Steamy Kitchen Recipes | RSS Feed http://steamykitchen.com Steamy Kitchen Food Blog: fast recipes, simple recipes, with fresh ingredients to create delicious meals. Fri, 26 Jun 2015 12:53:12 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.2 Split Pea and Ham Soup http://steamykitchen.com/21252-split-pea-and-ham-soup.html http://steamykitchen.com/21252-split-pea-and-ham-soup.html#comments Tue, 10 Apr 2012 15:27:26 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=21252 Usually sometime during the holiday, we’ll bake an entire bone-in ham. Split pea and ham soup is so surprisingly easy, especially in a pressure cooker. It takes about 3 minutes of chopping, 4 minutes of pressure cooking time and then 20 minutes to just let it sit. My friend, Wendy taught me her version, which actually comes from the back ...

The post Split Pea and Ham Soup appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>

Usually sometime during the holiday, we’ll bake an entire bone-in ham.

Split pea and ham soup is so surprisingly easy, especially in a pressure cooker. It takes about 3 minutes of chopping, 4 minutes of pressure cooking time and then 20 minutes to just let it sit. My friend, Wendy taught me her version, which actually comes from the back of the package of split peas!

No soaking necessary (which makes the recipe even simpler!)

Yum
Print

Split Pea and Ham Soup Recipe

Servings: serves 4 Prep Time: 5 mins Cook Time: 25 mins
pressure-cooker-split-pea-ham-soup-recipe-5649

Split pea and ham soup is so surprisingly easy. It takes about 3 minutes of chopping, 4 minutes of pressure cooking time and then 20 minutes to just let it sit.

Ingredients:

1 pound split peas
3 cups diced ham
bone from ham or smoked ham hock (optional)
3 carrots, diced
3 stalks celery, diced
1/2 onion, diced
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 bay leaf
3 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley (or 1 teaspoon dried parsley)
2 teaspoons kosher salt (or 1 teaspoon table salt)
freshly ground black pepper
1 1/2 quarts water

Directions:

Rinse peas and drain. Pick out anything that's "not-pea" :-)

Place all ingredients into pressure cooker, set on high for 4 minutes. When cooking is done, leave the pressure cooker to sit for an additional 15-20 minutes to let pressure and steam escape.

The post Split Pea and Ham Soup appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/21252-split-pea-and-ham-soup.html/feed 14
Chili and Basil Scallops http://steamykitchen.com/19262-chili-and-basil-scallops-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/19262-chili-and-basil-scallops-recipe.html#comments Wed, 09 Nov 2011 17:50:03 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=19262 A recipe for Chili and Basil Scallops by author of Mighty Spice Cookbook, John Gregory-Smith.

The post Chili and Basil Scallops appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>

A few months ago, I got an email from “John of Mighty Spice who lives in London” with a really nice message of, “hi, I’m a big fan, I love your blog, I wanna meet you.”

Well, not so blunt like that, it was way more eloquent, poetic and gentlemanly, as any proper Englishman would write. I replied, “Thanks John!” and a couple more generic, non-committal sentences – as um, anytime a handsome, young man emails me wishing to meet me in person, I sort of have an obligation to my husband to not accept random invitations from strangers.

John and I exchanged a few more emails, found out we have mutual friends – double checked back with the friends to make sure John was a-okay and for real (i.e. not stalker!) He checked out, so I finally said, “Okay, I’m speaking at Food Blogger Connect in London in a couple of months. Let’s meet there.”

We ended up actually having a chance to meet in person, over a quick Lebanese lunch and wow, did we have so much in common! We were both talking so fast and furious about food, cookbook, life, wine, travel and blogging that the lunch was over way too soon.

John had *just* come out with his very first cookbook, Mighty Spice and would be coming to America for a book tour. I invited him over to stay at our cottage and just hang out with the family. My boys *loved* Mr. John, and he became part of our family the moment he taught them how to speak with an English accent. :-)

While John was here, I helped him with some television and radio gigs, intro’d him to some amazing people, like Rebecca Brooks, Janis my literary agent and my peeps at Momentum. I know you’ll see more of John – don’t believe me? Watch this pilot!


Mighty Spice Cookbook, , by John Gregory-Smith is available on Amazon!

***

Chocolate and Chickens with Steamy Kitchen

I have just finished a crazy book tour of America. It was one of the most amazing experiences I have ever had and I can’t wait to return. My tour took me down to Florida, where for a few nights, I stayed at Steamy Kitchen HQ. I had met Jaden in London, where we chatted about all things delicious over a huge Lebanese feast. I arrived late on a Tuesday night and was greeted by, a then hobbling – due to a Taekwondo injury, Jaden, who had a glass of wine on hand to welcome her British guest! Scott had been on BBQ duty and we had an awesome dinner, with one amazing Kale and Cauliflower Salad. Jaden had arranged for me to make an appearance on Daytime TV, the following morning, and pointed out that I had come a bit underprepared – I had no equipment apart from my food, Doh! After a whip round the kitchen I was ready to rock and the show was a blast!

Jaden had started her epic vegetable garden, complete with real, live, flapping chickens. The guys took me for a closer look and it became very clear that I was useless at holding chickens! I live in central London and the only nature that comes my way is the occasional tree or what I find in the food market. Every time I was given one of the chickens to hold, they would sense my uselessness, flap off and carry on scratching away with their mates.

That night we had a delicious, alfresco Mexican dinner, complete with chicken, salsas, salads and yummy cheese. After dinner and a few beers my sweet tooth kicked in and I was in desperate need of some chocolate. Well, once again, staying with a high profile food blogger paid off. I was presented with a sack load of chocolate to eat – by the way, I ate all but a few squares, which I left in the little fridge, sorry!

The next day was a blur; up at 4am to catch a flight to Charlotte NC for a show, back to Tampa and 2 hour drive to Orlando to prepare for The Daily Buzz. It was so nice returning “home” to the Hair’s house, where we had a wonderful spaghetti and meatball dinner, with lots of lovely parmesan cheese! It was a delicious end to a wonderful few days.

Jaden, Scott, Nathan, Andrew and Coco thanks so much for having me, showing me the fish, turtles, chicken, for all the laughs and great food! Come over and see me soon in London!

In the meantime, enjoy this Chili and Basil Scallops recipe from my new book, Mighty Spice.

~John, Mighty Spice

Yum
Print

Chili and Basil Scallops

Servings: serves 4 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 5 minutes
Chilli Scallop Recipe

Recipe by Mighty Spice Cookbook author, John Gregory-Smith

For many years my brother Tom has been a loyal eating companion of
mine, a wingman, who loves his food and is also real fun to go out with.
Annoyingly he’s moved to Hong Kong with his lovely wife Rachel to live,
which makes dinner a bit more difficult to organize. Tom’s first choice
whenever we do get to go out is something with scallops, so these
beautiful, Asian-inspired scallops are here to keep him happy. Now all
he has to do is cook them for me.

Ingredients:

2 tablespoons vegetable oil
4 garlic cloves, finely chopped
2 red chilies, seeded and finely chopped
1 red onion, thinly sliced
1 pound 2 ounces scallops, with
or without roe attached
1 tablespoon light soy sauce
1 tablespoon fish sauce
1/4 teaspoon sugar
1/2 teaspoon coarsely ground black
pepper
2 large handfuls basil leaves, roughly
chopped

Directions:

1) Heat the oil in a large wok over high heat. When smoking hot, chuck in the garlic
and red chilies and stir-fry 30 seconds, or until fragrant. Add the onion and stir-fry
1 minute, then tip in the scallops and stir-fry 1 to 2 minutes longer, or until the
scallops start to turn golden at the edges.
2) Pour in the soy sauce and fish sauce and sprinkle in the sugar and black pepper. Mix
well and stir-fry 1 minute, or until the scallops are just cooked through and tender.
Throw in the basil leaves, mix well and serve immediately. You can use scallop shells
for presentation, if you like.

The post Chili and Basil Scallops appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/19262-chili-and-basil-scallops-recipe.html/feed 17
Pan Seared Trout with Pecan Browned Butter http://steamykitchen.com/18546-pan-seared-trout-recipe-pecan-browned-butter.html http://steamykitchen.com/18546-pan-seared-trout-recipe-pecan-browned-butter.html#comments Thu, 29 Sep 2011 14:13:05 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=18546 Meet my friend, Virginia Willis, former Kitchen Director for Martha Stewart Living Television, award-winning author of Bon Appetit, Y’all and this week celebrating the release of her brand new book, Basic to Brilliant, Y’all. I first met Virginia a couple of years ago at an IACP conference in Portland and I asked her to speak at a Food Blog Forum ...

The post Pan Seared Trout with Pecan Browned Butter appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>

Meet my friend, Virginia Willis, former Kitchen Director for Martha Stewart Living Television, award-winning author of Bon Appetit, Y’all and this week celebrating the release of her brand new book, Basic to Brilliant, Y’all.

I first met Virginia a couple of years ago at an IACP conference in Portland and I asked her to speak at a Food Blog Forum event we held last year in her hometown, Atlanta. The moment you meet Virginia, you know you’ve made a friend for life. She’s has that affect on people – you can’t help but be pulled in by her Southern charm and generous spirit.

Virginia’s Southern roots is complemented by her French culinary training. Her recipes are just that – good ol’ homey Southern recipes with a touch of French elegance. Her new book, Basic to Brilliant, Y’all is all about that special little somethin’ to turn a basic recipe to “Brilliant.”

Who else would tell you to top your jambalaya with Cracklin’ Powder? Just run to the store, grab a bag of fried pig skin (cracklin’s) and pulse them in your food processor. Sprinkle them on anything (I’ve done it to popcorn!!)

Today’s recipe, Pan-Seared Trout is from her book – and she turns this basic recipe to Brilliant with a simple Pecan Brown Butter that’s drizzled over the fish.

Virginia asked me to write a little blurb for the cover of the book – this is what I wrote for the inside flap:

“As a busy mom, I truly appreciate Virginia’s Brilliant tips that accompany every recipe; many of them take only a few minutes more to transform ordinary family favorites to extraordinary, company-worthy centerpieces. From these tips, I’ve learned so many clever techniques, short recipes and presentation ideas!”  ~Jaden Hair

Get a signed bookplate from Virginia Willis!

I hope you have a chance to browse through this book – and if you happen to want to purchase it, Virginia would love to give Steamy Kitchen readers a little something special – she’ll send you a personalized and signed bookplate. So, if you’re looking for a nice gift for yourself or a friend, purchase a copy of the book  and then fill out this online form by October 12, 2011 and Virginia will get the bookplate sent to you.

Give a shoutout to Virginia Willis on Facebook or Twitter and let her know what you think of her new book!

Yum
Print

Pan-Seared Trout with Pecan Brown Butter Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: Cook Time:
Pan Seared Georgia Trout Recipe

recipe from Basic to Brilliant, Y'all by Virginia Willis.

Make sure you read the Brilliant Short Recipe below to turn this Pan-Seared Georgia Trout into Brilliant!

Ingredients:

1/4 cup canola oil, plus more for the baking sheet
1 cup pecans, finely chopped
1 cup plain or whole-wheat fresh or panko (Japanese) breadcrumbs
1/4 cup chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
Coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper
4 (6- to 8-ounce) skin-on trout fillets
Lemon wedges, for garnishFOR THE PECAN BROWNED BUTTER
1/4 cup unsalted butter
1 lemon
1/4 cup chopped pecans
1/4 cup chopped flat leaf parsley
salt and pepper

Directions:

Preheat the oven to 200°F. Brush a rimmed baking sheet with canola oil and place in the oven to warm.
Combine the pecans, breadcrumbs, and parsley in a shallow bowl or pie plate. Season with salt and pepper. Press the flesh side of each fillet into the pecan mixture.
Heat 2 tablespoons of the oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Place 2 trout in the pan, crust side down, and cook until golden brown, 2 to 3 minutes. Turn and cook until fish is opaque in the center and just cooked through, 2 to 3 minutes. Transfer the trout to the prepared baking sheet, crust side up. Place the baking sheet in the oven. Repeat the process with the remaining 2 tablespoons of oil and the remaining 
2 trout fillets. Transfer to warmed serving plates and serve immediately, garnished with the lemon.

BRILLIANT SHORT RECIPE:
Pecan Brown Butter
Basic panfried trout is elevated to Brilliant when dressed with Pecan Brown Butter. Wipe the skillet clean with paper towels. Add 1/4 cup (1/2 stick) unsalted butter and melt over medium heat. Allow the butter to foam and turn medium brown, swirling the pan occasionally. Remove the pan from the heat, add the finely grated zest and juice of 1 lemon, 1/4 cup chopped pecans, and 1/4 cup fresh flat-leaf parsley; season with coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper. Place the trout, crust side up, on warmed serving plates. Drizzle with the pecan butter. Serve immediately.

The post Pan Seared Trout with Pecan Browned Butter appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/18546-pan-seared-trout-recipe-pecan-browned-butter.html/feed 21
Ketchup from Scratch: Indian Spiced Ketchup Chutney http://steamykitchen.com/17682-ketchup-chutney-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/17682-ketchup-chutney-recipe.html#comments Sat, 13 Aug 2011 06:36:13 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=17682 A step-by-step recipe for Indian spiced ketchup chutney from Food Network Star Aarti Sequeira.

The post Ketchup from Scratch: Indian Spiced Ketchup Chutney appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>

 

 I want you to meet a friend of mine, Aarti — though you’ve probably have seen her mesmerizingly happy smile on the Food Network already as she was the winner of The Next Food Network Star last year!

Aarti and I used to create cooking videos together with Good Bite (remember this Miso Soup?!) That was about 2 years ago, before Food Network discovered her and I’m so proud to announce that today, Aarti launches her brand new show, Aarti Party!

We’re sharing one of her recipes from Sunday’s show, Ketchup Chutney from scratch, a perfect compliment to your cheese plate or to slather on your burger. Make your own ketchup!? Absolutely! It’s a chunky, warmly spiced version of our All-American favorite condiment.

Here’s what Aarti emailed me when she suggested we try this recipe, “Alright, so I was thinking that a good recipe to share might be my “Ketchup Chutney”.  It’s a classic example of what I’m trying to do — introduce people to Indian flavours through the foods they recognise and love.  Ketchup, a condiment found in nearly every American fridge, is actually a chutney… which most people think of as an Indian invention.  Cool, huh?  So I make mine from scratch, which takes about 20 minutes, and it doesn’t have any stinky preservatives or high fructose corn syrup in it.  Plus, it’s got some gusto… packed with brawny Indian flavours like mustard seeds, cumin seeds, garlic and ginger (of course), garam masala and a little turmeric.”

Enjoy not only the recipe but a little Q&A with Aarti! Big thanks to Adam and Joanne for cooking the amazing recipe! ~Jaden

***

Tell us a little bit about life before Food Network Star, how has life changed since?

Well, before Food Network Star, my husband and I were scraping by on his unemployment checks (thank Goodness for those, or else I’m not sure what would have happened).  While that was really hard, what was harder was not knowing what I wanted to do with my life – my husband has always known that he wanted to be an actor, since he was 4 years old, and he’s great at it… but I didn’t feel like I had a clear talent, something that I felt really unquestionably passionate about.  Winning Food Network Star, heck COMPETING on FNS uncovered this passion that I never knew existed, or perhaps knew was there but never felt like I had anything to offer in that arena (cooking show host).  It is such a gift.  I wake up every morning thanking God for this new career.  I have received emails from people who either watched the competition or my cooking show now, that I would like to print out and frame – I never dreamed that I’d be able to touch people’s lives in this way.  It’s really breathtaking.

Where does your love of cooking come from, how about your love of teaching us about it?

I think we all ache for connection to each other… real, lasting connections that touch from the inside out.  Food is one way to do that.  I have NEVER been one of those eat to live types of people.  I live to eat.  And I live to eat with people, break bread with them – something magical happens when you do that.  You’re kind of bonded forever.  Whether it’s a first date, a special birthday, a comforting plate of food shared by two people in mourning… I just love that.  I think that’s where my love of cooking comes from.  That, and a really healthy appetite, that started from before birth – I was 10lbs when I was born!!

What is a day like in the life of a Food Network Star? How long will an episode take to shoot?

I spend a couple of months coming up with show themes and recipes, testing them and re-testing them.  When it’s time to shoot, we shoot 13 episodes in about 10 days – 1.5 episodes a day, with an extra few days to shoot the party scenes featuring my real friends and family.  I start at about 7am, with two hours in hair and makeup (yup, I need that much work!), then we start shooting at about 9am, and we go until about 730pm.  The shoot days are exhausting (I had no idea how much energy you need to be “perform”) but invigorating.  I love the production team that makes my show – they are fonts of knowledge and talent, and I can feel the cogs in my head turning just a bit faster when I’m around them.

How do you come up with recipes for Aarti Party?

Well, I eat a lot.  Ha!  But seriously, what joy to know that whenever I eat out, it’s for inspiration!  LA has some of the freshest and most creative food around.  I love finding new flavour combinations that I never knew worked together.  Then there’s old family favourites I can’t wait to share.  And, I take requests!  I often ask people on my Facebook fan page what they’d like to learn to make.  My fans (um, it’s still so crazy that I can say that!) are awesome.

What is your favorite comfort food or indulgence?

Ice cream, ice cream, ice cream.  One of the first presents that we bought for ourselves after I won was an ice cream maker, so that I could make ice cream whenever I wanted.  I am slowly working my way through David Lebovitz’s The Perfect Scoop.  I wasn’t allowed a lot of dessert growing up, because I was such a portly child, and so the thrill of eating a big bowl of ice cream hasn’t gotten old yet.  HA!

What is in your fridge right now?

We’re moving house right now so it’s mostly condiments: fig butter, sriracha, homemade apple-ginger chutney, some carrots, turnips and beets that I pickled, aged gouda, leftover chicken curry with apricots that I’m perfecting, a bottle of green Kombucha and some gluten-free beer.  I’m all over the place!

Aarti’s Burger Station Epsidoe will air on The Food Network 9am/8c Saturday, August 13, 2011!

making ketchup chutney

Ketchup Chutney comes together quite quickly, so we found it best to slice, dice and measure out everything in advance.

First, thinly slice 3 cloves of garlic.

Then, finely dice one medium onion.

And finally, use a microplane to grate about a 1-inch length of fresh ginger. You could also peel, then mince, but we found this method to be a bit easier. (The peel of the ginger gets pushed back from the microplane when grating).

Next, get all those spices ready! Aren’t the colors just beautiful?

Then, measure out the wet ingredients and make sure some salt is handy for later.

Making the chutney is easy. First, start with a medium saucepan. Aarti says to warm the oil over medium-high heat until nearly smoking, then toss in the mustard and cumin seeds.

Since the oil is so hot, they might start to jump around the pan a bit, so having a lid near by to make sure the seeds don’t all jump ship is a good idea. Just cover until the popping stops.

Next, add the onion, ginger and garlic to the pan.

Saute for 10 minutes or so until the onions are softened and just start to brown. Just watch the ginger does not burn.

Now, toss in the turmeric, garam masala and paprika. Stir well and cook for about 30 seconds.

Now, add the apple cider vinegar. Stand back when you do this, the fumes can be a bit overwhelming. Cook until the vinegar has reduced by about half.

Add in one 14.5 ounce can of diced tomatoes, liquid and all.

Then, the molasses.

And season with some salt and freshly ground black pepper.

Allow the the chutney to cook at a generous simmer for about 10 minutes – it will thicken nicely. If you would like, Aarti says you can puree the chutney, but we chose to keep it as is, we liked the texture. Just cool, jar and store in the refrigerator. We served a dollop of chutney on some sharp cheddar cheese and crusty bread, but you could certainly slather some on top of a burger, sandwich or anything else you desire.

Yum
Print

Ketchup Chutney

Servings: about 3 cups Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 20 minutes
ketchup-chutney-burger-recipe

Recipe by Aarti Sequeira of the Food Network Show, Aarti Party.

Ingredients:

3 tablespoons canola or grapeseed oil
1 teaspoon mustard seeds
½ teaspoon cumin seeds
1 medium red onion, finely diced
3 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
1-inch thumb ginger, minced
½ teaspoon turmeric
½ teaspoon garam masala
½ teaspoon paprika
¼ cup apple cider vinegar
1 14.5-ounce can diced tomatoes
2 tablespoons molasses
½ teaspoon kosher salt
Freshly ground black pepper

Directions:

1) Warm oil over medium-high heat in a medium saucepan, until nearly smoking.
2) Keep your lid handy. Add the mustard seeds and the cumin seeds; they should start enthusiastically popping upon contact with the oil, so cover the pot until the spluttering subsides.
3) Add the onions, garlic and ginger. Saute until softened and just starting to brown, about 10 minutes.
4) Add turmeric, garam masala and paprika. Stir and cook about 30 seconds. Then add the vinegar (standing back so you don’t inhale the fumes!), and cook until vinegar has reduced by about half.
5) Add tomatoes, molasses, salt and lots of freshly ground black pepper. Stir, bring to a boil, then cook at a generous simmer about 10 minutes until thickened. You can puree it if you like. Set aside to cool, then jar. Store in the refrigerator, ready for your next burger or sandwich or grilled meat or or or...!

The post Ketchup from Scratch: Indian Spiced Ketchup Chutney appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/17682-ketchup-chutney-recipe.html/feed 21
Stir Fried Shrimp, Eggs and Peas + Stir Fry Secrets http://steamykitchen.com/631-stir-fried-shrimp-eggs-and-peas-stir-fry-secrets.html http://steamykitchen.com/631-stir-fried-shrimp-eggs-and-peas-stir-fry-secrets.html#comments Thu, 24 Jul 2008 04:08:03 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/?p=631 Cooking Chinese for the Olympics! This is the 2nd recipe in the series…see the end for links Oh…and there’s a contest in the middle of this post!!! *** Last fall, my parents treated Scott and I to a 10 day group tour around China. Our first stop was Beijing, and first thing I noticed was how clean the city was. ...

The post Stir Fried Shrimp, Eggs and Peas + Stir Fry Secrets appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
Stir Fried Shrimp, Eggs and Peas

Cooking Chinese for the Olympics! This is the 2nd recipe in the series…see the end for links

Oh…and there’s a contest in the middle of this post!!!

***

Last fall, my parents treated Scott and I to a 10 day group tour around China. Our first stop was Beijing, and first thing I noticed was how clean the city was. I literally could eat off the streets, as there was an entire team of sanitation engineers whose sole job was to scrape gum off the streets and sidewalk. I’m so not kidding – they wore white gloves and could scrape even crusty, 2 week old Bubbalicious in one quick motion.

You could see the entire city was gearing for its big Olympic moment: sleek buildings, sporting stadiums and even beautiful parks were being quickly erected and created almost overnight. There was hardly any traffic for a city of over 17 million and in addition to the gum scrapers, workers were polishing the guard rails that lined the interstate.

But no tricking this smart rat! I knew our tour’s itinerary, including restaurants, shopping, sightseeing and even driving path was carefully planned and regulated by the government. I was half afraid to turn my head around and look out the back window of the tour bus, for fear that the set façade would be replaced by the daily regular.

Well, no matter…I mean, how can I blame Beijing? For if you come to my house for dinner, you’d find last night’s crumbs swept under my rug and mounds of dirty laundry shoved into closets too.

In the next couple of weeks, I’ll be sharing many of my favorite Chinese dishes, so that you’re not stuck just ordering take out from your local Chinese restaurant. But today, I want to teach you the secrets of a light, flavorful Chinese stir fry.

Ancient Chinese Stir Fry Secrets (at home)

Restaurant kitchens have extremely high powered stoves, flames that jump so high that your eyebrows will singe just standing in the doorway. At home, especially with electric stovetops, we just can’t get that kind of heat. To compensate, you’ve got take the time to let your wok or pan get super hot and the best way to judge whether it’s hot enough is to hold your hand 6 inches over your wok. The moment you start feeling some serious heat, it’s ready. Seriously, though, don’t try to be all macho and stuff, if it’s hot enough for you to say, “hot!” just pull away.

The second trick is to sear your meat or seafood first, remove from the wok, then cook the vegetables, and then returning the meat or seafood back to the wok towards the end of the stir fry. If you don’t, you’ll end up steaming your meat in the vegetable juices instead of frying it. You want each individual ingredient of a stir fry to sing on its own, instead of becoming a soggy, heavy, mish-mash.

The last trick is a tough one. I know it’s a gut reaction to constantly keep poking, prodding and stirring during a stir fry (which is essential in a massively hot restaurant wok), but resist the urge when you’re frying meat or seafood. When you first put your meat in the wok, spread it out so that the pieces are not touching and use all available surface area. Now, step away! Let the meat have a chance to sear. If you keep messing with it, the protein never has a chance to develop that wonderful carmelization and you’ll end up with mushy meat.

In this Stir Fried Shrimp, Eggs and Peas dish, you’ll practice all three of these secrets. You’ll let the oil heat up before adding the shrimp, spread out the shrimp so that they don’t touch and just let it sear. Once cooked, you’ll remove the shrimp and add it back in when the eggs are almost set. This will give you a light/firm/crisp/crunch/springy shrimp – a sure sign that you’ve cooked the shrimp properly.

STOP! I need a word or two that elegantly describes the texture of perfectly cooked, fresh shrimp. It’s the feeling in your mouth when you bite into the shrimp – “light/firm/crisp/crunch/springy” just doesn’t capture it quite right. There is a Chinese word for it (to not give Chinese speaking advantage on this contest, I’m not going to tell what that word is) – but I can’t find the right English words to match. The first person to come up with the best word or phrase wins a $25 gift certificate to Amazon.com!!

I always have a bag of frozen peas/carrots (and in this case just peas), some frozen shrimp and eggs on hand. When I’m cooking Chinese food and need just one more dish to make the meal complete, this is one of my go-to dishes.

In this recipe for Stir Fried Shrimp, Eggs and Peas, I’ve chosen to fry the chilies and garlic separate from the eggs and shrimp, using it as a topping. This is because my kids are eating this dish too – and they can pick the parts where the chilies are not touching.

I know you’ve been taught not to burn garlic, as it can be bitter and ruin the entire dish. But in this case, the garlic is fried to a crisp – it provides a wonderful texture. Since it’s a TOPPING – and not the base of the dish (i.e. I’m not cooking the garlic first and layering ingredients/flavors on top of the garlic) – the very slight bitterness is a welcome, especially nestled against the chili pepper’s sweet heat.

Stir Fried Shrimp, Eggs and Peas

1/2 pound raw shrimp, shelled and deveined and patted very, very dry
1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
freshly ground black pepper
1/2 teaspoon cornstarch
1/2 teaspoon sesame oil
1 teaspoon finely minced garlic
1 large mild chili (anaheim, Hungarian wax), thinly sliced
1/4 cup frozen peas, thawed
4 eggs, beaten
3/4 teaspoon kosher salt
cooking oil

in a bowl, combine shrimp, salt, pepper, cornstarch and sesame oil, let sit at room temperature for 10 minutes to marinate.

In a wok or large saute pan over high heat, add 1 tablespoon cooking oil, swirling to coat the wok. When the oil is very hot (hold your hand 6″ above the wok surface), add the shrimp (the shrimp should sizzle loudly upon contact) and spread out around the cooking surface. Let fry, untouched for 1 minute.

Flip shrimp and fry for an additional minute, or until cooked through. Remove the shrimp from wok to a plate, leaving as much cooking oil in the wok as possible.

Keep the heat on high, add the garlic and sliced chilies and fry until fragrant and the garlic is crispy, about 30 seconds. Remove from wok to a small dish and wipe the wok clean with paper towels. Return the wok to high heat and add 1 tablespoon of cooking oil. When the oil is hot (a drop of egg should sizzle immediately), pour in the eggs and gently stir for 1 minute, until almost set but still a little runny in the middle. Season the egg with salt and add the shrimp and the peas to the wok and stir to mix well until the eggs are completely cooked through. Dish to serving plate and top with the fried garlic and chilies.

***

Other great Chinese dishes

Sesame Shrimp Sesame Shrimp with Honey Mustard Sauce
Firecracker Shrimp Shrimp and Mango Firecrackers

Beijing Noodles Ground Beef with Beijing Sauce Over Noodles

Pan Fried Shrimp and Pork Postickers Pan Fried Shrimp and Pork Potstickers

Xiao Long Bao Xiao Long Bao – Steamed Shanghai Soup Dumplings

Wonton Noodle Soup Wonton Noodle Soup

The post Stir Fried Shrimp, Eggs and Peas + Stir Fry Secrets appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/631-stir-fried-shrimp-eggs-and-peas-stir-fry-secrets.html/feed 81
“Meat” Fried Rice – Four Ways http://steamykitchen.com/613-meat-fried-rice-four-ways.html http://steamykitchen.com/613-meat-fried-rice-four-ways.html#comments Tue, 08 Jul 2008 05:59:10 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/?p=613 My editor, Jeff Houck, sent over a picture of pan-fried Scrapple slice and my heart fluttered like crazy. “Scrapple? Scrapple! What’s Scrapple? I asked him,” and within 30 minutes was off to the supermarket to find Scrapple, a distant cousin to Spam. Yes, I have an odd fascination with meat that comes in it’s own coffin. “hmmm…I wonder if I ...

The post “Meat” Fried Rice – Four Ways appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
Meat Fried Rice - Four Ways

My editor, Jeff Houck, sent over a picture of pan-fried Scrapple slice and my heart fluttered like crazy. “Scrapple? Scrapple! What’s Scrapple? I asked him,” and within 30 minutes was off to the supermarket to find Scrapple, a distant cousin to Spam.

Yes, I have an odd fascination with meat that comes in it’s own coffin.

“hmmm…I wonder if I could showcase the otherwise disgusting “meat” in a edgy, fashion-y, Bon Appetit-esque yet appetizinng way. I mean, when was the last time you saw a photo of canned ham and said, “DAMN…that’s a mighty fine piece of ass?!”

While I was there, I went bezerk and ended up with a basketful of “meat” products along with a variety of ingredients to concoct four different recipes. And really. That’s how my “meat” adventure began.

***

Scrapple Fried Rice with Fresh Chilies and Garlic

Scrapple

Hello world, meet Scrapple, a product that when fried with nothing else, tastes just like the name sounds, scrappy offal. If you must know what scrapple is made of, Wikipedia paints a pretty picture:

Scrapple is typically made of hog offal, such as the head, heart, liver, and other scraps, which are boiled with any bones attached (often the entire head), to make a broth. Once cooked, bones and fat are discarded, the meat is reserved, and (dry) cornmeal is boiled in the broth to make a mush. The meat, finely minced, is returned, and seasonings, typically sage, thyme, savory, and others are added. The mush is cast into loaves and allowed to cool thoroughly until gelled.

I don’t know about you, but thank goodness for sage, thyme and savory. The thought of jellied pig snout without those herbs just sends shivers throughout my frail, virgin body.

My main strategy when developing this recipe, was really, “how the hell do I transform something so utterly disgusting into a flavorful fried rice that even the pickiest eater would enjoy (as long as I didn’t let on what scrapple was.)

I chose 3 of the most pungent Asian ingredients that I had on hand: fresh chilies, fish sauce and garlic. Now, I know some of you would say that fish sauce sounds just as disgusting as scrapple, since basically a vat of stinky, fermented fish. But it’s a Southeast Asian staple and I’m being SO hypocritical right now. But did you know that your beloved Worcestershire sauce also contains a version of fish sauce? Dude. I KNOW! If only the makers of scrapple had marketing smarts too – and named their product something a little appealing than horse shit.

Scrapple Fried Rice

Because scrapple contains cornmeal, it crumbles pretty easily when fried, so I treated it like ground beef. First, I cut the scrapple into small cubes and stir fried it, using my spatula to break it up even further.

Scrapple Fried Rice with Fresh Chilies and Garlic

serves 2

1 1/2 tablespoons cooking oil, divided
1 teaspoon finely minced garlic
1 stalk scallion, minced
1 thinly sliced fresh chili (like Thai bird’s eye or jalepeno)
1/2 cup chopped scrapple
2 cups cooked, leftover rice (grains separated with a fork)
3/4 teaspoon fish sauce (substitute with 1 to 2 tsp soy sauce)
freshly ground black pepper

In a wok or large saute pan, heat just 1 tablespoon of the cooking oil over high heat. When the oil is very hot, add the scrapple and fry until browned, about 1 minute. Push the scrapple towards the outer edges of the wok, clearing a space in the middle to fry the aromatics. Turn the heat to medium, add the remaining 1/2 tablespoon of cooking oil and immediately add the garlic, scallion and fresh chilies. Stir fry for 15 seconds, until you can smell the fragrance of the aromatics. Turn your heat to high and add the rice. Use your spatula to mix all the ingredients thoroughly and at the same time spreading the rice and ingredients to use as much of the cooking surface of the wok as possible.

Now just leave it alone for 30 seconds. Don’t stir, poke or prod. Let the rice grains heat up, which basically will re-steam the rice. Once the rice has heated up, use your spatula to stir and flip the mixture. Pour the fish sauce slowly around the outer edges of the wok – the heat of the wok will help evaporate the fish sauce as it moves down the sides. Stir and flip the rice well again, to mix the fish sauce throughout. Season with black pepper. Let rice continue to cook until each of rice grain is hot.

***

Spam Fried Rice with Pineapple

Spam Fried Rice with Pineapple

Wow, what a voluptuous fan of Spam! Spread it all out, hot stuff!

spam fried rice

This was a no-brainer…I’ve previously have professed my love for Spam, in the Ode to Spam in the Style of Seuss, and I wanted to create a simpler, more refreshing version of Spam Fried Rice. My recipe calls for canned pineapple – but of course, you can use fresh pineapple, but hey…we’re going with the whole canned and processed theme here.

Spam Fried Rice with Pineapple

serves 2

2 teaspoons cooking oil
1/2 cup diced spam
1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger
1 stalk scallion, minced
1/4 cup crushed or 1/8 inch diced pineapple (canned or fresh)
2 cups cooked, leftover rice (grains separated)
1 to 2 teaspoons soy sauce
1/2 teaspoon sesame oil

In a wok or large saute pan, heat the cooking oil over medium-high heat. When the oil is hot but not smoking, add the diced spam and fry until browned on all sides, about 1 minute. Push the spam towards the outer edges of the wok, clearing a space in the middle to fry. You should still have a bit of oil left that is pooled in the middle of the wok. Turn the heat to low, add the  add the ginger, scallions and pineapple. Stir fry for 15 seconds, until fragrant. Turn your heat to high and immediately add the rice. Use your spatula to mix all the ingredients thoroughly and at the same time spreading the rice and ingredients to use as much of the cooking surface of the wok as possible.

Now just leave it alone for 30 seconds. Don’t stir, poke or prod. Let the rice grains heat up, which basically will re-steam the rice. Once the rice has heated up, use your spatula to stir and flip the mixture. Pour the soy sauce sauce slowly around the outer edges of the wok – the heat of the wok will help evaporate the soy sauce as it moves down the sides. Stir and flip the rice well again, to mix the ingredients throughout. Finish with sesame oil and stir well. Let rice continue to cook until each of rice grain is hot.

***

Pork Roll Fried Rice with Shitake Mushrooms and Red Bell Pepper

Pork Roll Fried Rice
“Come ‘on, baby, look sexy for the camera….WORK IT!….Twirl and look over your shoulder now!…..YEAH BABY”

I had no idea there was such a thing as Pork Roll until I went shopping for Scrapple! The meat manager actually went around the store with me, helping find the scrapple (frozen section) and then also brought me to the refrigerated bacon and sausage section to hand me a package of Pork Roll. Four slices come per package, and it’s used in a regional specialty called “The Jersey Breakfast” – fried pork roll, egg and cheese sandwich. If you’re not lucky enough to find Pork Roll at your market, substitute with that strange oval-ish shaped canned ham. But then you’d have to buy that big can and only use a half cup diced. I have no idea how to eat that stuff outside of fried rice. I guess you could make the Jersey Breakfast sandwiches the next day from leftover canned ham.

Pork roll is basically coursely ground pork shoulder, and to me, is a Gucci-er version of spam. So I had to up the ante and use some fancy ingredients like fresh shitake mushrooms and fresh red bell peppers. Instead of plain ‘ol soy, I used Maggi sauce, a very popular condiment in Asia (even though its origins are Swiss). I’ve seen this seasoning at most major supermarkets and of course Asian markets too. I believe Maggi sauce even has a big cult following including myself!…. 😉

Pork Roll Fried Rice

We were going for the casually tossed, grunge look for this photoshoot.

Pork Roll Fried Rice with Shitake Mushrooms and Red Bell Pepper

Pork Roll Fried Rice with Shitake and Bell Peppers

serves 2

2 teaspoons cooking oil
1/2 cup sliced pork roll
4 fresh shitake mushrooms, thinly sliced
1/2 red bell pepper, thinly sliced
2 cups cooked, leftover rice (grains separated)
1 teaspoon Chinese rice wine
1 teaspoon Maggi sauce (substitute with 1 to 2 teaspoons soy sauce)

In a wok or large saute pan, heat the cooking oil over medium-high heat. When the oil is hot but not smoking, add the pork roll and fry until browned, about 1 minute. Push the pork roll towards the outer edges of the wok, clearing a space in the middle to fry. You should still have a bit of oil left that is pooled in the middle of the wok. Turn the heat to low, add the shitake and bell pepper. Stir fry for 30 seconds, until softened. Turn your heat to high and immediately add the rice. Use your spatula to mix all the ingredients thoroughly and at the same time spreading the rice and ingredients to use as much of the cooking surface of the wok as possible.

Now just leave it alone for 30 seconds. Don’t stir, poke or prod. Let the rice grains heat up, which basically will re-steam the rice. Once the rice has heated up, use your spatula to stir and flip the mixture. Pour the Maggi sauce and the rice wine sauce slowly around the outer edges of the wok – the heat of the wok will help evaporate the sauce as it moves down the sides. Immediately, stir and flip the rice well again, to mix the ingredients throughout. Let rice continue to cook until each of rice grain is hot.

***

Vienna Sausage Fried Rice with Kaffir and Lemongrass

Vienna Sausage

Went for minimalistic architecture – symmetrical, clean, lines. Very sleek and slimming!

I admit to eating an entire can of Vienna Sausages – straight out the can at room temperature. LOVE IT. We used to eat these little turds fried for breakfast in Hong Kong. I thought it would be great to put a Southeast Asian twist to this fried rice – and use thin slivers of lemongrass and torn kaffir lime leaves – both from my garden, but you can find at most Asian markets. If they don’t have fresh lemongrass or kaffir, ask for either in frozen form.

To prepare lemongrass, measure about 4-6 inches from the bottom and cut. Discard the scratchy, long leaves and keep the bottom, white bulb part. Peel off the outermost leaves and use a very sharp chef’s knife to cut paper-thin slivers. If you’re not capable of doing this, grab a microplane grater and just grate the bottom 4 inches of the bulb. It’s a pretty fibrous grass, and if you cut into huge chunks, you’ll end up chewing like a cow. Not so lady-like.

For the Kaffir, take a single leaf and tear in several spaces, stopping at the spine to keep the leaf intact. You won’t actually eat this leaf, but exposing the inner part of the leaf will fragrance your entire dish.

Vienna Sausage Fried Rice with Kaffir and Lemongrass

Even the bowl is sleek and slimming!

Vienna Sausage Fried Rice with Kaffir and Lemongrass

Vienna Sausage Fried Rice with Kaffir and Lemongrass

3 teaspoons cooking oil, divided
1/2 cup Vienna sausage, each link cut into 4 pieces
1 tablespoon fine rings of lemongrass (see note)
3 kaffir lime leaves, torn in several places to spine
1 tablespoon sliced chilies
2 eggs, beaten
2 cups cooked, leftover rice (grains separated)
1 1/2 teaspoons fish sauce (substitute with 1-2 teaspoons soy sauce)

In a wok or large saute pan, heat just 2 teaspoons of cooking oil over medium-high heat. When the oil is hot but not smoking, add the Vienna sausage and fry until browned, about 1 minute. Push the sausage towards the outer edges of the wok, clearing a space in the middle to fry. You should still have a bit of oil left that is pooled in the middle of the wok. Turn the heat to low, add the lemongrass, kaffir leaves and chilies. . Stir fry for 30 seconds, until fragrant.

Now push those aromatics up to the sides of the wok to clear space again in the middle. Turn the heat to high and add the remaining 1 teaspoon of cooking oil and let that heat up to hot but not smoking. Add the egg and fry the egg, swirling gently to break up the egg. Cook the egg until firm, about 1 minute.

Add the rice. Use your spatula to mix all the ingredients thoroughly and at the same time spreading the rice and ingredients to use as much of the cooking surface of the wok as possible.

Now just leave it alone for 30 seconds. Don’t stir, poke or prod. Let the rice grains heat up, which basically will re-steam the rice. Once the rice has heated up, use your spatula to stir and flip the mixture. Pour the fish sauce slowly around the outer edges of the wok – the heat of the wok will help evaporate the sauce as it moves down the sides. Immediately, stir and flip the rice well again, to mix the ingredients throughout. Let rice continue to cook until each of rice grain is hot.

***
If you enjoyed this post, will you please click on “Stumble This” or “Digg” for me? The icons are right below this area here. Thank you!

The post “Meat” Fried Rice – Four Ways appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/613-meat-fried-rice-four-ways.html/feed 75
Easy Pan Fried Mango Curry Chicken http://steamykitchen.com/607-easy-pan-fried-mango-curry-chicken.html http://steamykitchen.com/607-easy-pan-fried-mango-curry-chicken.html#comments Wed, 02 Jul 2008 12:33:23 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/?p=607 from Steamy Kitchen food column in Tampa Tribune Writing and editing more than 100 recipes for a cookbook that I’m doing is no easy task. In fact, it’s quite a bit more intense than I had ever imagined. The more-than-occasional brain farts and writer’s block are tough, and usually I can deal with those moments by distracting myself with a ...

The post Easy Pan Fried Mango Curry Chicken appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
Easy Pan Fried Mango Curry Chicken

from Steamy Kitchen food column in Tampa Tribune

Writing and editing more than 100 recipes for a cookbook that I’m doing is no easy task. In fact, it’s quite a bit more intense than I had ever imagined. The more-than-occasional brain farts and writer’s block are tough, and usually I can deal with those moments by distracting myself with a massive, industrial-sized roll of bubble wrap. It’s uniquely satisfying, covering three out of five senses in less than two seconds.

pop! pip! pop!

Sometimes, when the stress of writing turns into a gnarly tumbleweed, the giant roll of bubble wrap finds its place under the desk, propped between my feet. I unroll a nice, perfect, clean sheet onto my lap, I take a deep breath and let my hands wring the shit out of those air pockets.

POPOPOPOPOPOPOPOPOP!!!!

I succeed in waking up yet another sense because when you release an entire yard of trapped air, your house ends up smelling like the scent of a plastic factory. I think if a manufacturer came up with a scented bubble wrap, like, let’s say warm chocolate lava cake or buttery banana bread, its sales would skyrocket!

So you see how my mind wanders when confronted with the evils of writer’s congestion. Although some of the ideas I come up with are pretty clever and could really be the next big thing, this silliness does absolutely nothing to contribute to the daunting task of scaling the treacherous mountain of 100 recipes. One. Hundred. Recipes.

I’ve discovered that the easiest and quickest way to jump-start my dead battery is to engage myself in an activity that involves all five of my senses. Yes, bubble wrap is fun and addictive, but hardly tasty. So, naturally, I scurry to the kitchen to find something to play with.

But it can’t just be ANY kind of cooking – it has to be a dish with maximum sizzle, crunch, intoxicating aroma, juiciness and boldness. So I turn to Nigel Slater who wrote one of my favorite cookbooks, “Appetite” (Clarkson Potter, $74). It’s a hefty volume of recipes that you’ll turn to when you need that easy yet creative, throw-together cooking. Edit: holy crap! $74???? I got it free from The Good Cook cookbook club.

Mango Curry Chicken

Instead of a standard recipe format, Nigel provides you with sensual cues to guide you in finishing the dish. I’ve adapted his Chicken, Garlic and Herbs recipe into Pan-Fried Mango Curry Chicken. The skin is crispy curry, the mango is fresh, luscious and sweet, and the sauce is buttery garlicky.

This is kitchen therapy at its finest.

Easy Pan Fried Mango Curry Chicken

This is Nigel’s style of recipe writing – instead of a rigid, precise recipe – Nigel prefers give you guidance on what the dish feels, smells, sounds, tastes and looks like. I’ve taken his basic recipe and added mangoes and a curry spice. Enjoy!

Pan-Fried Mango Curry Chicken

Free-range chicken – cut up or 2 chicken pieces per person, skin and bones to remain in place
Olive oil
Sea salt
Curry powder – a big pinch
Freshly ground black pepper
Butter – a thick slice
Garlic cloves, 8 large, sweet cloves
White wine – a large wine glass
Mango – a nice firm, but ripe one, cut up into large chunks
Herbs – a few sprigs of parsley, minced

Place chicken in a large bowl and rub the chicken all over with a drizzle olive oil. Season the chicken with the salt, curry powder and black pepper.

Heat a large skillet or pan (pan can have high sides or be shallow, but it must have a lid) on high heat with enough olive oil to make a small puddle in the bottom, then add the butter. Once the butter starts to froth, add the chicken pieces, skin side down. Keep the heat moderately high heat while they color to a pale and relatively even gold.

In the meantime, smash the garlic cloves with the side of your knife so that they flatten but remain fairly intact, and peel off the skin. Throw the garlic cloves into the pan. Turn down the heat to medium-low so that the fat under the chicken skin is gently fizzing. Cover with tight-fitting lid. You’ll cook about 35-40 minutes, turning the chicken over halfway through cooking.

Once the chicken is cooked, remove the chicken onto a platter and cover loosely with tin foil to keep warm. Tip the pan slightly and spoon out most of the fat. Turn the heat to high and add the white wine and let it bubble. Use a wooden spatula to scrape and loosen the golden bits and the sweet, soft garlic cloves in the pan. Turn the heat down a bit and add the mango chunks and minced parsley. Let simmer for 1 minute. Taste the sauce and adjust seasoning – you may have to add some salt or pepper. Spoon over chicken.

Makes 4 servings

p.s. Did you see THIS??? THE %&!*%&!% COOLEST THING EVVVVEEERRRRRRR….. <–must check out

The post Easy Pan Fried Mango Curry Chicken appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/607-easy-pan-fried-mango-curry-chicken.html/feed 66