Steamy Kitchen Recipes | RSS Feed http://steamykitchen.com Steamy Kitchen Food Blog: fast recipes, simple recipes, with fresh ingredients to create delicious meals. Wed, 01 Jul 2015 20:35:01 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.2 Singapore Chili Crab http://steamykitchen.com/40175-singapore-chili-crab-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/40175-singapore-chili-crab-recipe.html#comments Tue, 28 Apr 2015 14:13:04 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=40175 What you’ll learn: Singapore Chili Crab is one of the most popular Asian crab dishes. Simmer crab in a thick, sweet, savory and spicy sauce. Simple authentic recipe, with a homemade Chili-Ginger Sauce that heightens the flavor Substitute jumbo-sized shrimp for the crab, if desired Recipe fromSoutheast Asia’s Best Recipes Cookbook by Wendy Hutton This famous Singapore Chili Crab has ...

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Singapore Chili Crab Recipe

What you’ll learn:

  • Singapore Chili Crab is one of the most popular Asian crab dishes. Simmer crab in a thick, sweet, savory and spicy sauce.
  • Simple authentic recipe, with a homemade Chili-Ginger Sauce that heightens the flavor
  • Substitute jumbo-sized shrimp for the crab, if desired
  • Recipe fromSoutheast Asia’s Best Recipes Cookbook by Wendy Hutton

This famous Singapore Chili Crab has been named a “national dish” of Singapore, and named #35 on the list of CNN’s list of “World’s 50 Best Foods.”

Fresh crab is simmered in a base of sweet chili sauce, fresh chilies, ginger, garlic and tomato sauce — it can be made as spicy as you wish! Another signature element of this dish is the delicate ribbons of egg to thicken and add body to the sauce.

This is a messy dish, to be eaten with a stack of napkins and crusty French bread or steamed Chinese buns to mop up all of the sauce.

Singapore Chili Crab RecipeThe recipe is from Southeast Asia’s Best Recipes Cookbook by Wendy Hutton, featuring the most popular and best-known recipes from Thailand, Vietnam, Malaysia, Indonesia, Cambodia and all across the region.

Hutton has spent more than four decades traveling and and eating her way through Asia, collecting the best recipes from simple country homes to elegant restaurant kitchens. In her signature, expert prose, Hutton explores the glorious splendor of Southeast Asia’s rich and varied cuisine, from Singapore’s fascinating cosmopolitan offerings to Thailand’s sinfully spicy dishes to Vietnam’s refreshingly healthful recipes. Hutton is based in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo.

Each of the authentic Southeast Asian recipes in this book is accompanied by a luscious color photograph shot by the award-winning photographer, Masano Kawana, who won a James Beard Award for Best Cookbook Photography for his Shunju: New Japanese Cuisine Cookbook.

What is Hot Bean Paste?

Chili bean sauce for singapore chili crab recipeChinese Hot Bean Paste or Chili Bean Sauce is made from fresh chilies and fermented broad (fava) beans and soy beans.

This Sichuan style sauce adds a spicy, salty, umami-rich flavor to any dish. A spoonful of the sauce into any Chinese noodle dish will spice it up! We also use a spoonful in Mapo Tofu as well.

Other names:
Hot Bean Paste
Broad Bean Paste
Chili Soy Bean Paste
Toban Djan
Dou Ban Jiang
辣豆瓣酱

You can find this Hot Bean Sauce in most Asian grocery stores and online. If you find “Bean Sauce” (basically, the sauce without the chilies, you can substitute 3 tablespoons + minced red chilies in this Singapore Chili Crab recipe. The Bean Sauce without the chilies is saltier, that’s why we decrease the amount used.

Recipes using Hot Bean Sauce

Recommended Equipment

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Singapore Chili Crab Recipe

Servings: 4-6 Prep Time: 40 minutes Cook Time: 20 minutes
Singapore Chili Crab Recipe

Reprinted with Permission from Tuttle Publishing. Recipe from Southeast Asia's Best Recipes by Wendy Hutton. Photography by Masano Kawana.

If you do not have fresh crab, substitute with 1 1/2 pounds of jumbo shell-on shrimp -- but only cook for 5-7 minutes in Step 3.

In Singapore, mud crabs are used in this dish, but substitute with any fresh crab - my favorite is Dungeness or blue crab - though blue crab is so small, it may be difficult to tease out the meat if you're not accustomed to it! You can even use soft-shelled crab.

The perfect accompaniment to this Singapore Chili Crab Recipe is crusty French bread to mop up the sauce.

Ingredients:

3-4 pounds live crab
2 tablespoons oil
6 shallots, minced
6 large cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons finely minced ginger
3 red bird's eye chilies, minced
3 1/2 cups (875 ml) chicken stock
4 tablespoons hot bean paste
1/4 cup (60 ml) bottled chili sauce
1/2 cup (125ml) canned tomato sauce
1 tablespoon sugar
2 tablespoons Chinese rice wine (or dry sherry)
2 teaspoons salt
1 teaspoon white pepper (or black pepper)
2 tablespoons cornstarch, mixed with 3 tablespoons water
2 eggs, lightly beatenFOR THE CHILI GINGER SAUCE:
6 red finger-length chilies, minced
5 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons finely minced ginger
2 teaspoons sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon rice vinegar
1 tablespoon water

Directions:

1. Place the live crabs in the freezer for 15 minutes to immobilize them. Cut in half, lengthwise with a cleaver or large chef's knife and remove the back and discard the spongy grey matter. Take off the claws and crack in several places with a cleaver. Cut each body half into two to three pieces, leaving the legs attached.

2. Make the Chili-Ginger Sauce by whisking all the ingredients in a bowl. Set aside.

3. Heat the oil in a wok over medium-low heat and add the shallots, garlic, ginger and chilies. Stir-fry until fragrant, about 3 minutes, then add the Chili-Ginger Sauce, chicken stock, hot bean paste, chili sauce, tomato sauce, sugar, rice wine, salt and pepper. Bring to a boil, then lower the heat and simmer for 2 minutes. Add the crab pieces and simmer, uncovered, turning several times, until the shells are bright red and the crabs are cooked, about 10 minutes.

4. Add the cornstarch/water mixture and stir until the sauce thickens, about 30 seconds. Add the eggs and stir until set, then transfer the chili crab to a serving dish and serve with crusty bread.

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Thai Sweet and Sour Tofu http://steamykitchen.com/39756-thai-sweet-and-sour-tofu-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/39756-thai-sweet-and-sour-tofu-recipe.html#comments Fri, 24 Apr 2015 17:13:04 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=39756 In this recipe, you’ll learn: 20-Minute recipe that you can serve over rice or noodles Simple sweet and sour sauce that can be used in countless dishes Recipe from the famous Rosa’s Thai Cafe in London Rosa’s Thai restaurants in London are known for their locally sourced ingredients, blending over 100 authentic Thai recipes with a modern flair and seasonal ingredients of ...

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Thai Sweet and Sour Tofu

In this recipe, you’ll learn:

  • 20-Minute recipe that you can serve over rice or noodles
  • Simple sweet and sour sauce that can be used in countless dishes
  • Recipe from the famous Rosa’s Thai Cafe in London

rosas-thai-cafeRosa’s Thai restaurants in London are known for their locally sourced ingredients, blending over 100 authentic Thai recipes with a modern flair and seasonal ingredients of London.

In keeping with our contemporary twist on authentic Thai cuisine “Rosa’s Thai Café The Cookbook” celebrates traditional Thai cooking techniques. The book features over 100 recipes, including dishes from the menu at Rosa’s as well as family favourites and regional dishes from founder Saiphin Moore’s regular trips back home. Recipes range from the aromatic Beef Massaman Curry to the Soft Shell Crab Salad, Larb Spring Rolls, homemade Sriracha Sauce and Mangoes with Sticky Rice. Rosa

Rosa's Thai Cafe: The CookbookRosa began her culinary adventure in her hometown, Phetchabun, in northern Thailand, with the opening of a grocery store. Nineteen years later, and 6 restaurants under her belt in London, Rosa is now famous for her homestyle Thai cooking.

I had such a great time exploring through Rosa’s blog – she makes frequent trips back to Thailand and documents her visits with some video. Come check out her flavorful and authentic Thai recipes on Rosa’s blog, including Chicken Green Curry and Pad Kra Pow.

Rosa has generously shared her Thai Sweet and Sour Tofu Recipe with us on Steamy Kitchen!

Buy a copy of Rosa’s Thai Café: The Cookbook (it’s currently the #1 Thai cookbook on Amazon!)

Serve this Thai Sweet and Sour Tofu Recipe with Jasmine Rice

 

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Thai Sweet and Sour Tofu Recipe

Servings: Serves 4 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes
Thai Sweet and Sour Tofu

Reprinted with permission from Rosa's Thai Café: The Cookbook; photography by Dan Jones, Interlink Books, an imprint of Interlink Publishing Group, Inc.

Ingredients:

4 tablespoons ketchup
2 tablespoon rice vinegar
1 teaspoon Chinese rice wine (or dry sherry)
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1/2 tablespoon granulated sugar
3 tablespoons vegetable oil
1/2 red bell pepper, chopped
1/2 green bell pepper, chopped
1/2 onion, chopped
1 stalk green onion, chopped2 garlic cloves, chopped
4 ounces canned baby corn, sliced in half, lengthwise
1 tomato, chopped
1 cup fresh pineapple, cut into cubes
14 ounces tofu, cut into pieces (soft or firm)

Directions:

In a small bowl, whisk together the ketchup, vinegar, wine, soy sauce and sugar.

Heat a wok or large saute pan over high heat. When hot, swirl in the cooking oil. Add in green and red bell pepper and the onion. Stir fry for 30 seconds, until vegetables are slightly softened. Then add in the green onion and garlic and stir fry for another 10 seconds.

Lower the heat to medium. Pour in the sauce mixture and bring to a simmer. Add in the baby corn, tomato, pineapple and tofu. Let simmer for 3 minutes.

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Chinese New Year Recipes: What to eat if you want a raise! http://steamykitchen.com/31179-chinese-new-year-2014-what-to-eat-if-you-want-a-raise.html http://steamykitchen.com/31179-chinese-new-year-2014-what-to-eat-if-you-want-a-raise.html#comments Fri, 13 Feb 2015 12:29:14 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=31179 Chinese New Year begins Thursday, February 19th! It’s the Year of the Sheep, Goat and Ram. Because the Chinese in particular are extremely superstitious, there are “rules” for what to do and eat (and NOT) to usher in the New Year and ward off bad spirits. The specific recipes in the infographic are in my cookbook, Healthy Asian Favorites, on ...

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Chinese New Year begins Thursday, February 19th! It’s the Year of the Sheep, Goat and Ram.

Because the Chinese in particular are extremely superstitious, there are “rules” for what to do and eat (and NOT) to usher in the New Year and ward off bad spirits.

chinese-new-year-infographic

The specific recipes in the infographic are in my cookbook, Healthy Asian Favorites, on sale at Amazon.com for $18.99.

Below is a big list of recipes free, on SteamyKitchen.com:

Gong Hay Fat Choy!

Chinese New Year Recipes

From top left:

  1. My Mother’s Famous Chinese Egg Rolls or Vegetable Spring Rolls with video (egg rolls look like gold bars, which symbolize wealth) 
  2. Chinese Boiled Pork Dumplings (also symbolize wealth)
  3. Pan Fried Shrimp & Pork Potstickers (wealth)
  4. Shrimp Fried Rice (shrimp for happiness and joy)
  5. Chinese Broccoli Beef Noodles (noodles for longevity)
  6. Fresh Pear and Shrimp Stir Fry (shrimp for happiness and joy)

From top left:

  1. Long Life Fertility Noodles and Happy Shrimp
  2. Chinese Lettuce Cups (lettuce = rising fortune)
  3. Hainanese Chicken Rice (serve your chicken whole & cut at table for Chinese New Year. Cooking a whole chicken or duck represents health — carving it before serving would meant to “cut” your health)
  4. Chinese Tea Eggs (for prosperity)
  5. Chinese Whole Steamed Fish
  6. Stir Fried Beef with Nectarines (nectarine = happiness, health)

See more Chinese New Year Recipes on Steamy Kitchen!

More Chinese New Year Recipes

Thai Larb Lettuce Cups from my good friends Diane and Todd of White on Rice Couple
Dan Dan Mien from Jeannette’s Healthy Kitchen
Jiaozi Dumplings
 – from my friends Nate & Mary Kate on Epicurious (who just came out with their Chinese cookbook Feeding the Dragon!)
Chicken Lettuce Cups – Nate & Mary Kate on Epicurious
Stir Fried Prawns with XO Sauce – Noob Cook
Stir Fried Leeks with Vegetable – Noob Cook
Chinese Almond Chicken – Appetite for China
Braised Bok Choy – Taste Hong Kong
Sichuan Wonton – Appetite for China
Steamed Pork & Shrimp Dumplings (Sui Mai) – Flavor Explosions
Steamed Chicken in Lotus Leaf
 – RasaMalaysia
Stir Fried Pine Nuts with Corn and Peas – RasaMalaysia (dish means “full of gold and jade”)
Stir Fried Broccoli and Scallop – RasaMalaysia (“richness and abundance”)
Baked BBQ Pork Buns – RasaMalaysia
Soy Sauce Chicken – RasaMalaysia (though serve your chicken whole & cut at table for Chinese New Year. Cooking a whole chicken or duck represents health — carving it before serving would meant to “cut” your health)
Flank Steak with Fried Noodles – Food Network
Ketchup Prawns – Sea Salt with Food
Egg Dumplings – Show Shanti
Homemade Chili Oil – Show Shanti
Singapore Black Pepper Crab – Sea Salt with Food
Chinese Long Beans – Washington Post (long beans = longevity)
Chinese Almond Cookies – Simply Recipes (beautiful, Garrett, just beautiful!)
Fortune Cookie Recipe – Martha Stewart
Fortune Cookie Recipe video – Cookbook Maniac (love her tips for fortune cookies)
Chocolate Fortune Cookies – Martha Stewart
Vegetarian Buddha’s Delight – Epicurious
Orange Peking Duck – recipe from Ken Hom, author of Ken Hom’s Top 100 Stir Fry Recipes
Sweet & Sour Pork – recipe from Grace Young, author Breath of a Wok
Buddha’s Delight with Tofu & Brocooli– Cooking Light
Peanut Sesame Noodles – Appetite for China
Soy Sauce Chicken – Appetite for China
Water Chestnut Cake with Ginger – Appetite for China
Dragon Well Tea Shrimp – Appetite for China
Dan Dan Mian – Appetite for China
Stir Fried Noodles, Taiwanese Style – Explore Hong Kong
Chinese New Year Cake – Asian Grandmother’s Cookbook
Scallion Pancakes – Tigers and Strawberries (perfect recipe. we made these many times)
Chinese White Cut Chicken – Sunday Nite Dinner (serve your chicken whole & cut at table for Chinese New Year. Cooking a whole chicken or duck represents health — carving it before serving would meant to “cut” your health)
Tea Smoked Duck – Cooking Channel
Nian Gao Cake – Asian Grandmother’s Cookbook
Shanghai Style Nian Gao – Donna Cooks (“rising higher each year” This dish is a must for our table – I love the soft, chewy noodles. This is also one of my Dad’s hometown dishes)
Stir Fried Shanghai Nian Gao – mmm-yoso
Lion’s Head Meatballs – NY Times (lion = strength; big round meatballs = family togetherness)
Fuscshia Dunlop’s Braised Pork Belly – Cookbook Maniac
Chinese Walnut Cookies – Lily’s Wai Sek Hong
Paper Lined Cup Sponge Cake – Lily’s Wai Sek Hong
Dragon Cookies – Lily’s Wai Sek Hong (love this idea – we’ll make these dragon cookies w/my kids)
Almond Cookie Cresents – Lily’s Wai Sek Hong
Double Sided Gold Noodles – Lily’s Wai Sek Hong (one of my favorite noodles as a kid)
Steamed Pork Bun Recipe + how to fold Chinese buns video – Christine’s Recipes
Braised Chinese Mushrooms – Christine’s Recipes (easy dish to make, we always have whole Chinese mushrooms on CNY)
Egg Custard Pastry – Christine’s Recipes (with a cheater crust! brilliant)
Stir Fried Glutinous Rice – Christine’s Recipes
Stir Fried Broccoli with Fish Fillet – Christine’s Recipes
Tomato Chili Prawns – Christine’s Recipes (shrimp = laughter and joy)
Butter Cookies – Christine’s Recipes
Braised Chinese Mushrooms – Christine’s Recipes
Baked Coconut Cake – Christine’s Recipes
Radish Cake – Christine’s Recipes

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Slow Cooker Bone Broth – Asian Style http://steamykitchen.com/39418-slow-cooker-bone-broth-asian-style.html http://steamykitchen.com/39418-slow-cooker-bone-broth-asian-style.html#comments Wed, 28 Jan 2015 22:23:46 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=39418 In Asian culture, soups and broths are part of everyday meals. A traditional Japanese breakfast would include a bowl of Miso Soup to warm the body. Chinese restaurants feature a long list of house soups, from an appetite stimulating Hot and Sour Soup to even a light broth served after dinner to cleanse the palate and complete the meal. Growing up, Mom ...

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Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian

In Asian culture, soups and broths are part of everyday meals. A traditional Japanese breakfast would include a bowl of Miso Soup to warm the body. Chinese restaurants feature a long list of house soups, from an appetite stimulating Hot and Sour Soup to even a light broth served after dinner to cleanse the palate and complete the meal.

Growing up, Mom always had soup simmering on the stove. Every night, without doubt, there was a Chinese style soup on the table. I remember saving the soup for last, as a ritual to conclude a delightful home-cooked meal.

I’ve tried to emulate Mom, but we’ve got such an active lifestyle that a pot simmering for hours on the stove isn’t feasible. Instead, we use a large 6-quart slow cooker to make an Asian-style bone broth that will last the entire week for our family.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian

What is bone broth?

Bone broth is often gently simmered for 24 hours (or more!) to extract as much nutrients from the bones of an animal, whether it be fish, chicken, pork or beef. The long cooking time breaks down bone to release vitamins, collagen and calcium phosphate — nutrients that are good for us.

Sure, it’s a trendy thing right now, with restaurants offering drive-through bone broth served in a coffee cup for $9, cookbooks dedicated to the art of bone broths (I highly recommend The Nourished Kitchen Cookbook which features bone broth) and even an entire line of bone broth concentrates that you can buy.

What’s the difference between broth, bone broth and soups?

Generally, soups are made with meats, bones, vegetables, herbs, added grains, sometimes thickened with starches – and simmered for a couple of hours.

Broths are mostly made from meats or vegetables and left clear without very much else added. Broths are also simmered for a couple of hours, resulting in a light colored, light flavored broth.

Bone broths are cooked for a day or even longer. Your favorite Vietnamese restaurant most likely simmer their pho broth overnight, which is why the broth is so rich and flavorful.

The long cooking time extracts so many nutrients and flavor! How do you know when you’ve extracted maximum nutrients and flavor? When the bones literally disintegrate just by giving a little pressure with your fingers.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe Asian Style

Like Nourished Kitchen, we make our bone broth in the slow cooker, and it will last us all week long. The process starts on Sunday night, and the slow cooker will do its magic all night long.

In the morning, we’ll enjoy bone broth as part of our breakfast. Every day, I’ll top off the pot with more water and keep the slow cooker humming along.

Each day, I’ll add a vegetable, switch out for fresh herbs, throw in a couple of umami-boosting Asian ingredients.

As the days progress, the bone broth develops new flavor, gets richer, smoother, fuller. We get the benefit of the valuable nutrition that’s normally locked inside the bones.

Some days, we’ll top off the bone broth with chopped herbs, or shredded seaweed just before serving. Or a spoonful of leftover rice in the bone broth is great too.

Secrets to Clear, Clean Bone Broth

Key to bone broth – be gentle. The cooking process is slow and gentle, coaxing out flavor with very little bubbles (no violent boiling!)

Don’t stir. Especially after the first 2 days. The bones will be come very soft and will crumble if you stir the pot too vigorously, resulting in a gritty broth.

Use cheesecloth or herb/tea bags to contain any herbs, aromatics or spices that are very small (see below.) This avoids having you dig around, stir around to fish these items out.

Use a very fine mesh skimmer to skim the surface of the broth every day, especially during the first 6-8 hours. The “scum” will cloud your broth during these first few hours of cooking. What’s the scum made out of? Proteins, fats, microscopic bone fragments (especially if the bones were cut), oils, impurities. Get rid of it!

Ready for the next batch? Jumpstart your next batch with a little of the last batch of concentrated “liquid gold!” We call this “Infinite Bone Broth.” Restaurants do the same with broths, sauces and sourdough bread too. Seed the next batch with rich flavor you’ve already built.

Bone Broth, Chinese Style

The “holy trinity” of Chinese cooking is garlic, ginger and green onion.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Garlic, Ginger & Green Onion

I’m not a fan of fishing out little pieces of ingredients, so I try to cut herbs so that they are easy to find and spoon out. The garlic head is cut in half. Sometimes, the cloves will separate (like above) but I’ll use a bag made for for DIY teabags or as an herb pouch (100 bags for $5.67)

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian DIY Herb Pouch

Fill it up with the garlic cloves that are loose. Fold the top over and the cloves or anything you put inside will stay put. You can also make your own with cheesecloth. I like to use these teabags for other spices too, like whole peppercorns or star anise – anything that would be hard to find and fish out.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Fill Herb Pouch with loose garlic cloves

The green onions are tied with twine, again for easy removal. The ginger is a big hunk, just sliced in half.  I reserve the other half of the ginger + the garlic cloves in the bag + more green onion  – to add to the bone broth a couple of days later (I’ll discard the spent herbs/aromatics, replace with fresh.)

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Tie green onions with twine and slice ginger in half

This week, I’m making bone broth with spareribs (it was on sale). Pork broth is very popular in Chinese cuisine. It’s just as popular as chicken broth is here in the U.S. Most of the Chinese soups that I make start with pork – for a lighter, more neutral flavor than beef or chicken.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Spareribs for bone broth

Some people like to cut off the excess fat, but I just leave it on. I’ll skim out the fats and oils later with a skimmer.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Everything goes into the slow cooker

Everything goes into the slow cooker, set it on low and let it go. If you plan on making slow cooker bone broth often, I suggest getting the largest slow cooker you can find. This one is a Cuisinart 6 1/2 Quart Slow Cooker ($99) that works really well. It’s never failed us.

After a few hours, I’ll skim the scuzz with a very fine mesh skimmer. This skimmer mesh is so fine that it catches all particles AND surface oils and fats.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian skim skuzz with very fine mesh skimmer

Look how rich this bone broth is the next day! Season with salt, or fish sauce. Season to taste.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian

I’ll discard the spent green onion, garlic and ginger, and add fresh to replace. This time, I’m adding garlic chives and cilantro from the garden – again, tied  up to make it easier to remove.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian discard spent herbs and add garlic chives and cilantro

Top it off with fresh water. The slow cooker stays on all week, on low.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian top off with fresh water

Chinese Bone Broth

After a couple of days, I might throw in some Chinese dried ingredients for a massive flavor and umami-boost:

Dried scallops, dried shrimp or dried black mushrooms (shitake).

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian dried scallops, dried shrimp and black mushrooms

You can also add in sliced daikon and carrots for one of my very favorite home-style soups! Every trip back to my Mom’s house, I request her Daikon Carrot soup.

If you like cilantro, you can also add in a bunch of cilantro stems, which have just as much flavor as the leaves. I often use the stems for soups.

Japanese Bone Broth

If you’d like Japanese flavor for a bone broth, add a small 6-inch piece of dried kombu and a handful of bonito flakes (place these in the tea bag.) By the way, kombu can be used over, and over again. Just rinse, wipe, and let dry completely before storing for next use.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian dried kombu and bonito flakes

My favorite breakfast? Bone broth with a spoonful of leftover rice or grains, top with roasted seaweed. This type of seaweed is called Kizame Nori – or sliced, roasted seaweed.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian with a spoonful of leftover rice or grains and roasted seaweed

By the way, have you ever tried Ochazuke?

Also, if you’d like to fortify the Japanese bone broth with miso paste – do this separately. Miso paste cooked at high heat or for too long will break apart and become gritty. Ladle some bone broth into a separate saucepan. Bring to simmer if you need to, but if it’s coming straight from the slow cooker, there’s no need to heat it up. Turn off heat. Whisk just a couple tablespoons of miso paste into the soup. Be careful of how much miso you add, especially if you’ve already added salt to the bone broth. I prefer shiro miso (white miso paste) as it’s lighter and less salty than the others. Miso paste is always added off heat.

Vietnamese Bone Broth

Add Vietnamese pho spices to a mesh bag or the tea bag (Here’s a recipe for Slow Cooker Vietnamese Pho.)

If you visit an Asian market, you can often find all these spices packaged, ready to go. Look for “Pho Spice Pack.” Instead of seasoning the broth with salt, season the bone broth with fish sauce. Start with 1 tablespoon, taste, and then add 1 teaspoon at a time until perfect.

What’s my favorite fish sauce? Right there in the sidebar is a free “Asian Masters of Flavor” ebook I wrote that includes my favorite brand! There’s a big difference between good quality fish sauce and crap, chemical-laden fish sauce.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Vietnamese Bone Broth Spices

More notes

If you’re concerned with the cost of running a slow cooker throughout the week, it costs pennies per day!

We grow all of our own herbs and most of our own vegetables in our aquaponics garden and greenhouse. Here’s a tip for green onion.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Our aquaphonics garden

You can even start with store-bought green onion. Make sure you buy ones that have nice, wet, strong roots (no dry or wilted!) Just stick’em in soil. The green onions will continue to grow their roots and sprout more leaves. I just snip off what I need (leafy part only) and new ones will continue to grow throughout the entire growing season!

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian grow your own green onion

Recommended Cooking Equipment

More recipes to explore

Vietnamese Pho Pressure Cooker – Paleo Friendly  (Steam Kitchen)

Mom’s Chinese Chicken Soup  (Steam Kitchen)

Vegetable Thai Curry Noodle Soup  (Steam Kitchen)

Tofu and Mushroom Miso Soup  (Steam Kitchen)

Chinese Daikon and Carrot Soup  (Steam Kitchen)

15 Minute Udon Miso Noodle Soup  (Steam Kitchen)

Thai Fish Soup  (Steam Kitchen)

Soba Noodles in Shiitake-Shoyu Broth with Spring Vegetables (Serious Eats)

Spicy Korean Seafood Soup (Serious Eats)

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Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Style

Servings: Prep Time: 5 minutes Cook Time:
slow-cooker-bone-broth-recipe-asian-3832

I prefer using pork or chicken for Chinese or Japanese style bone broth. If you'd like to use beef bones (great for Vietnamese bone broth), I suggest roasting the bones (350F for 30 minutes) first before adding them to your slow cooker. Not necessary, but it will give a richer bone broth. I don't normally roast pork or chicken bones - I just add them to the pot. Grassfed, organic is best.

PORK: spareribs, neck, hock, really anything.


CHICKEN: whole, raw chicken, or just the frame of a rotisserie chicken you've already enjoyed. You can also use chicken wings or chicken feet. Turkey works great too.


BEEF: oxtail, knuckle, neck, short ribs. I also use beef bone marrow as well - but after roasting, I"ll spoon out the marrow, spread it on bread and sprinkle with sea salt for a little treat. Basically, too much marrow in the bone broth will make the broth greasy tasting. Short ribs have amazing flavor - I like to add them to any beef bone broth that I make.


FISH: Fish bones and head. I like to do this traditional Chinese style with garlic, lots of ginger and green onion. Remove the fish skin and the thin, silvery lining in the gut area (very fishy taste). If the fish is raw, I prefer to roast the fish bones (350F for 20 minutes) - as this tames the fishiness smell and flavor of the bone broth. Most fish will work except for oily fish like mackerel.

Ingredients:

4 pounds spareribs
1 head garlic, halved
big knob of fresh ginger (about the size of 2 fingers), halved
3-4 stalks green onions, cut in half

Directions:

1. Reserve half of the garlic, ginger and green onion for later in the week. Tie the green onion bundles with twine.

2. In a slow-cooker, add green onion, garlic and ginger. Fill slow cooker with water, up to 1-inch below rim. Set to cook on high heat at first. When the bone broth comes to a simmer after an hour or so, you'll see lots of scum. Skim and discard. Set slow cooker on low and let the bone broth cook for at least 6 hours.

3. Use a skimmer to skim the surface of any particles and oil. Season with salt, to taste.

4. After drinking some of the bone broth, top off the slow cooker with additional fresh water. You can also discard the spent herbs and add the reserved garlic, onion and green onion. Continue to add additional vegetables, aromatics, dried ingredients (see post above for details) as you wish. Keep the setting on low.

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Pad Thai Zoodles Recipe http://steamykitchen.com/37769-pad-thai-zoodles-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/37769-pad-thai-zoodles-recipe.html#comments Wed, 01 Oct 2014 18:23:41 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=37769   Before I get into the recipe, I wanted to give you a quick peek at the Daytime TV studios where I tape cooking segments at. It’s a show that’s syndicated in nearly 200 markets in the US with hosts Cyndi Edwards and the incredibly funny Jerry Penacoli (formerly of EXTRA.) My cooking segments are around 4 minutes-ish long. We tape ...

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Before I get into the recipe, I wanted to give you a quick peek at the Daytime TV studios where I tape cooking segments at. It’s a show that’s syndicated in nearly 200 markets in the US with hosts Cyndi Edwards and the incredibly funny Jerry Penacoli (formerly of EXTRA.) My cooking segments are around 4 minutes-ish long. We tape the segment and then it gets aired 2 or 3 days after that, depending on the market.

The studio is HUGE. This is just a picture of the back half.

 

pad-thai-zoodles-recipe-7791

 

Here’s another angle. I’m fascinated by the ceiling – every available inch is covered by cables that hold up lights, speakers and I have no idea what else is hidden up there.

 

pad-thai-zoodles-recipe-7792

 

This is from the kitchen, looking out towards the cameras. There are 3 cameras, but I pretty much don’t look straight at the camera, except for at the beginning (intro and saying hi) and at the end (saying goodbye.) My focus is on the food and cooking alongside and chatting with the co-host.

The cooking segment is divided into 4 parts:

Hello
Demo/Cook
Taste
Goodbye

 

pad-thai-zoodles-recipe-7795

 

But just because I’m not LOOKING at the camera, doesn’t mean that I ignore them! Quite the contrary. I always know with my peripheral vision which camera is on (see that red light on top of the middle camera?)

When I’m cooking and need to show something, I have to keep in mind to stop, make sure the camera gets it and hold my hands still while I’m still talking and cooking. That prevents you, the viewer, from getting all dizzy trying to follow my hands!

Whether or not my cooking is done, time over is time over! Daytime doesn’t like to re-record or “cut” – we go with the flow and do it all in one take. Unless there’s a oopsie with a camera. Even if *I* make a mistake or don’t finish cooking in time – there’s no re-do!

That’s what I love, though. Learning to tape cooking segments this way has trained me to let go of perfection. In fact, if you happen to see the segment tomorrow or Friday, you’ll see that not only did I forget an ingredient (cilantro) but also made a MASSIVE mess trying to get the Pad Thai Zoodles on the stupid plate! LOL. The co-host, Cyndi and I laughed about it on-camera and just let it slide.

It makes the show a lot more natural, less “scripted” (nothing is scripted and there is no teleprompter other than the intro and the exit.) I’ve also trained myself to mentally walk through the recipe backwards to see what I have to prep or cook beforehand, so that we end up perfectly on time. For this recipe, I had to pre-cook the tofu. I also pre-spiralized the “zoodles” so we had a batch ready to go into the wok. So I started cooking while Cyndi was zoodling away with the zoodle-maker, called the Paderno 4-Blade Spiralizer magical machine.

If for some reason, Rob waves his 2-minute fingers at us, and there’s NO WAY that I’ll be done in those 2 minutes, I’ll either:

  • Cut out steps or some ingredients, just get something to taste*
  • Freak out

Just kidding. I don’t freak out. One time, the chicken was not cooked through, it was obvious that it wasn’t cooked through, but time was up and it was the “taste” time. I ended up saying, “So Jerry, we are running out of time, the chicken needs to cook for another couple of minutes. Here. take a fork and give the vegetables and the sauce a try!” We proceeded to dip into the pan (it was a one-pan dish) and tasted NOT-CHICKEN. This way, Jerry had something to say about the flavor for the camera. I hope I didn’t give him salmonella or gastroenteritis.

Sooooo, enough about the TV! What about the food that I came here for????

This was the recipe I made on-air, but I had to re-create it for the photo shoot on a little camping stove in my backyard (Less than 1 week before I get a real kitchen back!)

By the way, my cilantro looks very parsley-ish, We grow both. I wonder if they cross-pollinate and now I’ve just created Cilantrey or Partro. Or, as my friend, Cheri, would call it, “You-Ruined-The-Parsley.”

PAD THAI

 

The JERF Analysis

JERF is “Just Eat Real Food”

JERF

Tofu
Eggs
Green Onion
Garlic
Ginger
Carrots
Zucchini
Lime
Peanuts
Cilantro

Not-JERF

Thai Kitchen Pad Thai Sauce (though we are only using 3 tablespoons of the sauce)

__

 

*I haven’t done enough research on cooking oils yet to put them in a category.

I don’t mind using Prepared Pad Thai Sauce – or any shortcut sauce as long as the JERF column is significant. This recipe serves four, so 3 tablespoons of the sauce isn’t a deal-breaker. HOWEVER, if you want to stay JERF, go check out Todd and Diane’s version of Pad Thai Zoodles! They make their sauce from scratch, with ketchup, fish sauce, vinegar, etc.

The Zoodle Machine a.k.a. Spiralizer

This is what I used to make the zucchini noodles: the Paderno 4-Blade Vegetable Spiralizer

paderno-4-blade-spiralizer

 

I had previously done a video review of the Paderno 3-Blade (earlier model) and other options – here’s the Spiralizer Review Video. This new 4-Blader is even better – extra blade to cut angelhair sized zoodles and a metal rod so that you can make those carnival-style potato chips on a stick.

The Paderno 4-Blade Spiralizer price is $49.95 on Amazon. It’s a must-by if you plan on making a lot of zoodles. If you think it’s a once-in-a-while thing, you might want to consider one of my most-used tools in the kitchen – the Oxo Julienne Peeler for $10 – it’s smaller, fits in a drawer, cheaper.

 

How to cook Pad Thai Zoodles

I’m a crispy-crunchy tofu-lover. To make sure they stay crispy-crunchy, you have to cook them separately and remove the tofu from the pan so that they don’t drown in the sauce or vegetables.

Toss them in a little oil, add to hot pan, Brown on each side. This takes 1-2 minutes per side. But it’s worth the wait.

 

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Remove them from the pan

Next up, the eggs! Look how beautiful our hens’ eggs are. The yolks are so bright, vivid, vibrant.

 

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Give ’em a good scramble. Then remove them from the pan.

 

pad-thai-zoodles-recipe-2676

 

Why remove the eggs? Good question:

1. I like my eggs to be perfectly cooked, firm, separate from the rest of the stir-fry.

2. If I cook the eggs first, and then add everything else, the eggs will be overcooked. Plus, the “everything else” will be drowned by the wetness of the eggs. I want the “everything else” to have its own time in the wok, its own chance to fry in the cooking oil. Eggs are oil-hoggers.

3. If I cook all the vegetables first, then add the egg, then the raw egg will just “coat” the vegetables, making giant, soggy mess.

4. I could do this: Cook the aromatics (ginger, garlic, green onion), then cook the carrots, then zucchini. Then make a nice big hole in middle of wok, dribble in just a bit of cooking oil. Add eggs and scramble the eggs in that empty space. Once the eggs firm up, thoroughly mix all of the stir fry together and incorporate the cooked eggs.

HOWEVER – zucchini noodles cook way too fast. They are best cooked 80% of the way so that you still get some nice texture and bite. Soggy, overcooked zucchini becomes watery. Bad.

So to be on the safe side, I cook the eggs separate. You’ll see when I add them back into the pan later.

Once eggs are out, use a paper towel and just do a couple of swipes to clean the wok. Swirl in the remaining cooking oil, just a tiny bit, and add in the aromatics: ginger, garlic, green onion. Let that stir fry in the oil until crazy fragrant. This takes about 15-30 seconds.

 

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By the way, the reason we only use 3 tablespoons of prepared Pad Thai sauce (and not the entire jar) is because we’re amping up the “aromatics” and flavor with the garlic, ginger and green onion.

Add in the carrots to the pan and stir fry. *NOTE I didn’t use the Paderno Spiralizer to cut these carrots (I chose to just buy a bag of matchstick cut carrots to save time) – because in order to use the spiralizer effectively, the carrots have to be FAT. My store carries wimpy organic carrots. The carrots from our garden are too skinny.

 

pad-thai-zoodles-recipe-2681

 

Cook for a minute or so – carrots take longer than zucchini to cook, so I add carrots in first. The secret to wok-cooking is knowing when to add ingredients. If I had added in the zucchini at the same time as the carrots, the zucchini would be overcooked while waiting for the carrots to catch up.

Now add in the zucchini zoodles.

 

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Toss very well, let it stir fry for a bit until you start seeing the zucchini change color from opaque to just beginning stages of slightly transluscent. Zucchini cooks fast, so this doesn’t take long.

Add in the Pad Thai sauce – I use Thai Kitchen Pad Thai Sauce (gluten free, dairy free, but it does contain fish sauce, so not vegetarian.) It’s on the sweet side, so if you feel like you need more salty flavor but not sweetness, try adding a few sprinkles of fish sauce or soy sauce.

 

pad-thai-zoodles-recipe-2685

 

Add in the tofu and the eggs. Toss! Toss! Toss!

 

pad-thai-zoodles-recipe-2687

To finish, squeeze in some fresh lime juice. (Toss again), Top with peanuts and cilantro. Serve with more lime wedges and some hot sauce!

On the TV segment that I taped, I used a new product that I just got from Rodelle. Sriracha Seasoning!!

pad-thai-zoodles-recipe-2710

 

It is like an explosion of spice, garlic, salty, sweet, tangy. When we did our “taste” on air, both Cyndi and I said, “WOW!”

The good: Adds a POW of flavor. Ingredients that I can pronounce: sugar, salt, spices, garlic, vinegar powder (maltodextrin + distilled white vinegar), citric acid, soybean oil.

The bad: Sugar is the first ingredient, but since it’s a spice, you’re only using 1/4 teaspoon per serving.

I can’t wait to try this as a dry rub for shrimp on the grill, well….anything on the grill. I’m sure it will be wonderful on a roast too!

What I used to make Pad Thai Zoodles

Thank you for using my affiliate links! :-)

The magical Paderno zoodle machine. See my video review of different spiralizers here

The highly recommended Oxo Julienne Peeler that I love, love, love

The Sriracha spice blend:

My favorite wok:

Pad Thai Zoodles Recipe

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Pad Thai Zoodles

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 20 minutes
pad-thai-zoodles-recipe-2

The prepared Pad Thai sauce is sweet. Start with 3 tablespoons of the sauce and if you feel like you need more salty (but not sweet), add a teaspoon of fish sauce or soy sauce. If you enjoy more sweet, add another tablespoon of the Pad Thai sauce.

Ingredients:

8 ounces extra firm tofu, cubed
2 tablespoons cooking oil, divided
2 eggs, beaten
1 stalk green onion, cut into 2" lengths
1 clove garlic
1 teaspoon fresh grated ginger
1 cup matchstick cut carrots
3 large zucchini, cut into noodle spirals
3 tablespoons prepared Pad Thai sauce (or more, depending on taste)
1 lime, halved (use 1 half for step 5, cut other half into wedges for serving)
1/4 cup chopped peanuts
sprigs of cilantro, minced

Directions:

1. Pat the tofu very dry with paper towels. Toss just 1 tablespoon of the cooking oil with the tofu. Heat a wok over high heat. When hot, carefully slide the tofu (be careful of any splatters). Brown all sides of tofu, about 1-2 minutes each side. Remove tofu to plate and set aside.

2. With a paper towel, wipe the wok clean. Swirl in just half of the remaining cooking oil and turn the heat to medium-high. When hot, add in the eggs and scramble. Remove the eggs to to the tofu plate and set aside.

3. Return wok to medium-high heat. Swirl in the last of the cooking oil and turn heat to medium-high. When hot, add in the green onion, garlic and ginger. Cook for 15 seconds, until fragrant.

4. Turn heat to high and add in the carrots. Toss and stir fry for 1 minute. Then add in the zucchini noodles. Toss well and when zucchini begins to soften (about 1 minute), then stir in the Pad Thai sauce. Add in the eggs and the tofu. Toss, cook for 2 minutes. Taste and add additional sauce if desired.

5. Squeeze a little lime on top, top with chopped peanuts and cilantro. Serve with additional lime wedges.

 

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Vietnamese Pho Pressure Cooker – Paleo Friendly http://steamykitchen.com/31369-vietnamese-pho-pressure-cooker-noodle-soup-paleo-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/31369-vietnamese-pho-pressure-cooker-noodle-soup-paleo-recipe.html#comments Mon, 10 Mar 2014 15:45:10 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=31369 It’s been a loooong time since I’ve made home made pho – much too long! Normally I make beef pho the long and slow way – either in the slow cooker or barely bubbling on the stovetop: Slow Cooker Vietnamese Pho Recipe Vietnamese Beef Pho Recipe Chicken Pho Recipe (Pho Ga) But a very persistent reader has been emailing me ...

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vietnamese-pho-pressure-cooker-noodle-soup-recipe-pinterest.jpg

It’s been a loooong time since I’ve made home made pho – much too long! Normally I make beef pho the long and slow way – either in the slow cooker or barely bubbling on the stovetop:

Slow Cooker Vietnamese Pho Recipe
Vietnamese Beef Pho Recipe
Chicken Pho Recipe (Pho Ga)

But a very persistent reader has been emailing me about creating a Pressure Cooker Vietnamese Pho recipe for the past 2 years. If you can make awesome Pho in the slow cooker, why not a pressure cooker?

Vietnamese Pho Pressure Cooker (Noodle Soup)

The only limitation of using a slow cooker or pressure cooker is space. Both appliances aren’t that big, and if I’m going to take the time to make Vietnamese Pho, I want to make a BIG BATCH of it! Well, enough to serve 4 people and some broth for the freezer too (freeze in quart containers or bags to make the best “instant noodle” broth ever.)

My solution for Pressure Cooker Pho is to treat the pressure cooker as a “pho broth concentrator” – the ingredients in the recipe are sufficient enough to create such a rich pho broth concentrate. You can add water to adjust after the broth is complete.

Vietnamese Pho Pressure Cooker (Noodle Soup)

Paleo Friendly Vietnamese Pho!

Screen Shot 2014-01-28 at 9.11.47 AM

Here’s a bonus. The recipe is Paleo friendly.

Big thanks to Nom Nom Paleo Food for Humans Cookbook by my friends Michelle Tam and Henry Fong for another stellar recipe. LOVE this cookbook, I can’t recommend it enough and have purchased copies for my friends.

If you’re non-Paleo, don’t worry. I’m creating notes for Paleo and non-Paleo recipe the Vietnamese Beef Pho using the pressure cooker.

 

 

20 Minute Sriracha Sauce Recipe

20 Minute Sriracha Sauce Recipe – Paleo Friendly –

Cauliflower Fried Rice Paleo Recipe

Cauliflower Fried Rice Recipe – > – Paleo Friendly

Non-Paleo Notes: Vietnamese Pho is generally Paleo friendly, as-is. The only ingredient substitution is the type of oil and noodles. Paleo grain-free “noodles” can be Shirotaki noodles (slippery little noodles made from Asian mountain potatoes – found in refrigerated section next to tofu at the store), Zucchini noodles (watch my video reviewing different gadgets to cut zucchini noodles), Kelp noodles made from seaweed.

Traditional Vietnamese Pho Ingredients

If you’re regular eatin’ folk, the traditional Vietnamese Pho noodles are rice noodles. You can find fresh rice noodles at Asian markets or you can get dried rice noodles at your grocery store. They come in different widths, just get one that you like. Generally, I can easily find the 1/4″ thick noodles very easily.

Dried rice noodles cook differently from the regular wheat-based Italian style pasta that you’re used to. The great news its that it’s faster! Dried rice noodles cook in as quickly as 1-3 minutes! If you overcook the noodles, they become mushy and pretty much inedible.

Here’s the best way to cook the dried rice noodles:

  1. Soak the dried noodles in hot water (not boiling water, just hot water from tap) for about 10 minutes. This will soften up the rice noodles. Drain.
  2. Bring a small pot of water to a simmer. You don’t really need a ton of water (like you do for pasta) – just enough so that all the noodles can be submerged in the hot water. Turn off heat.
  3. Add drained rice noodles to the hot water. Let it sit for 1 minute. Very thin noodles will be ready after 1 minute. Thicker rice noodles will need a couple of minutes. Drain.

Cooking noodles in the Pho broth?

I know you’re gonna ask me: why not cook the noodles directly in the Pho broth? I never do this. Here’s why:

  1. Because the rice noodles cook so darn quickly, it’s so easy to over cook them. I don’t want to ruin a batch of hard-earned broth with overcooked noodles!
  2. Cooking any type of noodles releases starch. For example, when you cook noodles, the water becomes cloudy from the extra flour. I don’t want that in my Pho broth!
  3. Related to #1 is that because the rice noodles can get mushy if submerged in boiling water too long, I add the noodles to each personal bowl first. When everyone is ready to eat (at the table, all staring at me, impatiently tapping their chopsticks on the table) – I will pour the Pho broth INTO the bowls one by one and serve immediately. Basically, I make the bowls to-serve.

No Pressure Cooker? No problem!

Just follow all instructions and simmer the broth for 4 hours on your stovetop. Put all ingredients into a large pot. Fill with 2-1/2 quarts of water. Bring to a boil, reduce heat so that the water is BARELY simmering – just tiny bubbles here and there. Simmer slightly covered for 3-4 hours. Skim surface of fats and stuff that floats frequently.

Vietnamese Pho Pressure Cooker (Noodle Soup) Recipe Video


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Vietnamese Pho Pressure Cooker (Noodle Soup)

Servings: 6 Prep Time: 15 minutes Cook Time: 2 hours
vietnamese pho pressure cooker noodle soup recipe featured-0888

Adapted from Nom Nom Paleo Cookbook by Henry Fong and Michelle Tam. This recipe makes a Vietnamese Pho Soup concentrate.

A tip for the Beef Eye of Round. The key to this is to very thinly slice. These slices will be added to each person's bowl RAW. When you pour the simmering hot pho broth into each bowl, it will cook the beef perfectly! To slice very thin, space the Eye of Round roast into the freezer for 20 minutes. This will firm up the roast and make it easier to slice very thin.

OR - sometimes you can find already-sliced beef at your grocery store. My store sells pre-sliced beef that you use for cheesesteak sandwiches. Even if it's not eye-of-round roast, just use what they are selling pre-sliced!

Ingredients:

3 whole star anise
2 tablespoons whole coriander seeds
1 cinnamon stick
3 whole cloves
1 green cardamom pod
2 tablespoons butter, divided (Non-Paleo version: cooking oil)
8 slices fresh ginger, unpeeled, 1/2 inch thick
1/2 large yellow onion, peeled
2 pound beef cross shanks, 1-1/2 inches thick
1-1/2 pound oxtails
1-1/2 pound beef brisket
3-1/2 tablespoons fish sauce
1 pound beef eye of round roast, very thinly sliced (keep refrigerated until ready to serve)
8 cups shirotaki noodles (Non-Paleo version: dried rice noodles)FOR THE TABLE:2 limes, cut into wedges
2 jalapeño peppers, sliced
1 bunch fresh cilantro
1 bunch fresh Thai basil (or regular Italian basil)
1 bunch fresh mint
2 cups bean sprouts
Sriracha sauce (store bought or 20 Minute Sriracha Recipe)

Directions:

1. In a large saucepan over medium-high heat, add all spices and toast until they become fragrant. Take care not to burn them! Place them in a coffee filter or piece of cheesecloth and tie it up. Place the sachet into the pressure cooker pot.
2. In the same sauce pan over medium-high heat, add 1 tablespoon butter (or oil) and add onion and ginger pieces. Brown until there is a nice sear on them. Remove them from the pan and place them in the pressure cooker.
3. Sear the meat in batches: add the remaining tablespoon of butter to the pan and sear the shank, oxtail and brisket. You'll do this in batches, all in a single layer. Give everything plenty of space so that they SEAR and brown. Crowding the pan will not brown the meat. Sear each side, remove each meat from the pan and add them to the pressure cooker.

4. Cover the contents of the pressure cooker with water or up to the fill line. Set your pressure cooker to cook for 60 minutes. This means it will cook under pressure for 60 minutes. It will take time to build up pressure (usually 30 minutes) and additional time to release pressure after cooking (usually 30 minutes).
Approximately: 30 minutes to build up pressure + 60 minutes under pressure + 30 minutes to release pressure. Exact timing is really not that important - and also depends on your pressure cooker system. Follow manufacturer instructions.

5. Once finished cooking and safe to open, open the pressure cooker and using a fine mesh or ladle, remove the top layer of fatty liquid that has accumulated on the surface of the broth and discard (there will be lots of it.) Remove the onion, ginger and spice sachet and discard. Remove the meat to your cutting board. Shred the brisket using two forks. Remove any other meat from bone.

6. The resulting broth is a concentrate. Dilute the pho concentrate with 4-6 cups of water. Season the Pho broth with fish sauce. Taste and add additional fish sauce if needed. Bring to a simmer on stovetop right before you are ready to serve.

Assemble the Pho Bowls:
Serve to order. In a large bowl for each person, add shirotaki noodles and meat (including the sliced eye of round). Pour the just-simmering hot broth into each bowl. Hot broth will cook the sliced eye of round. Serve with the remaining sides a la carte so each person can add whatever they'd like to their soup.

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Healthy Garlicky Spinach Artichoke Dip with Baked Tofu Fries http://steamykitchen.com/30480-garlicky-spinach-artichoke-dip-with-tofu-fries.html http://steamykitchen.com/30480-garlicky-spinach-artichoke-dip-with-tofu-fries.html#comments Thu, 19 Dec 2013 18:02:14 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=30480   Here’s another way to incorporate more tofu in your life! I developed a series of recipes for Mori-Nu tofu, made Tualatin, Oregon, USA. You’ll love this one! ~Jaden   If you’re looking for a dip for your holiday party – here it is! I was so incredibly surprised testing this recipe – the Garlicky Spinach Artichoke Dip was made with ...

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Garlicky Spinach Artichoke Dip with Tofu Fries Recipe

 

Here’s another way to incorporate more tofu in your life! :-) I developed a series of recipes for Mori-Nu tofu, made Tualatin, Oregon, USA. You’ll love this one! ~Jaden

 

Garlicky Spinach Artichoke Dip with Tofu Fries Recipe

If you’re looking for a dip for your holiday party – here it is! I was so incredibly surprised testing this recipe – the Garlicky Spinach Artichoke Dip was made with a base of silken tofu and light mayonnaise, cutting the amount of fat and calories. In return for opting for a healthier dip, you’ll be rewarded with a light, creamy, full-flavored dip that’s got a nice zing with the addition of garlic and lemon juice!

Garlicky Spinach Artichoke Dip with Tofu Fries Recipe

For something a little different, we made baked tofu fries too. They take less than 20 minutes to make in the oven.

Watch the video for all the details!

Garlicky Spinach Artichoke Dip with Baked Tofu Fries Recipe Video

 

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Garlicky Spinach Artichoke Dip with Baked Tofu Fries

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 20 minutes
garlic spinach artichoke dip featured-0525

Nobody will believe you when you tell them the dip is made from tofu! In fact, I prefer this version over the full-fat original version. This tofu version is light, zippy and garlicky! The tofu fries are so fun to make and eat - they look just like french fries! Use them to dip too!

Ingredients:

FOR THE TOFU FRIES

1 box firm tofu (I prefer Mori-Nu silken extra-firm brand), drained

cooking sprayFOR THE GARLICKY SPINACH ARTICHOKE DIP


3/4 cup light mayonnaise of your choice
3/4 cup parmesan cheese

1/2 cup silken tofu (I prefer Mori-Nu silken), drained

1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
2 cloves garlic

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 (10-oz) package frozen spinach, defrosted

1 tablespoon fresh dill

1 (8 oz) can marinated artichoke hearts, drained

Directions:

FOR THE TOFU FRIES

Set your oven to broil, place rack near top (about 6" below heating element). Pat the tofu dry with a paper towel. Slice the block of tofu into 1/2-inch thick strips. Coat the baking sheet with the cooking oil spray. Add the tofu to the baking sheet. Coat the top of the tofu with more cooking oil spray. Broil tofu in the oven for 7-10 minutes, or until the bottoms are browned. Carefully flip and broil the other side for 7 minutes or until all sides are browned. Season while hot with salt and pepper if you'd like. I also enjoy a little smoked paprika or a Cajun spice on them too.

FOR THE GARLICKY SPINACH ARTICHOKE DIP
Drain the defrosted spinach and use your hands to squeeze as much water as possible out. Save the spinach water for another use if you want.
In a food processor, add the mayonnaise, cheese, tofu, garlic, lemon juice, and salt. Blend until well combined. Add the spinach and dill and pulse a few times. Add the artichoke hearts and pulse 3-4 times until the artichokes are just coarsely chopped. Serve as a dip with the tofu fries and other vegetables such as carrots, celery and radishes.

 

 

 

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Pasta Nests – with a bite of Thanksgiving! http://steamykitchen.com/29086-pasta-nests-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/29086-pasta-nests-recipe-video.html#comments Wed, 20 Nov 2013 12:22:45 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=29086 Hi! This is a recipe I’ve created for Mori-Nu Tofu – I try to present to you creative ways to add more healthy tofu in your diet! ~jaden After 10 days of traveling in Hong Kong and Toyko (with brief stops in the beautiful Minneapolis airport), we’re finally home now. It’s nice to come back just in time to get in ...

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Thanksgiving Tofu Pasta Nests Recipe

Hi! This is a recipe I’ve created for Mori-Nu Tofu – I try to present to you creative ways to add more healthy tofu in your diet! ~jaden

After 10 days of traveling in Hong Kong and Toyko (with brief stops in the beautiful Minneapolis airport), we’re finally home now. It’s nice to come back just in time to get in gear for Thanksgiving, turkey talk, Fall decorations (despite the retailers attempt to lure me straight into Christmas shopping with all the blingy lights and decorated trees).

I’ve got a really fun PRE and POST Thanksgiving recipe for you – if you’re hosting a holiday party this weekend or……if you’re looking to use up some leftovers from the big meal, these crispy, cheesy, tofu pasta nests are so creative.

For the Pre-Thanksgiving folk – you don’t have to cook up an entire Thanksgiving dinner just to make these appetizers – use store-bought roasted turkey breast or rotisserie chicken, canned cranberry sauce and an easy 5-minute Stovetop Stuffing mix. I top each with a tiny bit of fresh thyme.

Thanksgiving Tofu Pasta Nests Recipe

Of course, don’t limit these pasta nests to just Thanksgiving – top with smoked salmon, a dollop of crème fraîche (or goat cheese, marscapone, greek yogurt, etc) and top with some ikura, sushi salmon eggs. If you don’t have a local Japanese market that sells ikura, head to your favorite sushi joint and ask to buy a package from them. You only need a little bit to top each nest. Finish off with minced fresh chives.

Thanksgiving Tofu Pasta Nests Recipe

The nests are made with cooked pasta (like thin spaghetti or angel hair), grated parmesan, butter and silken tofu to hold it all together. I’ve used Mori-Nu Silken Tofu to bind the nests together – and it allows me to use LESS butter in the recipe. Using too much butter ended up being to greasy – so the tofu worked perfectly.

Thanksgiving Tofu Pasta Nests Recipe

 

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Thanksgiving Tofu Pasta Nests Recipe Video

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Pasta Nest Recipe

Servings: 18 nests Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 25 minutes
tofu pasta nests featured-0248

Make pasta nests and top with anything you'd like!

Ingredients:

6 ounces soft silken tofu (I prefer Mori-Nu brand)
3 tablespoons butter, melted
1 cup parmesan cheese, grated
8 ounces dried thin spaghetti or angel hair pasta

Directions:

Preheat the oven to 375F.

Cook the pasta according to package instructions, drain.

In a large bowl, whisk together the tofu, butter and cheese until combined. Add the cooked spaghetti and stir well to coat. In a muffin tin, divide the pasta for each cup. Form into a "nest" shape with your fingers. Don't overload - you should be able to make 18 nests (the less pasta you use, the crisper the nests will be).

Bake for 20-25 minutes or until pasta nests are golden brown.

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Salmon Teriyaki Recipe http://steamykitchen.com/28997-salmon-teriyaki-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/28997-salmon-teriyaki-recipe-video.html#comments Thu, 07 Nov 2013 17:24:39 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=28997 It’s not often that you meet soul mates or life-long family friends. We (and I mean every one of us in the Steamy Kitchen family, including Coco) feel extremely lucky to count Todd and Diane of White on Rice Couple as part of our family.   I think that was 4 years ago when I first saw their post on Tofu ...

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Salmon Teriyaki Recipe

It’s not often that you meet soul mates or life-long family friends. We (and I mean every one of us in the Steamy Kitchen family, including Coco) feel extremely lucky to count Todd and Diane of White on Rice Couple as part of our family.

Salmon Teriyaki Recipe

 

I think that was 4 years ago when I first saw their post on Tofu Fries, but honestly, time is all jumbled up since that darn internet/social media/blogging world sped up time. OMGGGGG- I just checked the link and it’s been almost 6 years now. Hot damn.

Salmon Teriyaki Recipe

Diane and Todd have supported us through countless videos, trips, Food Blog Forums, long texts, phone calls and virtual hugs. They are just the most generous, love-with-open-arms people that we know. My kids lovingly call them “Auntie Diane” and “Uncle Todd.”

Finally, it’s our turn to introduce to you their very first cookbook, Bountiful: Recipes Inspired by our Garden.

Salmon Teriyaki Recipe

Well, it’s more than just a cookbook. The book is a peek into their bountiful life and surroundings with gorgeous photography of vegetables, fruit, herbs….and of course recipes. I hope you have a chance look through a copy of their book. Psst….here’s an article from LA Times Food Section on how they transformed their mess of a backyard into a bountiful oasis.

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Bountiful cookbook by Todd Porter and Diane Cu

diane and todd

I’ve made their super-simple Pineapple Teriyaki Sauce and paired with fresh salmon. It’s a 16-minute recipe. You’ll love the updated freshness of Japanese teriyaki sauce. This Pineapple Teriyaki Sauce goes with evvvverything. Not only is the sauce “no-cook” but it all comes together simply in a blender. Use the sauce to drizzle on roasted or steamed veggies; as a marinade for pork, chicken or seafood, as a simmer sauce (like this recipe) or just toss with cooked noodles.

Salmon Teriyaki Recipe

Salmon Teriyaki Recipe Video

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Salmon Teriyaki

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 5 minutes Cook Time: 8 minutes
salmon teriyaki recipe featured-0112

Ingredients:

2 cups fresh pineapple, divided
1 knob fresh ginger
2 garlic cloves
1/2 cup soy sauce
3 tablespoons brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon sesame oil
sprig of fresh mint or basil
1 tablespoon olive oil
4 salmon filets (about 4-6 oz each)

Directions:

For the Pineapple Teriyaki Sauce: In a blender, add just 1 cup of the pineapple, ginger, garlic, soy sauce, brown sugar, sesame oil and puree until smooth.

Dice the remaining pineapple. Mince the fresh mint or basil. Combine these two ingredients in a small bowl and set aside.

Heat a large sauté or frying pan over medium high heat and swirl in the olive oil. When hot, add the salmon filets.

Cook each side of the salmon for approximately 2-3 minutes or until there is a nice crust but the inside is still just barely raw. Pour in the teriyaki sauce to the pan and simmer for one minute, spooning the hot mixture all over the salmon. Top with the fresh diced pineapple and mint. Serve immediately.

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Indian Spiced Black Bean & Tofu Burgers http://steamykitchen.com/28772-indian-spiced-black-bean-and-tofu-burgers-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/28772-indian-spiced-black-bean-and-tofu-burgers-recipe-video.html#comments Fri, 18 Oct 2013 15:15:19 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=28772 Hi! Here’s another way to incorporate more tofu in your life! I create delicious tofu recipes for Mori-Nu Tofu, made right here in the USA. Enjoy! Jaden Y’all know I’m a true omnivore, given a choice between a vegetarian taco and a pulled pork taco, you know which one I’d choose. The closest I had ever gotten to a vegetarian burger ...

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Indian Spiced Black Bean and Tofu Burgers

Hi! Here’s another way to incorporate more tofu in your life! I create delicious tofu recipes for Mori-Nu Tofu, made right here in the USA. Enjoy! Jaden

Y’all know I’m a true omnivore, given a choice between a vegetarian taco and a pulled pork taco, you know which one I’d choose. The closest I had ever gotten to a vegetarian burger was once I was accidentally given a Gardenburger at a restaurant instead of my order of a fancy $18 grass-fed, local, organic, massaged and manicured burger (the Gardenburger was for the other table).

Indian Spiced Black Bean and Tofu Burgers

But when you go to a mostly vegan/vegetarian cafe like Simon’s Cafe in Sarasota, Florida, the burger of the day is a lentil burger. It came highly recommended from the waitress when I asked, “What do you recommend??”

Indian Spiced Black Bean and Tofu Burgers

I love hearing what the waiters and waitresses recommend – but then I sort of feel obligated to order what they recommend. I guess I feel rude for asking them to take their time to rattle off their menu favorites and then totally disregard what they just said!

 

Indian Spiced Black Bean and Tofu Burgers

The burger was nothing like I had imagined (While waiting for my meal, I was dreadfully thinking that the lentil burger would be dry, chalky, lentil-y, NOT MEAT….and then pissed off at myself for ordering it…..then pissed off that the waitress had recommended it.)

Indian Spiced Black Bean and Tofu Burgers

All that huffing and puffing was totally unnecessary, and energy wasted. The vegetarian burger turned out to be everything that a meat burger WAS NOT…and in the most delicious way. It was seasoned generously with a blend of inviting, warm Indian spices and made of finely minced bell peppers, mushrooms, lentils, oats and other grains. The goat cheese was a perfect match – creamy yet assertive (a little goes a long ways) with a tangy punch.

Indian Spiced Black Bean and Tofu Burgers

At the Steamy Kitchen kitchens, we’ve been testing different variations of bean burgers and came up with one that is just as fabulous as Simon’s – and maybe just slightly even better since these are very simple to make and really a 3-step recipe!

Throw vegetables and canned black beans in food processor. Mix in silken tofu (acts like a healthy, low-calorie, protein rice binder) and panko bread crumbs. If you have any leftover grains (rice, quinoa, wild rice, couscous) you can add that too. Form into patties and fry both sides. Of course, I couldn’t leave out the goat cheese!

Indian Spiced Black Bean and Tofu Burgers

Indian Spiced Black Bean & Tofu Burgers Recipe Video

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Indian Spiced Black Bean and Tofu Burgers

Servings: 6 (makes 6 burgers) Prep Time: 5 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes
tofu blackbean sliders featured-0052

This recipe is also great for using leftover rice, brown rice wild rice, couscous, farro or quinoa. You can substitute up to 1/2 cup of bread crumbs with any of these items. So, if you have 1/2 cup leftover rice, you can use that + 1/2 cup panko bread crumbs. In the video and photos, I used 1/2 cup quinoa + 1/2 cup panko bread crumbs. You can make Black Bean and Tofu Sliders instead - just make 12 small patties and use slider buns.

Ingredients:

1/4 red onion
1 bell pepper, cored
6 ounces fresh mushroom of your choice
One 16-ounce can black beans, rinsed and drained
2 teaspoons garam masala seasoning
1/2 teaspoon kosher or sea salt
6 ounces soft silken tofu (I prefer Mori-nu brand)
1 cup panko bread crumbs
2 teaspoons cooking oil
12 burger buns
mayonnaise (or soy mayonnaise)
2 cups fresh arugula
6 ounces goat cheese (or soy cheese)

Directions:

Roughly chop the onion and bell pepper (it makes it easier for the food processor). In a food processor, add the first 6 ingredients. Pulse until the mixture becomes finely minced.

Drain the tofu and pat dry. With a large spoon, mix the tofu and the panko bread crumbs into the patty mixture. You can taste the mixture and add additional garam masala seasoning or salt, if needed. Refrigerate the patty mixture for at least 20 minutes (or up to overnight). The mixture should be moist, but just firm enough to hold a patty shape - if it is too wet, mix in 1/4 additional bread crumbs. Shape the mixture into 6-8 patties.

When ready to cook, heat a frying pan over medium heat and swirl in the cooking oil. When hot, carefully add as many patties that can fit without touching. Fry each side until it is golden brown, about 2-3 minutes per side. Assemble the patties onto each bun with mayonnaise, arugula and cheese.

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