Steamy Kitchen Recipes | RSS Feed http://steamykitchen.com Steamy Kitchen Food Blog: fast recipes, simple recipes, with fresh ingredients to create delicious meals. Wed, 22 Apr 2015 19:27:52 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2 1-Step, Fail Proof Prime Rib Roast Recipe on the Rotisserie http://steamykitchen.com/38718-one-step-fail-proof-prime-rib-roast-recipe-on-rotisserie.html http://steamykitchen.com/38718-one-step-fail-proof-prime-rib-roast-recipe-on-rotisserie.html#comments Wed, 10 Dec 2014 14:40:18 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=38718 Have you ever tried to make a Prime Rib Roast at home? The normal process involves multiple steps and kitchen acrobatics: I would fire up my large cast-iron pan, heat it up to near-smoking, and then wrangle the prime rib roast onto the pan, searing each side. If the roast is extra large and heavy, I’d have to use 2 ...

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Prime Rib Roast Recipe

Have you ever tried to make a Prime Rib Roast at home? The normal process involves multiple steps and kitchen acrobatics: I would fire up my large cast-iron pan, heat it up to near-smoking, and then wrangle the prime rib roast onto the pan, searing each side. If the roast is extra large and heavy, I’d have to use 2 tongs to lift, rotate and hold the roast. Then transfer the burning-hot seared hunk into a roasting pan (without dropping it) to slow-roast in the oven. While the recipe produces my perfect, steakhouse-quality Prime Rib Roast, it is a multi-step process.

But I now rely on my 1-Step, Fail Proof Prime Rib Roast Recipe, which produces even BETTER results than anything I’ve ever tried.

The solution is to use a rotisserie. We’ve had this Ronco bad boy for about four years. It gets used more often than my oven, because it’s easy to clean, easy to operate (just turn the timer knob) and provides excellent results 100% of the time.

prime rib roast rotisserie

(Here’s my Amazon affiliate link if you’d like to purchase one)

Rotisserie for Prime Rib???

Most people associate rotisserie for chickens, but we use it for lamb roasts, pork tenderloin and prime rib roasts too.

The rotisserie’s turning mechanism ensures the prime rib roast recipe cooks evenly and has a nice crust on all sides, while keeping the center medium to medium-rare. With a built-in timer that automatically shuts off the oven, you are guaranteed perfect prime rib.  The timing is based on the weight of the prime rib.

Prime Rib Roast Recipe - Rotiserrie

Standing Prime Rib Roast

What is a rib roast, a.k.a. Standing Rib Roast a.k.a. Prime Rib? It’s basically the same cut as a rib eye steak. But instead of cutting individual steaks, the meat is left uncut and often tied to keep its nice shape during cooking.

This one is from the fine folks at Lobel’s in New York. For the past 60 years, five generations of the Lobel family have run the most well-known meat market in New York. They ship  their exceptional meats nationwide. This is a USDA Prime Dry Aged Rib Roast (they also have Wagyu Prime Dry Aged Rib Roast.) But no need to get all fancy if you don’t want to. Just a nice hunk of rib roast with good marbling. Most rib-eyes have that nice band of fat around what I call the “collar” of the ribeye, which is my #2 favorite part of a ribeye. My #1 favorite part is the BONE (hey, I’m Asian. I like to gnaw and nibble all that juicy meat on the bones to the dismay of my dogs!)

Prime Rib Roast Recipe

Let’s season this prime rib!

I love rubbing the prime rib with Kansas City Steak Seasoning from Two Snooty Chefs (fun name!)

Prime Rib Roast Recipe on Rotisserie

Fill the pan with some veggies. These veggies will roast along with the prime rib, and we’ll use this to make the Red Wine Au Jus.

Prime Rib Roast Recipe - Fresh Vegetables

Here’s your one-step, fail-proof method

With the rotisserie, this Prime Rib Roast becomes super simple, one-step and fail-proof. Load ‘er up!

Prime Rib Roast Recipe - Rotiserrie

Turn it on. 16-18 minutes per pound, depending if you want it rare or medium-rare. We went with 18 minutes per pound. Set the timer on the rotisserie.

Prime Rib Roast Recipe - Rotiserrie

The dripping fall conveniently into a pan that I’ve loaded with vegetables. This all gets collected to make the Red Wine Au Jus. Oh, I forgot, I threw in a few sprigs of fresh thyme in there too.

To check doneness, use an instant-read meat thermometer; 125 degrees F for rare; 160 degrees F for well done; insert at thickest part of roast and away from bone

Prime Rib Roast Recipe - Rotiserrie

When it’s done, let it rest while you make the Red Wine Au Jus. YUM! Can you smell that? Isn’t this one-step process on the rotisserie so easy?

Prime Rib Roast Recipe

Red Wine Au Jus

Carefully pour the contents of the pan into a small saucepan.

Prime Rib Roast Recipe

Pour in 1 cup of good quality red wine (yeah, that was from my wine glass)

Prime Rib Roast Recipe

1 cup of beef broth.

Prime Rib Roast Recipe

Pan drippings + Roasted Vegetables + Red Wine + Beef Broth = Red Wine Au Jus.

Prime Rib Roast Recipe

Let it simmer for 8 minutes.

Prime Rib Roast Recipe

Strain.

Prime Rib Roast Recipe

 

Cut the Prime Rib Roast

The first step is to cut the bones off.

Prime Rib Roast Recipe

Prime Rib Roast Recipe

The bones will then get cut further and all go on MY plate (heehee!)

Then slice the prime rib roast into desired thickness. You can also carve this at the table, if you wish.

Prime Rib Roast Recipe

Serve with the Red Wine Au Jus.

Prime Rib Roast Recipe

 

Big thanks to Lobel’s for sending me a big, fat, USDA Prime Rib Roast. The meat was exceptional, the best we’ve ever had, perfectly aged. We’ve been spoiled now!

More Recipes to Explore

Perfect Prime Rib Recipe with Red Wine Jus (Steamy Kitchen)

Roasted Garlic Mashed Potatoes (Steamy Kitchen)

Yorkshire Pudding (Steamy Kitchen)

Ruth’s Chris Sweet Potato Casserole Recipe (Steamy Kitchen)

Dr. BBQ’s Famous Baby Back Ribs (Steamy Kitchen)

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1-Step, Fail Proof Prime Rib Roast Recipe on Rotisserie

Servings: 6 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: varies
Prime Rib Roast Recipe

A 4-pound roast (with 3 bones) will feed 6 people. Purchase whatever size roast you need, adjust cooking time based on size. Please read the instructions that comes with your rotisserie on how to load the rib roast and cooking times. Our rotisserie instructions were 16-18 minutes per pound.

Ingredients:

One bone-in prime rib roast
salt and pepper (or seasoning blend of your choice)
3 carrots, peeled, cut in big chunks
3 stalks celery, cut in big chunks
1 large onion, quartered
several sprigs of thyme
1 cup red wine
1 cup beef broth

Directions:

Season the rib roast generously on all sides. Load the rib roast onto the rotisserie, with spikes between the bones.

Scatter the carrots, celery, onion and thyme in the roasting tray. Insert roasting tray into rotisserie.

Set rotisserie to cook according to manufacturer's instructions. Please read the manual and find cooking time chart, as your machine may be different from mine.

When done, let roast rest while you make the Red Wine Au Jus. Pour the contents of the roasting pan into a medium saucepan set on medium-high heat. Add the red wine and beef broth. Simmer on low for 8 minutes, uncovered. Strain and serve with the Prime Rib Roast.

To carve the Prime Rib Roast, first, cut off the bones. Cut each bone apart. Then slice the rib roast into desired thickness.

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Chinese Beef Broccoli Recipe (video) http://steamykitchen.com/22980-chinese-beef-broccoli-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/22980-chinese-beef-broccoli-recipe.html#comments Fri, 17 Aug 2012 16:52:27 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=22980 Watch video step by step how to make Chinese Beef Broccoli with Jaden.

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Chinese Beef Broccoli Recipe

I’ve posted this recipe before (and it’s in the first Steamy Kitchen Cookbook) but I’ve just made a video showing you how to cook Chinese Beef Broccoli. It’s a super short 1:38 minute video.

I’ll even tell you my super secret ingredient for Chinese Beef Broccoli in the video. Also, I’m using the Steamy Kitchen wok that we just launched. It’s a nonstick wok with a cast iron interior layer and enamel outer layer. I’m using an induction burner – the wok works on gas, electric and induction!

For those who think you can’t sear or brown meats in a nonstick pan – I’m here to prove you wrong! YES YOU CAN. I’ll show you how.

Chinese Beef Broccoli Recipe

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Chinese Beef Broccoli Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes
chinese-beef-broccoli-recipe-4547-2.jpg

The secret ingredient in this dish is Chinese black vinegar. If you don't have this, substitute with young, unaged balsamic vinegar. The aged, good quality balsamic vinegar is too sweet - so make sure you get the cheaper, young balsamic.

To keep this dish vegetarian, replace the beef with fresh, thick, meaty shitake mushrooms (cut in half) or even sliced portobello mushrooms.

TO CUT FLANK STEAK ACROSS THE GRAIN: in the middle of this post for Flank Steak with Goat Cheese Recipe, I have a couple of photos showing you exactly how to cut flank steak across the grain. This is an important step because flank and skirt steak both are very tough cuts -- however -- if you cut it correctly, the steak becomes incredibly tender. Make sure you don't skip this step!

Ingredients:

1/2 pound flank or sirloin steak
1 1/2 teaspoons soy sauce
1 teaspoon cornstarch
Freshly ground black pepper
1 pound broccoli, cut into bite-size florets
1 tablespoon high-heat cooking oil (canola, vegetable, rice)
1 clove garlic, finely minced
1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger
FOR THE STIR FRY SAUCE
3 tablespoons oyster sauce
2 teaspoons Chinese rice wine (or dry sherry)
2 teaspoons Chinese black vinegar (or young balsamic vinegar)

Directions:

1. Slice the flank steak ACROSS the grain. In a bowl, combine the beef with the soy sauce, cornstarch and black pepper. Marinate for 10 minutes at room temperature.
2. In a small bowl, mix together the ingredients for the Stir-Fry Sauce.
3. In a wok or large saute pan, add 1 cup of water and bring to a boil. Add the broccoli and cover to steam for 3 minutes. The broccoli should be bright green, crisp tender and you should be able to pierce the stem with a fork. Drain.
4. Discard the water in the wok and dry the pan well. Set the pan over high heat, swirl in the cooking oil. When the wok is hot, add the marinated beef, use your tongs to spread the beef out all over the surface of the wok in one layer. Let beef cook, undisturbed, for 2 minutes, until nicely browned. Flip the beef, again spread the beef out over the wok and brown the other side.
Push the beef aside and add in the garlic and ginger. Stir fry the garlic and ginger for 30 seconds. Then mix together with the beef.
5. Pour in the Stir-fry Sauce and stir to combine. Simmer until the sauce is thick enough to coat the back of a spoon, about 15 seconds. Add the cooked broccoli back into the wok and toss to coat well.

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Kalbi Ribs with Macadamia Nut Rice http://steamykitchen.com/18881-kalbi-ribs-with-macadamia-nut-rice-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/18881-kalbi-ribs-with-macadamia-nut-rice-recipe.html#comments Tue, 11 Oct 2011 15:09:29 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=18881 Lucy Lean shares a Peter Merriman recipe for Kalbi Ribs with Macadamia Nut Rice from her cookbook, Made in America.

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I met my friend Lucy Lean through Diane & Todd a couple of years ago in Los Angeles. At that time, she was the Editor of Edible Los Angeles and we chatted for hours over bottles of red wine and plates of cheese and charcuterie. It turns out, Lucy has 2 kids around the same age as mine and on our next trip out to L.A., we brought the kiddies out to a massive children’s park near Griffith Park.

As the kids went all crazy on the playground, Lucy and I sat on a nearby bench, straining our eyes to catch up with each of our kids, as they were darting from here to there to who knows where. Imagine 8 different play structures, 50 little kids, and probably 29 pounds of sugar running through their veins.

It’s pretty tough to hold decent conversation whilst trying to make sure your children don’t beat up on another kid, try to take cutsies or wander off. But Lucy and I did manage to have one very important conversation that afternoon:

Lucy: I think I want to start a blog, what do you think?

Me: Sure! That’s a great idea! Do you have a name for it? What do you want to write about?

Lucy: I have the perfect name – Ladles & Jellyspoons, you know, like Ladies & Gentleman, but cuter. Oh, and food related. But I don’t know…..I don’t know if I could do it.

Me: Lucy! That’s a fab name for a blog! Did you get the URL for it already? 

Lucy: No, not yet. I don’t even know how to use WordPress or anything. Well, maybe I’ll ask Didier (her husband) to help me when I get home. Maybe.

Me: Sweetheart, listen to me. That URL could be taken If you don’t buy the name like *right now* I’m going buy it and then sell it back to you for 10x the price! (as I’m logging into my GoDaddy account on my phone). It’s now or never, baby!

So *of course* she bought it. I’m can be pushy like that LOL! Lucy launched Ladles & Jellyspoons, cooking with chefs past, present and future blog and a little while later snagged a book deal to write a book called Made in America: Our Best Chefs Reinvent Comfort Food and is now a casting judge for Master Chef television show.

Wow, right!? She’s amazing. Here’s a recipe we chose to share with you from the brand new book! ~Jaden

***

Merriman’s has been the destination restaurant in Waimea on the Big Island since it opened in 1988. The Los Angeles Times named chef and owner Peter Merriman “The Pied Piper of Hawaii regional cuisine,” and he’s proud of showcasing local ingredients on his menu.
There are toasted Hawaiian macadamia nuts in the jasmine rice for extra texture and flavor, a good example of how he integrates ingredients to present them at their best. Originally, he sourced local produce simply because it tasted better, encouraging farmers to cultivate varieties never before grown on the island.
With the creation of Hawaii regional cuisine, many local farmers and ranchers are now providing Merriman with a vast array of ingredients—from fresh organic mushrooms and greens to award-winning goat cheese and free-range, hormone-free lamb and beef. All find their way onto Merriman’s extensive menu with 90 percent of the ingredients from Hawaii.
Merriman also grows a lot of his own herbs, fruits, and vegetables for the restaurant in a little kitchen garden that the dining room overlooks. A couple of tomatoes cling to a drying vine from a season long since over in the rest of America; a large bunch of bananas are about to ripen; black sugarcane stands tall; and tiny, bright, super hot red peppers dot a low bush.
Merriman shows off the abundance, bending to smell an herb and happy to share his stories. “These are all canoe crops,” he tells me. “Brought to Hawaii hundreds of years ago. The only indigenous species are coconuts and kukui nuts [their oil is used as the fuel in tiki lamps].” ~Lucy Lean
Her book is available on Amazon here, Made in America: Our Best Chefs Reinvent Comfort Food!

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Kalbi Ribs with Macadamia Nut Rice

Servings: 4 - 6 servings Prep Time: 8 hours Cook Time: 15 minutes
Kalbi Ribs with Macadamia Nut Rice Recipe1

This Korean twist on the American classic comfort food, short ribs, is supereasy and quick,” says Merriman. “It’s also a guys’ recipe. It should be cooked outside on the grill. It goes great with a beer.

Recipe copyright Peter Merriman

Ingredients:

1 jumbo onion
6 cloves garlic
1/4 cup finely chopped fresh ginger
2 cups low-sodium soy sauce
1/4 cup brown sugar
5 pounds 1/2-inch-cut beef short ribs, use prime or choice corn-fed beef (you need the fat)
12 ounces jasmine rice
2 tablespoons garlic butter
1/2 cup chopped toasted macadamia nuts
1/2 cup chopped scallions

Directions:

1. Purée the onion, garlic, ginger, soy sauce, and brown sugar in a food processor. Pour over ribs and marinate for 8 hours.
2. rinse the rice in a sieve under cold water, place in a small saucepan, and pour in enough water to cover rice and come to 1 inch above it. Bring to a boil and then reduce the heat and simmer for 15 minutes. turn off the heat and let the rice rest for 15 minutes without opening the lid.
3. Grill the ribs over charcoal until medium rare.
4. Serve on jasmine rice tossed with garlic butter, toasted macadamia nuts, and chopped scallions.

Chef Merriman’s Tip
“Half-inch pieces of beef absorb the marinade better, stay more tender, and cook more evenly—so have your butcher cut them down.”

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Black Pepper Steak http://steamykitchen.com/18298-black-pepper-steak.html http://steamykitchen.com/18298-black-pepper-steak.html#comments Wed, 14 Sep 2011 14:32:34 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=18298 One of my very first blogging friends is Bee from Rasa Malaysia. In the early days of the blog, we used to chat on the phone after my kids went to bed about the technical side of blogging — silly acronyms like SEO, PHP, CSS and HTML. Back then (I say “back then” like it was decades ago, but in reality ...

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One of my very first blogging friends is Bee from Rasa Malaysia. In the early days of the blog, we used to chat on the phone after my kids went to bed about the technical side of blogging — silly acronyms like SEO, PHP, CSS and HTML. Back then (I say “back then” like it was decades ago, but in reality it was just 4 1/2 years ago!) there weren’t a ton of plug-ins and support forums weren’t available for food bloggers. Wow, have we come a long way! 

She asked me to write the Foreword for her brand new book, Easy Chinese Recipes, it’s a beautiful book with simple recipes that you’d find at your favorite Chinese restaurant, like Shrimp Fried Rice, Kung Pao Chicken and Homestyle Chow Mein Noodles. I hope you enjoy this recipe for Black Pepper Steak from her book. ~Jaden

***

Hi all, I am Bee of Rasa Malaysia, a food blog about easy Asian recipes. I am extremely thrilled to be on Steamy Kitchen today, sharing a recipe from my cookbook “Easy Chinese Recipes.” Jaden and I met some four years ago through our blogs; we also share the same publisher, Tuttle Publishing. I wanted to take this special opportunity to thank Jaden for writing the Foreword of the book and hervaluable advice when I was working on the project. Truth be told, I wouldn’t have done it if she didn’t tell me to “do it” when I got the offer!

Easy Chinese Recipes is a compilation of 80+ popular Chinese recipes: all-time favorites, Chinese takeout dishes, dim sum, dumplings, and more. Some recipes reflect my many travels in China and Hong Kong. Others are my interpretation of classic Chinese recipes, perfected through years of preparing them at home.

Black Pepper Beef is one of my favorite recipes in the cookbook as I love the combination of bell pepper and black pepper in Chinese stir-fries. These two ingredients, coupled with the right cut of beef—I like beef tenderloin, flank steak or flap meat—will often guarantee a successful dish. If you love the sweetness and slightly charred taste of caramelized onions, stir-fry the onions and bell peppers slightly longer before adding  the beef to the stir-fry. You will be rewarded with a richer flavored Black Pepper Beef. Enjoy! ~ Bee

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Black Pepper Steak Recipe

Servings: Serves 2 as a main dish with rice or 4 as part of a multicourse meal Prep Time: 15 minutes Cook Time:
Black Pepper Steak Recipe

If you are using Flank Steak - make sure you cut ACROSS the grain, otherwise the steak will be chewy and tough.

Ingredients:

8 oz (250 g) beef tenderloin, flank steak or flap meat, thinly sliced
2 1/2 tablespoons cooking oil
1 clove garlic, minced
1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger
1/2 small green bell pepper, deseeded and cut into pieces
1/2 small red bell pepper, deseeded and cut into pieces
1/2 onion, sliced
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
Salt, to tasteFor the Marinade
1 teaspoons soy sauce
1 tablespoon oyster sauce
1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
1 teaspoon Chinese rice wine or sherry
1/2 teaspoon cornstarch
1/2 teaspoon sesame oil
1/2 teaspoon sugar

Directions:

1. Marinate the beef with all the Marinade ingredients, about 15
minutes.
2. Heat 1 tablespoon of the oil in a wok or skillet over high heat.
Stir-fry the beef until the beef is browned on the outside but still pink
inside. Dish out and set aside.
3. Heat the remaining oil in a wok or skillet over high heat. Stir-fry
the garlic and the ginger until aromatic, and then add the green bell
pepper, red bell pepper, onion, and black pepper. Stir-fry until you smell
the aroma from the ingredients in the wok.
4. Transfer the beef back into the wok or skillet. Stir-fry until the
beef is cooked through and the center of the meat is no longer pink, about
1-2 minutes. Dish out and serve immediately with steamed rice.

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Peppercorn Crusted Filet Mignon with Balsamic Red Wine Sauce http://steamykitchen.com/16443-peppercorn-crusted-filet-mignon-with-balsamic-red-wine-sauce.html http://steamykitchen.com/16443-peppercorn-crusted-filet-mignon-with-balsamic-red-wine-sauce.html#comments Wed, 06 Jul 2011 18:54:17 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=16443 We splurge on filet mignon a few times a year, it’s the most expensive cut of steak because it’s incredibly tender and you can only get about 9 filets per cow. Instead of buying the filet mignon piece by piece, we always get the entire tenderloin and spend the time to carve it up ourselves for a 50% price savings. ...

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We splurge on filet mignon a few times a year, it’s the most expensive cut of steak because it’s incredibly tender and you can only get about 9 filets per cow. Instead of buying the filet mignon piece by piece, we always get the entire tenderloin and spend the time to carve it up ourselves for a 50% price savings.

But how to do transform a whole tenderloin, which is as big as a bodybuilder’s forearm, into pretty, petite filet mignon? Well, Pat the butcher from my local Sweetbay Supermarket will show you how. I’m working with Sweetbay to get y’all to eat more Black Angus Beef! :-)

How to Trim Tenderloin

Trimming tenderloin is actually a lot easier than you think. In fact, it’s easier than any other steak cut, mainly because the size is manageable (have you seen a how massive the rib roast is!?) and the meat is so tender you barely have to put any strength into carving. By the way, if you’re not into carving this up yourself, just ask the butcher at Sweetbay to do it for you, free of charge.

This is a whole tenderloin. It comes wrapped and sealed to keep its shape and freshness. Don’t open the package until you’re ready to carve. If you’re carving this up yourself, take note that there’s quite a bit of blood inside the bag. What I like to do is to open just one end of the bag and let the blood drain into the sink first before taking the tenderloin out.

There’s a small end and a large end. We’ll start cutting from the bigger end. When you get down to the smaller end, you can make smaller filet mignon pieces and use twine to tie 2 of them together to make a bigger piece. When it gets too small, Pat will grind the remainder with the scraps for filet mignon ground beef. Another option is to use the smaller pieces for a stir fry or stroganoff.

Pat begins cutting 1¾” thick slices from the larger end. You can cut yours smaller if you wish.

Here’s a cut for you to look at. Notice there’s fat around the filet, that’s okay, Pat will trim that off later. This was my biggest lesson – I used to trim the fat and the silver skin off the tenderloin FIRST, which made a massive mess and wasted too much good meat.

Once all the pieces have been cut, Pat trims each one carefully, taking off majority of the fat and the thick, tough silver skin.

Look how perfect this is. And the size! You get massive cuts.

We got nine 1¾” large filet mignon from the tenderloin.

The leftover scraps – including the fat – will go into the grinder. Again, if you prefer to use these as-is, cut them into smaller pieces and use them in stir fries!

Into the grinder it goes and now I’ve got 4 pounds of the very best filet mignon ground beef.  Use this ground beef for any dish that you want – though meatballs and burgers don’t work very well. The filet mignon ground beef is so lean that it will have trouble binding together. I see some Asian Lettuce Cups with Ground Beef in my future!

I’ve just saved nearly 50% and will have a freezer full of filet mignon (I’ll seal each filet mignon individually).

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Peppercorn Crusted Filet Mignon with Balsamic Red Wine Sauce

Servings: Serves 4 Prep Time: Cook Time:
peppercorn-filet-mignon-047

The recipe I’ve made with the filet mignon is a Peppercorn Crusted Filet Mignon with Balsamic Balsamic Red Wine Sauce.

It sounds like a fancy recipe, but you need a fancy-sounding recipe for filet mignon! Secretly, though, the recipe is so incredibly simple, has only a few ingredients and takes only 20 minutes hands-on.

Ingredients:

2 tablespoons butter
1/2 cup balsamic vinegar
1/4 cup red wine
1/2 cup beef broth
salt
3 tablespoons whole peppercorn
1 tablespoon cooking oil
4 pieces Filet Mignon (at least 1¼” inch thick)

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 400F.
2. Heat a saucepan with the butter, balsamic vinegar over medium heat. When the balsamic begins to bubble, turn the heat down to medium-low and cook for 3 minutes to reduce to half. Add in the red wine and the beef broth and let simmer for 5-8 minutes until reduces to a sauce thick enough to coat back of spoon. Taste and season with salt.
3. Place the peppercorns in a baking sheet. Use a heavy bottomed skillet to gently crush the peppercorns by pressing the bottom of the skillet on top of the peppercorns using a rocking motion.
4. Rub each filet mignon lightly with the cooking oil. Season each filet mignon with salt on both sides and then press the filet mignon onto the peppercorns on both sides.
5. Heat large oven-proof skilling on high heat. When very hot, add the filet mignon, searing both sides for 1 minute each. Remove the filet mignon from the heat and onto the baking sheet (it’s okay if there’s still peppercorn on the baking sheet). Place into oven for 4-7 minutes, depending on your desired doneness and thickness of filet mignon.
For 1-inch filet mignon: 4 minutes and then check temperature with meat thermometer. For every ¼” more, add 1 minute.

Rare: 120F-125F
Medium-Rare: 130F-135F
Medium: 140F-145F

6. Let rest for 3 minutes before serving with the Balsamic Sauce.

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Vietnamese Barbecued Lemongrass Beef http://steamykitchen.com/14565-vietnamese-barbecued-lemongrass-beef.html http://steamykitchen.com/14565-vietnamese-barbecued-lemongrass-beef.html#comments Mon, 14 Mar 2011 01:09:04 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=14565 I think this is my second favorite Vietnamese dish, right after Pho. It’s light, healthy and incorporates the salty, sweet, tangy, spicy, sour elements that make Vietnamese food so tasty. Recipe for Vietnamese Barbecued Lemongrass Beef, courtesy of Periplus Publishing on my other site, New Asian Cuisine.

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I think this is my second favorite Vietnamese dish, right after Pho. It’s light, healthy and incorporates the salty, sweet, tangy, spicy, sour elements that make Vietnamese food so tasty.

Recipe for Vietnamese Barbecued Lemongrass Beef, courtesy of Periplus Publishing on my other site, New Asian Cuisine.

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Perfect Prime Rib Recipe with Red Wine Jus http://steamykitchen.com/12516-perfect-prime-rib-roast-au-jus-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/12516-perfect-prime-rib-roast-au-jus-recipe.html#comments Thu, 09 Dec 2010 15:34:39 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=12516 Step by step photos for perfect prime rib - the secret is the hot sear and then slow and low roast.

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Prime Rib Recipe - Prime Rib Roast with Red Wine Jus
The first meal I ever cooked for my parents and brother was when I was I was 26 years old. Yeah, believe it or not, I never cooked at all for my family, the kitchen in our home was Mom’s domain and us “kids” were relegated to boring kitchen duties any time we stepped foot on the linoleum.

When I moved from Los Angeles to San Jose, my parents and brother drove up to visit for Thanksgiving. I decided to go all out and made my very first prime rib roast ever. It was perfect. I impressed the heck outta my Mom, who finally said, “Who knew you could cook! I should have let you cook all these years!”

Ahhhh young grasshoppa has talent! That would have surely beat washing dishes! 😉

Prime Rib Recipe - Prime Rib Roast with Red Wine Jus

Each year for the holidays, usually Christmas dinner, I’ll make the prime rib roast. The recipe has changed very little, a hot sear and then slow and low is the key to absolutely perfect prime rib.

Prime Rib Recipe - Prime Rib Roast with Red Wine Jus

It’s easier than you think, almost foolproof if you have a meat thermometer. Even if you do goof and leave it in the oven a little longer than desired, it will still be amazing moist and tender (because of the slow ‘n low cooking temp)

Don’t be fooled by the word “prime” in the name of Prime Rib Roast – just regular ‘ol supermarket Choice cut rib roast is fine, no need to splurge (and what a massive splurge that would be!) for the Prime cuts.

These days, I like to dry age my roast (This weekend would be the perfect time to start the dry aging if you are game to do it yourself!), but it’s absolutely not necessary.

Prime Rib Recipe - Dry age the roast

The recipe I use most comes from Cook’s Illustrated with some small changes. It’s come out perfect every single time.

How to Cook Perfect Prime Rib Recipe with Jus

Start with oxtails smeared with tomato paste – this will produce some crazy flavor for the Red Wine Jus (which honestly, is 42% of why I love Prime Rib). Throw some veggies into the pan and roast for 20 minutes to give it a head start.

Prime Rib Recipe - Roast oxtail and veggies

After the oxtails and veg have had a nice bake in the oven, you can already see how much flavor it will add to the recipe.

Prime Rib Recipe - Roast oxtail and veggies

Here’s the roast….instead of trying to carve the roast off the bone AFTER cooking, Cooks Illustrated advises to carve the meat off the bone before roasting for 2 reasons:

1. It’s easier to carve to serve without having to wrestle with bone.
2. The bone will flavor the au jus later in the cooking process.

Prime Rib Recipe - Carve the meat off bone before roasting

You’ll want to cut the roast as close to the bone as possible – don’t waste any of that precious meat!

Prime Rib Recipe - Carve the meat off bone before roasting

In a large frying pan or cast iron pan (preferred), sear each side of the boneless roast.

Prime Rib Recipe - Sear boneless roast

Get a nice crusty crust.

Prime Rib Recipe - Sear each side of roast

On each side.

Now we’ll tie the roast back onto the bones. I like using strips of cheesecloth. Easier than wrangling with twine and that fancy tying thing.  Two strips is all you really need – tie it like a present.

Prime Rib Recipe - Tie roast onto bones with cheesecloth

Tie the roast back on — this is important, because the bone will serve as our “rack” in the roasting pan so that the roast cooks evenly. The bone also gives a lot of flavor. Push the oxtails and veg to the side.

Prime Rib Recipe - Tie roast onto bones with cheesecloth

Roast 17-20 minutes per pound…for a 7 pound roast that would be 2 hours. Check temp with a meat thermometer – just stick the thermometer deep in the middle (don’t touch bone). 122F for rare, 130F for medium-rare.

Prime Rib Recipe - Roast 17-20 minutes per pound

Now it’s time to make the savory red wine jus! Spoon out the fat from the roasting pan (use it for the Yorkshire Pudding Recipe!) Return roasting pan with the oxtails, vegetables and the BONES of the rib roast (just untie them from the roast) with wine, broth and thyme.

Prime Rib Recipe - Red wine Jus

Simmer it good.

Prime Rib Recipe - Red wine Jus

Strain.

Prime Rib Recipe - Strain jus mixture

And it’s done!

Prime Rib Recipe - Strain jus mixture

Carve the prime rib roast.

Prime Rib Recipe - Carve Roast

Serve the prime rib with jus

Prime Rib Recipe - Serve with jus

But don’t forget….for your favorite dog…

Prime Rib Recipe - Save bones for your dog

Oh look! Steph from Faye Bernoulli blog made this Prime Rib recipe. Here’s her photo.

Perfect Accompaniment to Prime Rib Recipe — Yorkshire Pudding

How can you resist!? The beef fat from the roasting pan goes into making these airy Yorkshire Pudding popovers.

Prime Rib Recipe - Yorkshire Pudding

 

More recipes to explore

Prime Rib Roast with Miso Jus (Steamy Kitchen)

Fall off the Bone Baby Back Ribs with Sweet Chili Sauce (Steamy Kitchen)

Cayenne Cinnamon Ribs with Maple Glaze (Steamy Kitchen)

Grilled Garlic and Rosemary Ribeye Steak (Steamy Kitchen)

Roast Beef with Caramelised Onion Gravy (BBC Good Food)

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Perfect Prime Rib Recipe with Red Wine Jus

Servings: 10-12 Prep Time: 2 hours to let roast come to room temperature, but only 30 minutes of hands-on. Cook Time: 2-3 hours, depending on size of roast
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Recipe adapted from Cooks Illustrated.
Important points:
1) Get bone-in rib roast, preferable first-cut, ribs 9-12 for most flavor. Choice grade of beef (i.e. not the pricey Prime grade) is what you'll ask for.
2) Take note of how many pounds the roast is prior to cooking (bones and roast) to determine cooking time
3) Use a meat thermometer

Ingredients:

1 bone-on beef rib roast (about 7-8 pounds)
1 1/2 pounds oxtail bones
1 tablespoon tomato paste
2 onions, quartered
3 carrots, cut into thirds
3 stalks celery, cut into thirds
1 whole head garlic, halved
2 tablespoons cooking oil, divided
salt and pepper
1 cup red wine
1 3/4 cups beef broth
1 3/4 cups chicken broth
3 sprigs fresh thyme

Directions:

1. Take roast from refrigerator and let stand at room temperature for 2 hours. Preheat oven to 400F, place rack on lowest position. Rub oxtails with tomato paste, place in roasting pan. Add onions, celery, carrots and garlic, toss with just 1 tablespoon of the cooking oil. Roast for 20 minutes.

2. In the meantime, cut the bone from the rib roast (try to carve as close to the bone as possible). Rub roast with remaining 1 tablespoon oil and generously season with salt and pepper. Heat large frying pan on high heat. When smoking hot, place rib roast, fat side down in pan and sear each side 5 minutes. Remove from pan and let cool for a few minutes. Place the roast right back onto the bones. Use kitchen twine or strips of cheesecloth to tie roast back onto the bones.

3. When the oxtails and vegetables are done, remove pan from oven.

4. Reduce the oven temperature to 250F.

5. Push the oxtail bones and vegetables to the sides, place roast, bone side down in roasting pan. Return pan to oven. Roast for 17-20 minutes PER POUND or until temperature of the middle of the roast is 130F (medium-rare to medium). Transfer roast to cutting board, carefully untie the bones from roast. Cover loosely with tin foil. Rest for 20 minutes.

6. While roast is resting, make the red wine jus. Keep the oxtails and vegetables in the roasting pan but pour out all but 1 teaspoon of the fat (reserve for Yorkshire Pudding if desired). Place the bones that you've untied from roast in roasting pan 2 burners set on high heat.

7. Pour in the red wine and cook until wine is reduced by half. Use a wooden spoon to scrape up the bits. Add the beef broth, chicken broth, thyme. Turn heat to medium-low and simmer for 15 minutes. Add any juices accumulated from the rib roast on the cutting board. Turn off heat.

8. Remove the oxtails and the bones. Strain the jus with mesh strainer, pressing down with wooden spoon to extract out all the juice from the vegetables. Carve the roast, serve with the jus. Give the bones to a nice dog.

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Chinese Broccoli Beef http://steamykitchen.com/11368-chinese-broccoli-beef.html http://steamykitchen.com/11368-chinese-broccoli-beef.html#comments Tue, 05 Oct 2010 16:00:54 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=11368 Chinese Broccoli Beef Recipe (from my cookbook!) on my other website, New Asian Cuisine.

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Chinese Broccoli Beef Recipe (from my cookbook!) on my other website, New Asian Cuisine.

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Artisan Beef Burger Tasting http://steamykitchen.com/7996-artisan-burger-tasting.html http://steamykitchen.com/7996-artisan-burger-tasting.html#comments Sun, 06 Jun 2010 05:41:54 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=7996 Carrie Oliver knows her beef. And luckily, she’s one of my very good friends and loves to send me on happy beef adventures, including an Artisan Steak Tasting a couple of years ago and more recently an Artisan Burger Tasting, which I actually enjoyed even more. If you’ve never heard of artisan beef tasting – in short – not all ...

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Carrie Oliver knows her beef. And luckily, she’s one of my very good friends and loves to send me on happy beef adventures, including an Artisan Steak Tasting a couple of years ago and more recently an Artisan Burger Tasting, which I actually enjoyed even more.

If you’ve never heard of artisan beef tasting – in short – not all beef is created equal and USDA’s way of judging quality of beef (prime, choice, select) is based on fat content – which in truth, has very little to do with flavor of beef.

What influences flavor even more than marbling is the breed of cattle, where they were raised, what they were fed and how they were treated. Can you imagine doing a burger tasting like you’d do a wine tasting? Flavors notes of parmesan, nutty, mushrooms, earthy, grassy, hay, etc. Carrie Oliver developed a flavor profile system for Artisan Beef that I think is absolutely brilliant because it considers all of the factors  that affect flavor above, including information about the rancher themselves.

It’s a blind taste test and we each recorded flavor notes and chose our favorite. At the end of the tasting, the artisan producers and information on the cattle was revealed.

Burger #1 was from Mettenberg Farm:

(click on the chart above for more detailed tasting notes)

and we did the same type of tasting notes for the remaining burgers – Satchel Creek from Kansas, Varner from Kansas and Elliott Ferris from Colorado.

If you’d like to do an Artisan Burger Tasting, start by heading over to Carrie Oliver’s site where you can download tasting guides and a step-by-step.

I recommend trying each of the burgers naked at first  (and honestly, the beef is so damn good that you might not even want anything else — even the bun!) I took a few bites of each burger as is, and then added lettuce, tomato and good mustard to each after recording my flavor profile notes.

In the meantime, I’ll let Carrie take over and explain Artisan Burger Tasting to you herself! Enjoy! ~jaden

p.s. Artisan Burger Tasting or Artisan Steak Tasting is a great Father’s Day idea! Carrie sells an Artisan Steak Tasting Kit – Four 10-12 oz. sirloins from 4 different artisan ranchers plus 2-day shipping and tasting kit is $85. Dad will love it more than the silly golf doo-hickey that he’ll never use.

p.p.s. I love what Carrie is doing because she’s a one-woman show in her business and determined to change the way people think about beef. And my kids love her too.

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Artisan Burger Tasting

by Carrie Oliver

If I invited you an Artisan Burger Tasting, what would you expect? Unless you’ve read Jaden’s post on one of my Artisan Steak Tasting events, my guess is that you’d come prepared to for a “smack down” between by multiple contestants, each trying to outdo the others with fancy buns, unique seasonings, and condiments like black truffles or foie gras or Cherokee Purple heirloom tomatoes.

As Jaden can attest, there are more interesting things to explore. Rather than rating a chef’s ability to create a masterpiece of a burger, I’d like to invite you to have a tasting in which you focus on the flavor and texture of the beef itself. Think of it as like a wine tasting but with burgers from different farms or ranches, or what my I call MeatCamp.

First, let’s back up a bit and talk about what is the difference between Artisan Beef and the regular stuff you find at large supermarkets, or what I call mystery meat.

What Is Artisan Beef?

Many people tell me that the steak or burger they ate this week wasn’t as good as the week before. Most of us blame ourselves. “I bought the wrong steak.” Or, “I cooked it wrong.” And, “I left it in the refrigerator too long.” That’s what I used to tell myself for many years as well, until one day I learned that beef tasted different last week because IT WAS different.

I’ve spent the last several years researching the practices and standards that create differences, good and bad, in the beef that we eat. In doing so I created the designation “Artisan Beef” and am busy cataloging the farmers and butchers who have taken up Artisan Beef practices – or in some cases never abandoned them – and helping you find the good stuff, too. An Artisan Burger Tasting is a great place to start.

Think for a moment how beef is merchandised. When you go to the grocery store, whether it’s produce or packaged goods you are presented with a huge variety from which to choose. On my last visit I counted 11 varieties of apples, 8 types of lettuce, 76 different tomato-based spaghetti sauces, countless flavors of potato chips and cheeses, and a selection of wines that would fit any budget, flavor preference, or occasion.

The typical meat counter offers a very different study. Chicken and pork come in different cuts of, well, chicken or pork. By and large, beef is sorted and sold by the amount of fat in it in. For ground beef, the grocery store I mention above offered lean, very lean, and ground chuck.

The truth is, the percentage fat in a burger doesn’t tell you that much about the flavor or texture of that burger (which may come as good news for those of us who are concerned about counting calories). That’s right, USDA Grade is nowhere near as important as we’ve been led to think.

Instead, in many ways, beef is just like wine. As wines made from Cabernet Sauvignon grapes will typically taste different than wines made from Pinot Noir grapes, the same is true with beef. There are dozens if not hundreds of cattle breeds and crossbreeds spread across 750,000 farms and ranches in North America. Each has different characteristics, as with wine grapes.

Yet when you get to the supermarket shelf, the huge natural variety is all jumbled together and labeled as beef, or at best USDA Choice or nowadays, grass-fed beef. To me buying this mystery beef at the supermarket is like buying wine without a label or an apple without even knowing the color of its skin.

Artisan Beef, on the other hand, begins with a rancher/farmer and butcher who pay attention to practices that bring out the best flavors and textures in beef and also meet our growing desire for open pasture grazing, low-stress handling, and avoidance of growth hormones and preventative antibiotics.

Beyond the basics of good animal husbandry, flavor, texture, and overall quality are influenced by many factors, including but not limited to the following:

If you’re not too familiar with wine, the principles with coffee or apples are the same. I strongly prefer tart apples such as Pippins, Braeburns, or Granny Smiths. I bet you have a favorite cup of java or apple variety, too.

So what does all this mean for the humble burger. Simply put, there’s a world of flavors and textures of burgers out there just waiting to be discovered and you, your kids, and your friends will like some better than others. The best way to find out what you like is to start experimenting!

Finding Beef for An Artisan Burger Tasting

If you think a wine or chocolate tasting is fun, you’re in for a real treat with an Artisan Burger Tasting. The trick is, just like any other food, you need to actually know what’s on your plate if you expect to enjoy the same or similar flavor the next time.

First you’ll need to find a few different sources of beef to include in your tasting. You are ideally looking to find farm- or ranch-specific beef and to know what kind of cattle they raised and how. (If this isn’t practical, as a first step look for beef with a label that says it was raised without the use of added growth hormones or antibiotics and then try to find out as much as you can about the beef as possible.)

Ask the following and jot down the answers: the cattle breed or crossbreed (e.g. Hereford, Purebred Angus, Angus-Jersey Crossbreed, Charolais, etc.), the growing region, the specific diet, the aging technique used (dry-aging or wet-aging), and the name of the farm, ranch, or ranch group.

I would also ask what the % fat is in the burger. As many of you will know from reading my earlier posts, fat content makes far less of an impact on beef – especially in steaks – as one might otherwise think. But fat does carry some flavor, and in burgers it can also have an impact on mouth-feel. Some people describe this feeling as juicy; others find it filmy or oily. As part of your growing appreciation for burgers, you’ll want to learn whether you prefer the feel of fat or not in your burgers.

Finally, this is a great opportunity to try grass-fed beef if you haven’t already done so, so try to include at least one sample in your tasting.

You can use this as a guide.

You will often have the best luck at your local farmers markets, where the purveyors are highly likely to be able to answer your questions. You may even get to speak with the actual farmer!

Next, consider the butchers in your area: you may be lucky and find one or two who can proudly tell you the specifics like the name of the farm, the breed, the aging, and so on. Finally, while your supermarket or mass merchandising chain cannot typically give you the details of breed, diet, and so on, if that’s where you usually buy your burger why not include it in your tasting?

If you are having trouble locating good sources in your area, send me an email – if I can help I will respond with some possible local sources. Also, when you find new and interesting sources of beef (or chicken, or pork), PLEASE send me an email so I can add them to my directory. I’m at Carrie AT oliverranch {dot] com.

How to host an artisan burger tasting:

Outside of the beef itself, the most important thing to have is a copy of my Artisan Beef Tasting Guides.

Artisan Steak Tasting Guide:

Artisan Steak Tasting Guide Note Paper:

The guide will help you and your friends and family compare the burgers from different farms or ranchers and take notes. It includes a list of flavors that you might find in beef and also helps you categorize each beef according to three basic, easy to understand criteria: Texture, Personality, and Impression. [downloadable guide]

Mark the plates & create diagram for grill or pans

To start, mark all plates and platters so you can keep track of which beef came from which farm throughout the tasting. If possible, I recommend you take the extra effort to plan a “blind” tasting, using a code to mask the identity of each beef until after the tasting is completed.

Make the burgers

Next, make 1½ oz mini-burgers (“sliders”) from each farm’s beef. An ice cream scoop will be close enough if you don’t own a kitchen scale. Be sure to diligently follow proper food handling rules throughout the process. Sprinkle each burger with a small amount of kosher salt or unflavored sea salt, and voila! You’re ready.

Cook the burgers

Cook the patties on a grill or cast iron pans, keeping the beef from each farm separate from each other while cooking. The USDA recommends cooking the burgers until they reach an internal temperature of 160 F.

Plate the burgers

Place one patty from each farm onto individual serving plates in the exact same order for each person at your tasting. Serve immediately.

Taste the burgers

Ask your guests to read my Artisan Beef Tasting guide and then taste the burgers keeping notes as they go. I may be able to join you by Skype or phone, too, just let me. Choose one patty to start with, and then taste each burger in clockwise order and take notes. Ask tasters NOT to share their opinions or blurt out reactions that could spoil the experience for others. Taste now, share later.

If you like, have people taste the patties first unadorned and then again with condiments and or buns. But make sure to taste the beef on it’s own, first, to get the full experience.

Compare artisan burger tasting notes

This is the best part, finding out what other people thought of each ranch’s beef by reading aloud your tasting notes and then revealing your first, second, third, and fourth favorite. Remember, this isn’t a “smack down.” Rather than consider who “won” the tasting, I encourage you to learn what you like best and why, so you can buy more of good stuff!

Buy more of your favorite! Support artisan beef producers!

You’ve stocked up on your favorite wine, cheese, chocolate, heck, even your laundry detergent. Why? Because you usually save money and you also have your trusty favorite around whenever you want it. The same is true for beef. If you find a beef you and your family love (or even if you have a split decision), I strongly encourage you to buy more from the same farm or ranch. The savings can be phenomenal, you’ll know the people who produced your beef, and you can enjoy your preferred flavor of beef whenever you like.

Send me your notes!

I am always interested in learning about new, fabulous artisan farms, ranch’s and butchers. You can volunteer to have me celebrate your tasting event on my Web site. How fun would that be? You can even use my easy survey form to send me your notes, just go to my tasting notes Rate Your Burger survey here.  You’ll also have a choice to join my newsletter so I can tell you about great sources of Artisan Beef (and if you’re interested, pork, lamb, and poultry, too) and upcoming Meat Camp tasting events.

Artisan Burger Tastings – It’s Like A Wine Tasting, But With Burgers!

ps If you ever host a home steak tasting or one of my own artisan steak tasting kits, please also send me your notes with this Rate Your Steak survey, here.

Tasting Guide :

Artisan Steak Tasting Guide:

Artisan Steak Tasting Guide Note Paper:

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Chinese Broccoli Beef Noodle Stir Fry http://steamykitchen.com/4997-broccoli-beef-noodle-stir-fry.html http://steamykitchen.com/4997-broccoli-beef-noodle-stir-fry.html#comments Tue, 11 Aug 2009 03:22:35 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=4997 Simple 15 minute recipe for Chinese Broccoli Beef Noodle Stir Fry with step by step photos.

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Here’s what you’ll learn:

  • How to choose and buy the freshest Chinese broccoli (gai-lan)
  • The perfect marinade recipe
  • Secrets to no-fail Chinese stir fries

 

Chinese Broccoli (Gai-Lan)

Chinese broccoli should be almost all stem and green leaves. Look for Chinese broccoli with minimal open flowers (lots of open white flowers means that the Chinese broccoli is past its prime and bitter.

You can also tell from the cut stems if the Chinese broccoli will be perfect or too old. See the bottoms of these cut stems? It’s milky-translucent and smooth. If the bottoms of the stem have a hard white circle in the middle (instead of smooth, milky and translucent) it will probably be past its prime and taste tough and bitter.

Photo below is Chinese Broccoli…see the beautiful stem-bottoms?

broccoli-beef-noodles-17

For this Broccoli Beef Noodle Stir Fry recipe, you can use ANY type of noodles. Really, spaghetti noodles are fantastic in this dish. I happened to have Japanese style egg-noodles, so that’s what I used! Cook your noodles according to package directions.

broccoli-beef-noodles-1

While the noodles are cooking, marinate the beef slices in soy sauce, cornstarch, sugar, oyster sauce and rice wine. If you don’t have rice wine, use dry sherry or any dry white wine will do. The sugar and the oyster sauce will help the meat caramelize.

broccoli-beef-noodles-21

You want beautiful, carmelized meat in your stir fry?

Here’s the secret. DO NOT CROWD THE MEAT! Single layer, ladies and gents!

broccoli-beef-noodles-27

Once you add it to the wok or frying pan, LEAVE THE THING ALONE. Resist the temptation to shake, move it around or flip…until the first side has a chance to caramelize. Then flip.

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See the nicely caramelized bits?

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Once the meat finishes cooking, remove to a plate. Now it’s time for Chinese Broccoli (Gai Lan).

broccoli-beef-noodles-36

Stir fry for a minute, scooping up the oils at the bottom of the wok all over the Chinese Broccoli. Bathe the oil over the Chinese Broccoli.

Now turn heat down, add 1/4 cup of water or browth and cover to let steam.

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A couple of minutes later…test the Chinese Broccoli to see if done! A knife should pierce easily into the steam.

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Now its the cooked noodles turn to take a bath in the sauce.

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See it absorb all the juicy bits?

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Now return the beef and broccoli to the wok and serve!!

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Yum.

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Chinese Broccoli Beef Noodle Stir Fry Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: Cook Time:
broccoli-beef-noodles-59

Ingredients:

3 tablespoons soy sauce
3 tablespoons oyster sauce
3 tablespoons Shaoxing wine, sake or dry white wine
1 tablespoon sugar
1 tablespoon tapioca starch or cornstarch
1 teaspoon dark sesame oil
1 pound beef sirloin, thinly sliced
1 pound fresh or 10 ounces dried noodles
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
3 large garlic cloves, crushed and finely chopped
1.25 cups chicken or vegetable stock
1 pound Chinese broccoli or regular common broccoli, cut into bite-size chunks or florets
Freshly ground black pepper

Directions:

In a medium bowl, whisk together 1 tablespoon each soy sauce, oyster sauce and rice wine. Add the sugar and continue to whisk until completely dissolved. Stir in the tapioca starch and continue stirring until smooth. Add the sesame oil and beef, and mix well. Marinate for 20 minutes. Drain and discard the excess marinade.

Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Cook the noodles until 1 minute shy of done and drain. (We'll finish cooking the noodles at the end)

Heat 1 tablespoon of the vegetable oil in a skillet or wok over high heat and stir-fry the garlic until fragrant, about 1o seconds. Add the beef and stir-fry until tender, 1 to 2 minutes. Transfer to a plate. Add the remaining tablespoon of oil and when hot, add the Chinese broccoli, stir frying so that the oil coats the Chinese broccoli. Pour in the 1/4 cup of the stock, turn the heat to medium-low and cover with a tight fitting lid. Cook the Chinese broccoli until tender, 3 to 5 minutes. Transfer the Chinese broccoli to the same plate.

Add the remaining cup of stock and the remaining 2 tablespoons each of soy sauce, oyster sauce, and rice wine to the same skillet and bring to a boil over
high heat.

Add the noodles and cook until the liquid has almost completely evaporated, leaving the noodles lightly moistened,2 to 3 minutes. Return the beef and broccoli to the skillet and toss to mix the ingredients thoroughly. Season with pepper to taste and serve.

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