ritual to conclude a delightful home-cooked meal.

I’ve tried to emulate Mom, but we’ve got such an active lifestyle that a pot simmering for hours on the stove isn’t feasible. Instead, we use a large 6-quart slow cooker to make an Asian-style bone broth that will last the entire week for our family.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian

What is bone broth?

Bone broth is often gently simmered for 24 hours (or more!) to extract as much nutrients from the bones of an animal, whether it be fish, chicken, pork or beef. The long cooking time breaks down bone to release vitamins, collagen and calcium phosphate — nutrients that are good for us.

Sure, it’s a trendy thing right now, with restaurants offering drive-through bone broth served in a coffee cup for $9, cookbooks dedicated to the art of bone broths (I highly recommend The Nourished Kitchen Cookbook which features bone broth) and even an entire line of bone broth concentrates that you can buy.

What’s the difference between broth, bone broth and soups?

Generally, soups are made with meats, bones, vegetables, herbs, added grains, sometimes thickened with starches – and simmered for a couple of hours.

Broths are mostly made from meats or vegetables and left clear without very much else added. Broths are also simmered for a couple of hours, resulting in a light colored, light flavored broth.

Bone broths are cooked for a day or even longer. Your favorite Vietnamese restaurant most likely simmer their pho broth overnight, which is why the broth is so rich and flavorful.

The long cooking time extracts so many nutrients and flavor! How do you know when you’ve extracted maximum nutrients and flavor? When the bones literally disintegrate just by giving a little pressure with your fingers.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe Asian Style

Like Nourished Kitchen, we make our bone broth in the slow cooker, and it will last us all week long. The process starts on Sunday night, and the slow cooker will do its magic all night long.

In the morning, we’ll enjoy bone broth as part of our breakfast. Every day, I’ll top off the pot with more water and keep the slow cooker humming along.

Each day, I’ll add a vegetable, switch out for fresh herbs, throw in a couple of umami-boosting Asian ingredients.

As the days progress, the bone broth develops new flavor, gets richer, smoother, fuller. We get the benefit of the valuable nutrition that’s normally locked inside the bones.

Some days, we’ll top off the bone broth with chopped herbs, or shredded seaweed just before serving. Or a spoonful of leftover rice in the bone broth is great too.

Secrets to Clear, Clean Bone Broth

Key to bone broth – be gentle. The cooking process is slow and gentle, coaxing out flavor with very little bubbles (no violent boiling!)

Don’t stir. Especially after the first 2 days. The bones will be come very soft and will crumble if you stir the pot too vigorously, resulting in a gritty broth.

Use cheesecloth or herb/tea bags to contain any herbs, aromatics or spices that are very small (see below.) This avoids having you dig around, stir around to fish these items out.

Use a very fine mesh skimmer to skim the surface of the broth every day, especially during the first 6-8 hours. The “scum” will cloud your broth during these first few hours of cooking. What’s the scum made out of? Proteins, fats, microscopic bone fragments (especially if the bones were cut), oils, impurities. Get rid of it!

Ready for the next batch? Jumpstart your next batch with a little of the last batch of concentrated “liquid gold!” We call this “Infinite Bone Broth.” Restaurants do the same with broths, sauces and sourdough bread too. Seed the next batch with rich flavor you’ve already built.

Bone Broth, Chinese Style

The “holy trinity” of Chinese cooking is garlic, ginger and green onion.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Garlic, Ginger & Green Onion

I’m not a fan of fishing out little pieces of ingredients, so I try to cut herbs so that they are easy to find and spoon out. The garlic head is cut in half. Sometimes, the cloves will separate (like above) but I’ll use a bag made for for DIY teabags or as an herb pouch (100 bags for $5.67)

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian DIY Herb Pouch

Fill it up with the garlic cloves that are loose. Fold the top over and the cloves or anything you put inside will stay put. You can also make your own with cheesecloth. I like to use these teabags for other spices too, like whole peppercorns or star anise – anything that would be hard to find and fish out.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Fill Herb Pouch with loose garlic cloves

The green onions are tied with twine, again for easy removal. The ginger is a big hunk, just sliced in half.  I reserve the other half of the ginger + the garlic cloves in the bag + more green onion  – to add to the bone broth a couple of days later (I’ll discard the spent herbs/aromatics, replace with fresh.)

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Tie green onions with twine and slice ginger in half

This week, I’m making bone broth with spareribs (it was on sale). Pork broth is very popular in Chinese cuisine. It’s just as popular as chicken broth is here in the U.S. Most of the Chinese soups that I make start with pork – for a lighter, more neutral flavor than beef or chicken.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Spareribs for bone broth

Some people like to cut off the excess fat, but I just leave it on. I’ll skim out the fats and oils later with a skimmer.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Everything goes into the slow cooker

Everything goes into the slow cooker, set it on low and let it go. If you plan on making slow cooker bone broth often, I suggest getting the largest slow cooker you can find. This one is a Cuisinart 6 1/2 Quart Slow Cooker ($99) that works really well. It’s never failed us.

After a few hours, I’ll skim the scuzz with a very fine mesh skimmer. This skimmer mesh is so fine that it catches all particles AND surface oils and fats.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian skim skuzz with very fine mesh skimmer

Look how rich this bone broth is the next day! Season with salt, or fish sauce. Season to taste.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian

I’ll discard the spent green onion, garlic and ginger, and add fresh to replace. This time, I’m adding garlic chives and cilantro from the garden – again, tied  up to make it easier to remove.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian discard spent herbs and add garlic chives and cilantro

Top it off with fresh water. The slow cooker stays on all week, on low.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian top off with fresh water

Chinese Bone Broth

After a couple of days, I might throw in some Chinese dried ingredients for a massive flavor and umami-boost:

Dried scallops, dried shrimp or dried black mushrooms (shitake).

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian dried scallops, dried shrimp and black mushrooms

You can also add in sliced daikon and carrots for one of my very favorite home-style soups! Every trip back to my Mom’s house, I request her Daikon Carrot soup.

If you like cilantro, you can also add in a bunch of cilantro stems, which have just as much flavor as the leaves. I often use the stems for soups.

Japanese Bone Broth

If you’d like Japanese flavor for a bone broth, add a small 6-inch piece of dried kombu and a handful of bonito flakes (place these in the tea bag.) By the way, kombu can be used over, and over again. Just rinse, wipe, and let dry completely before storing for next use.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian dried kombu and bonito flakes

My favorite breakfast? Bone broth with a spoonful of leftover rice or grains, top with roasted seaweed. This type of seaweed is called Kizame Nori – or sliced, roasted seaweed.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian with a spoonful of leftover rice or grains and roasted seaweed

By the way, have you ever tried Ochazuke?

Also, if you’d like to fortify the Japanese bone broth with miso paste – do this separately. Miso paste cooked at high heat or for too long will break apart and become gritty. Ladle some bone broth into a separate saucepan. Bring to simmer if you need to, but if it’s coming straight from the slow cooker, there’s no need to heat it up. Turn off heat. Whisk just a couple tablespoons of miso paste into the soup. Be careful of how much miso you add, especially if you’ve already added salt to the bone broth. I prefer shiro miso (white miso paste) as it’s lighter and less salty than the others. Miso paste is always added off heat.

Vietnamese Bone Broth

Add Vietnamese pho spices to a mesh bag or the tea bag (Here’s a recipe for Slow Cooker Vietnamese Pho.)

If you visit an Asian market, you can often find all these spices packaged, ready to go. Look for “Pho Spice Pack.” Instead of seasoning the broth with salt, season the bone broth with fish sauce. Start with 1 tablespoon, taste, and then add 1 teaspoon at a time until perfect.

What’s my favorite fish sauce? Right there in the sidebar is a free “Asian Masters of Flavor” ebook I wrote that includes my favorite brand! There’s a big difference between good quality fish sauce and crap, chemical-laden fish sauce.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Vietnamese Bone Broth Spices

More notes

If you’re concerned with the cost of running a slow cooker throughout the week, it costs pennies per day!

We grow all of our own herbs and most of our own vegetables in our aquaponics garden and greenhouse. Here’s a tip for green onion.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Our aquaphonics garden

You can even start with store-bought green onion. Make sure you buy ones that have nice, wet, strong roots (no dry or wilted!) Just stick’em in soil. The green onions will continue to grow their roots and sprout more leaves. I just snip off what I need (leafy part only) and new ones will continue to grow throughout the entire growing season!

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian grow your own green onion

Recommended Cooking Equipment

More recipes to explore

Vietnamese Pho Pressure Cooker – Paleo Friendly  (Steam Kitchen)

Mom’s Chinese Chicken Soup  (Steam Kitchen)

Vegetable Thai Curry Noodle Soup  (Steam Kitchen)

Tofu and Mushroom Miso Soup  (Steam Kitchen)

Chinese Daikon and Carrot Soup  (Steam Kitchen)

15 Minute Udon Miso Noodle Soup  (Steam Kitchen)

Thai Fish Soup  (Steam Kitchen)

Soba Noodles in Shiitake-Shoyu Broth with Spring Vegetables (Serious Eats)

Spicy Korean Seafood Soup (Serious Eats)

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Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Style

Servings: Prep Time: 5 minutes Cook Time:
slow-cooker-bone-broth-recipe-asian-3832

I prefer using pork or chicken for Chinese or Japanese style bone broth. If you'd like to use beef bones (great for Vietnamese bone broth), I suggest roasting the bones (350F for 30 minutes) first before adding them to your slow cooker. Not necessary, but it will give a richer bone broth. I don't normally roast pork or chicken bones - I just add them to the pot. Grassfed, organic is best.

PORK: spareribs, neck, hock, really anything.


CHICKEN: whole, raw chicken, or just the frame of a rotisserie chicken you've already enjoyed. You can also use chicken wings or chicken feet. Turkey works great too.


BEEF: oxtail, knuckle, neck, short ribs. I also use beef bone marrow as well - but after roasting, I"ll spoon out the marrow, spread it on bread and sprinkle with sea salt for a little treat. Basically, too much marrow in the bone broth will make the broth greasy tasting. Short ribs have amazing flavor - I like to add them to any beef bone broth that I make.


FISH: Fish bones and head. I like to do this traditional Chinese style with garlic, lots of ginger and green onion. Remove the fish skin and the thin, silvery lining in the gut area (very fishy taste). If the fish is raw, I prefer to roast the fish bones (350F for 20 minutes) - as this tames the fishiness smell and flavor of the bone broth. Most fish will work except for oily fish like mackerel.

Ingredients:

4 pounds spareribs
1 head garlic, halved
big knob of fresh ginger (about the size of 2 fingers), halved
3-4 stalks green onions, cut in half

Directions:

1. Reserve half of the garlic, ginger and green onion for later in the week. Tie the green onion bundles with twine.

2. In a slow-cooker, add green onion, garlic and ginger. Fill slow cooker with water, up to 1-inch below rim. Set to cook on high heat at first. When the bone broth comes to a simmer after an hour or so, you'll see lots of scum. Skim and discard. Set slow cooker on low and let the bone broth cook for at least 6 hours.

3. Use a skimmer to skim the surface of any particles and oil. Season with salt, to taste.

4. After drinking some of the bone broth, top off the slow cooker with additional fresh water. You can also discard the spent herbs and add the reserved garlic, onion and green onion. Continue to add additional vegetables, aromatics, dried ingredients (see post above for details) as you wish. Keep the setting on low.

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Chocolate Chip Hazelnut Cookie Recipe http://steamykitchen.com/39303-chocolate-chip-hazelnut-cookie-recipe-dorie-greenspan.html http://steamykitchen.com/39303-chocolate-chip-hazelnut-cookie-recipe-dorie-greenspan.html#comments Wed, 14 Jan 2015 14:23:11 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=39303 This chocolate chip cookie recipe features: This recipe is from Dorie Greenspan, a James Beard Award winner and New York Times Bestselling author of Baking with Julia and Around My French Table. The hazelnut or almond flour gives the cookie a extraordinary richy, nutty flavor throughout the cookie, without having chunks of nuts interrupting the smooth, gooey, velvety chocolate chip cookie experience. ...

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Chocolate Chip Hazelnut Cookie Recipe Dorie Greenspan

This chocolate chip cookie recipe features:

  • This recipe is from Dorie Greenspan, a James Beard Award winner and New York Times Bestselling author of Baking with Julia and Around My French Table.
  • The hazelnut or almond flour gives the cookie a extraordinary richy, nutty flavor throughout the cookie, without having chunks of nuts interrupting the smooth, gooey, velvety chocolate chip cookie experience.
  • Big chocolate chunks throughout cookie, crisp and browned on bottoms, soft and tender in the center.

Chocolate Chip Hazelnut Cookie Recipe Dorie Greenspan

I first met Dorie Greenspan in a middle of bland lunch buffet at a food conference. You’d think that when feeding a crowd of cookbook authors, food photographers and other important people in the culinary world, one would take the utmost care in providing a feast, worthy of being written about, or at least memorable in a good way.

Baking Chez Moi by Dorie GreenspanBut, we weren’t there for the food. There aren’t very many times in my life that I can actually say that! At food conferences, we attend to learn, share and connect. The conference lunch buffet is just there for calories and to keep our energy high. After the conference is a totally different story — it’s all about food and wine then!

Dorie is instantly recognizable, her short-cropped hair, distinctive, round-rimmed glasses and everlasting smile. She’s happy, always happy, always smiling and is one of those people who make you instantly feel loved and special.
If you love baking or French inspired cooking, you’ll probably have seen her books: Around My French Table (try the Chicken in a Pot recipe – here’s the recipe on Dorie’s website), Baking with Julia (as in Julia Child), Paris Sweets and others. Here’s her entire list of cookbooks.

From her brand new book, Baking Chez Moi – Recipes from My Paris Home to Your Home Anywhere, I chose her recipe, “Edouard’s Chocolate Chip Cookies,” a classic American-style chocolate chip cookie with one worthy addition: hazelnut flour.

Here’s what Dorie says about the recipe:

Edouard’s Chocolate Chip Cookie Recipe

“When Edouard Bobin, the co-owner of one of the sweetest small bistros in Pris, Le Pantruche, said he would give me the recipe for his favorite hazelnut cookie, I knew the minute I read the one-word title, Cookies, that chocolate chips would be involved.”

“These cookies are good warm or at room temperature; good with coffee, good with tea and terrific with milk (a beverage I’ve never seen a grown French person sip); and even good with Armagnac.”

– Dorie Greenspan

The hazelnut or almond flour gives the cookie a extraordinary richy, nutty flavor throughout the cookie, without having chunks of nuts interrupting the smooth, gooey, velvety chocolate chip cookie experience. You can also use almond meal/flour as well. Both nut flours are made from only from super-fine ground blanched nuts. Sometimes, you’ll find it labeled “hazelnut meal” or “almond meal.”

Bob’s Red Mill makes both the almond meal/flour and hazelnut meal/flour.

Chocolate Chip Hazelnut Cookie Recipe Dorie Greenspan

I love the hazelnut flour – ground so fine it’s almost powdery.

Chocolate Chip Hazelnut Cookie Recipe Dorie Greenspan

I followed Dorie’s instructions exactly, even enjoying the suggested glass of Armagnac with my first cookie!

Chocolate Chip Hazelnut Cookie Recipe Dorie Greenspan

Our hens provided the eggs – we have a couple of hens that lay olive green eggs. The color reminds me of our 1970’s Chevrolet Impala Station Wagon with deluxe wood panels and drab olive green paint that we used to have growing up.

Chocolate Chip Hazelnut Cookie Recipe Dorie Greenspan

In fact, all of the hens lay very distinctive eggs – I can tell you who laid which egg!

Chocolate Chip Hazelnut Cookie Recipe Dorie Greenspan

Inside the shell of the olive egg is a creamy, almost blue-tinged color.

Chocolate Chip Hazelnut Cookie Recipe Dorie Greenspan

Use real sea salt.

Chocolate Chip Hazelnut Cookie Recipe Dorie Greenspan

Instead of chocolate chips, I used Scharffen Berger 70% Bittersweet Baking Chunks. You can also buy a good bar of dark or bittersweet chocolate and chop it up into chunks.

Chocolate Chip Hazelnut Cookie Recipe Dorie Greenspan

And enjoy with milk (or Armagnac!)

Chocolate Chip Hazelnut Cookie Recipe Dorie Greenspan

Baking Chez Moi by Dorie GreenspanWe’re also giving away a copy of Dorie Greenspan’s Baking Chez Moi Cookbook!

Enter the giveaway here

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Chocolate Chip Hazelnut Cookie Recipe by Dorie Greenspan

Servings: 50 cookies Prep Time: 15 minutes + 2 hours chilling in refrigerator Cook Time: 15 minutes
chocolate-chip-hazelnut-cookie-recipe-dorie-greenspan-3683

Recipe reprinted with permission from Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. Baking Chez Moi: Recipes from my Paris Home to Your Home Anywhere by Dorie Greenspan.

Ingredients:

3 1/2 cups all-purpose flour (476 grams)
1 1/4 teaspoons fine sea salt
3/4 teaspoons baking soda
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
8 ounces unsalted butter, at room temperature (2 sticks)
1 cup sugar (200 grams)
1 cup packed brown sugar (200 grams)
1 1/2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
2 large eggs, at room temperature
12 ounces semisweet or bittersweet chocolate, coarsely chopped (or 2 cups chocolate chips)
1 1/2 cups hazelnut or almond flour (150 grams)

Directions:

1. In a medium bowl, whisk the flour, salt, baking soda and baking powder together.

2. In the bowl of the stand mixer fitted with a paddle attachment, beat the butter on medium speed for 1 minute, until smooth. Add the sugar and brown sugar and beat for 2 minutes, until well blended. Beat in the vanilla.

3. Add in the eggs, one at a time, beating for minute after each egg goes in. Reduce the speed to low and add in the flour mixture in 4-5 additions, mixing only until each addition is just incorporated (about 5 seconds for each addition - don't over-mix!)

4. Still on low speed, mix in the chocolate chips and the hazelnut (or almond) flour. Refrigerate dough for 2 hours or up to 3 days. If you are planning to freeze a portion - you can scoop out 1 1/2-inch rounds of dough to freeze.

5. Preheat oven to 350F with rack centered. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper. Scoop out 1 1/2" rounds of dough onto baking sheet, about 2-inches apart.

6. Bake the cookies one sheet at a time for 8 minutes, and then, using a spatula, gently press each mound down just a little; rotate the baking sheet when returning to oven. Bake for another 7 minutes, or so, until the cookies are pale brown. They'll still be slightly soft in the center, but that's fine- they'll firm up as they cool. Transfer to rack to cool. Repeat with remainder of dough, always using a cool baking sheet.

 

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Korean Beef Jerky http://steamykitchen.com/38897-korean-beef-jerky-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/38897-korean-beef-jerky-recipe.html#comments Sun, 28 Dec 2014 13:00:42 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=38897 Our friends, Darrin and Sylvia Isaacs, introduced us to their love of homemade beef jerky several months ago. If you are an avid fisherman, you might have heard of Darrin before. He co-hosted and co-produced several ESPN fishing shows – Big Game Fishing the World, BXRL-Billfishing Xtreme Release League, Inside Big Game Fishing Hawaii and Big Game Bites – with his ...

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Korean Beef Jerky Recipe

Our friends, Darrin and Sylvia Isaacs, introduced us to their love of homemade beef jerky several months ago. If you are an avid fisherman, you might have heard of Darrin before. He co-hosted and co-produced several ESPN fishing shows – Big Game Fishing the World, BXRL-Billfishing Xtreme Release League, Inside Big Game Fishing Hawaii and Big Game Bites – with his father, Norm Isaacs.

The Isaacs family lives nearby – and in a twist of fate (or is it kismet?) – Scott and Darrin met at an aquaponics shop. Darrin was there, asking questions to the stop owner, looking for some equipment to set up his system. Scott overheard the conversation. Once outside the shop, as both were leaving, Scott offered to give Darrin some of our equipment that we weren’t using.

Here’s where it gets strange:

-Darrin and Sylvia met on the big island in Hawaii. So did Scott and I. In fact, they were living on the big island the same time we were there, too.
-Our sets of boys are the exact same ages, same number of months apart, same grades. They are a mixed race of Caucasian and Chinese.
-Sylvia used to work in the wine industry. So did I. Sylvia and I are both Chinese.
-They live an hour away currently, all the way on the very opposite side of the county — but it turns out Darrin and Sylvia just bought some property and it’s a stone’s throw from our home.

If I list out any more similarities, it might even give me chills. When we get together, it’s like a gaggle of dark-brown haired boys – You can’t tell them apart from each other unless you really look closely.

We’ve become good friends with the Isaacs, how could we not feel like “instant old friends” given all the crazy similarities? They’ve just launched a new website and podcast, Boats and Billfish, for sport fishing.

Anyways, we also now love making our own beef jerky, just like the Isaacs. We’ve purchased a dehydrator (though to be honest, this is the 3rd dehydrator I have ever owned, but the FIRST dehydrator to be used more than twice and not bought from a TV infomercial.)

Rather than go the traditional American style of beef jerky, I opted to try a Korean flavor, inspired by another good family friend, Diana of Eating Richly. I modified my go-to recipe for Korean Bulgogi BBQ, omitting the sesame seeds, green onion, and grated fresh pear. The grated pear is meant as a tenderizer (the enzymes break down the meat), but since we’re making jerky, there’s not tenderizing needed! Instead of the normal grated onion and fresh garlic, we used onion powder and garlic powder. Fresh grated onion would add too much moisture to the marinade.

Previously, we had the butchers slice the beef for us with their fancy machinery (we love the Publix butchers, always so kind and helpful.) But recently received a Kalorik Meat and Deli Slicer for review that’s designed specifically for the home market. The unit is affordable at $79.00, and small enough to tuck away in the pantry. We’re also giving away a unit (see end of this recipe for details.)

 

Korean Beef Jerky Recipe

How to make Korean Beef Jerky

Start with the right meat. After several tests, we’ve found London Broil to be the best cut. Actually, “London Broil” is a term used to describe a method of cooking, not necessarily a butcher’s cut. However, many American supermarkets label Top Round Steak that’s cut even and flat as London Broil. Some butchers also label Flank Steak as London Broil as well, but I’m not as fond of Flank Steak for beef jerky as it’s often too thin and flat. Your beef jerky will turn out to be 1/2-inch wide strips. If you use Flank Steak for beef jerky, make sure you slice ACROSS the grain.

TopRoundSteakThe London Broil a.k.a. Top Round Steak that I like to use is about 1.75-inches thick, which makes nice-sized beef jerky slices. Also, take a look at the meat. It is even in thickness and lean – very little visible fat is what you want, as dehydrated fat doesn’t taste very good. Photo source

I’ve turned the beef on its side so that you can see how nice and even this steak is.

Korean Beef Jerky Recipe - use london broil

We set up the Kalorik meat slicer on our counter, it was already assembled out of the box. The unit is surprisingly light and has suction feet on the bottom to prevent sliding or shifting. Though you really have to push down to make the suction cup stick to my counter top, which is quartz, matte and not-so-easily suction-cuppable (nice word!)

Korean Beef Jerky Recipe - different thickness

Like the Isaacs, we like our beef jerky sliced very thin. While thick hunks of beef jerky certainly gives your jaws a workout, the thinner beef jerky wins in taste, texture, ease of enjoying and marinating time.

 

Korean Beef Jerky Recipe - Kalorik meat slicer

It’s best to test out which thickness you like best. Our meat slicer has a knob numbered 0 to 10. The top photo is beef sliced at 0.5, obviously too thin. The bottom meat was sliced at 1.5. We chose 1.25.

Korean Beef Jerky Recipe - different thickness

Oh, just a quick note – if you look above at the photo of sliced meat, you’ll see a very thin stripe of fat on the bottom – I would normally trim off ALL visible fat from the steak before slicing. As I mentioned, dried fat is not appealing to eat.

The Kalorik meat slicer has nice safety features – your fingers stay safely out of the way. The unit is made of mostly plastic on the base, the area that you place the meat and the handle.

Korean Beef Jerky Recipe - slice thinly

Slice at an even pace and take your time. This is the back of the unit, where the sliced meat falls.

Korean Beef Jerky Recipe - slice thinly

After slicing, prepare the marinade (garlic, soy, sesame oil, sugar, grated onion) in a freezer or storage bag. Add in your meat, seal. Massage and shake the bag to get the marinade incorporated throughout. I then unseal a tiny opening in the bag, squeeze as much air out from the bag as possible and quickly reseal. This helps the marinade stay put on the meat, instead of settling back down on the bottom of the bag.

The marinade recipe for Korean Beef Jerky is below, at the end of this post.

Because the meat is sliced so thinly, I marinate only 30 minutes. I also like lightly seasoned beef jerky, not beef jerky that’s so salty you need a gallon of water to rehydrate yourself! However, if you are using thicker slices of meat, marinate for an hour or up to overnight.

We bought the Nesco SnackMaster Pro Dehydrator $69.99 and have no complaints. It works very well, it does its job. I wish the unit would have a timer built in. Tip: don’t try to wash the drying racks by hand – you’ll go crazy just trying to scrub off all the dried bits. Instead, throw the racks into the dishwasher. The hot water will help soften the bits and clean them off. Also, during the summer, place the dehydrator outside on the patio so you don’t heat up your house with all that hot air!

Lay the beef slices in a single layer, spread them out so that there are no curls or folds in the meat.

Korean Beef Jerky Recipe - lay on dehydrator

Right about now, the dogs GO NUTS. Steak? Steak? Steak? I smell STEAK!

Korean Beef Jerky Recipe - dehydrator

After 4 hours-ish, the beef jerky is ready.

Korean Beef Jerky Recipe - done drying

Final thoughts on the Kalorik Meat Slicer:

PROS: It’s affordable, less than $100. The unit is lightweight, already-assembled out of the box. Good safety features – turn the knob dial for blade to “P” to make the blade flush with the unit for storage. The handle design keeps your fingers out of the way of the blade. The blade is simple to clean, the unit wipes down easily. It also comes with a silicone blade safety cover to keep the blade edge partly covered.

CONS: Because it is so lightweight, the suction cups are necessarily to keep the unit from shifting. The suction cups didn’t work very well on my counter, and I got a little nervous until I got the hang of it. The key is to not PUSH the meat forward towards the blade (which would move the meat slicer), but rather, gently glide the meat forward while applying pressure to the left to keep the meat sandwiched against the blade area. Sorry, it’s so difficult to explain in words! I wish the suction feet would be larger, more sturdier. Removing the very sharp blade from the unit is almost too easy – just twist this little knob and the blade is loose. It is difficult to tell whether the blade is securely set in from the little black knob. Take care when removing and washing the blade – I use my trusty Pitt Mitts to handle the blade.

If you are starting out on this beef jerky adventure, have your butcher slice the meat for you. Go during non-peak hours, and kindly ask for a very thin slice for beef jerky. Most butchers will know how to slice the steak correctly, though in my opinion, they’ll slice it too thick. Once you get the slices exactly how you want them, ask the butcher, “What setting did you use?” and just remember that magic number. Next time, just say, “Slice for beef jerky, at setting number ___.”

Make a couple of batches before investing in a slicer. It’s a big appliance to store in your house. However, if you’re really into beef jerky like we are, it’s really worth it to slice the meat exactly how we like it, without bothering or waiting for the butcher. It’s a nice-to-have appliance for the serious beef jerky aficionado!

That being said, we make beef jerky a lot. It’s a healthy snack, nutritious, gives me energy, and best of all, it’s real food. The kids love it and will pack beef jerky in their backpack for a snack instead of crackers or a granola bar.

We’re giving a Kalorik Meat Slicer away! Enter the giveaway here.

Retail beef jerky “Jack Links Teriyaki Flavored” 

Jerky_Teriyaki

-Ingredients: Beef, water, sugar, dried soy suace (soybeans, salt, wheat), maltodextrin, fructos, monosodium glutamate, flavorings, hydrolyzed corn protein, sodium erythorbate, paprika extract, sodium nitrate.
-Not sure what type of beef
-Contains MSG and other chemicals I can’t pronounce
-$5.99 for 3.5 ounces


Homemade Beef Jerky

korean-beef-jerky-recipe-3498
-Ingredients: Top Round steak, Soy sauce (soybeans, salt, wheat), sesame oil, garlic powder, onion powder, brown sugar
-Substitute soy sauce with Coconut Aminos (we love this sauce!) for a wheat and soy free alternative
-London Broil (Top Round Steak) – you can choose to use organic, free range beef
-$5.29 per pound for the meat (on sale), each pound makes approx 6-8 ounces beef jerky

Korean Beef Jerky Recipe

More recipes to explore

Steak Recipe: Turning Cheap “Choice” Steak into Gucci “Prime” Steak (Steamy Kitchen)

Flank Steak with Bloody Mary Tomato Salad Recipe (Steamy Kitchen)

1-Step, Fail Proof Prime Rib Roast Recipe on the Rotisserie (Steamy Kitchen)

Korean Kalbi Baby Back Ribs (Steamy Kitchen)

Black Pepper Jerky (Food & Wine)

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Korean Beef Jerky Recipe

Servings: Prep Time: 30 minutes Cook Time: 4 hours in dehydrator
Korean Beef Jerky Recipe

I've had best results using London Broil (Top Round Steak) meat. In my Nesco dehydrator, I can fit 4 pounds of sliced meat on the trays. Your unit may be smaller or larger. The recipe calls for 2 pounds of meat, so if you have a similar sized dehydrator, make 2 batches of the marinade side by side in separate bags. To clarify, don't try to stuff 4 pounds of sliced meat into 1 bag of marinade. It won't fit.

Ingredients:

3 tablespoons low sodium soy sauce
3 tablespoons brown sugar
1 teaspoon onion powder
1 teaspoon garlic powder
1 teaspoon Asian sesame oil
2 pounds London broil, very thinly sliced

Directions:

1. In a resealable freezer bag, combine all ingredients except for the meat.

2. Add the sliced meat, seal bag and massage gently to incorporate the marinade throughout the meat. Unseal just a small section, push as much air out of the bag as possible, and reseal. Let marinate for 30 minutes (on counter-top at room temperature is fine) or refrigerate up to overnight.

3. Lay out the meat in a single layer (as neat as possible) on the dehydrator racks. Set dehydrator according to manufacturer's instructions.

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1-Step, Fail Proof Prime Rib Roast Recipe on the Rotisserie http://steamykitchen.com/38718-one-step-fail-proof-prime-rib-roast-recipe-on-rotisserie.html http://steamykitchen.com/38718-one-step-fail-proof-prime-rib-roast-recipe-on-rotisserie.html#comments Wed, 10 Dec 2014 14:40:18 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=38718 Have you ever tried to make a Prime Rib Roast at home? The normal process involves multiple steps and kitchen acrobatics: I would fire up my large cast-iron pan, heat it up to near-smoking, and then wrangle the prime rib roast onto the pan, searing each side. If the roast is extra large and heavy, I’d have to use 2 ...

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Prime Rib Roast Recipe

Have you ever tried to make a Prime Rib Roast at home? The normal process involves multiple steps and kitchen acrobatics: I would fire up my large cast-iron pan, heat it up to near-smoking, and then wrangle the prime rib roast onto the pan, searing each side. If the roast is extra large and heavy, I’d have to use 2 tongs to lift, rotate and hold the roast. Then transfer the burning-hot seared hunk into a roasting pan (without dropping it) to slow-roast in the oven. While the recipe produces my perfect, steakhouse-quality Prime Rib Roast, it is a multi-step process.

But I now rely on my 1-Step, Fail Proof Prime Rib Roast Recipe, which produces even BETTER results than anything I’ve ever tried.

The solution is to use a rotisserie. We’ve had this Ronco bad boy for about four years. It gets used more often than my oven, because it’s easy to clean, easy to operate (just turn the timer knob) and provides excellent results 100% of the time.

prime rib roast rotisserie

(Here’s my Amazon affiliate link if you’d like to purchase one)

Rotisserie for Prime Rib???

Most people associate rotisserie for chickens, but we use it for lamb roasts, pork tenderloin and prime rib roasts too.

The rotisserie’s turning mechanism ensures the prime rib roast recipe cooks evenly and has a nice crust on all sides, while keeping the center medium to medium-rare. With a built-in timer that automatically shuts off the oven, you are guaranteed perfect prime rib.  The timing is based on the weight of the prime rib.

Prime Rib Roast Recipe - Rotiserrie

Standing Prime Rib Roast

What is a rib roast, a.k.a. Standing Rib Roast a.k.a. Prime Rib? It’s basically the same cut as a rib eye steak. But instead of cutting individual steaks, the meat is left uncut and often tied to keep its nice shape during cooking.

This one is from the fine folks at Lobel’s in New York. For the past 60 years, five generations of the Lobel family have run the most well-known meat market in New York. They ship  their exceptional meats nationwide. This is a USDA Prime Dry Aged Rib Roast (they also have Wagyu Prime Dry Aged Rib Roast.) But no need to get all fancy if you don’t want to. Just a nice hunk of rib roast with good marbling. Most rib-eyes have that nice band of fat around what I call the “collar” of the ribeye, which is my #2 favorite part of a ribeye. My #1 favorite part is the BONE (hey, I’m Asian. I like to gnaw and nibble all that juicy meat on the bones to the dismay of my dogs!)

Prime Rib Roast Recipe

Let’s season this prime rib!

I love rubbing the prime rib with Kansas City Steak Seasoning from Two Snooty Chefs (fun name!)

Prime Rib Roast Recipe on Rotisserie

Fill the pan with some veggies. These veggies will roast along with the prime rib, and we’ll use this to make the Red Wine Au Jus.

Prime Rib Roast Recipe - Fresh Vegetables

Here’s your one-step, fail-proof method

With the rotisserie, this Prime Rib Roast becomes super simple, one-step and fail-proof. Load ‘er up!

Prime Rib Roast Recipe - Rotiserrie

Turn it on. 16-18 minutes per pound, depending if you want it rare or medium-rare. We went with 18 minutes per pound. Set the timer on the rotisserie.

Prime Rib Roast Recipe - Rotiserrie

The dripping fall conveniently into a pan that I’ve loaded with vegetables. This all gets collected to make the Red Wine Au Jus. Oh, I forgot, I threw in a few sprigs of fresh thyme in there too.

To check doneness, use an instant-read meat thermometer; 125 degrees F for rare; 160 degrees F for well done; insert at thickest part of roast and away from bone

Prime Rib Roast Recipe - Rotiserrie

When it’s done, let it rest while you make the Red Wine Au Jus. YUM! Can you smell that? Isn’t this one-step process on the rotisserie so easy?

Prime Rib Roast Recipe

Red Wine Au Jus

Carefully pour the contents of the pan into a small saucepan.

Prime Rib Roast Recipe

Pour in 1 cup of good quality red wine (yeah, that was from my wine glass)

Prime Rib Roast Recipe

1 cup of beef broth.

Prime Rib Roast Recipe

Pan drippings + Roasted Vegetables + Red Wine + Beef Broth = Red Wine Au Jus.

Prime Rib Roast Recipe

Let it simmer for 8 minutes.

Prime Rib Roast Recipe

Strain.

Prime Rib Roast Recipe

 

Cut the Prime Rib Roast

The first step is to cut the bones off.

Prime Rib Roast Recipe

Prime Rib Roast Recipe

The bones will then get cut further and all go on MY plate (heehee!)

Then slice the prime rib roast into desired thickness. You can also carve this at the table, if you wish.

Prime Rib Roast Recipe

Serve with the Red Wine Au Jus.

Prime Rib Roast Recipe

 

Big thanks to Lobel’s for sending me a big, fat, USDA Prime Rib Roast. The meat was exceptional, the best we’ve ever had, perfectly aged. We’ve been spoiled now!

More Recipes to Explore

Perfect Prime Rib Recipe with Red Wine Jus (Steamy Kitchen)

Roasted Garlic Mashed Potatoes (Steamy Kitchen)

Yorkshire Pudding (Steamy Kitchen)

Ruth’s Chris Sweet Potato Casserole Recipe (Steamy Kitchen)

Dr. BBQ’s Famous Baby Back Ribs (Steamy Kitchen)

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1-Step, Fail Proof Prime Rib Roast Recipe on Rotisserie

Servings: 6 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: varies
Prime Rib Roast Recipe

A 4-pound roast (with 3 bones) will feed 6 people. Purchase whatever size roast you need, adjust cooking time based on size. Please read the instructions that comes with your rotisserie on how to load the rib roast and cooking times. Our rotisserie instructions were 16-18 minutes per pound.

Ingredients:

One bone-in prime rib roast
salt and pepper (or seasoning blend of your choice)
3 carrots, peeled, cut in big chunks
3 stalks celery, cut in big chunks
1 large onion, quartered
several sprigs of thyme
1 cup red wine
1 cup beef broth

Directions:

Season the rib roast generously on all sides. Load the rib roast onto the rotisserie, with spikes between the bones.

Scatter the carrots, celery, onion and thyme in the roasting tray. Insert roasting tray into rotisserie.

Set rotisserie to cook according to manufacturer's instructions. Please read the manual and find cooking time chart, as your machine may be different from mine.

When done, let roast rest while you make the Red Wine Au Jus. Pour the contents of the roasting pan into a medium saucepan set on medium-high heat. Add the red wine and beef broth. Simmer on low for 8 minutes, uncovered. Strain and serve with the Prime Rib Roast.

To carve the Prime Rib Roast, first, cut off the bones. Cut each bone apart. Then slice the rib roast into desired thickness.

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