Steamy Kitchen Recipes | RSS Feed http://steamykitchen.com Steamy Kitchen Food Blog: fast recipes, simple recipes, with fresh ingredients to create delicious meals. Fri, 01 May 2015 15:39:44 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.1 Salmon with Magical Butter Sauce http://steamykitchen.com/38066-salmon-with-magical-butter-sauce-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/38066-salmon-with-magical-butter-sauce-recipe.html#comments Mon, 20 Oct 2014 19:10:26 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=38066 What you’ll learn: 5-ingredient salmon recipe Microwave: butter + your favorite fruit jam + balsamic vinegar Use on shrimp, pork chops, fish or steamed vegetables How to pan-seared salmon When I buy salmon fillet, I try to get the most even piece – meaning, even in thickness. But, it’s not always possible. Even when thickness is just a little different, it ...

The post Salmon with Magical Butter Sauce appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
Salmon with Magical Butter Sauce

What you’ll learn:

  • 5-ingredient salmon recipe
  • Microwave: butter + your favorite fruit jam + balsamic vinegar
  • Use on shrimp, pork chops, fish or steamed vegetables

salmon-magical-butter-sauce-8861

How to pan-seared salmon

When I buy salmon fillet, I try to get the most even piece – meaning, even in thickness. But, it’s not always possible. Even when thickness is just a little different, it can cause parts of the salmon to overcook.

Salmon with Magical Butter Sauce Recipe

 

I like to just roll the salmon piece and tie with twine (skin or no skin it’s up to you.) This gives me a nice, even salmon “steak” that cooks evenly. With the piece of salmon that I have here, I removed the skin, then rolled the salmon. Tied twine in 2 or 3 different places. Then cut that roll in 2 or 3 pieces – so that I have several pieces of salmon steak, each about an 1 1/4-inches thick. The larger the salmon piece, the more steaks you can make.

Season with salt and pepper.

Heat a little oil in the pan, place salmon down in the pan. Sear for 2 minutes.

I have kitchen envy…these photos were taken 4 years ago, in my old house when I had a real gas stove.

 

salmon-magical-butter-sauce-8843

Turn salmon over. See that nice crust? Cook for 1 minute.

salmon-magical-butter-sauce-8844

Turn heat to medium-low, then cover loosely with tin foil.

The loose tin foil traps heat to cook the inside of the salmon – but it still lets steam escape, so that you don’t lose that nice crust you’ve created.
salmon-magical-butter-sauce-8846

Alternatively, you can do this in the oven. But cooking this way on the stovetop saves you from having to heat up the oven.

What about asparagus? Magical butter sauce is the best.

salmon-magical-butter-sauce-8870

Yum
Print

Salmon with Magical Butter Sauce Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes
Salmon with Magical Butter Sauce

If you are using the Magical Butter just by itself: In a microwave safe bowl, melt the butter, then whisk in the remaining ingredients.

Ingredients:

FOR THE MAGICAL BUTTER SAUCE
1/2 cup butter
3 tablespoons fruit preserves (like apricot, mango-jalapeno, blackberry, etc.)
1 1/2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
salt and pepper
1 tablespoon minced herbs (like parsley, cilantro, basil, chives)

FOR THE FISH
1 piece skinless salmon fillet, about 5-6 inches long
salt and pepper
Vegetable oil, for cooking

Directions:

1. Season the salmon with salt and pepper. Roll the salmon. Use kitchen twine to tie the salmon in 4 places, evenly spaced. Make sure you tie it tight! Cut between the twine to make 4 evenly sized pieces, about 1 1/4" thick.

2. Heat a large frying pan with some vegetable oil over high heat. When hot, add the salmon steaks. Cook for 2 minutes. Turn the salmon over. Cook an additional 1 minute. Turn heat to medium-low, then cover pan loosely with tin foil. Cook for 4-5 minutes, or until the salmon is cooked through. Remove salmon to clean plate.

3. To the same pan on medium-low heat, add the Magical Butter ingredients. Cook until bubbly and butter is melted, about 30 seconds. Pour on top of the salmon.

 

 

 

 

 

The post Salmon with Magical Butter Sauce appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/38066-salmon-with-magical-butter-sauce-recipe.html/feed 23
Roasted Brussels Sprouts and Grapes http://steamykitchen.com/28972-roasted-brussels-sprouts-and-grapes-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/28972-roasted-brussels-sprouts-and-grapes-recipe-video.html#comments Wed, 11 Dec 2013 14:19:28 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=28972 If you’re looking for a holiday side dish to complement the turkey, prime rib (or both!), mark this recipe down as a top contender! Not only is this a 5-ingredient dish, but the roasted brussels sprouts are treated to a special ingredient – sweet, red grapes. Let your oven do its magic – 20 minutes is all it takes – ...

The post Roasted Brussels Sprouts and Grapes appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
Roasted Brussels Sprouts and Grapes

If you’re looking for a holiday side dish to complement the turkey, prime rib (or both!), mark this recipe down as a top contender! Not only is this a 5-ingredient dish, but the roasted brussels sprouts are treated to a special ingredient – sweet, red grapes.

Roasted Brussels Sprouts and Grapes

Let your oven do its magic – 20 minutes is all it takes – to make all traces of bitterness disappear from the brussels sprouts. Roasting also concentrates the grapes’ flavor – intensifying its natural sweetness.

Roasted Brussels Sprouts and Grapes

Cook’s Bonus: The stray leaves that fall off in the roasting pan turn into impossibly thin, brittle, crispy bites. This is what I call the Cook’s Bonus – a little delicious somethn’ for the chef that never makes it out to the table. Shhh….don’t tell anyone.

Roasted Brussels Sprouts and Grapes

I recently made these on the Daytime Show and instantly converted two of the TV crew members who were life-long brussels sprouts avoiders — into LOVAHS. Uh, I mean lovers of brussels sprouts, um, not each other. Nevermind.

Here’s a quick video to show you how it’s done.

Roasted Brussels Sprouts and Grapes Recipe Video


Yum
Print

Roasted Brussels Sprouts and Grapes

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 5 minutes Cook Time: 20 minutes
Roasted Brussels Sprouts and Grapes featured-0388

Tip: The larger the grapes, the better! If you can find big, round, seedless globe grapes, those work perfect.

Ingredients:

1 pound brussels sprouts, halved
1/2 pound seedless red grapes, halved
3 tablespoons olive oil, divided
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar freshly ground black pepper

Directions:

Heat the oven to 400F. On a baking sheet, toss the brussels sprouts and grapes in just 2 tablespoons of the olive oil to coat evenly. Roast in the oven for 20 minutes, tossing them halfway so they cook evenly. Pierce a brussels sprout to make sure they are cooked through. Remove baking sheet from oven.

In a small bowl, whisk the remaining olive oil, soy sauce and balsamic vinegar. Toss this sauce over the roasted brussels sprouts and grapes that are still on the baking sheet. Return to oven, place on top shelf. Turn oven to broil and cook for 3 minutes or until the sauce is bubbling and caramelizing. Watch them carefully so they don't burn! Remove from the oven and serve immediately.

 

The post Roasted Brussels Sprouts and Grapes appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/28972-roasted-brussels-sprouts-and-grapes-recipe-video.html/feed 8
Tofu Prosciutto Panini http://steamykitchen.com/27918-tofu-prosciutto-panini-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/27918-tofu-prosciutto-panini-recipe-video.html#comments Wed, 24 Jul 2013 13:27:29 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=27918 You probably did a double-take on that recipe title. Tofu? In a Panini? Just try it and you’ll be surprised at how well it does work. Tofu is one of the most versatile foods out there, it plays nice with other foods and just blends in. I’ll be creating a series of tofu recipes, as I’m working with an American ...

The post Tofu Prosciutto Panini appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
Tofu Prosciutto Panini Recipe

You probably did a double-take on that recipe title. Tofu? In a Panini? Just try it and you’ll be surprised at how well it does work. Tofu is one of the most versatile foods out there, it plays nice with other foods and just blends in.

Tofu Prosciutto Panini Recipe

I’ll be creating a series of tofu recipes, as I’m working with an American company called Morinaga, based in Torrance, California. Their tofu, Mori-nu is a silken-style tofu that comes in a sealed packaging* that allows the tofu to be free from the harmful effects of light, oxygen, and microorganisms without preservatives or irradiation. 

Tofu Prosciutto Panini Recipe

I love the packaging – it stores safely in the pantry (no refrigeration needed until you open it) so you can always have tofu handy.

*This modern packaging system was voted “the #1 food science innovation of the last 50 years” by the prestigious Institute of Food Technologists because it increases nutrient retention and flavor while ensuring food safety.

Tofu Prosciutto Panini Recipe

The recipes I’ll be creating will focus on unexpected ways you can use tofu, like in this Tofu Prosciutto Panini recipe. The silken tofu actually looks like melted fresh mozzarella!

Tofu Prosciutto Panini Recipe Video

 ***

 

Yum
Print

Tofu Prosciutto Panini Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 5 minutes
tofu-prosciutto-panini-recipe-featured-9492

For a gluten-free version, use gluten-free bread. The fresh mozzarella in the recipe is optional, I love the sandwich with or without it. Here's a tip - if you are not using fresh mozzarella, be generous in seasoning with salt and pepper to give the tofu some extra flavor.

Ingredients:

8 slices bread (I like good crusty Italian bread)
2 tablespoons olive oil
8 thin slices prosciutto
4 ounces silken tofu (firm) thinly sliced (I used Mori-nu brand)
2 medium tomatoes, sliced
4 ounces fresh buffalo mozzarella, sliced
8 leaves fresh basil
salt and pepper
4 teaspoons balsamic vinegar

Directions:

Heat panini press to medium-high heat. Brush one side of the bread with olive oil. For each sandwich, layer on the prosciutto, tofu, tomatoes, fresh buffalo mozzarella and basil. Generously season each sandwich with salt and pepper. Drizzle 1 teaspoon of balsamic vinegar on each sandwich. Close the sandwich, and brush the outside of both bread slices with olive oil. Place sandwich in panini press. Cook for 4 minutes or until the panini is browned.

Alternatively, you can grill these sandwiches in a grill or frying pan over medium-high heat until golden brown on both sides and heated through. Serve warm.

 

The post Tofu Prosciutto Panini appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/27918-tofu-prosciutto-panini-recipe-video.html/feed 11
Chinese Beef Broccoli Recipe (video) http://steamykitchen.com/22980-chinese-beef-broccoli-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/22980-chinese-beef-broccoli-recipe.html#comments Fri, 17 Aug 2012 16:52:27 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=22980 Watch video step by step how to make Chinese Beef Broccoli with Jaden.

The post Chinese Beef Broccoli Recipe (video) appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
Chinese Beef Broccoli Recipe

I’ve posted this recipe before (and it’s in the first Steamy Kitchen Cookbook) but I’ve just made a video showing you how to cook Chinese Beef Broccoli. It’s a super short 1:38 minute video.

I’ll even tell you my super secret ingredient for Chinese Beef Broccoli in the video. Also, I’m using the Steamy Kitchen wok that we just launched. It’s a nonstick wok with a cast iron interior layer and enamel outer layer. I’m using an induction burner – the wok works on gas, electric and induction!

For those who think you can’t sear or brown meats in a nonstick pan – I’m here to prove you wrong! YES YOU CAN. I’ll show you how.

Chinese Beef Broccoli Recipe

Yum
Print

Chinese Beef Broccoli Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes
chinese-beef-broccoli-recipe-4547-2.jpg

The secret ingredient in this dish is Chinese black vinegar. If you don't have this, substitute with young, unaged balsamic vinegar. The aged, good quality balsamic vinegar is too sweet - so make sure you get the cheaper, young balsamic.

To keep this dish vegetarian, replace the beef with fresh, thick, meaty shitake mushrooms (cut in half) or even sliced portobello mushrooms.

TO CUT FLANK STEAK ACROSS THE GRAIN: in the middle of this post for Flank Steak with Goat Cheese Recipe, I have a couple of photos showing you exactly how to cut flank steak across the grain. This is an important step because flank and skirt steak both are very tough cuts -- however -- if you cut it correctly, the steak becomes incredibly tender. Make sure you don't skip this step!

Ingredients:

1/2 pound flank or sirloin steak
1 1/2 teaspoons soy sauce
1 teaspoon cornstarch
Freshly ground black pepper
1 pound broccoli, cut into bite-size florets
1 tablespoon high-heat cooking oil (canola, vegetable, rice)
1 clove garlic, finely minced
1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger
FOR THE STIR FRY SAUCE
3 tablespoons oyster sauce
2 teaspoons Chinese rice wine (or dry sherry)
2 teaspoons Chinese black vinegar (or young balsamic vinegar)

Directions:

1. Slice the flank steak ACROSS the grain. In a bowl, combine the beef with the soy sauce, cornstarch and black pepper. Marinate for 10 minutes at room temperature.
2. In a small bowl, mix together the ingredients for the Stir-Fry Sauce.
3. In a wok or large saute pan, add 1 cup of water and bring to a boil. Add the broccoli and cover to steam for 3 minutes. The broccoli should be bright green, crisp tender and you should be able to pierce the stem with a fork. Drain.
4. Discard the water in the wok and dry the pan well. Set the pan over high heat, swirl in the cooking oil. When the wok is hot, add the marinated beef, use your tongs to spread the beef out all over the surface of the wok in one layer. Let beef cook, undisturbed, for 2 minutes, until nicely browned. Flip the beef, again spread the beef out over the wok and brown the other side.
Push the beef aside and add in the garlic and ginger. Stir fry the garlic and ginger for 30 seconds. Then mix together with the beef.
5. Pour in the Stir-fry Sauce and stir to combine. Simmer until the sauce is thick enough to coat the back of a spoon, about 15 seconds. Add the cooked broccoli back into the wok and toss to coat well.

The post Chinese Beef Broccoli Recipe (video) appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/22980-chinese-beef-broccoli-recipe.html/feed 36
Microwave Spaghetti Squash with Tomatoes & Basil http://steamykitchen.com/19385-microwave-spaghetti-squash-with-tomatoes-and-basil.html http://steamykitchen.com/19385-microwave-spaghetti-squash-with-tomatoes-and-basil.html#comments Mon, 14 Nov 2011 19:22:07 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=19385 Microwave instructions for Spaghetti Squash with Tomatoes and Basil with step by step photos.

The post Microwave Spaghetti Squash with Tomatoes & Basil appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>

If you ask Nathan what his most favorite recipe to cook is, he’ll tell you, “p’skeddi squash and steak!” He’s taken quite a liking to p’skeddi squash, and we’ve never tried to correct his pronunciation of spaghetti squash, it’s just too darn cute! Though I can imagine one day, when he’s older and cooking a romantic meal for a special gal, calling it p’skeddi may ruin his chances of a second date.

Due to a little goof while gardening with 35 seed packets and 2 over-zealous kids, we planted 12 spaghetti squash plants in the garden, enough to supply our entire zip code with spaghetti squash for life.

Thankfully, the chickens have a taste for the leaves and the happy-yellow flowers – and we haven’t stopped them from consuming most of the spaghetti squash plants, so now we’re left with 3 plants, one of which is barely hanging on.

The hens are my heroes!

Microwaving the Spaghetti Squash

The fastest way to cook the spaghetti squash is to microwave it! If microwaving a solid, heavy squash intimidates you a bit, you can also bake the spaghetti squash in the oven, which takes an hour to do, but is just as easy.

You’ll take a sharp paring knife and carefully, very carefully, pierce the squash in several places all over. It’s a hard squash, so it takes a bit of effort to do this. I guess a better instruction would be to say STAB the squash. But do this carefully, k?! The squash is a round, rolly, hard object.

Microwave on high for 10-12 minutes, rotating the squash halfway during cooking.

After cooking, just let the squash sit there for a few minutes to cool down a bit. Put on some oven gloves and remove the hot squash.

I highly suggest a thick towel or oven gloves – remember you stabbed the squash? Well inside the squash is steaming hot squash and some liquid which may leak through the stab marks.

I use these Pit Mitts – okay, so I look like a dork, but they are amazing – soft gloves that actually fit my hand with rubber grippy grip lines all over. I highly recommend them as I’m not a fan of those traditional oven mitts that make you feel like you’re cooking with Barney the annoying purple dinosaur hands.

The squash should cut open very easily, with no resistance. If not, return it back to microwave and let it go for another couple of minutes.

Once you cut it open, it should look like this. Remove the seeds. If you’re only cooking for a small family, just use half the spaghetti squash, and save the other half for another recipe (see end of post for links to other great spaghetti squash recipes)

Use two fork to scrape out the strands of spaghetti squash. Try a piece of squash – if you feel like it needs to be cooked a little more, don’t worry – we’ll be saute’ing in a pan and you can cook the squash further in the pan. Just make a mental note that you’ll need to add a couple minutes of cooking time in the pan.

Okay, now it’s time to saute the rest of the ingredients – fresh basil, garlic and tomatoes.

Add in the spaghetti squash, toss with tongs. Season with salt, pepper and balsamic vinegar.

Throw in the cheese! Toss again.

Serve right away!

 

Yum
Print

Spaghetti Squash with Tomatoes and Basil Recipe

Servings: 8-10 Prep Time: 8 minutes Cook Time: 15 minutes
Spaghetti Squash Recipe with Tomatoes and Basil

If you're only feeding 4-6 people, I suggest cooking the spaghetti squash whole, then only using half of the squash when you're ready to saute with the tomatoes.

I like my spaghetti squash not too hard, not too soft. It shouldn't be mushy, you should be able to still separate the strands of squash.

Ingredients:

1 spaghetti squash
1 tablespoon olive oil
4 cloves garlic, minced
2 tomatoes, chopped
few basil leaves, chopped
salt and pepper
1 teaspoon balsamic vinegar
1/4 cup grated pecorino or parmesan cheese

Directions:

1. Using a sharp paring knife, carefully pierce (I really mean stab) the spaghetti squash in a few places (about 6 slashes is good). Microwave on high for 10-12 minutes, turning/rotating the squash halfway during cooking. A fork should very easily pierce through the squash, if there is resistance - microwave for an additional 1-2 minutes.

2. Let squash cool for a few minutes before handling. Carefully (the squash will be steaming hot!), use a chef's knife to cut the squash in half, lengthwise. The squash should be soft and easy to cut. Remove and discard the seeds. Use two forks to scrape apart the strands of the squash. Compost or discard the skin.

3. Heat a large saute pan over medium heat with the olive oil. Add in the garlic and cook for 1 minute. Add in the tomatoes and basil and cook for 2 minutes. Turn heat to medium-high and add in the spaghetti squash and toss. Season with salt and pepper and drizzle in the balsamic vinegar. Taste the squash - adjust seasoning and if the squash still needs a bit more time to cook through, cover and cook for 2 minutes. If the squash texture is perfect, toss in the grated cheese and serve immediately.

 

More Spaghetti Squash Recipes

Moroccan Spiced Spaghetti Squash (Smitten Kitchen)
Recipe for Spaghetti Squash and Chard Gratin (Kalyn’s Kitchen)
Spaghetti Squash with Ricotta, Sage, and Pine Nuts (The Kitchn)
Spaghetti Squash with Sausage (White on Rice Couple)

 

 

 

 

The post Microwave Spaghetti Squash with Tomatoes & Basil appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/19385-microwave-spaghetti-squash-with-tomatoes-and-basil.html/feed 43
Peppercorn Crusted Filet Mignon with Balsamic Red Wine Sauce http://steamykitchen.com/16443-peppercorn-crusted-filet-mignon-with-balsamic-red-wine-sauce.html http://steamykitchen.com/16443-peppercorn-crusted-filet-mignon-with-balsamic-red-wine-sauce.html#comments Wed, 06 Jul 2011 18:54:17 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=16443 We splurge on filet mignon a few times a year, it’s the most expensive cut of steak because it’s incredibly tender and you can only get about 9 filets per cow. Instead of buying the filet mignon piece by piece, we always get the entire tenderloin and spend the time to carve it up ourselves for a 50% price savings. ...

The post Peppercorn Crusted Filet Mignon with Balsamic Red Wine Sauce appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>

We splurge on filet mignon a few times a year, it’s the most expensive cut of steak because it’s incredibly tender and you can only get about 9 filets per cow. Instead of buying the filet mignon piece by piece, we always get the entire tenderloin and spend the time to carve it up ourselves for a 50% price savings.

But how to do transform a whole tenderloin, which is as big as a bodybuilder’s forearm, into pretty, petite filet mignon? Well, Pat the butcher from my local Sweetbay Supermarket will show you how. I’m working with Sweetbay to get y’all to eat more Black Angus Beef! :-)

How to Trim Tenderloin

Trimming tenderloin is actually a lot easier than you think. In fact, it’s easier than any other steak cut, mainly because the size is manageable (have you seen a how massive the rib roast is!?) and the meat is so tender you barely have to put any strength into carving. By the way, if you’re not into carving this up yourself, just ask the butcher at Sweetbay to do it for you, free of charge.

This is a whole tenderloin. It comes wrapped and sealed to keep its shape and freshness. Don’t open the package until you’re ready to carve. If you’re carving this up yourself, take note that there’s quite a bit of blood inside the bag. What I like to do is to open just one end of the bag and let the blood drain into the sink first before taking the tenderloin out.

There’s a small end and a large end. We’ll start cutting from the bigger end. When you get down to the smaller end, you can make smaller filet mignon pieces and use twine to tie 2 of them together to make a bigger piece. When it gets too small, Pat will grind the remainder with the scraps for filet mignon ground beef. Another option is to use the smaller pieces for a stir fry or stroganoff.

Pat begins cutting 1¾” thick slices from the larger end. You can cut yours smaller if you wish.

Here’s a cut for you to look at. Notice there’s fat around the filet, that’s okay, Pat will trim that off later. This was my biggest lesson – I used to trim the fat and the silver skin off the tenderloin FIRST, which made a massive mess and wasted too much good meat.

Once all the pieces have been cut, Pat trims each one carefully, taking off majority of the fat and the thick, tough silver skin.

Look how perfect this is. And the size! You get massive cuts.

We got nine 1¾” large filet mignon from the tenderloin.

The leftover scraps – including the fat – will go into the grinder. Again, if you prefer to use these as-is, cut them into smaller pieces and use them in stir fries!

Into the grinder it goes and now I’ve got 4 pounds of the very best filet mignon ground beef.  Use this ground beef for any dish that you want – though meatballs and burgers don’t work very well. The filet mignon ground beef is so lean that it will have trouble binding together. I see some Asian Lettuce Cups with Ground Beef in my future!

I’ve just saved nearly 50% and will have a freezer full of filet mignon (I’ll seal each filet mignon individually).

Yum
Print

Peppercorn Crusted Filet Mignon with Balsamic Red Wine Sauce

Servings: Serves 4 Prep Time: Cook Time:
peppercorn-filet-mignon-047

The recipe I’ve made with the filet mignon is a Peppercorn Crusted Filet Mignon with Balsamic Balsamic Red Wine Sauce.

It sounds like a fancy recipe, but you need a fancy-sounding recipe for filet mignon! Secretly, though, the recipe is so incredibly simple, has only a few ingredients and takes only 20 minutes hands-on.

Ingredients:

2 tablespoons butter
1/2 cup balsamic vinegar
1/4 cup red wine
1/2 cup beef broth
salt
3 tablespoons whole peppercorn
1 tablespoon cooking oil
4 pieces Filet Mignon (at least 1¼” inch thick)

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 400F.
2. Heat a saucepan with the butter, balsamic vinegar over medium heat. When the balsamic begins to bubble, turn the heat down to medium-low and cook for 3 minutes to reduce to half. Add in the red wine and the beef broth and let simmer for 5-8 minutes until reduces to a sauce thick enough to coat back of spoon. Taste and season with salt.
3. Place the peppercorns in a baking sheet. Use a heavy bottomed skillet to gently crush the peppercorns by pressing the bottom of the skillet on top of the peppercorns using a rocking motion.
4. Rub each filet mignon lightly with the cooking oil. Season each filet mignon with salt on both sides and then press the filet mignon onto the peppercorns on both sides.
5. Heat large oven-proof skilling on high heat. When very hot, add the filet mignon, searing both sides for 1 minute each. Remove the filet mignon from the heat and onto the baking sheet (it’s okay if there’s still peppercorn on the baking sheet). Place into oven for 4-7 minutes, depending on your desired doneness and thickness of filet mignon.
For 1-inch filet mignon: 4 minutes and then check temperature with meat thermometer. For every ¼” more, add 1 minute.

Rare: 120F-125F
Medium-Rare: 130F-135F
Medium: 140F-145F

6. Let rest for 3 minutes before serving with the Balsamic Sauce.

The post Peppercorn Crusted Filet Mignon with Balsamic Red Wine Sauce appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/16443-peppercorn-crusted-filet-mignon-with-balsamic-red-wine-sauce.html/feed 26
Steak with Creamy Whiskey Mushroom Sauce http://steamykitchen.com/7069-creamy-mushroom-whiskey-steak-sauce.html http://steamykitchen.com/7069-creamy-mushroom-whiskey-steak-sauce.html#comments Thu, 07 Jan 2010 13:19:31 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=7069 Every cook should have a great steak topping in their repertoire. Either because you A) enjoy having a sauce smothering your steak B) want to to stretch out a piece of meat to feed the family or C) attempt cover up a botched steak job. I’m in category A, especially if it involves heavy cream and whisky, but I’ve been ...

The post Steak with Creamy Whiskey Mushroom Sauce appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>

Every cook should have a great steak topping in their repertoire. Either because you

A) enjoy having a sauce smothering your steak

B) want to to stretch out a piece of meat to feed the family or

C) attempt cover up a botched steak job. I’m in category A, especially if it involves heavy cream and whisky, but I’ve been known to practice C more often that I care to admit.

When my in-laws are in town, there’s always whiskey in the house. It makes for a more pleasant stay. But your in-laws might prefer bourbon, white wine or other such happy-drink. That’s fine too. Just don’t use red wine, as it makes your cream sauce pink and people in my house don’t eat pink food, especially if it’s on a steak.

How to make a creamy mushroom sauce (with booze)

For this recipe, I’ve used morel mushrooms, but you can use any type of fresh mushrooms you like. Anything from shiitake, crimini, baby portobello, Hokto Kinoko’s maitake, brown/white beech, king trumpet, to even the old standby white button mushroom. The mushrooms can be cut into big chunks, halved or sliced, depending on the type and the size. The general rule about mushrooms is to avoid washing them under water, and instead use a paper towel to brush off any dirt. Mushrooms are like sponges, and when you soak them or even rinse them, they will absorb the water, which makes it difficult to get a good browning in the saute pan.

1. Start with fresh mushrooms, clean the mushrooms by wiping surface with a damp cloth and trimming the stems off.
2. Saute onions slowly in butter or oil (or combo) so that they gently cook.
3. Once the onions are softened and browned (not burnt!) add the mushrooms and saute for just a couple of minutes.
4. It’s time. For the booze. Add a glug of bourbon, whiskey or even beer. Let it bubble a bit to burn off the alcohol.

5. Pour in some heavy cream – the amount is up to you. You can add as little as a tablespoon if you want. I like a lot of cream. I guess that’s why my jeans don’t fit.
6. Let it reduce for a bit.
7. And here’s the secrete ingredient….pour in just a touch of balsamic vinegar. This is to balance out the creaminess of the sauce….because the steak, the mushrooms and the cream is so rich, you need that little acid (or tang) to balance out the flavors. Trust me on this.

And here you go:

This steak was dry aged – see Dry Aging Steaks at Home.

It’s rich, decadent and the best part is that the recipe is flexible. In fact, check out Pioneer Woman’s cookbook – I made her Whiskey Sauce and then used it to top grilled LOBSTER. Oh yeah.


Yum
Print

Steak with Creamy Whiskey Mushroom Sauce Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 15 minutes Cook Time: 15 minutes
0912_mushroom-cream-sauce_4053

Ingredients:

4 steak cuts of your choice (filet, ribeye, sirloin, strip, etc)
cooking oil
salt and pepper
2 tablespoons butter
1/2 onion, minced
1 clove garlic, finely minced
2-3 cups sliced fresh mushrooms
1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg
3 tablespoons whiskey, bourbon, beer or white wine
1 tablespoon good quality balsamic vinegar
1/2 cup heavy cream (though you can use as little as 1 tablespoon)
1 tablespoon finely minced fresh herb of your choice (chives, parsley, tarragon, basil, etc.)

Directions:

1. Rub both sides of each of the steaks with some cooking oil. Season steaks with salt and pepper on both sides.

2. Heat a large frying pan or grill pan over high heat. When very hot, add the steaks. Cook both sides until desired doneness - timing depends on thickness of steak. Generally, for 1-inch thick steak, I grill 5 minutes per side then check with meat thermometer (145F is medium-rare, 160F is medium). Remove steaks to a plate and tent with tin foil to rest.

3. Return the same frying pan to the stove, heat the butter over medium heat. When the butter starts bubbling, add the onions and saute until the onions are soft, transluscent and just slightly golden. Take care not to burn the onions by keeping your heat on medium or even medium-low. This will take about 3 minutes. Add the garlic and saute for an additional minute until the garlic is fragrant.

4. Turn your heat to medium-high and add the mushrooms all at once. Immediately start tossing so that the onion/garlic/butter mixture is evenly distributed amongst the mushrooms. Saute the mushrooms until they are browned and softened, about 3-5 minutes depending on the thickness and size of your mushrooms.

5. Season with salt, pepper and nutmeg. Pour in the whiskey and the balsamic vinegar and let the mixture bubble a bit to burn off some of the alcohol. Turn the heat down just a bit and add in the heavy cream. Let it bubble for another 30 seconds and then taste to adjust the salt. Stir in the freshly minced herbs and pour over just-grilled steak.

The post Steak with Creamy Whiskey Mushroom Sauce appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/7069-creamy-mushroom-whiskey-steak-sauce.html/feed 51
Pork Ragu Recipe http://steamykitchen.com/6830-pork-ragu-pasta-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/6830-pork-ragu-pasta-recipe.html#comments Fri, 11 Dec 2009 11:38:02 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=6830 Step by step video for Pork Ragu over Pasta Recipe.

The post Pork Ragu Recipe appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
Oink!

Oink!

This is probably my most favorite Good Bite video of all time – Elise, Ruhlman and I had a great time talking about one of our favorite subjects ever…

And for the recipes and videos: my Pork Ragu over Pasta, Ruhlman’s Grilled Pulled Pork with Chipotle BBQ Sauce and Elise’s Pork Chop with Red Currant Sauce

Pork Ragu over Pasta Recipe Video

Yum
Print

Pork Ragu Recipe

Servings: 4-6 Prep Time: Cook Time:
pork-ragu-recipe-2

Serve this hearty, stewlike sauce over the pasta of your choice for a delicious, no-fuss, weeknight meal. Using ground pork adds an interesting twist to a classic recipe, and the ragu makes great leftovers

Ingredients:

1 pound pasta
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 small onion, diced
3 garlic cloves, minced
1 bell pepper, stemmed, seeded, and diced
1 large carrot, peeled and diced
1 pound lean ground pork
One 28-ounce can crushed tomatoes
1 1⁄2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
1 1⁄2 teaspoons kosher salt
1 teaspoon sugar

Directions:

1. Prepare the pasta according to the package instructions.

2. While the pasta is cooking, heat the oil in a large pot over medium heat. Add the onion and cook, stirring, for 30 seconds. Add the garlic and cook, stirring, for 30 seconds. Add the bell pepper and carrot and cook until the vegetables are softened and golden-brown, stirring occasionally, about 5 minutes.

3. Increase the heat to high and add the ground pork, using a spatula or spoon to break up the meat. Cook until the pork is browned, about 5 minutes. Add the crushed tomatoes, balsamic vinegar, kosher salt, and sugar and bring to a boil, about 5 minutes. Reduce the heat to low, cover, and simmer, stirring occasionally, for 45 minutes.

Serve over the hot cooked pasta.

The post Pork Ragu Recipe appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/6830-pork-ragu-pasta-recipe.html/feed 10
Chanterelle, Bacon and Plum Salad with Blue Cheese http://steamykitchen.com/4887-chanterelle-bacon-and-plum-salad-with-blue-cheese.html http://steamykitchen.com/4887-chanterelle-bacon-and-plum-salad-with-blue-cheese.html#comments Tue, 04 Aug 2009 03:30:02 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=4887 It’s week 2 of the Summer Fest! Last week we played around with herbs and this week it’s time for fruit from trees. If you haven’t yet heard about Summer Fest, it’s a four-week celebration of fresh-from-the-garden food: recipes, growing tips, even tricks for storing and preserving summer’s best with my co-hosts White on Rice, Away to Garden and Matt ...

The post Chanterelle, Bacon and Plum Salad with Blue Cheese appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>

It’s week 2 of the Summer Fest! Last week we played around with herbs and this week it’s time for fruit from trees. If you haven’t yet heard about Summer Fest, it’s a four-week celebration of fresh-from-the-garden food: recipes, growing tips, even tricks for storing and preserving summer’s best with my co-hosts White on Rice, Away to Garden and Matt Bites. Of course, It’s not a party without your participation! And I’ll tell you how in just a bit.

My contribution to this week’s “fruit from trees” is a warm salad made with juicy, sweet caramelized plums… barely sauteed fresh chanterelles, crumbly blue cheese and crisp savory bacon. This was a recipe that I made two nights in a row…it was such a hit.

Chanterelles may be hard to find, but any type of mushroom would do…from sliced, meaty portabello to velvety white button mushrooms.

And of course any type of stone fruit would work in this recipe. Please don’t limit this to just plums but experiment with peaches and nectarines.

The bacon? Oh honey, there’s no substitute for the bacon. Do 10 push-ups tomorrow.

My Friends at Earthy.com surprised me with a pound of beautiful trumpet-shaped Michigan chanterelles.

chanterelle-bacon-blue-cheese-plum-salad-6

After trimming the ends, the smaller ones get halved…and the larger chantrelles are quartered.

chanterelle-bacon-blue-cheese-plum-salad-28

Chanterelles are so beautiful that I’d hate to drown them in any type of sauce. Michael Ruhlman suggested that I keep them pretty simple with minimal ingredients so that I would enjoy the full flavor of the wild mushrooms. Simple? Sure, I could do that. Sauteed ’em in bacon drippings. Can life be any simpler than warm bacon drippings?

chanterelle-bacon-blue-cheese-plum-salad-34

Okay I’m going to teach you how to cut stone fruit into nice, even wedges. The problem with stone fruit is that there is a pit in the middle. And sometimes it’s a bitch to get out without tearing up the flesh. So here’s how I do it. Listen good, because it involves a highly technical term called plum asscrack. Find the plum’s crack – STOP LAUGHING – and hold your knife parallel to the crack, about a little more than 1/4-inch to the SIDE of the asscrack. See the crack? It’s just to the left of my knife.

chanterelle-bacon-blue-cheese-plum-salad-39

Now cut. The The seat of the plum is oval-ish and cutting it this way is the most efficient method.

chanterelle-bacon-blue-cheese-plum-salad-41

Now turn the plum around to the other side and 1/4-inch to side of the plum asscrack, cut again.  Now you’ve got two nice, big, plum asscheeks.

chanterelle-bacon-blue-cheese-plum-salad-42

Cut these babies into wedges.

chanterelle-bacon-blue-cheese-plum-salad-44

Oh but we’re not done yet! That middle section with the seed? Angle your knife and cut around the seed for two more wedges.

chanterelle-bacon-blue-cheese-plum-salad-47

Can you imagine me trying to explain this process without photos? You think I was nuts!

chanterelle-bacon-blue-cheese-plum-salad-49

Chanterelle, Bacon and Plum Salad with Blue Cheese Recipe

Adapted from scandinavian-cookbookThe Scandinavian Cookbook by Trina Hahnemann

serves 4

1/2 pound bacon, cubed
1/2 pound fresh chanterelle mushrooms, brushed clean and halved or quartered
salt and pepper
2 ripe plums, pitted and cut into wedges
4 cups mixed lettuce leaves (I prefer arugula)
4 ounces blue cheese, crumbled

Dressing:
1/4 cup balsamic vinegar
1/2 teaspoon sugar
2 tablespoons olive oil

1. Whisk the dressing ingredients together and set aside. Put the bacon cubes in a large frying pan or saute pan, and turn the heat to medium-high. When the bacon starts cooking and crisping up, turn the heat to medium and continue cooking and stirring until crisp on both sides. Remove the bacon, reserving 1 tablespoon of the bacon drippings in the pan (discard the rest of the bacon drippings). Let bacon drain on a paper towel.

2. In the same pan on medium-high heat, saute the mushrooms for 4 minutes. Push the mushrooms to one side of the frying pan. On the other side, lay the plum wedges and cook 1 minute each side. By this time, the mushrooms will have cooked through. Season the mushrooms with salt and pepper.

3. Assemble salad by combining the bacon, blue cheese, chanterelles, plums and lettuce. Be light and gentle. Drizzle with the dressing. Serve immediately.

===

[imagebrowser id=23]

===

What did my co-hosts make for the Summer Fest Party?

peach-clafoutis-3 Margaret Roach of Away to Garden ditched the flour and made a super simple Peach Clafoutis, that old friend Martha Stewart taught her.

ginger-peach-pandowdy Marilyn of Simmer Til Done shows us her gorgeous Ginger Peach Pandowdy…what’s a pandowdy? Go find out!

Paige of Hey Little Sister tells us a tale about The Perils of Pie…oh the pie crisis!

mattbites_apricots Only Matt of Matt Bites can pull off an Apricot Ice Cream while RAPPING to Supersonic.

peach-cooler1-576x863 Peach Cooler! Look at those perfect peaches from White On Rice’s garden! It’s even kid friendly (sshhh…I’m adding a bit of rum to that drink!)

gluten-free-fruit-crumble While Shauna is on vacation, Margaret snuck into her blog and pulled out a Gluten Free Fruit Crumble from 2007!

===

The post Chanterelle, Bacon and Plum Salad with Blue Cheese appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/4887-chanterelle-bacon-and-plum-salad-with-blue-cheese.html/feed 47
Aged Black Garlic: a new superfood? http://steamykitchen.com/2927-black-garlic-with-scallops.html http://steamykitchen.com/2927-black-garlic-with-scallops.html#comments Mon, 23 Mar 2009 06:06:28 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/?p=2927 [imagebrowser id=3] View 7 photos in the above slide show Why is it that Asian ingredients that are “good for you” are so darn ugly and nasty sounding? Mom used to feed me and my brother bird’s nest soup, chilled frog jelly soup and countless other strange protein specimens that would probably make you wonder how I’m still alive today. ...

The post Aged Black Garlic: a new superfood? appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
View 7 photos in the above slide show

Why is it that Asian ingredients that are “good for you” are so darn ugly and nasty sounding? Mom used to feed me and my brother bird’s nest soup, chilled frog jelly soup and countless other strange protein specimens that would probably make you wonder how I’m still alive today.

The latest “it” ingredient is aged black garlic. It’s matte-black and gooey-soft with a chewyishy texture. It’s the new plaything of gourmet restaurant kitchens across the U.S.. and its recent appearance on Top Chef and Iron Chef television shows created newfound fame for this otherwise frightful thing. Trust me, if you found this on your kitchen counter and didn’t know that it was supposed to be black, you’d probably think it was rotten.

Well, good thing it’s not rotten, but rather “aged,” a more pleasant way to describe the process of letting time and temperature do its thing. I spoke with Scott Kim, CEO of Black Garlic, Inc. and he told me that garlic heads either grown in Korea or California are put into a machine he invented which fluctuates temperature and humidity for thirty days. What results is supposedly a garlic that has twice the antioxidants as regular garlic.

I think there’s a lot of misinformation and mystery about black garlic – some articles hint that black garlic has been used for hundreds of years in Korea and Japan as a superfood and Kim claims to have invented the machine a handful of years ago after a story he heard from someone in the garlic business in Korea. I asked, “Is the black garlic exposed to light source in his machine (as I’ve read online)?” Kim answered no.

I asked him how people used to make black garlic before his magical machine and he told me he didn’t know. How do they make black garlic in Japan? He didn’t know either. The scientific study done in Korea of the antioxidant level is not available online, though Kim did offer to send me information in Korean. 

So, I’m highly skeptical on its superfood status and the origins of black garlic until I can find more information. But there’s one thing I’m sure of – and that is I love the taste of black garlic. It’s sweet, mild, caramelly and reminds me of molasses. When you bite into a raw clove, you don’t get the harsh-hit-you-in-the-face that regular garlic has. It’s smooth, soft and the garlic flavor is mellowed out times one-hundred.

I was lucky enough to get a few heads to play with from my friend Chef David Eger of Earthy.com (and in exchange I let him use the photo of black garlic that I shot), where they sell four ounces of black garlic for $10.00. I’ve sliced a few cloves (as best as I could…it’s so soft that it’s difficult to slice), fried them in olive oil with scallops and it was dynamo.

Black Garlic at our Blogger Playdate

My friends, Chef Mark and Jennifer of The Culinary Media Network in New York made a bruschetta out of a few cloves for our dinner party and guests could not stop eating it. I had to steal bruschetta off of people’s plates just to get a photograph of it! If you want to see black garlic in action, watch the Culinary Media Network video below (note: I didn’t speak with Scott Kim, founder of Black Garlic, Inc. until the day after this video was shot – so the comment about the garlic being exposed to light is incorrect.)

Superfood Status?

Is it an ancient Asian secret superfood? I don’t know and am trying to hold my judgement until an independant lab in the U.S. can verify and publish the results in English. But try aged, black garlic for its taste. I like using the black garlic is raw (like in a bruschetta), roasted whole cloves and then smeared on toasted bread with a drizzle of olive oil or sliced and fried like in this recipe.


black-garlic-web-11

Black Garlic with Scallops Recipe

Even if you don’t have black garlic, this is a simple recipe for scallops. Just substitute the black garlic with regular garlic. Just don’t expect any nooky tonight, unless you’re both having the dish!3 tablespoons butter, divided
16 extra-large dry-packed scallops, patted very dry (about 1 ½ pounds)
salt and freshly ground black pepper
3 cloves black garlic, thinly sliced (or use regular garlic)
1-2 teaspoons finely minced jalepeno pepper
¼ cup white wine
2 teaspoons good balsamic vinegar
2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley

Heat a large frying pan with just 2 tablespoons of the butter over high heat. Season the scallops with salt and pepper, and when the butter is bubbling, gently lay the scallops in the pan, not touching. Sear the scallops and cook for 4 minutes, turning once. They should have a lovely golden brown color on both sides. Transfer to a platter.

To the same hot pan on high heat, add the remaining 1 tablespoon of butter. Add the garlic slices and the jalepeno pepper and fry until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Pour in the white wine and the balsamic vinegar into the pan. Let simmer for 1 minute, season with salt and pepper and add the fresh parsley. Pour over scallops.

Serves 4

The post Aged Black Garlic: a new superfood? appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/2927-black-garlic-with-scallops.html/feed 75