Steamy Kitchen Recipes | RSS Feed http://steamykitchen.com Steamy Kitchen Food Blog: fast recipes, simple recipes, with fresh ingredients to create delicious meals. Mon, 29 Jun 2015 20:33:14 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.2 Coconut Curry Shrimp with Coconut Rice http://steamykitchen.com/25694-coconut-curry-shrimp-with-coconut-rice-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/25694-coconut-curry-shrimp-with-coconut-rice-recipe-video.html#comments Tue, 26 Feb 2013 18:04:40 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=25694 There isn’t a curry that I don’t like. Well, as long as the spice level is is not outrageously crazy! This is a seafood curry that I made recently on television, and it’s a Caribbean Creole curry from the cookbook, Flavors of Belize (I made Beef Satay with Habanero Peanut Sauce from the book too). I learned something new from ...

The post Coconut Curry Shrimp with Coconut Rice appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
Coconut Curry Shrimp with Coconut Rice Recipe

There isn’t a curry that I don’t like. Well, as long as the spice level is is not outrageously crazy! This is a seafood curry that I made recently on television, and it’s a Caribbean Creole curry from the cookbook, Flavors of Belize (I made Beef Satay with Habanero Peanut Sauce from the book too).

Coconut Curry Shrimp with Coconut Rice Recipe

I learned something new from cookbook author Tanya McNabb – Caribbean Creole is different from Louisiana Creole! Their cuisine features lots of seafood and use of coconut, so this recipe for Coconut Curry Shrimp with Coconut Rice is a perfect example of a Creolean speciality.

Coconut Curry Shrimp with Coconut Rice Recipe

Not only does the recipe take only 20 minutes to make (the rice takes 20 minutes, the curry really only takes 7 minutes), but the spice level is mild, perfect for kids too. The curry flavor comes from yellow curry powder and ground green cardamom, so it’s warming and comforting. Of course, you can add more chile sauce if you wish!

Coconut Curry Shrimp with Coconut Rice Recipe

The shrimp can be replaced with sea scallops or chunks of fish (grouper would be fantastic). The television crew loved it so much that we ate the entire dish minutes after filming!

Coconut Curry Shrimp with Coconut Rice Recipe Video

***

Yum
Print

Coconut Curry Shrimp with Coconut Rice

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 20 Cook Time: 30
coconut-curry-shrimp-with-coconut-white-rice-recipe-featured-1014.jpg

Ingredients:

For the Coconut Curry Shrimp
1 pound shrimp, peeled and deveined
2 tablespoons coconut oil
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger
1 onion, diced
1 cup green bell pepper, deseeded, diced
2 tomatoes, deseeded, diced
2 cardamom pods, crushed
1 tablespoon curry powder
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
2 teaspoons hot sauce, to taste
2 cups seafood or chicken stock
2 cups coconut milk
2 tablespoons fresh cilantro, choppedFor the Coconut Rice
2 cups white rice
2 cups coconut milk
1 cup water
1 teaspoon salt

Directions:

To make the Coconut Curry Shrimp:
In a large cast-iron pan or frying pan over medium-high heat, heat the coconut oil. Add the garlic, ginger, onion, bell peppers and tomato. Cook until tender, about 5 minutes. Add cardamom pods, curry powder, black pepper and creole pepper sauce and stir well. Add shrimp and saute for 5 minutes. Remove shrimp and set aside. Add stock and coconut milk to sautéed vegetables and reduce over medium heat for approximately 10 to 15 minutes. Return shrimp to stock, add fresh cilantro and simmer for an additional 5 minutes. Serve on a bed of freshly cooked coconut rice.

To make the Coconut Rice:
In a large saucepan over high heat, bring rice, coconut milk, water and salt to a boil, cover and simmer for 20 minutes or until liquid is fully absorbed and rice is fully cooked.

Coconut Curry Shrimp with Coconut Rice Recipe

The post Coconut Curry Shrimp with Coconut Rice appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/25694-coconut-curry-shrimp-with-coconut-rice-recipe-video.html/feed 41
Chicken Vindaloo http://steamykitchen.com/16512-chicken-vindaloo.html http://steamykitchen.com/16512-chicken-vindaloo.html#comments Sun, 26 Jun 2011 19:47:13 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=16512 *waving hello!* Hey guys! I’m still in the middle of getting the new house ready and packing boxes in our old house. We’re almost done painting every single wall, baseboard and ceiling trays. Three more days until the big move! I’ll post some photos later today. Lots of love, Jaden We are so thrilled to introduce you to Prerna, from Indian Simmer. ...

The post Chicken Vindaloo appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>

*waving hello!* Hey guys! I’m still in the middle of getting the new house ready and packing boxes in our old house. We’re almost done painting every single wall, baseboard and ceiling trays. Three more days until the big move! I’ll post some photos later today. Lots of love, Jaden

We are so thrilled to introduce you to Prerna, from Indian Simmer. Today, she is sharing her recipe for Chicken Vindaloo, one of our absolute favorites, packed with flavor from chilies, garlic, cardamon, cinnamon and more. We know you will love Prerna and her blog, with photography that inspires, charged with brilliant and bold colors, and recipes from the heart, like Chicken Tikka Masala and Cumin scented Green Peas Pulao or Matar Paneer. Enjoy! – adam and joanne

A few weeks back I got a message from someone with the email address jaden at steamykitchen.com and it said will you “guest post for me?” My first reaction was to check whether that it was really written to me. Why?  Because never in my wildest dreams would I expect that JADEN from STEAMY KITCHEN would ask little me to guest post on her blog. And even when I found out that it was actually Jaden, I was in complete disbelief! Just like millions of other bloggers and food lovers, I have always been inspired by Jaden. It is an honor to be featured on Steamy Kitchen and thanks so much Jaden for the opportunity!

When asked about what I should be cooking for her, Jaden said she loves Chicken Vindaloo and would love to share its recipe with her readers. So Chicken Vindaloo it is! It is a dish which, if not most popular, must be one of the most popular Indian dishes in the world. Vindaloo is a popular curry that hails from a tiny little state of Goa in India. Portuguese had their colony in Goa for decades and so the state has a great influence from Portuguese culture. It is believed that the name Vindaloo was also derived from Portuguese dish where “vinho” means wine and “alhos” is garlic. Usually the recipe asks for pork and wine along with garlic. In course of time Vindaloo evolved and cooks started making it with chicken or lamb and wine was substituted with vinegar.

I am sure you will always notice that the Chicken Vindaloos served in restaurants have potatoes in them. Aloo in hindi means potatoes and since Vind- aloo has aloo in it, I assumed that potatoes are a must in the dish. But after doing a little bit of a research I found that potatoes are not really an essential ingredient. A traditional Vindaloo just asks for meat, garlic, wine or vinegar and lots of chilies in it. So the potatoes you see in the Vindaloo they serve at your favorite Indian restaurant are probably because they either want to make the gravy thicker or increase the volume but definitely not because the recipe asks for it!

Most important part of a Vindaloo masala (spice mix) is the chilies in it. The dish is mostly fiery hot because Vindaloo masala is a chili based preparation and that is where it gets all its flavors. In my recipe I used the dry whole red chilies found at Indian markets. You can make it milder to your taste and use Kasmiri Mirch (a mild form of red chili). This will help make the curry red and pretty but still not very hot.

So here’s the recipe for Chicken Vindaloo. Again, you can tweak the amount of spices and heat according to your taste. Also if you want, you can add diced boiled potatoes in the curry but if you do so, do it right after the chicken is almost cooked and you are giving it a final boil.

Yum
Print

Chicken Vindaloo Recipe

Servings: serves 4 Prep Time: 1 hour 30 minutes Cook Time: 20 minutes
chicken-vindaloo-recipe-1

Ingredients:

1 ½ lb chicken thighs (cut into cubes)
1 cup diced onions
4-5 whole red chilies
6-7 cloves of garlic
1 inch ginger
¼ cup white wine vinegar (add more if you like)
For dry spice mix:
1 teaspoon cloves
3-4 whole cardamoms
1 teaspoon cinammon powder
1/2 tablespoon peppercorns
1 tablespoon cumin
1 teaspoon turmeric powder
1 1/2 teaspoons mustard seeds
2 cups diced potatoes (optional)
4 tablespoons olive oil
Salt

Directions:

1) Soak whole chilies, garlic cloves and ginger in the white wine vinegar for about half an hour. Grind and make a paste of it.
2) Marinate chicken in the chili paste and let it sit in a refrigerator for at least an hour.
3) For the dry spice: mix cloves, cumin, cardamom, cinnamon, turmeric and peppercorn. Grind them in a spice or coffee grinder. Set aside.
4) Heat oil in a thick bottom pan, add mustard seeds.
5) Once they start to pop, add onions and fry them in oil until they turn light golden brown.
6) Add marinated chicken with all the juices and stir fry for a few minutes.
7) Add dry spices along with salt, mix it all together and cover the pan with a lid.
8) Let it simmer and cook until the chicken is done and curry is thick (stirring in between from time to time).
9) Garnish with chopped cilantro and serve hot with rice or your choice of bread.

The post Chicken Vindaloo appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/16512-chicken-vindaloo.html/feed 50
Thai Iced Coffee http://steamykitchen.com/16139-thai-iced-coffee-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/16139-thai-iced-coffee-recipe.html#comments Mon, 13 Jun 2011 15:05:49 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=16139 Learn how to make Thai Iced Coffee!

The post Thai Iced Coffee appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>

Back in my bad-girl motorcycle days at UCLA, my friends and I would ride our bikes along the famous and curvy Sunset Boulevard that bordered the northern end of school. Our destination was a Thai restaurant that I don’t recall the name of. On a motorcycle at night, the ride exhilarating on Sunset Boulevard, zipping between fancy cars with famous people (who drive too fast) and gawking tourists (who drive too slow).

Flaming hot curry, “barbecue” chicken and Thai iced coffee were our must-orders. The meal was cheap. The restaurant opened until 2am and the coffee kept me awake and alert doing all-nighters, which happened quite often.

What makes this iced coffee so different from anything you’ve had before is the infusion of cardamom into the half and half. Cardamom gives the coffee a warm-spice flavor. You can use either green or black cardamom (the black cardamom is cheaper), or in a pinch, ground cardamom.

 

 

Yum
Print

Thai Iced Coffee Recipe

Servings: serves 4 Prep Time: 5 Cook Time: 15
thai-coffee-recipe

When making Thai Iced Coffee, I brew very strong coffee by doubling the amount of coffee grounds than I normally use. This makes sure that the iced coffee is perfectly balanced and not diluted. If you can't find whole cardamom pods, substitute with 1/4 teaspoon of ground cardamom. Big thanks to Adam and Joanne for helping me with this recipe!

Ingredients:

4 cups double-strength brewed coffee
2 cups half-and-half or cream
3 tablespoons granulated sugar (add more to taste)
3 cardamom pods (or 1/4 teaspoon ground cardamom)
1/4 teaspoon almond extract
ice

Directions:

1. The first step is to smash the cardamom pods to release its flavor and aroma. You can do this with your mortar & pestle - just gently tap the pods until the outer shell is cracked. If you don't have a mortar & pestle, place the pods on a cutting board and with a heavy chef's knife, use the bottom of the handle to smash the pod.

2. In a saucepan over medium heat, bring half-and-half or cream, sugar and cardamom pods to a simmer, turn off the heat and allow to steep for 15 minutes.
Remove the cardamom pods then add the almond extract.

3. Fill 4 tall glasses to the brim with ice. Divide the flavored half-and-half or cream between each of the 4 glasses. Then slowly pour the coffee into each glass.

The post Thai Iced Coffee appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/16139-thai-iced-coffee-recipe.html/feed 56
Crêpes with Sweet Coconut Cardamom Filling (Patishapta) http://steamykitchen.com/14704-crepes-with-sweet-coconut-cardamom-filling-patishapta.html http://steamykitchen.com/14704-crepes-with-sweet-coconut-cardamom-filling-patishapta.html#comments Wed, 23 Mar 2011 15:25:13 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=14704 Light, sweet and aromatic! Crêpes with Sweet Coconut Cardamom Filling (Patishapta). Soma Rathore, ecurry.com shares the recipe for these crepes that are perfect for Spring brunch.

The post Crêpes with Sweet Coconut Cardamom Filling (Patishapta) appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>

Light, sweet and aromatic! Crêpes with Sweet Coconut Cardamom Filling (Patishapta). Soma Rathore, ecurry.com shares the recipe for these crepes that are perfect for Spring brunch.

The post Crêpes with Sweet Coconut Cardamom Filling (Patishapta) appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/14704-crepes-with-sweet-coconut-cardamom-filling-patishapta.html/feed 3
Crock Pot Pho (Vietnamese Beef Noodle Soup) http://steamykitchen.com/3136-crock-pot-pho.html http://steamykitchen.com/3136-crock-pot-pho.html#comments Mon, 04 May 2009 12:00:16 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/?p=3136     It’s no secret that good Pho broth requires a gazillion hours of simmering time. Time that I just don’t have. Tony, a boyfriend from a lifetime ago, told me his Dad used to simmer giant vats of pho broth overnight for his little pho restaurant in Houston. So, one day, I thought it would be really genius to ...

The post Crock Pot Pho (Vietnamese Beef Noodle Soup) appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
Crockpot Pho Recipe   

It’s no secret that good Pho broth requires a gazillion hours of simmering time. Time that I just don’t have. Tony, a boyfriend from a lifetime ago, told me his Dad used to simmer giant vats of pho broth overnight for his little pho restaurant in Houston. So, one day, I thought it would be really genius to do the same. Dump a bunch of beefy, tendony, knuckley, marrowey bones into the largest stockpot that I have and let it simmer away while I slept.

Crockpot Pho Recipe

It didn’t quite work out as I had intended:

11:30pm Initial hard boil of the bones to get all the yuck, guck and scum off. Char ginger and onion.

11:38pm Dumped out water, added clean water, the clean bones, spices, ginger and onion. Let the dance begin.

11:45pm Nighty-night

12:35am Is the flame low enough? Maybe I need to check to see.

1:23am Hmmm…I smell something funny. Go check.

2:41am What if it boiled over? Go check.

3:24am What if there’s a gas bubble in the pipe and the the stove spontaneously bursts out in big flames? Maybe I should sleep on the couch closer to the kitchen.

4:45am Gosh I’m hungry. Sneak a big spoonful of Ben & Jerry’s Pistachio Ice Cream.

4:51am Did I forget to put ice cream back in freezer? What if the gas bubble really does happen and stove spontaneously bursts out in flames? Then sleeping on couch is a dumbass idea. Crawl back to bed.

6:00am Kids wake up. Jumps up and down on my belly trying to wake me up.

6:15am PHO-KING TIRED

Enter the Slow Cooker

A few weeks later, I was contacted by the peeps at Crock-Pot® The Original Slow Cooker <- yes, they are insanely paranoid about me using their correct trademarked name, so much that they’ve given me very specific instructions 4 separate times on how to properly spell/mark their product names.) They sent me their new eLume Crock-Pot® Programmable Slow Cooker with Touch Screen Technology to test.

crock-pot-elume <- shiny, pretty and fancy. Oh crap, I forgot the ™ after eLume™.

It’s the perfect size (6.5 quarts) for a big mean mama pot of PHO!!!

Oh yeah, baby! It solves my problem of paranoia when leaving stove on all night.

What I love about the eLume™ Crock Pot® is© its™ lighted™© touchscreen®™©. Just a light tap is all that you need and it’s totally programmable from 30 minutes to 20 hours of cooking time. You can also set it to start cooking at a certain time, but when making my Crock Pot Pho Recipe, I don’t recommend a delayed start time since we are working with raw meat bones.

Crockpot Pho Recipe

How to make Crock Pot Pho

Whether you use the Crock Pot Pho method or the traditional stove top method, there are a couple of steps that you’ll need to do before throwing it all in the Crock Pot or slow cooker. Namely, toasting the spices, grilling the onion/ginger and pre-boiling the bones. These aren’t absolutely necessary steps…you’ll still make great pho…BUT these extra steps will make the difference between good pho and pho-bulous pho.

Toasting the Vietnamese Pho Spices

Toasting spices for Crock pot Vietnamese pho

You can buy Pho spices at most Asian supermarkets – you can buy the spices separately (coriander seeds, cloves, cinnamon, star anise, fennel and cardamom pod) or purchase them already mixed up in a package (which also includes a small mesh bag). The quality of these pre-mixed spices are just okay – but sometimes it’s just convenient to pick up a bag, not to mention much cheaper if you don’t already have many of these spices. A Pho spice pack will typically sell for $1-$3.

This day that I made the Crock Pot Pho, I used individual spices. I didn’t have cardamom pod. So yes, if you are missing one of couple of the spices, it’s okay. To get the best flavor from these spices, you’ll toast them in a dry skillet.

Grilling Ginger and Onion

This is a totally optional step, but it really gives the ginger and the onion a deep, sweet, mellow flavor. When I’m making Pho the traditional stovetop way, I’ll char them in the broiler. But with the crock pot method, I didn’t want to use the oven at all. After toasting the spices (above) in a frying pan, I add a bit of oil and grilled the onion half and thick ginger slices.

crockpot-pho-beef_090418__004_onion-web

Pre-Boiling the Bones

Knuckles, leg bones with lots of marrow are the best for making soup. The marrow will also make the soup rich and thick. The bones are pre-boiled for a few minutes on high heat to clean the bones and get rid of the nasty scum.

You’ll bring a big stockpot of water to a boil on high heat. Add the bones and boil hard for 10 minutes. You’ll see brownish scum rise to the surface. If you hadn’t taken the time to pre-boil the bones, all that scummy stuff ends up in your soup.

crockpot-pho-beef_090418__003_scum-web <– nasty pho-reaky scum

Drain, discard the scummy water and briefly rinse the bones.

Now you’ll add the spices, ginger, onion and bones to the slow cooker.

crockpot-pho-beef_090418__008_pot-web

Fill with fresh, clean, cool water about 1-1/2 inches below the surface. Set your slow cooker on low for 8 hours. I haven’t tried this method on high, but I’m sure it would be just fine.

So let this cook during all day while you’re at work or at night while you sleep and you’ll be rewarded with the cleanest, best tasting pho soups ever. Because the slow cooker doesn’t let the stock boil hard, it’s safe, easy and convenient.

Here’s what the stock looks like when it’s been cooking for 8 hours on low. Notice that the level of the liquid is still pretty high. The low, even setting doesn’t evaporate the precious liquid as much as a stove top can. The stock is strained before serving.

Crock Pot Pho Soup

Other Pho Ingredients

I used different ingredients than my previous version of traditional Vietnamese Pho and I wanted to highlight them. Instead of using dried rice noodles, I used fresh rice noodles found at Asian markets, in the refrigerated section because all these need is a quick dip in boiling water. Very fast!

Crock Pot Pho Noodles

I also bought a package of Vietnamese Beef Balls (called Bo Vien Dan). There are all sorts of balls – beef, pork, chicken, fish, crab, and my favorite – beef tendon. They come frozen in a package and they are pre-cooked, so all you need to do is throw the frozen balls into the same pot of boiling water as you cooked your noodles in. Just boil for a couple of minutes until the beef balls are heated through. I like cutting these beef balls in half, so make them easier to eat. It’s not so pretty trying to stick an entire beef ball in your mouth. Unless…you’re like really into that.

Crock Pot Pho Beef Balls

***

Crockpot Pho Recipe

***

Yum
Print

Crock Pot Pho Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: Cook Time:
crockpot vietnamese pho

This is a recipe for a 6.5 quart (or larger) Crock Pot. Any smaller really isn't that great - you won't get enough stock out of it...because the beef bones are really chunky and big. The thinly sliced meat for the bowls may be easier to slice if you freeze the chunk of meat for 15 minutes prior to slicing. You really want them as thin a possible. You can also do what I do - palm your butcher a $5 bill and he'll slice the meat for you on his fancy slicing machine

Ingredients:

For the Pho Stock:
4 pounds beef bones
1/2 onion
4 inch section of ginger, sliced
1 package Vietnamese Pho Spices (or as many of these spices as you have: 2 cinnamon sticks, 2 teaspoons whole coriander, 1 teaspooon fennel, 3 whole star anise, 3 whole cloves, 1 cardamom pod)
9 cups water
2 1/2 tablespoons fish sauce or to taste
1 teaspoon sugarFor the Pho Bowls
16 ounces fresh or dried rice noodles
1/2 pound flank, london broil, sirloin or eye of round steak, sliced as thinly as possible.
11 ounces Vietnamese beef balls, cut into halfFor the table
1-2 limes, cut into wedges
fresh herbs: cilantro, Thai basil, mint
2-3 chili peppers, sliced
2 big handfuls of bean sprouts
Hoisin sauce
Sriracha hot chili sauce

Directions:

1. Bring a large stockpot with water to boil over high heat. When it comes to a rolling boil, add the beef bones and boil vigourously for 10 minutes.

2. In the meantime, heat a frying pan on medium-low heat. Add the Vietnamese Pho Spices and toast until fragrant, about 2-3 minutes. Dump the spices to the empty Crock Pot or slow cooker immediately. Return frying pan to medium-high heat and add 1 tablespoon of oil. When the oil is hot, add the ginger slices and the onion half. Cook until the ginger is browned on both sides and the onion half is nicely browned and softened. Add the ginger and the onion to the Crock Pot or slow cooker.

3. When the bones have been pre-boiled, drain, discard water and rinse bones briefly to clean them. Add the bones to the Crock Pot or slow cooker. Fill the Crock Pot with fresh, clean, cool water to just 1-1/2 inches below surface, add the fish sauce and sugar. Cover and set the Crock Pot or slow cooker to cook on low for 8 hours. Taste and season with additional fish sauce if needed.

4. When you are just about ready to eat, you'll prep the rest of the ingredients for the Pho bowls. Bring a pot of water to a boil. Add the beef balls and cook until heated through, about 2 minutes. Remove the balls, keeping the water boiling and now cook the noodles according to package instructions. If you are using fresh noodles, all they need is a couple of minutes. Drain immediately.

5. Strain the stock with a fine meshed sieve. Discard the solids.

6. Line up 4 large bowls on counter. Distribute the noodles, beef balls and thin steak slices evenly amongst the bowls. Ladle the hot Pho stock into each bowl. The hot stock should cook the thin steak slices. Serve with lime wedges, fresh herbs, chili peppers, Hoisin sauce and Sriracha hot chili sauce at the table.

===

vietnamese-pho-beef-noodle-soup-recipe Vietnamese Pho Recipe (cooked the traditional, long, slow, stovetop method)

vietnamese-chicken-pho-recipe Vietnamese Chicken Pho Recipe (Pho Ga)

The post Crock Pot Pho (Vietnamese Beef Noodle Soup) appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/3136-crock-pot-pho.html/feed 195
Cardamom Coffee Zucchini Bread http://steamykitchen.com/1382-cardamom-coffee-zucchini-bread.html http://steamykitchen.com/1382-cardamom-coffee-zucchini-bread.html#comments Thu, 04 Sep 2008 02:05:13 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/?p=1382 We were quite a boring family when I grew up in North Platte, Nebraska. There just weren’t very many super exciting things for a Chinese immigrant family to do in the small town and we lived on a dirt road, across from the empty field lot, next to the traffic light in the middle of nowhere. Usually on weekends, we’d ...

The post Cardamom Coffee Zucchini Bread appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
Cardamom Coffee Zucchini Bread

We were quite a boring family when I grew up in North Platte, Nebraska. There just weren’t very many super exciting things for a Chinese immigrant family to do in the small town and we lived on a dirt road, across from the empty field lot, next to the traffic light in the middle of nowhere. Usually on weekends, we’d stay at home. But once every couple of months, when we were feeling a bit frisky and itchin’ for some variety, we’d all pack in our puke green Chevrolet Impala station wagon (complete with the lovely wood paneled sides) and drive to the nearest Asian market – Denver, Colorado, which was four and half hours away and four and a half hours back. It was good to be near our peeps, stock up on Asian ingredients and pick up a Chinese newspaper, our only link to what was happening back home. Oh, those were wild times.

My parents kept themselves occupied at home by building and tending to a ginormous backyard garden where we grew a bunch of Chinese vegetables and also all the normal Midwest garden stuff like corn, raspberries, watermelon and zucchini.

I hated the garden. No, hate is not a strong enough word. I’d rather spend my day picking rabid gnats off a monkey’s back than to tend to the half-acre of time sucking, weed wrestling, no-good garden. Oh, I’m sure my family enjoyed the fresh fruits and vegetables that we grew…but I don’t really remember that. All I remember were the weeds and zucchini. I don’t know what kind of ancient Chinese squid brain fertilizer my dad used, but damn, that stuff was potent, particularly favoring the zucchini.

My job was to go out into the garden every day, pull them stupid ‘ol weeds and then haul back the day’s squash harvest. We’d pile them up on our picnic table in the patio, stuff them in the refrigerator, canned them for the pantry (gross) and offer basketfuls to our neighbors. Pretty soon I was running out of room and ended up chucking them down the basement stairs just to temporarily have a place to store them. But then I’d forget and rotting zucchini smelled quite awful.

Mom made batches and batches of zucchini bread and would send me to school with loaves of zucchini bread to bribe my school teacher with. Very quickly, it became clear that the bribe was beginning to have adverse effects, especially after third loaf of zucchini bread in seven days, so I started chucking the zucchini bread into random, unlocked parked cars on my way to school. But then, I think people were tired of sitting down into their car seats and “squish” finding freshly squashed squash bread. They started locking their doors.

Well, I’ll tell you what. After all those years of making zucchini bread, I swear, my mom has perfected the recipe. So, when I challenged Chef Greg Howe of the Ritz Carlton to a Iron Chef-like competition and found out that the not-so-secret secret ingredient was zucchini, I called my mom for her recipe. And then I tweaked it ever so slightly to include two of my latest obsessions – coffee and cardamom.

By the way, Chef Greg kicked my butt in the competition. If you are ever in Sarasota, treat yourself to an exquisite dinner at the Ritz Carlton. Chef Greg is a master of packing bursts of fresh flavors in the most delicate, light textures. His unique Popcorn Bisque is a must-try. Just don’t order their zucchini bread dessert…I think mom’s was better!  😉

So, here’s my version of Cardamom Coffee Zucchini Bread.

Cardamom Coffee Zucchini Bread

3 cups flour
1/2 teaspoon table salt
2 teaspoons baking soda
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon ground cardamom
1 tablespoon finely ground coffee beans
3 eggs
1 cup canola oil
1 cup sugar
2/3 cup brown sugar
2 cups shredded zucchini
One 8.5oz can crushed pineapple

Preheat your oven to 350F.

In a large bowl, combine the flour, salt, baking soda, baking powder, ground cardamom and espresso.

In your mixer, beat the eggs with the canola oil, sugar and the brown sugar. Add the zucchini and crushed pineapple. Turn the mixer to low and add in the flour mixture, half at a time, letting it mix in between. Do not over mix.

Spray 2 loaf pans with nonstick cooking spray. Divide the batter in half and fill. Bake for 1 hour or until a toothpick inserted in the middle comes out clean.

The post Cardamom Coffee Zucchini Bread appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/1382-cardamom-coffee-zucchini-bread.html/feed 51
Grapes and Grappa, Figs and Olives + Free Cooking Light Cookbooks! http://steamykitchen.com/307-grapesgrappa.html http://steamykitchen.com/307-grapesgrappa.html#comments Fri, 25 Apr 2008 20:40:44 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/?p=307 Since I’ve been working on my cookbook, which is all about modern Asian cooking, almost everything edible that comes out of my kitchen has been Chinese, Japanese, Thai, Vietnamese, Malaysian or Korean. Yes, it can be tiring and I’m considering starting a new blog called “Steamy Kitchen, UnAsian” just to break the monotony. Gimme some Brazilian! Moroccan! Australian! My family ...

The post Grapes and Grappa, Figs and Olives + Free Cooking Light Cookbooks! appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
Grapes and Grappa, Figs and Olives

Since I’ve been working on my cookbook, which is all about modern Asian cooking, almost everything edible that comes out of my kitchen has been Chinese, Japanese, Thai, Vietnamese, Malaysian or Korean. Yes, it can be tiring and I’m considering starting a new blog called “Steamy Kitchen, UnAsian” just to break the monotony. Gimme some Brazilian! Moroccan! Australian!

My family has been begging for something different, and everytime that I ask the kids, “so what do you want for supper tonight?” They chime excitedly, “McDonald’s HAPPY MEALS! Hip, hip, HOORRAYYYY!”

Which is fine. I give in. Because I do love me some McD french fries dipped in soft serve ice cream. I know, You’re groaning. It’s a leftover habit and craving from my pregnancy days.

Please tell me that I’m not alone in this craving! Please tell me that you, too have strange culinary cravings and secret flavor combinations that just make other people squirm uncomfortably in their pants.

Tell me and I’ll enter you in the drawing to win one of three gorgeous Cooking Light The Complete Cookbook – this baby is MASSIVE, weighing in at 4.4lbs with 1,200 recipes, 630 color photographs and a companion DVD. Plus I think there is an offer for 1 free year of Cooking Light magazine subscription inside.

OHOHOH! And there’s a bonus…at the end of this post.

Perks of Being My Friend

I get many cookbooks and products for review. Things I don’t like, I don’t mention on the blog and just give it away. The things that I do like, I review, write about it and give you all a chance to win the product for free. One of the many perks of being in close proximity of my mailbox each day at 4pm when I check my mail is that you can be the first to call “dibs,” as I often give the book or product away when I’m done with the review.

MiMi (grandma), visiting from Buffalo, just happened to be there right as I was opening the box from Cooking Light’s PR agency. She called dibs and happily flipped through the book as if it was hers already.

But then later that evening, I finally had a chance to flip through it. HOT DAMN!! I love the book! And I’m keeping it. There’s no way I’m letting this baby go! (Sorry, Mimi, you’ll just have to enter in the contest and see if you can win it!)

The reason I love this book so much is the variety of flavor combinations that I normally wouldn’t have come up with myself. See recipes below.

adapted from Cooking Light The Complete Cookbook. The recipe calls for boneless chicken thighs, cut into chunks. What I did instead was use whole bone-in chicken thighs, had Scott grill them outside on the BBQ grill, and just made the sauce separate to pour over when the chicken was done grilling. I love this recipe- this is definitely a keeper and all my dinner guests raved about it.

Moroccan Chicken: Figs, Olives and Honey

Prep : 12 min. Cook : 16 min. Serves 4

2 teaspoons olive oil
1-1/2 lbs chicken skinless, boneless chicken thighs, cut into large 1-1/2″ pieces
1/2 cup chopped fresh parsley
1/2 cup quartered dried Calimyrna figs
1/4 cup chopped green olives
3 tablespoons sweet Marsala or Madeira wine
2 tablespoons honey
1 tablespoon minced garlic
2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
1/2 teaspoon ground coriander
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1/4 teaspoon ground cardamom

Heat oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add chicken; cook 5 minutes or until browned, stirring frequently. Stir in chopped parsley and next 9 ingredients; reduce heat to medium and cook 8 minutes; stirring occasionally. Garnish with parsley sprigs if desired.

Grapes and Grappa, Figs and Olives

inspired by Cooking Light The Complete Cookbook. Original recipe was Grapes and Grappa with Quail. But I didn’t have a quail handy and craved a warm salad instead. The original recipe called for Prosciutto, but when I went to the market, Prosciutto was *#$@!* $8.00 for 6 paper-thin slices. WTF? So I know this cookbook is cooking LIGHT. But I wasn’t about to pay that kind of money for crappy prosciutto. So I used bacon instead.

I think I just upped the caloric intake by a hundred or so. Feel free to slap me.

Grappa is an Italian liquor distilled from grape pressings left over after winemaking; cognac is a good substitute.

Grapes, Grappa and Bacon: A Warm Salad

serves 6-8

1 bag of salad greens
1/2 lb grapes, cut in half
4 slices of turkey bacon, bacon or prosciutto
2 ounces grappa
3 tablespoons cider vinegar
1/2 teaspoon sugar
1/2 teaspoon Dijon mustard
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

OPTION #1: I’m gonna give you a choice. If you’re gonna use bacon or turkey bacon, the cooking light way would be to crisp in the microwave on paper towels. Once it’s cooked, crumble and set aside. Heat a medium, nonstick skillet over high heat and add 1 tbl olive oil. When oil is hot, add the grapes and cook for 15 seconds. Add cider vinegar, grappa, sugar, mustard, salt and pepper. Simmer for 30 seconds and pour over salad greens. Top with crumbled bacon.

OPTION #2: Using prosciutto. Cut prosciutto into small, bite-sized pieces. Grab a large skillet, add 1 tbl olive oil and heat over medium heat. When hot, Add prosciutto. Fry crisp. Add grapes, let the grapes sizzle in the olive oil for 15 seconds. Add grappa, vinegar, sugar, S&P, and mustard. Let simmer on low for 30 seconds. Pour over salad greens. Eat and then go jogging around the block.

OPTION #3: The shameful, sinful method that I used. Cut bacon into small, bite-sized pieces. Grab a large skillet and add bacon in skillet. Cook bacon over medium heat. until crisp. You should have about 1 tablespoon of bacon fat in the pan. (wince!) You can spoon some of the fat out if there’s a lot. Add grapes, let the grapes sizzle in the fat for 15 seconds. Add grappa, vinegar, sugar, S&P, and mustard. Let simmer on low for 30 seconds. Pour over salad greens. Eat and then go jogging around the block.

***

Drawing for the free Cooking Light cookbook!

All you have to do is comment below. Tell me a flavor or ingredient combination that isn’t mainstream. It doesn’t have to be strange or exotic – just maybe a little different, innovative or…ok, strange is cool too. p.s. I like pickles + pate in a baguette too.

Here are mine:

Seaweed sprinkled with salty/sweet plum powder (li hing)

Canned smoked oysters + apricot jam

Winners have been announced!!! See who won.

***

I will really regret typing this…


But for shits and giggles, when I announce the 3 winners of the cookbook in a couple of weeks, I will let YOU vote for which strange flavor concoction for met to try. I will make it and videotape myself eating it, all for your sick and twisted enjoyment.

You’ll decide in a couple of weeks. And maybe…just maybe I might do this on television.

Now, that’s web-ertainment. Beat that, Zimmern.

Contest is over, but come vote for which strange flavor concoction that I will try (and whoever you pick also gets a nice Steamy Kitchen care package.

The post Grapes and Grappa, Figs and Olives + Free Cooking Light Cookbooks! appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/307-grapesgrappa.html/feed 408
Sparkling Ginger Lime & Mint Cooler http://steamykitchen.com/301-sparkling-ginger-lime-cooler.html http://steamykitchen.com/301-sparkling-ginger-lime-cooler.html#comments Thu, 10 Apr 2008 13:49:11 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/?p=301 These are fabulous recipes from Modern Indian cookbook , written by my new friend and famous chef, Hari Nayak. If you are new to Indian cooking, this is absolutely the perfect book to start with. The recipes are simple, elegant and uses ingredients you can find in most supermarkets. Sparkling Ginger Lime Cooler serves 6 1 (3-inch) piece peeled fresh ...

The post Sparkling Ginger Lime & Mint Cooler appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
Sparkling Ginger Lime & Mint Cooler

These are fabulous recipes from Modern Indian cookbook , written by my new friend and famous chef, Hari Nayak. If you are new to Indian cooking, this is absolutely the perfect book to start with. The recipes are simple, elegant and uses ingredients you can find in most supermarkets.

Sparkling Ginger Lime Cooler

serves 6

1 (3-inch) piece peeled fresh ginger, grated on microplane grater
1/2 cup coarsely chopped fresh mint leaves
1/2 cup fresh lime juice (about 6 limes)
6 cups sparking water or club soda
1/2 cup sugar
Pinch of salt
Pinch of freshly ground black pepper

In a blender, blend together all the ingredients, except ice. Strain and serve over lots of ice. You can also add gin or vodka too!

Sweet Yogurt Sundae with Saffron & Pomegranate

Yes, this is the same yogurt sundae from November. Remember when I slept with Rocco?

My favorite source for saffron is a company called Saffron.com, where you’ll find a better quality of the spice at least 10 times cheaper than at your local market. You can judge the quality of the saffron by just looking at it. Pure saffron is red and only includes the style. If you see any yellow or orange on the thread, then you’re paying for the stigma which is colorless, tasteless and aromaless. Get the good stuff, as you are only using a pinch of the spice.

Sweet Yogurt Sundae with Saffron & Pomegranate

Serves 8

4 cups plain yogurt
1/4 cup honey
1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon ground cardamom
1/2 pomegranate
2 kiwis
large pinch of saffron strands

Line a large sieve or colander with cheesecloth. Place colander over a bowl. Place yogurt in colander to drain for 2-3 hours in the refrigerator. Discard the water (or whey.) Turn the yogurt into a bowl and mix in the honey, nutmeg and cardamom. Lightly toast the saffron strands in a small dry skillet over medium heat, until brittle. Let saffron cool on plate and with your fingers, finely crush the strands. Cut kiwi into small pieces and remove the seeds from the pomegranate. Layer yogurt, fruit and saffron in dessert cups.

***

Photo time!

Here are the photos that led up to the money shot. I’m still not happy with these photos, but take a look. And !@(*$&!$! what’s going on with the soggy, mushy colors??? They look perfectly vibrant to me loaded from my computer, but then it gets to the web and BAM! the photos look drunk. I’m using same monitor to view both. argh.


The post Sparkling Ginger Lime & Mint Cooler appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/301-sparkling-ginger-lime-cooler.html/feed 64
Vietnamese Pho: Beef Noodle Soup http://steamykitchen.com/271-vietnamese-beef-noodle-soup-pho.html http://steamykitchen.com/271-vietnamese-beef-noodle-soup-pho.html#comments Sat, 09 Feb 2008 20:15:33 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/2008/02/09/vietnamese-beef-noodle-soup-pho/ What the Pho?! I’ve been working hard perfecting the techniques and recipe for Vietnamese Beef Noodle Soup, or Pho, just for you. It’s taken years of kitchen experiments, eating out and scouring for good recipes. Of all the cookbooks that I own, the best recipe that I’ve found for Pho is from: Andrea Nguyen’s Into the Vietnamese Kitchen, which is ...

The post Vietnamese Pho: Beef Noodle Soup appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
Vietnamese Pho Noodle Soup Recipe

What the Pho?!

I’ve been working hard perfecting the techniques and recipe for Vietnamese Beef Noodle Soup, or Pho, just for you. It’s taken years of kitchen experiments, eating out and scouring for good recipes. Of all the cookbooks that I own, the best recipe that I’ve found for Pho is from:

Andrea Nguyen’s Into the Vietnamese KitchenInto the Vietnamese Kitchen Cookbook, which is one of the most comprehensive books on the cuisine of Vietnam. The book also won nominations for a James Beard Foundation award and two International Association of Culinary Professionals (IACP). Definitely a must-have book for Asian food lovers.

So, let’s get right to the Vietnamese Beef Pho Recipe!

The dish is pronounced “fuh” and not “foo” or “foe” or “puh”

Yeah, Pho is cheap eat out…but to be able to make a home made version? Pretty Pho-king amazing, if you ask me.

Pho Spices

It’s best if you can get each spice separately, but I do find that the spice packets are pretty convenient. They cost less than $2.00 and even come with a mesh bag to put all the spices in. Spices include cinnamon sticks, cloves, coriander pods, star anise and cardamom. Whatever you do, don’t use the Pho spice paste that comes in a jar or can. Nasty stuff, that’s Pho-sho’.

Pho Spices use for Vietnamese Pho Recipe

Best Bones for Pho

Knuckle bones are the best to make the stock. The knobby knuckle bones, about the size of your fist, is full of gelatin – which gives body and richness to your broth. The knuckle bones make the biggest difference in your broth! You can find knuckle bones at Asian markets, but at regular supermarkets – you might have to ask your butcher.

Leg bones are also great for the pho broth. Take a look at the photo below. The bone that’s at 12-o’clock position is a leg bone that contains marrow. The marrow is good, but it’s extremely fatty. If I have a lot of marrow bones, I’ll scoop out the marrow with a small spoon or knife and discard after the par-boiling (see below). Having too much marrow will give you a greasy film on your pho broth.

But let’s say that you can’t find leg/knuckle bones. Go ahead and use whatever beef bones your supermarket has and just supplement with some oxtail bones or a pound of beef meat (rump, chuck, brisket, etc.) for extra flavor. Alternatively, you can buy knuckle bones online – Blue Valley Meats offers 100% grass fed knuckle bones for $9 per bag.

 

beef knuckle bones for pho

Blue Valley Meats knuckle bones

Bones are parboiled first for a good 10 minutes in rapidly boiling water – this gets rid of the yucky impurities like blood particles and extra fat. You’ll see gray foam float up to the surface as you boil. After 10 minutes, dump out all of the water, rinse out your pot, rinse the bones, and refill with clean, cool water. I know it’s an extra step, but this will give you the pure, clean-tasting broth.

If you have a lot of marrow bones, use a spoon or knife to scoop out and discard some of the marrow. Do this after the parboil, while the bones are still hot. The marrow can only be scooped out when the bones are hot, otherwise, it solidifies.

 

Charring Onions and Ginger

Charring or roasting the onions and ginger gives you a wonderfully mellow and naturally sweet flavor. I used to char over an open flame on my stovetop with a pair of tongs, but that got pretty tiring. Plus, metal tongs + long time over flame = very hothothot hands. So now, I just raise my oven rack to the highest position and turn my broiler on. See how golden the ginger gets?

Char onions and ginger for Vietnamese Pho Recipevietnamese-pho-recipe-ginger

Damn Scumbag!

So here is my broth boilin’ away with the mesh bag of spices, charred ginger, charred onions and beef bones. You can see floating bits of fat and the damn scumbag.

Fat & marrow bits = good eats. Try to keep that in the broth!

But gotta get rid of the scum! I use a very, very fine mesh strainer designed just for scum. heh. A scumbag strainer. Can you imagine if I had a line of cookware and tools – “Steamy Kitchen Scumbag Strainer.” Straining the scum keeps your broth pure and clean. The lower the simmer, the less scum you have.

A note on broth simmering time – I simmer the broth for 3 hours. According to both Andrea Nguyen and Corinne Trang (author of Authentic Vietnamese Cooking and former editor and director of Saveur’s test kitchen) – all of the flavors in the bone have been extracted after 3 hours.

Skim the Scum when making broth for Vietnamese Pho Recipe

Thin Sliced Meat

You can use a thinly sliced flank steak, london broil, sirloin, eye of round or tri-tip. Instead of beef slices, you could use beef balls (Bo Vien) found in the freezer section of your Asian market. The secret to cutting meat is to cut across the grain. You want your beef slices as thin as possible, and I always throw the whole chunk of meat in the freezer for 15 minutes to make it easier to slice thinly.

How to slice steak for Vietnamese Pho Recipe

Pho Noodles


Rice noodles for vietnamese pho recipe


Vietnamese Beef Noodle Soup typically uses rice noodles. You can buy them dried or fresh. I love the slippery softness of fresh noodles (look in the refrigerator or freezer section.) Most restaurants will use dried, flat rice noodles. Look for ones that are medium thickness and flat like these.

Pho Condiments


Condiments for Vietnamese Pho Recipe


Pho-tastic condiments! On the tables of every Pho restaurant, you’ll see these two condiments, Cock Sauce (Sriracha hot chili sauce) and Hoisin Sauce. You can squirt and slather as much of these two condiments as you want…but I’m a purist.If I’m going to spend a couple of hours carefully crafting a rich, flavor-packed, clean soup – I better taste every damn drop. Condiment sauces just get in the way. Sometimes, I’ll squirt a bit of each sauce in a little dish and dip my meat in the sauce as I take a bite. You ask….why do we call it Cock sauce? See that rooster on the bottle?

Pho Vegetables and Herbs

Fresh mint, cilantro, basil, bean sprouts, limees, sliced chili peppers are just some of my favorite accompaniments. Set a plate at the table and your guests can pick and choose what they like. Here’s a great Pho-tograph of fresh vegetables and herbs.

Fresh Herbs for Vietnamese Pho Recipe

Recommended Tools

These are tools that I recommend and use in my kitchen.




More Pho Recipes

Crock Pot/Slow Cooker Pho Recipe

Crock Pot Slow Cooker Pho
Don’t have time to man a stove? Use your crock pot or slow cooker!

Vietnamese Chicken Pho (Pho Ga) Recipe

vietnamese-chicken-pho-recipe Vietnamese Chicken Noodle Soup (Pho Ga)

Pho-Lovers Pho-Ever

Guilty Carnivore
Eat Drink & Be Merry

Yum
Print

Vietnamese Pho: Beef Noodle Soup Recipe

Servings: 8 Prep Time: 30 minutes Cook Time: 4 hours
vietnamese-pho-recipe-2

Adapted from my favorite Vietnamese cookbook
Into the Vietnamese Kitchen

Sometimes, I omit the 1 pound of beef meat in the broth (you'll see I've made it optional) - as I've found that as long as I have good bones, the broth will have enough flavor to not need the extra beef meat.

Ingredients:

THE BROTH



2 onions, halved
4" nub of ginger, halved lengthwise
5-6 pounds of good beef bones, preferably leg and knuckle
1 pound of beef meat - chuck, brisket, rump, cut into large slices [optional]6 quarts of water
1 package of Pho Spices [1 cinnamon stick, 1 tbl coriander seeds, 1 tbl fennel seeds, 5 whole star anise, 1 cardamom pod, 6 whole cloves - in mesh bag]1 1/2 tablespoons kosher salt (halve if using regular table salt)
1/4 cup fish sauce
1 inch chunk of yellow rock sugar (about 1 oz) - or 1oz of regular sugar

2 pounds rice noodles (dried or fresh)
Cooked beef from the broth (shredded or thinly sliced)
1/2 pound flank, london broil, sirloin or eye of round, sliced as thinly as possible.
big handful of each: mint, cilantro, basil
2 limes, cut into wedges
2-3 chili peppers, sliced
2 big handfuls of fresh bean sprouts
Hoisin sauce
Sriracha hot sauce

Directions:

Char: Turn your broiler on high and move rack to the highest spot. Place ginger and onions on baking sheet. Brush just a bit of cooking oil on the cut side of each. Broil on high until ginger and onions begin to char. Turn over and continue to char. This should take a total of 10-15 minutes.

Parboil the bones: Fill large pot (12-qt capacity) with cool water. Boil water, and then add the bones, keeping the heat on high. Boil vigorously for 10 minutes. Drain, rinse the bones and rinse out the pot. If you have a lot of marrow in the bones, use a small spoon to scoop out and discard some of the marrow. Refill pot with bones and 6 qts of cool water. Bring to boil over high heat and lower to simmer. Using a ladle or a fine mesh strainer, remove any scum that rises to the top.

Boil broth: Add ginger, onion, spice packet, beef, sugar, fish sauce, salt and simmer uncovered for 1 1/2 hours. Remove the beef meat and set aside (you'll be eating this meat later in the bowls) Continue simmering for another 1 1/2 hours. Strain broth and return the broth to the pot. Taste broth and adjust seasoning - this is a crucial step. If the broth's flavor doesn't quite shine yet, add 2 teaspoons more of fish sauce, large pinch of salt and a small nugget of rock sugar (or 1 teaspoon of regular sugar). Keep doing this until the broth tastes perfect.

Prepare noodles & meat: Slice your flank/london broil/sirloin as thin as possible - try freezing for 15 minutes prior to slicing to make it easier. Remember the cooked beef meat that was part of your broth? Cut or shred the meat and set aside. Arrange all other ingredients on a platter for the table. Your guests will "assemble" their own bowls. Follow the directions on your package of noodles - there are many different sizes and widths of rice noodles, so make sure you read the directions. For some fresh rice noodles, just a quick 5 second blanch in hot water is all that's needed. The package that I purchased (above) - needed about 45 seconds in boiling water.

Ladling: Bring your broth back to a boil. Line up your soup bowls next to the stove. Fill each bowl with rice noodles, shredded cooked beef and raw meat slices. As soon as the broth comes back to a boil, ladle into each bowl. the hot broth will cook your raw beef slices. Serve immediately. Guests can garnish their own bowls as they wish.

The post Vietnamese Pho: Beef Noodle Soup appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/271-vietnamese-beef-noodle-soup-pho.html/feed 635
Sweet Yogurt Sundae with Saffron & Pomegranate http://steamykitchen.com/200-sweetyogurtsundae.html http://steamykitchen.com/200-sweetyogurtsundae.html#comments Wed, 21 Nov 2007 04:55:55 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/2007/11/21/sweetyogurtsundae/ The moment my toes met carpet this morning, I could feel 12,035 pounds of heavy clouds whoosh towards my home, settling just above my tangled mess of hair. I should have just made myself a bloody mary, grabbed a bag of peanut M&M’s and surrendered back to bed, as there was no way that I would come out ahead ...

The post Sweet Yogurt Sundae with Saffron & Pomegranate appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
Sweet Yogurt Sundae

The moment my toes met carpet this morning, I could feel 12,035 pounds of heavy clouds whoosh towards my home, settling just above my tangled mess of hair. I should have just made myself a bloody mary, grabbed a bag of peanut M&M’s and surrendered back to bed, as there was no way that I would come out ahead at the end of this day. I knew it was over. I had an out of control problem and needed to address it head-on.

(sigh) “I’m sorry, Emeril. I’ve got to give you up, sweetie 

What I once called a “collection” had turned into an embarrassing epidemic. The books covered my kitchen counter, littered the floor like a trail of cookie crumbs leading from bed to bookshelf and completely took over every available dry, horizontal surface in my home. Every day at 5pm, it was the same routine – shuffle books from kitchen counter to dining table to make room to cook. Then shift the volumes back to the kitchen for dinnertime. Just last night, I spent 2 hours searching for my laptop, only to find it wedged between the Bread Bible and the past 6 years of Food and Wine.

But oh how I love my companions! In the late hours of the night, I love caressing Tyler’s, Giada’s and even Raichlen’s glossy pages of beautiful, lusty photographs of food. My husband is secure enough in our relationship that he lets Rocco hang out at the edge of the nightstand, just inches from my sleeping head.

No. I had to let go.

It was time to de-clutter. Wiping off yesterday’s black eyeliner that streaked down my cheek, I cradled Nigella and whispered, “Honey, it’s better this way, your Coconut Macaroons never really came out that great anyways.” With a single deep breath, I looked away, turned her face down and tearfully trailed my finger one last time along her spine.

(sniff)

Then suddenly, I heard a dull “thump” at the door. It was my prince, Amazon, who rode in a big brown truck coming to rescue me from this silliness. He quickly snapped me right back with the RRRRRIIIIPPPPP of the packing tape being torn off.

Ahhhh….dreamy Hari Nayak and his Modern Indian cookbook greeted me with a welcoming, warm cover that seduced me with exotic combinations of spices like cardamom, cinnamon, coriander and cloves. He even whispered sweet promises with innovative spice techniques like dry-toasting saffron threads for a smooth, creamy dessert.

So smitten I was with Chef Hari’s book that I emailed him for 3 signed copies for you. Oh, I know it sounds like I’m try to clutter your home with another cookbook, just so I could feel a little better about my situation. And yeah, ok, you got me there. But how could you resist recipes like Marsala Mashed Potatoes, Tamarind Rice with Roasted Peanuts and Pink Peppercorn Chocolate Truffles?

Quickly glancing back at the Tetris-like piles of books, I smiled sheepishly. I’ll try again tomorrow.

***

Sweet Yogurt Sundae with Saffron & Pomegranate

Yum
Print

Sweet Yogurt Sundae with Saffron & Pomegranate

Servings: 8 Prep Time: Cook Time:
Screen Shot 2014-02-26 at 2.26.21 PM

My version is a bit different from Chefs Hari and Vikas - but definitely inspired by their spice combinations. Straining the yogurt creates a creamy, rich dessert without the calories of let's say, ice cream or creme fraiche. Instead of straining plain yogurt, you can use unstrained Greek yogurt. Use whatever fruit combinations you like, I love the festiveness of pomegranate and kiwi. Fresh grated cinnamon would also be a great addition. I would have loved to have pistachios in the dessert too! Inspired by Modern Indian by Hari Nayak and Vikas Khanna

Ingredients:

4 cups plain yogurt
1/4 cup honey
1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon ground cardamom
1/2 pomegranate
2 kiwis
large pinch of saffron strands

Directions:

1. Line a large sieve or colander with cheesecloth. Place colander over a bowl. Place yogurt in colander to drain for 2-3 hours in the refrigerator. Discard the water (or whey.) Turn the yogurt into a bowl and mix in the honey, nutmeg and cardamom.

2. Lightly toast the saffron strands in a small dry skillet over medium heat, until brittle. Let saffron cool on plate and with your fingers, finely crush the strands. Cut kiwi into small pieces and remove the seeds from the pomegranate.

3. Layer yogurt, fruit and saffron in dessert cups.


***

This next recipe was also inspired by the book – I would have never thought to combine vanilla and sweet chili sauce for a salad dressing, but let me tell you, it was wonderfully sensuous. Seared Scallops with Vanilla & Sweet Chili Dressing.

The post Sweet Yogurt Sundae with Saffron & Pomegranate appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/200-sweetyogurtsundae.html/feed 113