Steamy Kitchen Recipes | RSS Feed http://steamykitchen.com Steamy Kitchen Food Blog: fast recipes, simple recipes, with fresh ingredients to create delicious meals. Tue, 30 Jun 2015 16:40:20 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.2 Chinese Broccoli with Garlicky Ginger Miso http://steamykitchen.com/21999-chinese-broccoli-garlicy-ginger-miso-sauce-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/21999-chinese-broccoli-garlicy-ginger-miso-sauce-recipe.html#comments Wed, 27 Jun 2012 15:18:00 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=21999 I’m so affected by food that even the mention of certain city names can illicit a salivary response. Pavlov’s dog for the foodie. If I think “Chicago”, I immediately remember Grant Achatz painting our table with candy gems, fruit baubles and sweet jams. Tomorrow, I’m heading back to Chi-town to speak at a food blogger event hosted by Verizon Wireless. Included in the trip ...

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Chinese Broccoli Garlicy Ginger Miso Sauce Recipe

I’m so affected by food that even the mention of certain city names can illicit a salivary response. Pavlov’s dog for the foodie. If I think “Chicago”, I immediately remember Grant Achatz painting our table with candy gems, fruit baubles and sweet jams.

Tomorrow, I’m heading back to Chi-town to speak at a food blogger event hosted by Verizon Wireless. Included in the trip is a free evening the day I arrive (can I sneak into Alinea? will they notice if I don an apron and pose as staff? can I hide under someone’s table?) and a super-secret supper that I know nothing about. I love super-secret suppers….well, that is, if I don’t get arrested for trying to sneak into Alinea!

Before I head out, I’m giving you another Asian recipe – this time for Chinese broccoli (called gai-lan) and a garlicky, gingery, chile-y, miso-y sauce.  It’s zippy.

Okay, so what’s Chinese broccoli? It comes from the same family as regular broccoli, but it has a stronger, more pronounced taste. It’s bitter if you eat it raw, which is why it’s always cooked.

In Chinese, it’s gai-lan or kai-lan, pronounced “guy-LAN”

The stems are thick, the color of the leaves is more like kale (blue-green).  While the florets of regular broccoli is eaten – many open florets on Chinese broccoli often means the vegetable is old and tough. The stems and leaves is what you eat.

Did you know? Broccolini is a cross between broccoli and gai-lan.

How to buy: Chinese broccoli should have very few florets. If you see small white flowers blooming, it probably means it’s past it’s prime and will be tough and bitter. Also take a look at the bottoms of the stems – fresh young Chinese broccoli will have a wet-milky-transluscent-ish color in the center of the stem. Old Chinese broccoli stem will be dried up with a hard, white opaque center. Skip it.

Chinese Broccoli Garlicy Ginger Miso Sauce Recipe

This is a recipe I’ve developed for my client, Miso & Easy. You can either use their product, which is miso paste in a squeeze bottle, or use regular miso paste that you can find in most grocery stores. Either one will work in this recipe!

Chinese Broccoli with Garlicy Ginger Miso Recipe

Here are the ingredients you’ll need:

ingredient map Chinese Broccoli Garlicy Ginger Miso Sauce Recipe

Cut the Chinese broccoli like this, which helps the vegetable cook evenly. The stems are thick, so they go at the bottom of the pan, which is hotter.

Chinese Broccoli Garlicy Ginger Miso Sauce Recipe

Add 1″ of water to your wok, then add in the stems on the bottom.

Chinese Broccoli Garlicy Ginger Miso Sauce Recipe

Lay the leaves on top.

Chinese Broccoli Garlicy Ginger Miso Sauce Recipe

Cover the wok and let the vegetables cook.

Chinese Broccoli Garlicy Ginger Miso Sauce Recipe

Once the Chinese broccoli is done, remove them to a plate and wipe the wok dry. This will prevent splatters when you add in the cooking oil. Stir fry the aromatics: garlic, ginger, chile.

Chinese Broccoli Garlicy Ginger Miso Sauce Recipe

Add in the remaining ingredients and stir. Let it simmer for just a bit and then pour on top of the Chinese broccoli and serve.

Chinese Broccoli Garlicy Ginger Miso Sauce Recipe

Chinese Broccoli Garlicy Ginger Miso Sauce Recipe

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Chinese Broccoli with Garlicky Ginger Miso Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 5 Minutes Cook Time: 5 Minutes
chinese-broccoli-miso-recipe-8236.jpg

If you don't have Chinese broccoli, feel free to use any other greens like asparagus, broccoli, broccolini, broccoli rabe, mustard greens, napa cabbage, bok choy, etc.

Ingredients:

1 pound Chinese broccoli (gai lan)
1 tablespoon cooking oil
1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger
1 clove garlic
1/2 teaspoon minced fresh hot chile pepper
1 tablespoon miso paste (or 2 tablespoons Miso & Easy)
2 tablespoons water
1/4 teaspoon roasted sesame oil
1 teaspoon soy sauce

Directions:

1. Trim ends of the Chinese broccoli. Line up the Chinese broccoli with the stems facing same direction. Cut the stalks in half to separate the thick stems from the leaves.

2. Add 1" of water to a wok, pot or large saute pan and bring to a simmer on medium heat. Layer in the broccoli stems at the bottom of the wok and layer the leaves on top of the stems. You want the thick stems closer to the bottom of the pan so that they will cook faster. Steam for 3 minutes. Use tongs to lift the leaves to a serving plate. Check the stems to make sure they are cooked - they should be easily pierced with a fork. Plate the stems when they are done.

3. Discard the remaining water in the wok and wipe dry with a towel. Return wok to the stove and add in the cooking oil and ginger, garlic and chile pepper. Turn the heat to medium-low. Once the oil in the wok begins shimmering, cook for another 15 seconds (take care not to burn the aromatics). Stir in the miso water, soy sauce and sesame oil and cook another 15 seconds. Pour sauce over the Chinese broccoli.

Other Chinese Vegetable Recipes

Chinese Broccoli with Oyster Sauce (Steamy Kitchen)

Chinese Yu Choy Stir Fry (Steamy Kitchen)

Stir Fried Bok Choy Recipe (Steamy Kitchen)

Restaurant Style Chinese Greens (Rasa Malaysia)

Stir Fried Nai Bai (Noob Cook)

Chinese Broccoli Beef Noodle Stir Fry (Steamy Kitchen)

 

 

 

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Malaysian Chicken Noodle Soup with Asian Greens and Chili-Soy Sauce http://steamykitchen.com/4128-malaysian-chicken-noodle-soup-ipoh-sar-hor-fun.html http://steamykitchen.com/4128-malaysian-chicken-noodle-soup-ipoh-sar-hor-fun.html#comments Thu, 18 Jun 2009 06:37:08 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=4128 [imagebrowser id=18] Malaysian Chicken Noodle Soup is called Ipoh Sar Hor Fun in Malaysia. “Ipoh” is the town that this dish originates from. I’m a bad, bad blogger. One who eats crumbly chocolate chip cookies while editing photos on a very expensive laptop with nose 2 inches from screen, thinking out loud “is this shade of green more greener than ...

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Malaysian Chicken Noodle Soup is called Ipoh Sar Hor Fun in Malaysia. “Ipoh” is the town that this dish originates from.

I’m a bad, bad blogger. One who eats crumbly chocolate chip cookies while editing photos on a very expensive laptop with nose 2 inches from screen, thinking out loud “is this shade of green more greener than that shade of green?” I never take the time to back up even now I’m a subscriber of multiple backup websites. And I read your very funny blog posts while drinking wine which sometimes results in a spontaneous spew of red, staining liquid that lands on my keyboard.

I’m a bad blogger because Chef Robert Danhi it took the time to chat with me on the phone a couple of weeks ago and I have yet to post the podcast. In fact, I don’t even know where the damn audio file is. It could be because of my upload-then-delete-on-harddrive-without-checking-upload habit that I accidentally slingshot (slingshotted? slingshoot? slungshot?) our recorded phone convo into a gazillion cyber-bytes, each zipping in separate directions.

I’m praying that Google will somehow come across the files, scoop it up and just stick it in his shirt pocket, at least just until I can figure a way to harness that “beam me up” technology to come claim my podcast.

-Jaden

p.s. I have some winners to announce! The winners of the Club Med vacation and the $50 Sur La Table Gift Card will be announced as soon as my jet lag decides it’s had enough (hopefully tomorrow)

But I still have one more giveaway going on – big-green-egg-baby-back-ribs-2475 Dr. BBQ Cookbook Giveaway (ends June 21st 12pm EST)

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Southeast Asian Flavors Cookbook

This morning we returned from a week in California, and all I wanted to eat was Chef Danhi’s Malaysian Chicken Noodle Soup. Warm, rich broth with silky-juicy chicken. Slippery fresh rice noodles and snappy shrimp. So I thought I might as well post this recipe without the podcast, before I lose this recipe and the photos too.

While the recipe is from Robert’s new book southeast-asian-flavors-cookbook Southeast Asian Flavors Cookbook, the photos above are mine when I had made his recipe two weeks prior. It’s a stellar recipe that I know you will absolutely enjoy. The James Beard Foundation nominated Southeast Asian Flavors among the finalists for a 2009 Book Award in the international category and it contains over 100 authentic recipes from Southeast Asia and over 700 color photographs that Robert Danhi took himself.

Southeast Asian Flavors Cookbook is a must-have in your Asian cookbook collection, because not only are the recipes authentic (Danhi has been traveling and studying Southeast Asian cooking for over 20 years) but the book also incudes anecdotes about the culture and history of Thailand, Vietnam, Malaysia and Singapore. Also make sure to visit Danhi’s website for this book – tons more photos.

This particular recipe for Malaysian Chicken Noodle Soup is virtually fool proof and one of the best recipes I’ve seen for an Asian noodle soup. The reason is because the chicken is slowly poached, resulting in meat that is tender and never overcooked. This is also the same technique that I use for Hainanese Chicken (recipe is in my upcoming cookbook)

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A few notes for Malaysian Chicken Noodle Soup Recipe

A few notes on the ingredients and techniques:

  • This method of poaching involves bringing the pot to a boil and then turning off the heat (keep the lid on!) and let the chicken slowly, gently poach in the very hot water until cooked through. It’s almost impossible to overcook the chicken this way, and you’ll get a very silky texture. Once the chicken is cooked through, immediately plunge it in ice-water to stop the cooking process and firm up the skin. Once the chicken is cool enough to handle, you’ll use your hands to shred/pull the meat. Whether you keep or discard the skin is up to you (I personally love the skin.) You won’t be using the entire chicken for this Malaysian Chicken Noodle Soup Recipe – reserve the rest for another meal.
  • Try to get a small chicken, if your chicken is larger than 3.5 pounds, you will have to increase your poaching time. If your chicken is over 4 pounds – once you’ve finished your 45 gentle poach, return the pot to a boil and immediately turn off the heat. Let the pot sit for another 5 minutes, then check for doneness.
  • If you don’t have white peppercorns, just use whole black peppercorns
  • I love using fresh rice noodles that you can find in the Asian markets (refrigerated section). If they are super-fresh they don’t need to be boiled…just soak them in warm water until softened. If they are still a bit hard, try soaking them in hot water for a few seconds. If you don’t have access to fresh rice noodles, then use dried, wide rice noodles and follow the instructions on the package for soaking/cooking times.

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Malaysian Chicken Noodle Soup (Ipoh Sar Hor Fun) Recipe

Recipe from southeast-asian-flavors-cookbook Southeast Asian Flavors Cookbook by Robert Danhi

Makes 4-6 bowls as a one-dish meal

1 whole chicken (3 to 3.5 lbs/ 1.4 to 1.8 kg.)
2-inch (5 cm.) piece ginger, cut into 1/2 inch slices and lightly smashed
1 large onion, cut in quarters
6 cloves garlic, smashed
12 white peppercorns, crushed with mortar/pestle or side of knife
2 teaspoons kosher salt

1. Make Chicken Broth: Place rinsed chicken in 2-gallon pot (8 L.), with just enough water to cover. Bring to a vigorous boil; lower to simmer. Skim off foam and impurities; simmer 15 minutes. Remove pot from heat, cover tightly, and leave undisturbed at room temperature for 45 minutes (an instant-read thermometer should read 165F / 74 C at the thickest part of the chicken).

2. Carefully lift chicken from poaching liquid and plunge into a large container/pot/bowl of ice water. Leave in water for 15 minutes to stop cooking and firm up meat. Using your hands, pull off skin and discard.

3. Pull meat off breast and thighs into 1/4to 1/2-inch (.6 to 1.3 cm.) thick strips, transfer to covered container and reserve at room temperature (you will have more than needed for the recipe).

4. Combine bones, thighs and poaching liquid back in the pot. Add ginger, onion, garlic, peppercorns and salt; simmer one hour to make a broth. Strain through fine wire mesh sieve. Taste and season well with salt.

SOUP GARNISHES
1 pound (454 g.) fresh rice noodles, about 1/4 inch (0.6 cm.) (1.3 cm.) wide
1/2 pound. (227 g.) small shrimp
1/2 pound. (227 g.) Chinese greens such as choy sum, bok choy, yu choy or gai-lan
2 scallions, chopped
Soak noodles in lukewarm water 10 minutes, drain; peel apart into individual strands. Poach shrimp in chicken broth until just cooked; peel, devein and halve lengthwise. Blanch whole bunches of choy sum in boiling water; transfer to a bowl of ice water for 30 seconds, squeeze dry, and cut into 2 to 3-inch pieces (5 to 7 cm.).

FOR THE CHILI-SOY SAUCE
4 to 6 each Thai bird chilies, or other small hot chilies, sliced thinly, about 1/8inch (0.3 cm.) thick
1/4 cup soy sauce
1/4 teaspoon dark/toasted sesame oil

Combine soy sauce, sesame oil and chilies, spoon mixture into individual bowls for each person.

ASSEMBLY OF MALAYSIAN CHICKEN NOODLE SOUP BOWLS
1. Bring seasoned broth up to a near boil. Have all ingredients ready, and have a pot of water boiling to reheat the noodles.

2. Reheat noodles in boiling water for 15 seconds. Drain, and distribute into 4 to 6 Asian soup bowls. Top noodles with chicken meat, shrimp, and choy sum. Ladle about 1 1/2 to 2 cups of broth into each bowl.

3. Sprinkle with scallions; serve with small dishes of chili-soy sauce. This sauce is used for dipping the subtly-flavored chicken, but can also be added to the soup.

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Chinese Broccoli (Gai Lan) with Oyster Sauce http://steamykitchen.com/82-chinese-broccoli-gai-lan-with-oyster-sauce-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/82-chinese-broccoli-gai-lan-with-oyster-sauce-recipe.html#comments Tue, 24 Apr 2007 13:30:05 +0000 http://s198136598.onlinehome.us/blog/2007/04/24/chinese-broccoli-gai-lan-with-oyster-sauce/         How to buy Gai Lan It’s easy to pick out the best Gai Lan, or to see if it is fresh and tender. Select a bunch, look at the ends of the stalk. If they are dry, crusted and shriveled. Don’t buy. The middle of the stalk should ideally be one color – a creamy, translucent ...

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Chinse Broccoli with Oyster Sauce Recipe

 

Chinse Broccoli with Oyster Sauce Recipe Closeup

Chinse Broccoli with Oyster Sauce Recipe Done

 

 

How to buy Gai Lan

It’s easy to pick out the best Gai Lan, or to see if it is fresh and tender. Select a bunch, look at the ends of the stalk. If they are dry, crusted and shriveled. Don’t buy. The middle of the stalk should ideally be one color – a creamy, translucent color. If you see a solid white circle in the middle of the stalk, it may mean the Gai Lan is a little old. It still could be good – look at the leaves and the buds for more clues to how fresh it is. Why is this so important? You briefly steam the Gai Lan so that it is tender crisp, so if the vegetable is old, you’ll really taste the bitterness.

 

Most Gai Lan have white flowers, though there are varieties that include both white and yellow flowers (probably a cross between gai lan and Chinese greens called yu choy) The flower buds should be tight and compact – there should be buds not open flowers. Lots and lots of open flowers means the stalk is older and past its prime for eating and it will be more bitter and chewy.

As with many Chinese stir-fry dishes, the ginger in this dish is cut into 1/8″ coins – the large pieces gently infuse the cooking oil and aren’t necessarily meant for eating. When we cook family-style, my Mom just leaves the ginger coins in the finished dish, and we just push them out of the way when we eat. Of course, you can remove them prior to serving if you’d like. The whole garlic also infuses the cooking oil and after toasting, it becomes soft and wonderfully sweet. Sometimes, I double the amount of garlic cloves because I just love eating the cloves of garlic!

 

 

 

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Chinese Broccoli Recipe (Gai Lan)

Servings: 4-6 Prep Time: 5 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes
chinese-broccoli-with-oyster-sauce

Ingredients:

1 pound of Chinese broccoli (Gai Lan)
1 1/2 tablespoons cooking oil
5 whole garlic cloves, peeled and gently smashed but left intact
1/4 cup vegetable stock
1 tablespoon Chinese rice wine (or dry sherry)
1/4 teaspoon sugar
1 inch of fresh ginger, cut into 1/8" coins and smashed with side of cleaver
3 tablespoons oyster sauce
1/2 teaspoon sesame oil

Directions:

To wash the gai lan, trim 1-inch from the ends of stalk and discard. In large wok or pan (large enough to hold all stalks), heat just 1 tablespoon of the cooking oil over medium heat. When the oil is just starting to get hot (the garlic should sizzle upon contact) add the whole garlic cloves and let them fry until golden brown on all sides. Be careful not to burn the garlic, you just want to toast them - if the garlic starts turning dark brown, turn the heat to low. Toasting the garlic should take about 2 minutes. While the garlic is toasting, in a small bowl mix the stock, wine and sugar and set aside.

Turn the heat to high and add the ginger, fry for 30 seconds. Add the gai lan stalks and use your spatula to scoop up the oil so that every stalk has been bathed with the ginger/garlic-infused oil for 30 seconds.

Pour the stock mixture into the wok and immediately cover the wok with a tight fitting lid. Turn the heat to medium and let the vegetable steam for 3-4 minutes, until stalks can be easily pierced with a paring knife or fork.

Remove the gai lan to a plate, leaving any remaining stock mixture in the wok. If you want, pick out and discard the ginger coins. To the wok, add the oyster sauce and sesame oil and bubble and thicken on high for 1 minute. Pour the sauce mixture over the gai lan and serve.

Other recipes

Bok Choy Recipe

Chinese Spinach Recipe (Yu Choy)

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