Steamy Kitchen Recipes | RSS Feed http://steamykitchen.com Steamy Kitchen Food Blog: fast recipes, simple recipes, with fresh ingredients to create delicious meals. Tue, 21 Jul 2015 18:52:51 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.2 Sous Vide Pork Belly Recipe http://steamykitchen.com/40432-sous-vide-pork-belly-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/40432-sous-vide-pork-belly-recipe.html#comments Fri, 15 May 2015 18:51:55 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=40432 What is Sous Vide? Sous Vide (pronounced “soo veed”) is a method of cooking that allows you to create foods that are perfectly cooked, at an exact temperature in a water bath. That means the most perfect steaks, impossibly tender, yet juicy brisket, and velvety smooth pork belly that melts in your mouth. Here’s a video to explain: Recommended Sous ...

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Sous Vide Pork Belly Tacos Recipe

What is Sous Vide?

Sous Vide (pronounced “soo veed”) is a method of cooking that allows you to create foods that are perfectly cooked, at an exact temperature in a water bath. That means the most perfect steaks, impossibly tender, yet juicy brisket, and velvety smooth pork belly that melts in your mouth.

Here’s a video to explain:

Recommended Sous Vide Class

I can’t say enough good things about ChefSteps. I’ve known about ChefSteps for awhile, from Tim Ferriss’ book, The 4-Hour Chef (btw, Tim mentions us in his book in the steak chapter – he features our steak salting method.) But it wasn’t until last week that I watched a class online. This is not a paid endorsement — I’m just a massive fan.

You can watch their free beginner Sous Vide class or for $10 enroll in their Cooking Sous Vide: Beyond the Basics – it’s worth every penny, and more. I’ve already learned better sous vide techniques beyond the steak and salmon.

Anova Sous Vide Review

Anova sous vide review

Anova Sous Vide ReviewWe have been cooking sous vide for over 6 years, starting with a Sous Vide Supreme Machine (here’s our review + the perfect 146F egg.) and have been using the first version of the Anova Sous Vide for the past couple of years. A month ago, we upgraded to the newer bluetooth enabled Anova Culinary Precision Cooker (fancy name for a sous vide appliance) and love the easier to use interface and dials.

Pros:

  • It’s a fantastic price point and affordable for home cooks. At $179 (Amazon.com), it is $100 cheaper than the Nomiku and $120 cheaper than Sous Vide Supreme. I don’t know enough about the new kid on the block, $199 Sansaire, to comment. The $699 PolyScience creates powerful sous vide machines for restaurants.
  • Simple to use: One button + one wheel to rotate for temperature selection. You don’t need the phone app to run the Anova. In fact, I installed the free app, used it once and just deleted it, as I didn’t find much use for the app.
  • Small size: The Anova works with any large stockpot, you just clip the Anova onto the side of the pot. This makes the Anova very easy to store in a drawer. Our old Sous Vide Supreme needed an entire deep shelf!
  • Reliability: Anova actually specializes in water bath equipment for laboratory, biotech, analytical
    equipment control, industry processes cooling, and culinary industries. They are based in Stafford, Texas and specialize in precision machines. If scientists trust their equipment, I can trust them to cook my steak.

Anova sous vide review

Cons:

  • While it does connect to my iPhone via bluetooth, I found that the app was just a “fun to have” and really see no need to be connected. Once you input the Anova temperature, you’re all set.
  • What I did like about my old Sous Vide Supreme unit was that it was a contained appliance with a lid vs. the Anova that clips to a pot. But that means a lid won’t fit. This doesn’t matter if you are cooking sous vide for just a couple of hours, but if you are cooking the perfect pork belly (hey, this recipe!) for 16 hours, a lot of water is lost through evaporation. Our sous vide runs overnight, and the last thing I want to do is to wake up in the middle of the night to check on my water level. There are polycarbonate boxes that chefs use, but you’ll need a plastic cutter to cut a hole for your Anova. You’ll see below how I tried to cover my stockpot (and failed!) Others have used ping pong balls or these very expensive balls that float on top of the water to prevent water loss. Yesterday, I actually considered cutting a hole in the lid of a small cooler, but not sure of the dangers of hot water sitting long periods of time in the plastic cooler.

Conclusion:

If you’re interested in giving sous vide cooking a try, this is the unit to buy. Paired with the ChefSteps online class, you’ll be on your way to cooking restaurant quality meals with minimal fuss.

How to Sous Vide Pork Belly

Sous Vide Pork Belly Recipe

Buy a nice piece of pork belly (this is where bacon comes from!) I like to use a handful kosher salt and “exfoliate” the pork skin. Here’s why you should do this, especially with chicken. It’s not a must, but I like to get the skin clean and scrubbed.

Char Siu sauce for sous vide pork belly recipe

I made two versions of this pork belly. One with garlic, ginger, green onion, orange peel, soy sauce and honey:

Anova sous vide review

And the other with prepared Char Siu (Chinese BBQ) sauce.

Char Siu sauce for sous vide pork belly recipe

With either sauce, the cooking. method is the same. Add the pork belly and sauce into a vacuum bag.

Anova sous vide review

Seal the vacuum bag. Schmush the sauce to evenly distribute on both sides of the pork belly.

Anova sous vide reviewAnova sous vide review

Fill pot with water, set the Anova Sous Vide to 158F. Place the bags into pot. Use clips to secure the bags so that they don’t move around too much and to ensure each bag has enough room for water to circulate. Cook for 16 hours.

Anova sous vide review

Don’t do this

In an effort to minimize water loss through evaporation, I covered the pot with tin foil.

Anova sous vide review

I threw a couple of dishtowels on top to keep the tin foil in place. Bad idea. After 8 hours, enough condensation had built up on the underside and edges of the tin foil, that the towel began absorbing that water. Then, the towels became soaked and water started dripping down on my counter.

Instead, use tin foil, but fit it INSIDE the pot, just crumple the edges so that it fits on top of the water and inside the pot. It won’t be a perfect, snug fit, but it will help minimize water loss.

A Few Tips

  • When cooking sous vide for a long time period, anything over 8 hours, I like to use a vacuum seal bag. You can also use a heavy duty sealable freezer bag, but double-bag.
  • Cut your vacuum bag 6″ larger than you need, use the excess bag to clip to the side of your pot, so that the bag stays put — and just in case the seal is not completely tight, prevent spillage.
  • Check your water level periodically. Top off as needed. If the water level is too low, the pork belly will not cook evenly or properly.
  • Is cooking 16 hours per the recipe absolutely necessary? No! The longer you sous vide, the more the collagen will break apart and meat will be fork tender. Cook too long: and you’ll get a mushy mess. Cook too short: the meat will be chewy and tough. For example, do you enjoy a nice, meaty strip steak that you can dig into? Then 1 hour per inch is about right. If you cook the same strip steak for 12 hours, you’ll be able to cut the steak with a fork, not quite the texture I enjoy for a steak, but one that I would like for pork shoulder. So, timing and temperature depends on the cut of meat AND the desired texture. For pork belly, 16 hours for pork belly falls right in the middle of that spectrum. Delicate and tender, yet retains its structure so that you can slice and sear without breaking apart. The wiggle room for cooking time is pretty lax, anywhere between 12-20 hours will still be good.

After 16 hours, remove pork belly from bag. I like to reserve the tasty juices. Slice thinly, about 1/4″. The pork belly is smooth, still firm in structure, yet unbelievably tender. You want pork belly that you can gently bite into, not just instantly melt in your mouth.

Sous Vide Pork Belly Recipe

The last step is to heat a sauté pan or frying pan (I prefer the high sides of a sauté pan – you’ll contain the fatty splatter better.) and sear both sides before serving. The full recipe is below at the end of this post.

To serve, I like to keep it simple. Pork belly is very rich, fatty and savory. You need to pair it with something light, bright and acidic, otherwise, like the rich, dense chocolate cake, you can only have a few bite before it’s overwhelming.

Sous Vide Pork Belly Recipe

I like serving pork belly with a super quick pickle – julienned bell pepper and cucumber tossed in a little seasoned rice vinegar. Warm flour or corn tortillas make it a simple hand-food. Super curly, crisp-crunchy green onion is made by soaking slivers of green onion in ice water. On the side, chili sauce and pickled ginger.

Sous Vide Pork Belly Tacos Recipe

Do you love these eco-friendly bamboo plates? It’s from RestaurantWare. The plates and dishes are sturdy – and reusable when you hand wash.

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Sous Vide Pork Belly Recipe (Taco)

Servings: 8 Prep Time: 15 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes active, 16 hours sous vide
Sous Vide Pork Belly Tacos Recipe

Char Siu sauce can be found on Amazon, many well-stocked grocery stores or any Asian market.

Serve with Asian chili sauce and pickled ginger, if desired

Ingredients:

1 pound pork belly
16 small flour tortillas
1 cucumber, julienned
1 bell pepper, cored and julienned
2 tablespoons seasoned rice vinegar
2 stalks, green onion (scallion)

VERSION 1:
1/4 cup prepared Char Siu sauce

VERSION 2: (combine)
2 stalks green onion, minced
2 teaspoons grated fresh ginger
2 garlic cloves, minced
2 tablespoons soy sauce
2 tablespoons honey

Directions:

Place pork belly in a vacuum seal bag. Slather your desired sauce (Char Siu or Soy/Honey) on both sides of the pork belly. Seal the bag and prepare your sous vide machine to run at 158F for 16 hours. Make sure you have enough water in the pot, topping off as needed. When done, open bag, reserving the Char Siu sauce in the bag. Slice the pork belly into 1/4".

To make the slaw, mix the cucumber and the bell pepper in a bowl, and toss with seasoned rice vinegar. For the green onion, slice as thinly as possible at a steep angle. Fill a small bowl with ice water, and add the sliced green onion.

When ready to serve, add the pork belly to a frying pan, then turn on the heat to medium. The pork belly will slowly caramelize, and fat will render as it heats up with the pan. Cook until browned, about 2 minutes. Flip and brown other side.

Drain the green onion from the ice water. Assemble tacos with warmed flour tortillas, pork belly, slaw and curly, crunchy green onion.

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Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Orange-Almond Sauce http://steamykitchen.com/34185-vietnamese-spring-rolls-with-orange-almond-sauce-from-the-blender-girl-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/34185-vietnamese-spring-rolls-with-orange-almond-sauce-from-the-blender-girl-recipe-video.html#comments Wed, 07 May 2014 11:45:54 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=34185 I very rarely veer off my “tried and true” basic recipe for Vietnamese Nuoc Cham (dipping sauce with lime juice, fish sauce, chili peppers, sugar, water) for Vietnamese Spring Rolls. It’s easy, predictable and I can make the sauce just by taste without measuring anything! But just because I *LOVE* something doesn’t mean that my entire family loves it too. My fish-fearing ...

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spring rolls with orange almond sauce recipe-1663

I very rarely veer off my “tried and true” basic recipe for Vietnamese Nuoc Cham (dipping sauce with lime juice, fish sauce, chili peppers, sugar, water) for Vietnamese Spring Rolls. It’s easy, predictable and I can make the sauce just by taste without measuring anything!

spring rolls with orange almond sauce recipe-1654

But just because I *LOVE* something doesn’t mean that my entire family loves it too. My fish-fearing husband won’t touch it….and therefore my kids won’t dip in it either. Sigh. I keep telling the kids that, “Buddha is a happy eater (see his belly!?) and he would want you to eat like Mama, not Dad.”

Screen Shot 2014-04-21 at 2.38.56 PM

My friend, Blender Girl (okay, her name is really Tess) just came out with a cookbook called The Blender Girl: Super-Easy, Super-Healthy Meals, Snacks, Desserts, and Drinks–100 Gluten-Free, Vegan Recipes.

I found a recipe for Orange Almond Sauce for Vietnamese Spring Rolls. Big massive hit all around. It’s creamy, light and made with almond butter and fresh citrus juices for something a little different.

If you vow to cook a little healthier this summer – take a look at Tess’ book with 100 recipes that are good for you. The blender does all the hard work! The book features smoothies you’d expect from a blender book – as well as sauces, soups, marinades, dressings and desserts.

The book is currently #3 cookbook on Amazon!

spring rolls with orange almond sauce recipe-1658

 

Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Orange Almond Sauce Recipe Video

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Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Orange Almond Sauce Recipe

Servings: Makes 16 rolls Prep Time: 15 minutes Cook Time: 15 minutes
spring rolls with orange almond sauce recipe-1654

You can make these rolls up to a day ahead. Here's what you need to remember: Place the rolls on a clean, dry plate in a single layer. If you want to stack multiple layers, place a sheet of plastic wrap between each layer. This prevents the rolls from sticking to each other. When all rolls are done, make sure you cover everything with plastic wrap - this prevents the rice paper from drying out in the refrigerator.

If you can't find almond butter - you can use any type of nut butter.

OPTIONAL: Soak the matchstick carrots and julienned cucumbers in 3 tablespoons of seasoned rice vinegar. It will add the amazing "zing" that you'll love!

Recipe adapted from The Blender Girl by Tess Masters

Ingredients:

FOR THE SPRING ROLLS
6 ounces dried rice vermicelli noodles
16 large dried rice paper wrappers
8 large lettuce leaves, preferably soft ones, halved and hard ribs removed
1 cup, matchstick cut carrots
2 cucumbers, julienned
1-2 avocado, pitted, peeled and sliced
1-2 bell pepper, cored, julienned
1 cup loosely packed cilantro
1 cup loosely packed mint
1 cup loosely packed basil




FOR THE ORANGE ALMOND SAUCE
1/4 cup water, plus more as needed
2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lime juice
3 tablespoons freshly squeezed orange juice
1/2 cup raw almond butter
1/2 teaspoon minced ginger
1 teaspoon honey or coconut nectar
1/2 teaspoon finely chopped garlic
1/2 teaspoon wheat-free tamari or soy sauce
1 teaspoon roasted sesame seeds

Directions:

Soak the noodles in hot water for about 20 minutes, until soft. Drain.

To assemble the rolls, fill a shallow dish half full with hot water (hot to the touch but not boiling. and submerge one rice paper wrapper for 5 seconds, let excess water drop off.  Place wrapper on a clean, dry surface and fold in half to form a half-circle. The wrapper should still be a bit stiff, but will soften by the time you've finished filling with vegetables.

Place a lettuce leaf in the middle of the half-circle and top it with a forkful of noodles, and then add a bit of each of the vegetables and herbs.  Carefully roll up the Vietnamese Spring Roll and set it on a dish, seam-side down in single layer. Repeat with the remaining wrappers and filling. If not serving immediately, chill in the fridge, covered with plastic wrap. 

To make the dipping sauce, throw all of the ingredients into your blender and puree on high for about 1 minute, until well combined. You may want to add an additional tablespoon or two of water to thin out the sauce. Stir in sesame seeds. Serve alongside the rolls.

 

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Pressure Cooker White Bean Chili Frito Pie http://steamykitchen.com/25426-white-bean-chili-frito-pie-pressure-cooker.html http://steamykitchen.com/25426-white-bean-chili-frito-pie-pressure-cooker.html#comments Fri, 25 Jan 2013 15:49:36 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=25426 Prior to 6 months ago, my motto for beans was, “love to eat ’em, hate to cook ’em!” Cooking beans the regular old way requires forethought the night before to soak the beans. But the problem with that is that usually, the night before, I’m too full from dinner to even think about what I’d possibly want to eat the ...

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White Bean Frito Pie Recipe

Prior to 6 months ago, my motto for beans was, “love to eat ’em, hate to cook ’em!” Cooking beans the regular old way requires forethought the night before to soak the beans. But the problem with that is that usually, the night before, I’m too full from dinner to even think about what I’d possibly want to eat the next day. It requires extreme planning and organization – which I just do not have.

White Bean Frito Pie Recipe

Then I learned that you can cook beans in a pressure cooker WITHOUT pre-soaking the beans the night before..

ezbeancookerThere’s a gadget that I want to introduce to you – not only is it genius, but the people behind the company are awesome. They wanted to pay me to create a recipe using the EZ Bean Cooker, but instead of paying me, I suggested that they donate $2,000 to my local Boys and Girls Club that Scott and I have adopted.

What a great trade! I get to enjoy beans, cooked in 60 minutes or less WITHOUT SOAKING and the DeSoto branch Boys & Girls Club made their fundraising goal. They happened to be short in fundraising and this made up the difference.

And the best part of this for you is that I’m giving another one of these EZ Bean Cookers away. Check out this giveaway post to enter!

Enjoy the recipe!

White Bean Chili Frito Pie Recipe Video

 

 

 

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Pressure Cooker White Bean Chili Frito Pie Recipe

Servings: 8-10 Prep Time: 5 minutes Cook Time: 50 minutes
White Bean Frito Pie Recipe

Directions are for either a regular pressure cooker or an EZ Bean Cooker.

Ingredients:

2 cups of cooked ham, cubed
1 red pepper, chopped
2 medium tomatoes, chopped
1 cup frozen corn kernels
1 onion, chopped
1 pound dry white beans, rinsed & drained (Great Northern Beans)
2 cans diced tomatoes with green chiles (look for Rotel brand)
1 envelope taco seasoning
2 cups water

Directions:

Sort beans by removing and discarding any foreign material or shriveled/discolored beans. Rinse beans with cold water. Add the sorted and rinsed beans to the inner cooking pot of the pressure cooker. Add the water and additional ingredients.

FOR EZ BEAN COOKER: Replace the lid on the EZ Bean Cooker and turn clockwise to lock the lid in place. Make sure that the pressure release valve is in the closed vent position. Select the "Great Northern Beans" button on the cooker, then push "Start". Once the cook cycle is complete, use caution to manually release the pressure.

FOR PRESSURE COOKER: Follow the directions included with your pressure cooker. Cook under pressure for 50 minutes.


 

 

 

 

 

 

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Thai Seafood Curry Recipe http://steamykitchen.com/23625-thai-seafood-curry-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/23625-thai-seafood-curry-recipe.html#comments Tue, 23 Oct 2012 15:35:00 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=23625 This is one of my go-to dishes when I’ve run out of time, have barely any fresh ingredients in the house and in need of a spicy fix. Thai curry only takes 15 minutes to make, from start to finish, including the rice if you use my microwave method. The recipe is crazy flexible – use whatever seafood you’d like ...

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Thai Seafood Curry Recipe

This is one of my go-to dishes when I’ve run out of time, have barely any fresh ingredients in the house and in need of a spicy fix. Thai curry only takes 15 minutes to make, from start to finish, including the rice if you use my microwave method.

Thai Seafood Curry Recipe

The recipe is crazy flexible – use whatever seafood you’d like – I happen to have a bag of frozen bay scallops in the freezer and a couple of bell peppers. The Thai curry paste and coconut milk both are from a can, the rice from the pantry.

Thai Seafood Curry Recipe

Oh yes, the rice! It’s actually a blend of quinoa and jasmine rice. All you need to do is stir in a couple of spoonfuls of quinoa grains to the raw rice and cook them together.

Thai Seafood Curry Recipe

The boys LOVE rice, but aren’t big fans of quinoa – but it’s so healthy for them that I mix it in (sorry, boys!)

Thai Seafood Curry Recipe

The Thai basil is from my garden, but you can use regular fresh basil that you can find at the market. Or leave it out if you don’t want it!

Thai Seafood Curry Recipe Video

I’ve been busy creating videos for each recipe – it doubles the work required in creating recipes, but I think the video is worth it. Generally, from start to finish, a recipe now takes me and my team 15 hours.

If you’re curious, I’ll have to detail out what we do step by step in recipe development and publishing soon!

Thai Seafood Curry Recipe

How to cook Thai Seafood Curry video

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Thai Seafood Curry Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 5 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes
thai-seafood-curry-recipe-featured-9615.jpg

This Thai Seafood Curry Recipe only takes 15 minutes to cook. You can cook the rice in the microwave (see link in the recipe below) while you cook the curry on the stovetop.

Ingredients:

1 1/2 cups rice
1 teaspoon cooking oil
4 ounce can of Thai curry paste
14 ounce can of coconut milk
1 tablespoon fish sauce
2 bell peppers, thinly sliced
1 pound seafood: bay scallops, shrimp, fish, etc.
sprig of fresh basil, leaves torn

Directions:

1. Cook the rice according to package instructions. Here are my instructions for how to cook rice in the microwave.

2. In a wok or saute pan, heat up the cooking oil over medium-low heat. When shimmering, carefully add in about half of the curry paste and stir for 15 seconds to release its flavors. Whisk in just 1/4 cup of the coconut milk until the curry paste is fully mixed in. Pour in the remaining coconut milk, turn the heat to medium-high and bring to a simmer.

3. Whisk in the fish sauce and taste. If you'd like it more spicy, add in more curry paste. If the curry needs more flavor (not necessarily spice), add in additional fish sauce.

4. Add in the bell peppers and the the scallops. Simmer for 4 minutes or until the scallops are just cooked through. Turn off the heat. Stir in the fresh basil. Serve over rice.

i

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Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork http://steamykitchen.com/23642-vietnamese-spring-rolls-slow-cooker-pork-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/23642-vietnamese-spring-rolls-slow-cooker-pork-recipe.html#comments Wed, 10 Oct 2012 19:41:35 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=23642 (Video) Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Orange Coriander Pork. Simple slow cooker recipe! Watch step by step video on how to roll Vietnamese Spring Rolls.

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Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork Recipe

I’ve been waiting MONTHS to share this video with you! We shot a series of cooking videos in Seattle back in June, when I was in town speaking at the BlogHer Food conference and tickling oysters.  The videos were produced by the National Pork Board and Costco, featuring pork and a few of my blogger friends – Sandy & Paul (Reluctant Entertainer), Diana (Eating Richly), Jenny (Picky Palate), Jessica (The Novice Chef), Lauren (Lauren’s Latest), Amanda (Kevin & Amanda).

I wanted to create a magical day for the gals, so we arranged to have a B-I-G stretch limo pick up all of us.

The limo was complete with sparkling disco lights, rockin’ music, lava lamps (all we were missing was a stripper pole in the middle).

Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork Recipe

Prior to shooting the video, each of us went through hair, makeup, food styling and video talent coaching. Some of the gals had never been on camera before, so it was important to get some tips and guidance from an industry pro.

Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork Recipe

So um, what does a video coach teach you? Well, uh….

Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork Recipe

You don’t realize how much you use these filler words until you tape yourself. I tend to use these fillers when I’m transitioning between finishing one sentence and not knowing what my next sentence would be quite yet.

Coach’s advice to me?

Now.

Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork Recipe

Honestly, I don’t remember what he said. Something about NOW.

Next up, hair and makeup. This is what it takes to make me “camera-ready.”

Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork Recipe

HOLD STILL, JADEN! | That’s the lovely Diana, who’s expecting a BOY!

Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork RecipeVietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork Recipe

Since we were shooting 5 different recipes with multiple bloggers, we also had a couple of food stylists help us cook, prep and pretty up the food. Each dish had to be planned out, including colors of napkins, the type of platter and what ingredient goes where.

Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork Recipe

And…..ACTION! (look closely! It’s an iPad!)

Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork Recipe

The cameras and lights can be a little intimidating if you’re not used to them. There were 3 cameramen, a sound guy, a lighting guy, a producer, food stylists, PR reps, the Pork team and then all of us.

Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork Recipe

In between takes, hair and makeup sneak in to touch up.

Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork Recipe

Put 8 food bloggers in a room, turn on a video camera, and you’re sure to get some bloopers! See end of post for the blooper reel!

Big thanks to Pork Board and to Costco for producing these videos! My dish that I made with pork was Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork. I used Sirloin Tip Roast – a very lean and flavorful cut perfect for roasting and slow cooking. It feeds a big crowd on a small budget! Enjoy the recipe!

Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork Recipe

How to roll Vietnamese Spring Rolls

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Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork Recipe

Servings: 8 to 10 Prep Time: 10 minutes for the pork + 25 minutes for assembly Cook Time: 3 3/4 hours
Vietnamese-Spring-Roll-Pork-Recipe-feature-16

Please watch the video for detailed wrapping instructions. For the dipping sauce, purchase Sweet Chili Sauce, usually found in regular supermarkets, in the Asian section. It's sold in glass bottles and is bright orange/red in color. The Sweet Chili Sauce is sweet, and not too spicy. Alternatively, you could use other sweet sauces like "Duck Sauce" or "Sweet Plum Sauce".

If you don't have a slow cooker - roast the pork in the oven, 275F for 4 hours.

Ingredients:

FOR THE ORANGE CORIANDER PORK
2 pound boneless pork sirloin tip roast
1 teaspoon ground coriander
3/4 teaspoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 onion, cut into thick slices
1 orange, cut into 1/4-inch-thick rounds (do not peel)
1 cup orange juice
1 cup canned chicken broth
2 tablespoons fish sauce or soy sauce
2 teaspoons finely chopped fresh ginger
6 garlic cloves, smashed under a knife & peeled

FOR THE ROLL ASSEMBLY
one 8-oz. package (8-inch-diameter) rice spring roll wrappers (22 wrappers)
2 cups matchstick cut carrots
1 cucumber, cut into matchstick (English or Japanese cucumber preferred)
1 medium red bell pepper, cut into matchsticks
2 cups packed baby spinach leaves
sprigs of fresh mint and basil leaves
1 cup prepared Sweet Chili Sauce

Directions:

FOR THE SLOW COOKER PORK
Season pork roast with coriander, salt and pepper. To the slow cooker, add orange juice, broth, fish sauce, garlic and ginger. Scatter half the onion and orange in the slow cooker, top with pork, then add remaining onion and orange on top of the pork. Cover and cook on low until an instant-read thermometer inserted in the center of the pork registers 160F, about 3-4 hours. Transfer the pork to a carving board. Rest for at least 15 minutes.

FOR THE ASSEMBLY:
Slice pork across the grain into very thin slices. Divide into 22 portions. Half-fill a wide bowl with warm water. For each roll, dip 1 wrapper for 5 seconds. Shake
off the excess water from the wrapper and place on clean and dry surface. The rice paper will still be a little stiff, but don't worry, it will soften up. Fold the rice paper in half to make half-moon shape. Place 1 portion of pork at the bottom of the wrapper and top with carrot, cucumber, bell pepper, spinach leaves and herbs. Roll up the wrapper tightly. Place roll on a platter and cover with a barely damp towel to keep moist. The rolls can be made and refrigerated up to 2 hours ahead. Serve chilled with the Sweet Chili Sauce for dipping.

Our Blooper Reel!

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Salt Cod (Bacalao) with Potatoes over Rice http://steamykitchen.com/20173-bacalao-salt-cod-with-potatoes-rice-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/20173-bacalao-salt-cod-with-potatoes-rice-recipe.html#comments Tue, 17 Jan 2012 15:43:57 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=20173 Bacalao, pronounced [bah-kah-LAH-oh] is Portuguese dried, salted cod fish. Before refrigeration, fish was dried and preserved in salt to keep in the cellar. There are hundreds of variations of bacalao recipes, but my favorite has always been Bacalao con Patatas (bacalao with potatoes) – however I don’t make it much at home because traditional recipes require too many steps and forethought for ...

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Bacalao, pronounced [bah-kah-LAH-oh] is Portuguese dried, salted cod fish. Before refrigeration, fish was dried and preserved in salt to keep in the cellar. There are hundreds of variations of bacalao recipes, but my favorite has always been Bacalao con Patatas (bacalao with potatoes) – however I don’t make it much at home because traditional recipes require too many steps and forethought for my bad habits (impatience and spontaneity).

After spying a bag of bacalao at my local market, I decided to create a recipe that that would cut out a major tedious step. Unfortunately, I couldn’t nix the “forethought” part – as bacalao needs to be soaked overnight in water to get rid of some of its salt. It’s a step that can’t be skipped (boo) and there really isn’t a good shortcut.

The “major tedious step” I’m talking about is boiling the potatoes first before adding it to the dish. Okay, so I’m being dramatic, but bringing a large pot of water to boil (and of course, staring at the darn thing waiting for the first bubbles) and then cooking the potatoes until tender is crazy boring and requires another pot on the stove.

Instead, dice the potatoes into 1/2″ dice, briefly brown them in the saute pan along with the rest of the vegetables. Then add the bacalao, a cup of water, cover and let ’em all simmer quietly and harmoniously for 15 minutes, just enough time to cook the potatoes through.

Serve over pasta, rice, quinoa….or enjoy with a loaf of bread.

Salt Cod (Bacalao) with Potatoes over Rice

Step 1: soak the bacalao overnight in cool water. This is a step you cannot skip….the fish will be way to salty.

Salt Cod (Bacalao) with Potatoes over Rice

The fresh ingredients – bell pepper, garlic, onion, tomatoes, salt cod (bacalao), celery and potatoes. All the veg are diced small – quicker cooking!

First, brown the potatoes in the saute pan.

Then saute the aromatics – garlic, onion, bell pepper, celery.

and add the rest of the ingredients in:

Including the de-salted (and drained) bacalao.

Cover and simmer for 15 minutes.

Serve over rice, pasta, quinoa…or enjoy with a loaf of bread.

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Salt Cod (Bacalao) with Potatoes over Rice Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 15 minutes + overnight soaking Cook Time: 20 minutes
bacalao-potatoes-rice-recipe-6509.jpg

Ingredients:

1 tablespoon olive oil
1 large russet potato, peeled and cut into 1/2" dice
1 bell pepper, diced
1/2 onion, diced
1 stalk celery, diced
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 tomatoes, diced
1 tablespoon tomato paste
1 cup water
2 cups rice grains + water to cook
1 tablespoon chopped fresh parsley
1 pound salt cod (bacalao), soaked overnight (see note below)

Directions:

1. The night before, cover the bacalao with cool water and refrigerate.

2. Drain the bacalao, rinse with fresh water. Cut into 1" pieces.

3. Heat a large saute pan over medium-high heat with the olive oil. When hot, add the potatoes and cook until lightly browned on all sides, about 2 minutes. Add in the bell pepper, onion, celery and garlic and saute for 3-4 minutes. Add in the tomatoes, tomato paste, water and stir. Bring to a simmer and add in the bacalao. Cover and simmer for 15 minutes or until the potatoes are cooked through. Stir in the parsley.

4. In the meantime, cook the rice according to package instructions. Serve the stew over rice.

 

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Leftover Turkey Recipe: Turkey Gumbo http://steamykitchen.com/19344-turkey-gumbo-leftover-thanksgiving-turkey-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/19344-turkey-gumbo-leftover-thanksgiving-turkey-recipe.html#comments Wed, 16 Nov 2011 14:00:42 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=19344 Use your leftover Thanksgiving turkey to make this simple Turkey Gumbo Recipe!

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I know it’s a little early to think about Thanksgiving leftovers, but believe me, time goes by so crazy fast! Once the big meal is over, even after the late-night refrigerator raid (you sneak in and pick at the turkey in the refrigerator too, right?!), we’ll always have more than enough leftover turkey for Turkey Gumbo.

Since Thanksgiving is such a big, heavy dinner, I created this recipe with restraint in mind.  It’s a lighter, milder version of gumbo than what you may be used to, a little more broth-y and no mouth-burning cayenne pepper or hot sauce, since the little kids will be enjoying this too (but feel free to douse your version with as much hot chili pepper as you like!)

While the ingredient list may look long, it is ingredients that you’ll probably have on hand anyways from cooking Thanksgiving meal. Leftover turkey meat is stirred into the gumbo at the end, just to heat through. The slow-simmered, richly flavored Turkey Gumbo served over steaming hot rice may just break the monotony of leftover turkey sandwiches this year for you too.

Making the Roux for Turkey Gumbo

Roux is cooking fat+flour over low heat to create a nutty thickener used in much of Southern cooking. It’s a simple, essential step for the gumbo, but takes a little patience as you have to cook the roux over low heat and stir frequently.

Traditional recipes call for 1:1 ratio of fat to flour, but I’ve found that I could use less fat and still achieve the same results, though I think Paula Deen would heartily disagree with me.

I like using butter as my fat, it’s the the most flavor — uh — unless you want to use bacon drippings (yay!) or even lard (double-yay!).

4 tablespoons of butter + 6 tablespoons all purpose flour. For gluten-free version, many have recommended using potato starch or rice flour.

Use a heavy-bottomed pot for best results. Thin pots = more likihood for burned roux. Once the butter starts bubblin’ a bit, sprinkle in the flour and stir.

Stir until the flour is totally incorporated. I use a silicone rubber spatula – here’s why: I’m not patient enough to stand over the stove constantly stirring nonstop. So I leave the silicone spatula in the pot – it doesn’t burn nor does it get hot. Every 30-40 seconds or so, I’ll stir. In the meantime, I’m choppin’ vegetables on a cutting board right next to the stove.

After a nearly 10 minutes, it will look smooth and the color of peanut butter. This is where I stop. By this time not only am I bored to tears, but a lighter roux makes a lighter gumbo. Feel free to keep cookin’ the roux if you have nothing else to do!

I’ve got onions, celery, green pepper, smoked sausage and whatever bits and pieces of vegetable I have in the refrigerator, basically any unused vegetables (like carrots, red bell pepper) from cooking Thanksgiving dinner.

Everything gets s simmered with a can of tomatoes and chicken broth for an hour or so.

In goes the frozen (no need to defrost) or fresh okra

and at the end, stir in the cooked, leftover turkey

Serve over rice. Isn’t this Turkey Gumbo better than your 48th turkey sandwich!?? Serve over rice!

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Turkey Gumbo Recipe (with leftover Thanksgiving turkey)

Servings: 8 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 1 hour
Turkey Gumbo Recipe

Don't worry about the long ingredient list, most of the ingredients are things you'll have in your refrigerator anyways, from cooking Thanksgiving feast! For gluten-free Turkey Gumbo, use rice flour, corn flour or potato starch in place of the flour.

Ingredients:

4 tablespoons butter
6 tablespoons all-purpose flour
2 bell peppers, diced
2 stalks celery, diced
1 onion, diced
5 cloves garlic, minced
2 bay leaves
1/2 teaspoon each: dried oregano, dried thyme
One 14-ounce can diced tomatoes
1 pound kielbasa, smoked or polish sausage, cut into bite-sized pieces
1 quart chicken or vegetable broth
8 cups water
2-3 cups frozen or fresh okra
2 cups cooked, shredded leftover turkey
salt and pepper to taste
small handful fresh parsley, chopped
cooked rice

Directions:

Heat a large stockpot with the butter over medium heat. When the butter begins to bubble a bit, use a whisk or wooden spoon to add in the flour, a little at a time. Continue stirring for a 2 minutes, until the flour is fully incorporated into the butter. Turn the heat to low and cook for 10 minutes, stirring every 30 seconds or so, until the roux has turned into the color of peanut butter. Make sure that the roux does not burn - stay close by!

Return heat to medium and add in the bell peppers, celery and onion and cook for 5 minutes. Add in the garlic and cook another minute or so until fragrant. Add in the bay leaves, oregano, thyme, tomatoes, smoked sausage, broth and water. Bring to a boil and let simmer for 1 hour.

Add in the okra, cook 2 minutes, then add in the cooked turkey. Taste and season with salt and pepper. Stir in chopped parsley. Serve over cooked rice.

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Black Pepper Steak http://steamykitchen.com/18298-black-pepper-steak.html http://steamykitchen.com/18298-black-pepper-steak.html#comments Wed, 14 Sep 2011 14:32:34 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=18298 One of my very first blogging friends is Bee from Rasa Malaysia. In the early days of the blog, we used to chat on the phone after my kids went to bed about the technical side of blogging — silly acronyms like SEO, PHP, CSS and HTML. Back then (I say “back then” like it was decades ago, but in reality ...

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One of my very first blogging friends is Bee from Rasa Malaysia. In the early days of the blog, we used to chat on the phone after my kids went to bed about the technical side of blogging — silly acronyms like SEO, PHP, CSS and HTML. Back then (I say “back then” like it was decades ago, but in reality it was just 4 1/2 years ago!) there weren’t a ton of plug-ins and support forums weren’t available for food bloggers. Wow, have we come a long way! 

She asked me to write the Foreword for her brand new book, Easy Chinese Recipes, it’s a beautiful book with simple recipes that you’d find at your favorite Chinese restaurant, like Shrimp Fried Rice, Kung Pao Chicken and Homestyle Chow Mein Noodles. I hope you enjoy this recipe for Black Pepper Steak from her book. ~Jaden

***

Hi all, I am Bee of Rasa Malaysia, a food blog about easy Asian recipes. I am extremely thrilled to be on Steamy Kitchen today, sharing a recipe from my cookbook “Easy Chinese Recipes.” Jaden and I met some four years ago through our blogs; we also share the same publisher, Tuttle Publishing. I wanted to take this special opportunity to thank Jaden for writing the Foreword of the book and hervaluable advice when I was working on the project. Truth be told, I wouldn’t have done it if she didn’t tell me to “do it” when I got the offer!

Easy Chinese Recipes is a compilation of 80+ popular Chinese recipes: all-time favorites, Chinese takeout dishes, dim sum, dumplings, and more. Some recipes reflect my many travels in China and Hong Kong. Others are my interpretation of classic Chinese recipes, perfected through years of preparing them at home.

Black Pepper Beef is one of my favorite recipes in the cookbook as I love the combination of bell pepper and black pepper in Chinese stir-fries. These two ingredients, coupled with the right cut of beef—I like beef tenderloin, flank steak or flap meat—will often guarantee a successful dish. If you love the sweetness and slightly charred taste of caramelized onions, stir-fry the onions and bell peppers slightly longer before adding  the beef to the stir-fry. You will be rewarded with a richer flavored Black Pepper Beef. Enjoy! ~ Bee

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Black Pepper Steak Recipe

Servings: Serves 2 as a main dish with rice or 4 as part of a multicourse meal Prep Time: 15 minutes Cook Time:
Black Pepper Steak Recipe

If you are using Flank Steak - make sure you cut ACROSS the grain, otherwise the steak will be chewy and tough.

Ingredients:

8 oz (250 g) beef tenderloin, flank steak or flap meat, thinly sliced
2 1/2 tablespoons cooking oil
1 clove garlic, minced
1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger
1/2 small green bell pepper, deseeded and cut into pieces
1/2 small red bell pepper, deseeded and cut into pieces
1/2 onion, sliced
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
Salt, to tasteFor the Marinade
1 teaspoons soy sauce
1 tablespoon oyster sauce
1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
1 teaspoon Chinese rice wine or sherry
1/2 teaspoon cornstarch
1/2 teaspoon sesame oil
1/2 teaspoon sugar

Directions:

1. Marinate the beef with all the Marinade ingredients, about 15
minutes.
2. Heat 1 tablespoon of the oil in a wok or skillet over high heat.
Stir-fry the beef until the beef is browned on the outside but still pink
inside. Dish out and set aside.
3. Heat the remaining oil in a wok or skillet over high heat. Stir-fry
the garlic and the ginger until aromatic, and then add the green bell
pepper, red bell pepper, onion, and black pepper. Stir-fry until you smell
the aroma from the ingredients in the wok.
4. Transfer the beef back into the wok or skillet. Stir-fry until the
beef is cooked through and the center of the meat is no longer pink, about
1-2 minutes. Dish out and serve immediately with steamed rice.

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Asian Steak Kabobs http://steamykitchen.com/16839-asian-steak-kabobs-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/16839-asian-steak-kabobs-recipe.html#comments Fri, 15 Jul 2011 14:55:53 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=16839 We’ve been kabob happy lately, and it’s all because of this man: click on photos to see where we were! and this man: My kids want to be Adam when they grow up. These two men wrote this book: Get this book! I know you’ll love it! Chicken and Waffles on a Stick? hells yeah! You can see more photos ...

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We’ve been kabob happy lately, and it’s all because of this man:


click on photos to see where we were!

and this man:


My kids want to be Adam when they grow up.

These two men wrote this book:

Get this book! I know you’ll love it! Chicken and Waffles on a Stick? hells yeah! You can see more photos from the book on Matt’s site.

How to make Asian Steak Kabobs

Okay, back to the kabobobobobobs….(I love sayin’ that)

Here’s what I chose for the kabobs:

 

The beef

For steak kabobs, I always choose sirloin: it’s cheaper, perfectly shaped for cutting into kabob chunks (with virtually no waste at all) and it’s got an intense beefy flavor.  These black angus sirloin steaks are from  my client, Sweetbay Supermarket (by the way, I’m giving away $250 gift certificate to Sweetbay).

There’s very little work to be done with the sirloin, except to trim away the outer fat if you’d like.

Then cut into 1½” cubes, oh about this size.

The vegetables

To make the perfect kabobs, it’s not just about the right mix of vegetables (the type of vegetables are totally up to you and what your friends and family prefer) but also how you cut the vegetables.

Ideally, the steak and the vegetables cook in harmony, coming to the right temperature and level of doneness at the same time. You wouldn’t want charred vegetables and undercooked meat, nor would you want perfectly grilled steak but undercooked vegetables.

I’ll go through each type of vegetable for you:

Zucchini or yellow squash should but cut into ¾” thick rounds. If the squash is small, just leave them as rounds. If they’re big ‘n fat, like mine, I cut them into half-moons. You want to make sure that the squash isn’t cut any thinner than ¾” thick – it’s a soft, delicate vegetable that breaks easily when skewered.

For bell peppers, I get every single color – red, green, orange and yellow. Slice the pepper in half first.

Then use your fingers (or a paring knife) to remove the seedy section.

Slice each half into 4 strips (3 if your pepper is small)

Then cut each strip into 3 squares.

For mushrooms, I prefer the meaty portobello. The problem you might run into with mushrooms is that they’re incredibly soft and tear easily when trying to skewer them.

Large portobellos cut thick work great. Slice into 1-inch thick slices, then halve each slice.

For onions, we enjoy both red onions and sweet Vidalia onions. Cut in half, peel away the skin and cut off the stem.

Cut each half into thirds (or half if using small onions)

Then cut each piece in half again.

Cherry tomatoes are left whole. The next step is to marinate. Put all vegetables EXCEPT the mushrooms into a big bowl. We’ll add the mushrooms in later.

I like having the steak and vegetables marinate separately, and in different sauces. For this recipe, I’ve got an Asian flair to the kabobs. To make it easy, I use store-bought salad dressing or marinades.

 The marinade

You can make your own marinade – it’s easy enough (2 tsp freshly grated ginger + 2 garlic cloves, finely minced + 1 teaspoon sesame oil + 2 tablespoons soy sauce)

Or you can cheat and use store-bought dressing:

By the way, San-J has a whole entire line of Asian style gluten-free marinades and dressings – love their stuff. The Makoto Ginger Dressing is found in the refrigerated produce section – you’ll love it, it’s one of my favorites.

What I like: marinate the sirloin steak in one type of dressing and the vegetables in a different type – that way I get a big hit of flavor, different in each bite. 

I place all the sirloin into a large bowl, season with salt, pepper and the ginger dressing. Cover and refrigerate.

For the vegetables, I chose the San-J Orange Sauce. Just season with salt, pepper and toss with the dressing.

Once you’ve tossed the vegetables, add the mushrooms on top and just leave them there.

The mushrooms are too delicate to toss and you want to keep the mushrooms relatively dry to stay meaty. Wet mushrooms get soggy, shrink down and are hard to skewer.

Cover and refrigerate if you’re marinating overnight. If you’re only marinating for a few hours, it’s fine to let the bowl sit on your counter. If you’re like me, refrigerator space is limited!

When you’re ready to cook, skewer the meat and vegetables together. Preheat your grill – one side high heat, the other side on low heat. Start the kabobs on high heat, searing both sides and move them to the lower heat to finish off.

You’ll see that the vegetables and the meat cook evenly together when you take the time to cut your vegetables nicely!

Who’s comin’ for dinner?

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Asian Steak Kabobs

Servings: Serves 6 Prep Time: 2 hours Cook Time: 12 minutes
asian steak kabobs recipe-22

Ingredients:

3 pounds Sweetbay Black Angus Sirloin
3 bell peppers
1 red onion
1 sweet Vidalia onion
1 pint cherry tomatoes
2 zucchini
2 portobello mushrooms
salt and pepper
1 cup Asian dressing or marinade of your choice (you can use two different types, ½ cup each)
bamboo skewers

Directions:

1. Cut the sirloin into 1½” cubes. Place in large bowl, season with salt and pepper. Pour in ½ cup of dressing or marinade of your choice. Cover and refrigerate a couple of hours or up to overnight.
2. Slice the vegetables as shown in the photos. Add all vegetables except for the mushrooms into a large bowl. Season with salt and pepper. Pour in ½ cup of dressing or marinade of your choice. Toss well. Add the mushrooms on top, but do not toss. Cover and refrigerate if marinating overnight. Otherwise, cover and set on counter until ready to cook.
3. While the ingredients are marinating, soak the bamboo skewers in water. When ready to skewer, alternate the steak with the vegetables on the stick.
4. Preheat your grill, high heat on one side and low heat on the other side. Grill the skewers on high heat, covered for 5 minutes. Then flip the kabobs, cover and grill another 5 minutes. Move the kabobs to the low heat, covered, to finish cooking, about another 2 minutes or so, depending on your desired level of doneness.

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Tomato and Watermelon Salad http://steamykitchen.com/16505-tomato-and-watermelon-salad.html http://steamykitchen.com/16505-tomato-and-watermelon-salad.html#comments Thu, 23 Jun 2011 00:09:39 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=16505 Jaden is knee deep in paint, tiles and packing boxes today, so she asked us to step in and tell you guys about this amazing tomato and watermelon salad. Today, we are introducing Zov Karamardian from the internationally acclaimed restaurant Zov’s. Jaden had the chance to meet Zov at IACP a couple of weeks ago and we could not be ...

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Jaden is knee deep in paint, tiles and packing boxes today, so she asked us to step in and tell you guys about this amazing tomato and watermelon salad. Today, we are introducing Zov Karamardian from the internationally acclaimed restaurant Zov’s. Jaden had the chance to meet Zov at IACP a couple of weeks ago and we could not be happier to share her recipe for this incredible salad. {Isn’t it just beautiful and the perfect side for your next BBQ?} The recipe comes straight from her newest cookbook, Simply Zov, Rustic Classics with a Mediterranean Twist.

Founded in 1987 by Chef Zov Karamardian, Zov’s Bistro & Bakery in Tustin, CA has become a culinary institution. Her cuisine blends contemporary with Eastern Mediterranean, a blend that is clear when flipping through her new cookbook, Simply Zov. Her approach is fresh and comes across easy, in a way that makes us feel we create her dishes just as she would in her restaurants. A few Adam and I have earmarked are her Parmesan Bruschetta, Tomato-Basil Risotto Fritters and of course that cover shot, a Greek Burger with Baby Arugula and Feta.

– Adam and Joanne

Photo and recipe from the Simply Zov: Rustic Classics with a Mediterranean Twist Cookbook

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Tomato and Watermelon Salad with Feta Cheese

Servings: serves 6 as a side Prep Time: 15 Cook Time:
Tomato-Watermelon-Salad

You will be surprised at how well watermelon and feta work together. Salty, sweet and refreshing, every bite bursts with flavor. This salad is truly a keeper, and an inventive way to make the most of summer produce. I love using heirloom tomatoes when I can find them. Serve with grilled fish or grilled steak.

Recipe from Simply Zov, Rustic Classics with a Mediterranean Twist by Zov Karamardian

Ingredients:

Red Wine Vinaigrette
1/4 cup red wine vinegar
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oilSalad
1 small cucumber, peeled
1/2 small red onion
3 heirloom tomatoes (about 12 ounces total), cut into bite-size chunks
3 1/2 cups peeled seeded bite-size watermelon chunks
1 red bell pepper, cut into bite-size chunks
7 ounces French feta cheese, cut into 1/2-inch cubes (see note)
1 cup fresh mint leaves, thinly sliced

Directions:

MAKE THE VINAIGRETTE: Whisk the vinegar, salt and pepper in a medium bowl to blend. Gradually whisk in the oil to blend well. Set aside.

MAKE THE SALAD: Cut the cucumber in half lengthwise, then, using a spoon, scrape out the seeds. Cut the cucumber halves crosswise into thin half-moon slices. Using a mandoline, cut the onion into 1-inch-long paper-thin slices. Toss the sliced cucumber, onion, tomatoes, watermelon, bell pepper, cheese and mint in a large bowl with enough vinaigrette to coat. Serve immediately.

Do-Ahead Tip: The vinaigrette can be made up to 1 week ahead. Store it in a tightly-sealed jar and refrigerate. Let the vinaigrette stand at room temperature until the olive oil liquefies, about 20 minutes, before shaking to blend.

Cooks Note: Feta is traditionally a Greek sheep’s milk cheese, but I prefer the French variety for its mid and creamy taste. Always store tomatoes at room temperature; place them in a decorative basket in your kitchen. Refrigeration can make them pulpy and dull their flavor. Do not cut or slice the tomatoes too far ahead of time or they will oxidize and turn acidic.

More Refreshing Salad Recipes

Summer Tomato Salad by David Lebovitz

Watermelon Salad with Feta or Cotija by Simply Recipes

Young Coconut Salad Recipe by Herbivoracious

Watermelon Salad with Feta, Mint and Lime by Whipped

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