Steamy Kitchen Recipes | RSS Feed http://steamykitchen.com Steamy Kitchen Food Blog: fast recipes, simple recipes, with fresh ingredients to create delicious meals. Fri, 24 Jul 2015 17:57:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.3 Chinese Clay Pot Rice Recipe http://steamykitchen.com/34175-chinese-clay-pot-rice-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/34175-chinese-clay-pot-rice-recipe-video.html#comments Mon, 28 Apr 2014 17:58:12 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=34175   Before my Mom came to visit, she sent a care package full of foodie goodies, and instructed me to save them for when she comes to visit. I knew exactly what that meant – Mama’s gonna cook for me! In the package were Chinese Preserved Pork Belly and Chinese Sausage. Sure enough, Mom announced she was making “Chinese Clay Pot Rice” for dinner ...

The post Chinese Clay Pot Rice Recipe appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
 

chinese-clay-pot-rice-recipe-pint

Before my Mom came to visit, she sent a care package full of foodie goodies, and instructed me to save them for when she comes to visit.

I knew exactly what that meant – Mama’s gonna cook for me! In the package were Chinese Preserved Pork Belly and Chinese Sausage.

Sure enough, Mom announced she was making “Chinese Clay Pot Rice” for dinner the day after she arrived!

Chinese Clay Pot Rice Recipe

Normally, a clay pot is used (duh! hence the name) but since I didn’t have a clay pot (broke mine during the move) – we decided to experiment with making Chinese Clay Pot Rice in the rice cooker (shortcut cheater method) and also on the stovetop in a heavy-bottomed pot (like cast iron or Le Creuset). This type of pot will ensure that the rice cooks evenly and does not burn.

There’s a a fine line between “crispy” and “burnt” rice! If you’re using a clay pot or a pot on a stove, you can get a really nice bottom crust (the best part!) that all the kids fight over.

The homemade Chinese Sweet Soy Sauce that is poured over the rice. Everything is super-easy to cook. The sauce takes 5 minutes to make. The Chinese Pork Belly and Chinese Sausage cook with the rice in the same pot.

Chinese Clay Pot Rice Recipe

The Chinese Cured Pork Belly or “Chinese Style Cured Pork Strips” by Kam Yen Jan is what we used. It’s actually a preserved and cured ingredient (kind of like Chinese version of smoked bacon!) so just like the Chinese sausage, it keeps for several months in the refrigerator (as long as you don’t open the package).

They are both found at Asian markets.

chinese-pork-belly

Watch the video to learn how to make Mom’s Chinese Lay Pot Rice Recipe with Sweet Soy Sauce!

Chinese Clay Pot Rice with Sweet Soy Sauce Recipe Video

 

***

Yum
Print

Chinese Clay Pot Rice Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 25 minutes
chinese clay pot rice recipe-1447

Recipe from Mama Ruthie! There are 2 versions of this recipe below - one for cooking on the stovetop and one for cooking in the rice cooker. The rice cooker method won't give you the super-coveted crispy burnt rice on the bottom of the pot - but it is definitely much easier to make.

You can find Chinese pork belly and Chinese sausage at the Asian market - they last for a long time! Buy a couple of packages and keep in the refrigerator. The Chinese rice wine is cooking wine made from rice. Substitute with dry sherry.

Ingredients:

FOR THE SWEET SOY SAUCE
2 tablespoons cooking oil
2 shallots, thinly sliced
1 thumb-sized piece of ginger, peeled and thinly sliced
3 tablespoons brown sugar
1 cup soy sauce
1/4 cup Chinese cooking rice wine
1 tablespoon sesame oil
----------------------------
FOR THE CLAY POT RICE
1 package Chinese sausage
1 package Chinese cured pork belly 
2 cups long-grain raw rice (I like jasmine rice)

Directions:

1. Make the Sweet Soy Sauce:
Heat a small sauce pot over medium heat with cooking oil. When hot, add in the shallot and the ginger and fry until browned but not burnt, approximately 3-5 minutes. The shallots should be shriveled, darker brown (just not black). Remove the shallots and ginger (as much as you can). The remaining oil will now be flavorful. Don't throw away the crispy shallots! Use this as a topping for salad, fried rice, vegetables, etc. The ginger can be discarded.

To the oil, add in the sugar, soy sauce and rice wine. Bring to a simmer and then turn the heat to low. Let simmer for 2 minutes. Turn off heat and pour in the sesame oil. Let cool completely before storing in a jar. Lasts up to 4 months in refrigerator.

2. Make the Clay Pot Rice

IF COOKING IN RICE COOKER
Place the rice in the rice cooker pot. Fill pot halfway with water and use your hands to swish the rice. Carefully pour out the water. Repeat 2-3 more times until the water is just barely cloudy. Pour in water until it reaches your knuckle. Use this Chinese method to measure water. Lay in the Chinese sausage and pork belly strips. Set rice cooker to cook. When cooking complete, remove pork belly and Chinese sausage and slice thinly on the diagonal. Serve with rice Sweet Soy Sauce drizzled on top.

IF COOKING ON STOVETOP
To the pot (preferably clay, cast iron, enameled cast iron or some kind of heavy-bottomed pot), add in the pork belly and Chinese sausage. Turn the heat to medium-high. As the pot heats up, the pork and sausage will slowly begin to release its fats (yum!). Cook for 2 minutes, then flip the pork and sausage and cook the other side. Remove the pork and sausage to a plate. You should have about a tablespoon of delicious fat in your pot! Add in your raw rice to the pot (still on medium-high heat) gently stir the raw rice in the fat for 30 seconds until coated. Pour in 3 cups of water and snuggle in the pork belly and sausage in the rice. Bring to a low boil. Turn heat to low and immediately cover. Cook for 12 minutes. When done cooking, pork belly and Chinese sausage and slice thinly on the diagonal. Serve with rice and Sweet Soy Sauce drizzled on top.

 

The post Chinese Clay Pot Rice Recipe appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/34175-chinese-clay-pot-rice-recipe-video.html/feed 20
Chinese Egg Drop Soup http://steamykitchen.com/25746-chinese-egg-drop-soup-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/25746-chinese-egg-drop-soup-recipe-video.html#comments Wed, 13 Feb 2013 15:28:45 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=25746 Chinese Egg Drop Soup is one of those dishes that can be made incredibly well as a warming start to a meal…..or done terribly, horribly, no-no wrong. There’s an Asian restaurant near my house, not naming names but *cough* on 53rd Avenue *cough*, who serves Egg Drop Soup that has so much food coloring that it practically glows in the ...

The post Chinese Egg Drop Soup appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
Chinese Egg Drop Soup Recipe

Chinese Egg Drop Soup is one of those dishes that can be made incredibly well as a warming start to a meal…..or done terribly, horribly, no-no wrong. There’s an Asian restaurant near my house, not naming names but *cough* on 53rd Avenue *cough*, who serves Egg Drop Soup that has so much food coloring that it practically glows in the dark. In fact, when the server comes out with it, the lights flicker with a low *ddzzzzddzzz* sound due to the soup’s radioactive contents.

Chinese Egg Drop Soup Recipe

You know what I mean, right?

So let me show you how to make the soup right. Chinese Egg Drop Soup should be savory, soothing, a little warming heat from the white pepper. The eggs should be delicate, floating, whisper-thin silky strands. Do I have you craving for a bowl now?

Chinese Egg Drop Soup Recipe

This recipe is from Diana Kuan’s new book, The Chinese Takeout Cookbook. Diana and I have not only gotten to know each other through blogging about Asian food (go Chinese sistahs!) but we’ve also shared a meal together early on, when she came to visit in Tampa. We also share the same literary agent (hi Janis!) and I’m proud to share with you her recipe for Egg Drop Soup.

The Chinese Takeout Cookbook by Diana Kuan

Chinese Egg Drop Soup Recipe

A note about ground white pepper: Buy it! Ground while pepper is lovely. Ignore anyone who claims it tastes strange. white peppercorn is basically a regular peppercorn, with the black outer coating removed. It’s less pungent, and the effect is more of an all-over warming than hot. Plus, since it’s a powder, it dissolves well in soup (no harsh black flakes to bite on).

Chinese Egg Drop Soup Recipe Video

***

Yum
Print

Chinese Egg Drop Soup

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 5 Cook Time: 10
Chinese Egg Drop Soup Recipe

Adapted from The Chinese Takeout Cookbook by Diana Kuan

You can use either dried Chinese black mushrooms or fresh shiitake mushrooms. If you use dried - soak them in water overnight or in very hot water for an hour. Drain, cut off and discard tough stems.

Ingredients:

6 shiitake mushrooms, thinly sliced
6 cups chicken or vegetable stock
1 tablespoon Chinese rice wine or dry sherry
1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger
1/2 teaspoon salt (or to taste)
1/4 teaspoon ground white pepper (or to taste)
1 tablespoon cornstarch, dissolved in 3 tablespoons water
1 large egg
handful thinly sliced green onion

Directions:

In a medium saucepan over high heat, add the mushrooms, chicken stock, rice wine and ginger and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer and stir in the salt and pepper.

Add the cornstarch mixture to the simmering soup and stir until the soup has slightly thickened (enough to coat the back of a spoon).

In a small bowl, whisk the egg lightly with a fork. Slowly pour the egg into the soup in a steady stream while continuouslly stirring with a ladle. The egg should cook immediately Turn off the heat to prevent from overcooking the egg. Sprinkle the green onions on top and serve.

***


Steamy Kitchen's Healthy Asian Favorites cookbook cover

My new cookbook is available for purchase now wherever books are sold!

You can also pick up a copy on Amazon for $13.98!

 

The post Chinese Egg Drop Soup appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/25746-chinese-egg-drop-soup-recipe-video.html/feed 25
Pork and Spinach Wonton http://steamykitchen.com/23790-pork-and-spinach-wontons-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/23790-pork-and-spinach-wontons-recipe-video.html#comments Mon, 10 Dec 2012 16:14:00 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=23790 Learn how to make and fold wonton! Pork and Spinach Wonton recipe & video.

The post Pork and Spinach Wonton appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
Pork and Spinach Wontons Recipe

I think the ultimate Chinese comfort food is handmade wonton in soup. Warm, soothing, gingery broth…..delicate, floating “clouds.” In Cantonese, wonton is pronounced wun tun 雲吞, which means “swallowing clouds.”  The wonton wrapper is so delicate and thin. the wonton appear to be floating in the soup.

Pork and Spinach Wontons Recipe

When I was in college, my girlfriends and I would get together and make hundreds of these and freeze them. It was cheap, easy to make and we had quite a bit of fun as we turned it into a “dumpling party.” It’s the best quick meal, as wonton can be cooked directly from the freezer into simmering broth.

Pork and Spinach Wontons Recipe

There’s all sorts of ingredients that you can use to fill wonton. Shrimp, ground beef, ground pork, cabbage, spinach, bamboo shoots, scallops, mushrooms….really, anything that you want. When snow crab or king crab legs are on sale, I’ll make crab and napa cabbage wonton.

Pork and Spinach Wontons Recipe

I normally eat wonton with a small dipping bowl of red vinegar and slivers of fresh ginger. That’s the Cantonese way! Add in some noodles to make wonton noodle soup and I’m in heaven.

Pork and Spinach Wontons Recipe

***

Pork and Spinach Wonton Recipe Video

 

***

 

Yum
Print

Pork and Spinach Wonton Recipe

Servings: 50 dumplings Prep Time: 40 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes
pswontons

Don't worry about the amount of salt used for the cabbage and spinach. The majority of the salt stays in the water and is discarded. The salt is used to release water from the vegetables (hey, remember osmosis from high school!?)

You can add cooked noodles to this dish to make wonton noodle soup - but just remember to cook the noodles in a separate pot of water (and not the broth) to prevent excess starch from the noodles from clouding up the good broth.

If you want, serve wonton with a dipping bowl of red wine vinegar and slivers of fresh ginger. Peel ginger, then use a vegetable peeler to peel paper-thin slices of ginger. Use knife to further chop into fine slivers. Combine with the red vinegar. To eat, place a wonton on your spoon. With chopsticks, pick up a few slivers of ginger and place on top of wonton. Eat!

Ingredients:

10-ounce package frozen spinach, defrosted
1/4 cabbage, grated on large holes of box grater
2 teaspoons salt
1 pound ground pork
2 teaspoons grated fresh ginger
2 cloves garlic, finely minced
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1 tablespoon Chinese rice wine (or dry sherry)
2 teaspoons roasted sesame oil
1 tablespoon cornstarch
16-ounce package of wonton wrappers (about 50 wrappers), defrosted (see note)
For the slurry: 1/4 cup cool water + 1 tablespoon cornstarch

FOR THE GINGER BROTH
2 quarts vegetable or chicken broth
2 thumb-sized pieces of ginger, sliced
sprigs of cilantro, optional

Directions:

1. Squeeze as much water out of the spinach and discard the water (or water your plants!). Place the spinach and cabbage in a large bowl. Sprinkle with salt and mix well. Let sit for 10 minutes. In large handfuls (or a cheesecloth), squeeze the water out of the cabbage/spinach and discard the water.

2. Add in the ground pork, ginger, garlic, soy sauce, wine, sesame oil and cornstarch. Mix well.

OPTIONAL: Heat up a small frying pan over medium heat, add in a touch of cooking oil. Cook a spoonful of the dumpling filling and taste. Adjust seasonings to the dumpling filling if you wish.

3. In a small bowl, mix together the water and cornstarch for the slurry.

4. Take one wonton wrapper, place 1 scant teaspoon of the dumpling mixture in the middle. Paint the outer edge of the wonton wrapper with the slurry. Fold wrapper over like in a triangle shape and seal tightly all around. Make sure there are no air pockets or holes in the wonton. Fold the two triangle points together and seal to make the wonton shape. Place folded wonton on a clean, dry plate and cover with plastic wrap or barely damp towel to avoid drying out.

5. When wonton are all folded, you can store or freeze.

6. For the broth: Set aside 2 cups of the broth. Bring the remaining broth and ginger to a simmer in a large stock pot and turn the heat to medium-high. Add in a batch of wonton. When the broth returns to a simmer again, pour in 1 cup of the reserved broth. Again, let the broth return to a simmer and then pour in the last 1 cup of reserved broth. Once the broth comes back to a simmer, the wonton should be done. Discard the ginger slices. Serve wonton and broth with few cilantro leaves if desired!

TO STORE:

- If you want to freeze the wonton, place all the UNCOOKED wonton flat on a plate. Do not crowd. Cover with plastic wrap and freeze. Once the wonton are frozen, you can gather them up and store in freezer bag. This ensures that the wonton freeze individually (otherwise if the wonton froze and stuck together, it would be nearly impossible to cook.

- When ready to cook wonton, they can go from freezer to simmering broth. Follow exact same cooking instructions. Since the wonton is frozen, it will take longer time for the broth to return to a simmer -- so it's self timing!.

The post Pork and Spinach Wonton appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/23790-pork-and-spinach-wontons-recipe-video.html/feed 39
Black Pepper Steak http://steamykitchen.com/18298-black-pepper-steak.html http://steamykitchen.com/18298-black-pepper-steak.html#comments Wed, 14 Sep 2011 14:32:34 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=18298 One of my very first blogging friends is Bee from Rasa Malaysia. In the early days of the blog, we used to chat on the phone after my kids went to bed about the technical side of blogging — silly acronyms like SEO, PHP, CSS and HTML. Back then (I say “back then” like it was decades ago, but in reality ...

The post Black Pepper Steak appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>

One of my very first blogging friends is Bee from Rasa Malaysia. In the early days of the blog, we used to chat on the phone after my kids went to bed about the technical side of blogging — silly acronyms like SEO, PHP, CSS and HTML. Back then (I say “back then” like it was decades ago, but in reality it was just 4 1/2 years ago!) there weren’t a ton of plug-ins and support forums weren’t available for food bloggers. Wow, have we come a long way! 

She asked me to write the Foreword for her brand new book, Easy Chinese Recipes, it’s a beautiful book with simple recipes that you’d find at your favorite Chinese restaurant, like Shrimp Fried Rice, Kung Pao Chicken and Homestyle Chow Mein Noodles. I hope you enjoy this recipe for Black Pepper Steak from her book. ~Jaden

***

Hi all, I am Bee of Rasa Malaysia, a food blog about easy Asian recipes. I am extremely thrilled to be on Steamy Kitchen today, sharing a recipe from my cookbook “Easy Chinese Recipes.” Jaden and I met some four years ago through our blogs; we also share the same publisher, Tuttle Publishing. I wanted to take this special opportunity to thank Jaden for writing the Foreword of the book and hervaluable advice when I was working on the project. Truth be told, I wouldn’t have done it if she didn’t tell me to “do it” when I got the offer!

Easy Chinese Recipes is a compilation of 80+ popular Chinese recipes: all-time favorites, Chinese takeout dishes, dim sum, dumplings, and more. Some recipes reflect my many travels in China and Hong Kong. Others are my interpretation of classic Chinese recipes, perfected through years of preparing them at home.

Black Pepper Beef is one of my favorite recipes in the cookbook as I love the combination of bell pepper and black pepper in Chinese stir-fries. These two ingredients, coupled with the right cut of beef—I like beef tenderloin, flank steak or flap meat—will often guarantee a successful dish. If you love the sweetness and slightly charred taste of caramelized onions, stir-fry the onions and bell peppers slightly longer before adding  the beef to the stir-fry. You will be rewarded with a richer flavored Black Pepper Beef. Enjoy! ~ Bee

Yum
Print

Black Pepper Steak Recipe

Servings: Serves 2 as a main dish with rice or 4 as part of a multicourse meal Prep Time: 15 minutes Cook Time:
Black Pepper Steak Recipe

If you are using Flank Steak - make sure you cut ACROSS the grain, otherwise the steak will be chewy and tough.

Ingredients:

8 oz (250 g) beef tenderloin, flank steak or flap meat, thinly sliced
2 1/2 tablespoons cooking oil
1 clove garlic, minced
1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger
1/2 small green bell pepper, deseeded and cut into pieces
1/2 small red bell pepper, deseeded and cut into pieces
1/2 onion, sliced
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
Salt, to tasteFor the Marinade
1 teaspoons soy sauce
1 tablespoon oyster sauce
1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
1 teaspoon Chinese rice wine or sherry
1/2 teaspoon cornstarch
1/2 teaspoon sesame oil
1/2 teaspoon sugar

Directions:

1. Marinate the beef with all the Marinade ingredients, about 15
minutes.
2. Heat 1 tablespoon of the oil in a wok or skillet over high heat.
Stir-fry the beef until the beef is browned on the outside but still pink
inside. Dish out and set aside.
3. Heat the remaining oil in a wok or skillet over high heat. Stir-fry
the garlic and the ginger until aromatic, and then add the green bell
pepper, red bell pepper, onion, and black pepper. Stir-fry until you smell
the aroma from the ingredients in the wok.
4. Transfer the beef back into the wok or skillet. Stir-fry until the
beef is cooked through and the center of the meat is no longer pink, about
1-2 minutes. Dish out and serve immediately with steamed rice.

The post Black Pepper Steak appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/18298-black-pepper-steak.html/feed 36
Chinese Broccoli Beef http://steamykitchen.com/11368-chinese-broccoli-beef.html http://steamykitchen.com/11368-chinese-broccoli-beef.html#comments Tue, 05 Oct 2010 16:00:54 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=11368 Chinese Broccoli Beef Recipe (from my cookbook!) on my other website, New Asian Cuisine.

The post Chinese Broccoli Beef appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>

Chinese Broccoli Beef Recipe (from my cookbook!) on my other website, New Asian Cuisine.

The post Chinese Broccoli Beef appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/11368-chinese-broccoli-beef.html/feed 5
Sweet and Sour Spare Ribs http://steamykitchen.com/3453-sweet-and-sour-spare-ribs.html http://steamykitchen.com/3453-sweet-and-sour-spare-ribs.html#comments Mon, 11 May 2009 03:08:32 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/?p=3453 [imagebrowser id=12] This Sweet and Sour Spare Ribs dish is a mouth-watering appetizer and goes-great-with-cold-beer type of dish from China. Normally, the ribs are deep fried, but I wanted to cook a version that didn’t require me to waste 3 cups of cooking oil. If you do want to deep fry the ribs, Curiously Ravenous has a recipe from Ye ...

The post Sweet and Sour Spare Ribs appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
This Sweet and Sour Spare Ribs dish is a mouth-watering appetizer and goes-great-with-cold-beer type of dish from China. Normally, the ribs are deep fried, but I wanted to cook a version that didn’t require me to waste 3 cups of cooking oil. If you do want to deep fry the ribs, Curiously Ravenous has a recipe from Ye Ye (Grandfather).

And I found the perfect recipe in fushia dunlop revolutionary-chinese-cookbookFushia Dunlop’s Revolutionary Chinese Cookbook: Recipes from Hunan Province. When I first heard about Fushia Dunlop and how authentic and thorough her recipes were, I immediately bought this book and the fushia-dunlop-land-of-plentyLand of Plenty: A Treasury of Authentic Sichuan Cooking. If you’re a fan of Chinese cooking, I definitely recommend both books. Ms. Dunlop has another book out which is a memior, but I haven’t had a chance to read it yet.

About Dark Soy Sauce

dark-soy-sauceDark Soy Sauce is not regular soy sauce. it’s labeled Thick or Dark Soy Sauce and it’s more intense, sweeter and less salty than regular soy sauce as it contain molasses. Dark Soy Sauce is used in many Chinese braised dishes.

About Chinese Black Vinegar

black-vinegarChinese Black Vinegar is an essential ingredient that adds the “sour” to the Sweet and Sour Spare Ribs recipe. The best black vinegar is from the Chinkiang Province of China. My family loves to dribble the tiniest spoonful into my Mom’s Famous Crispy Egg Rolls (take a bite from one end of the egg roll, spoon a few drops inside.) You can substitute with balsamic vinegar.

About the ribs

I used baby back ribs, but any type of pork ribs are fine. The ribs are normally cut into 2-inch pieces, and it’s something that you’d much rather have a butcher do for you in their fancy machines than try to whack them with your chef’s knife. The smaller ribs are easier to cook and absorb the sauce. But if you only have the 3 to 4-inch baby back ribs – you can feel free to leave them uncut.

I cut about half of my ribs – each rib took like 3 big whacks. Finally, I was like “this is stupid. why am I risking my very expensive Shun Chef’s knives whackin’ bones?”

1) I couldn’t find my heavy duty Chinese cleaver
2) Huzb’s hack saw was all rusty
3) I think y’all would understand why there are several ribs in the pic that are abnormally long.

So I quit whackin’.

Sweet and Sour Spare Ribs Recipe (tang cu pai gu)

Adapted from fushia dunlop revolutionary-chinese-cookbookFushia Dunlop’s Revolutionary Chinese Cookbook: Recipes from Hunan Province

serves 4

1 ½ pounds meaty spare ribs, cut into bite-size sections (baby back ribs preferred)
2-inch section of ginger, sliced into 1/2-inch “coins” and smashed
6 green onions, cut into 2-inch sections
1 tablespoon Chinese rice wine
generous pinch of salt
2 tablespoons high heat cooking oil
2 tablespoon dark soy sauce
4 tablespoons white sugar
1 ½ tablespoon Chinese black vinegar
1 teaspoon sesame oil

1. Place the ribs in a saucepan of water and bring to a boil over high heat. Skim the water, then add half of the ginger, half of the green onions, the Chinese rice wine and salt. Turn the heat to low and simmer for 15 minutes until the meat is cooked and tender. Continue skimming the pot. Strain and set aside, reserving the cooking liquid.

2. Heat a wok or large saute pan over high heat until very hot. Pour in the cooking oil and add the remaining ginger slices and green onions. Stir fry until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add in the strained spare ribs and stir fry for 2 minutes in the fragrant oil.

3. Add 1 cup of the cooking liquid, the dark soy sauce and sugar. Simmer over a medium flame, spooning the liquid over the ribs, until the sauce has reduced to a heavy, syrupy consistency.

4. Add the vinegar and cook for another 1-2 minutes, until the flavors have fused. Off the heat, stir in the sesame oil.

The post Sweet and Sour Spare Ribs appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/3453-sweet-and-sour-spare-ribs.html/feed 40
“Meat” Fried Rice – Four Ways http://steamykitchen.com/613-meat-fried-rice-four-ways.html http://steamykitchen.com/613-meat-fried-rice-four-ways.html#comments Tue, 08 Jul 2008 05:59:10 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/?p=613 My editor, Jeff Houck, sent over a picture of pan-fried Scrapple slice and my heart fluttered like crazy. “Scrapple? Scrapple! What’s Scrapple? I asked him,” and within 30 minutes was off to the supermarket to find Scrapple, a distant cousin to Spam. Yes, I have an odd fascination with meat that comes in it’s own coffin. “hmmm…I wonder if I ...

The post “Meat” Fried Rice – Four Ways appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
Meat Fried Rice - Four Ways

My editor, Jeff Houck, sent over a picture of pan-fried Scrapple slice and my heart fluttered like crazy. “Scrapple? Scrapple! What’s Scrapple? I asked him,” and within 30 minutes was off to the supermarket to find Scrapple, a distant cousin to Spam.

Yes, I have an odd fascination with meat that comes in it’s own coffin.

“hmmm…I wonder if I could showcase the otherwise disgusting “meat” in a edgy, fashion-y, Bon Appetit-esque yet appetizinng way. I mean, when was the last time you saw a photo of canned ham and said, “DAMN…that’s a mighty fine piece of ass?!”

While I was there, I went bezerk and ended up with a basketful of “meat” products along with a variety of ingredients to concoct four different recipes. And really. That’s how my “meat” adventure began.

***

Scrapple Fried Rice with Fresh Chilies and Garlic

Scrapple

Hello world, meet Scrapple, a product that when fried with nothing else, tastes just like the name sounds, scrappy offal. If you must know what scrapple is made of, Wikipedia paints a pretty picture:

Scrapple is typically made of hog offal, such as the head, heart, liver, and other scraps, which are boiled with any bones attached (often the entire head), to make a broth. Once cooked, bones and fat are discarded, the meat is reserved, and (dry) cornmeal is boiled in the broth to make a mush. The meat, finely minced, is returned, and seasonings, typically sage, thyme, savory, and others are added. The mush is cast into loaves and allowed to cool thoroughly until gelled.

I don’t know about you, but thank goodness for sage, thyme and savory. The thought of jellied pig snout without those herbs just sends shivers throughout my frail, virgin body.

My main strategy when developing this recipe, was really, “how the hell do I transform something so utterly disgusting into a flavorful fried rice that even the pickiest eater would enjoy (as long as I didn’t let on what scrapple was.)

I chose 3 of the most pungent Asian ingredients that I had on hand: fresh chilies, fish sauce and garlic. Now, I know some of you would say that fish sauce sounds just as disgusting as scrapple, since basically a vat of stinky, fermented fish. But it’s a Southeast Asian staple and I’m being SO hypocritical right now. But did you know that your beloved Worcestershire sauce also contains a version of fish sauce? Dude. I KNOW! If only the makers of scrapple had marketing smarts too – and named their product something a little appealing than horse shit.

Scrapple Fried Rice

Because scrapple contains cornmeal, it crumbles pretty easily when fried, so I treated it like ground beef. First, I cut the scrapple into small cubes and stir fried it, using my spatula to break it up even further.

Scrapple Fried Rice with Fresh Chilies and Garlic

serves 2

1 1/2 tablespoons cooking oil, divided
1 teaspoon finely minced garlic
1 stalk scallion, minced
1 thinly sliced fresh chili (like Thai bird’s eye or jalepeno)
1/2 cup chopped scrapple
2 cups cooked, leftover rice (grains separated with a fork)
3/4 teaspoon fish sauce (substitute with 1 to 2 tsp soy sauce)
freshly ground black pepper

In a wok or large saute pan, heat just 1 tablespoon of the cooking oil over high heat. When the oil is very hot, add the scrapple and fry until browned, about 1 minute. Push the scrapple towards the outer edges of the wok, clearing a space in the middle to fry the aromatics. Turn the heat to medium, add the remaining 1/2 tablespoon of cooking oil and immediately add the garlic, scallion and fresh chilies. Stir fry for 15 seconds, until you can smell the fragrance of the aromatics. Turn your heat to high and add the rice. Use your spatula to mix all the ingredients thoroughly and at the same time spreading the rice and ingredients to use as much of the cooking surface of the wok as possible.

Now just leave it alone for 30 seconds. Don’t stir, poke or prod. Let the rice grains heat up, which basically will re-steam the rice. Once the rice has heated up, use your spatula to stir and flip the mixture. Pour the fish sauce slowly around the outer edges of the wok – the heat of the wok will help evaporate the fish sauce as it moves down the sides. Stir and flip the rice well again, to mix the fish sauce throughout. Season with black pepper. Let rice continue to cook until each of rice grain is hot.

***

Spam Fried Rice with Pineapple

Spam Fried Rice with Pineapple

Wow, what a voluptuous fan of Spam! Spread it all out, hot stuff!

spam fried rice

This was a no-brainer…I’ve previously have professed my love for Spam, in the Ode to Spam in the Style of Seuss, and I wanted to create a simpler, more refreshing version of Spam Fried Rice. My recipe calls for canned pineapple – but of course, you can use fresh pineapple, but hey…we’re going with the whole canned and processed theme here.

Spam Fried Rice with Pineapple

serves 2

2 teaspoons cooking oil
1/2 cup diced spam
1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger
1 stalk scallion, minced
1/4 cup crushed or 1/8 inch diced pineapple (canned or fresh)
2 cups cooked, leftover rice (grains separated)
1 to 2 teaspoons soy sauce
1/2 teaspoon sesame oil

In a wok or large saute pan, heat the cooking oil over medium-high heat. When the oil is hot but not smoking, add the diced spam and fry until browned on all sides, about 1 minute. Push the spam towards the outer edges of the wok, clearing a space in the middle to fry. You should still have a bit of oil left that is pooled in the middle of the wok. Turn the heat to low, add the  add the ginger, scallions and pineapple. Stir fry for 15 seconds, until fragrant. Turn your heat to high and immediately add the rice. Use your spatula to mix all the ingredients thoroughly and at the same time spreading the rice and ingredients to use as much of the cooking surface of the wok as possible.

Now just leave it alone for 30 seconds. Don’t stir, poke or prod. Let the rice grains heat up, which basically will re-steam the rice. Once the rice has heated up, use your spatula to stir and flip the mixture. Pour the soy sauce sauce slowly around the outer edges of the wok – the heat of the wok will help evaporate the soy sauce as it moves down the sides. Stir and flip the rice well again, to mix the ingredients throughout. Finish with sesame oil and stir well. Let rice continue to cook until each of rice grain is hot.

***

Pork Roll Fried Rice with Shitake Mushrooms and Red Bell Pepper

Pork Roll Fried Rice
“Come ‘on, baby, look sexy for the camera….WORK IT!….Twirl and look over your shoulder now!…..YEAH BABY”

I had no idea there was such a thing as Pork Roll until I went shopping for Scrapple! The meat manager actually went around the store with me, helping find the scrapple (frozen section) and then also brought me to the refrigerated bacon and sausage section to hand me a package of Pork Roll. Four slices come per package, and it’s used in a regional specialty called “The Jersey Breakfast” – fried pork roll, egg and cheese sandwich. If you’re not lucky enough to find Pork Roll at your market, substitute with that strange oval-ish shaped canned ham. But then you’d have to buy that big can and only use a half cup diced. I have no idea how to eat that stuff outside of fried rice. I guess you could make the Jersey Breakfast sandwiches the next day from leftover canned ham.

Pork roll is basically coursely ground pork shoulder, and to me, is a Gucci-er version of spam. So I had to up the ante and use some fancy ingredients like fresh shitake mushrooms and fresh red bell peppers. Instead of plain ‘ol soy, I used Maggi sauce, a very popular condiment in Asia (even though its origins are Swiss). I’ve seen this seasoning at most major supermarkets and of course Asian markets too. I believe Maggi sauce even has a big cult following including myself!…. 😉

Pork Roll Fried Rice

We were going for the casually tossed, grunge look for this photoshoot.

Pork Roll Fried Rice with Shitake Mushrooms and Red Bell Pepper

Pork Roll Fried Rice with Shitake and Bell Peppers

serves 2

2 teaspoons cooking oil
1/2 cup sliced pork roll
4 fresh shitake mushrooms, thinly sliced
1/2 red bell pepper, thinly sliced
2 cups cooked, leftover rice (grains separated)
1 teaspoon Chinese rice wine
1 teaspoon Maggi sauce (substitute with 1 to 2 teaspoons soy sauce)

In a wok or large saute pan, heat the cooking oil over medium-high heat. When the oil is hot but not smoking, add the pork roll and fry until browned, about 1 minute. Push the pork roll towards the outer edges of the wok, clearing a space in the middle to fry. You should still have a bit of oil left that is pooled in the middle of the wok. Turn the heat to low, add the shitake and bell pepper. Stir fry for 30 seconds, until softened. Turn your heat to high and immediately add the rice. Use your spatula to mix all the ingredients thoroughly and at the same time spreading the rice and ingredients to use as much of the cooking surface of the wok as possible.

Now just leave it alone for 30 seconds. Don’t stir, poke or prod. Let the rice grains heat up, which basically will re-steam the rice. Once the rice has heated up, use your spatula to stir and flip the mixture. Pour the Maggi sauce and the rice wine sauce slowly around the outer edges of the wok – the heat of the wok will help evaporate the sauce as it moves down the sides. Immediately, stir and flip the rice well again, to mix the ingredients throughout. Let rice continue to cook until each of rice grain is hot.

***

Vienna Sausage Fried Rice with Kaffir and Lemongrass

Vienna Sausage

Went for minimalistic architecture – symmetrical, clean, lines. Very sleek and slimming!

I admit to eating an entire can of Vienna Sausages – straight out the can at room temperature. LOVE IT. We used to eat these little turds fried for breakfast in Hong Kong. I thought it would be great to put a Southeast Asian twist to this fried rice – and use thin slivers of lemongrass and torn kaffir lime leaves – both from my garden, but you can find at most Asian markets. If they don’t have fresh lemongrass or kaffir, ask for either in frozen form.

To prepare lemongrass, measure about 4-6 inches from the bottom and cut. Discard the scratchy, long leaves and keep the bottom, white bulb part. Peel off the outermost leaves and use a very sharp chef’s knife to cut paper-thin slivers. If you’re not capable of doing this, grab a microplane grater and just grate the bottom 4 inches of the bulb. It’s a pretty fibrous grass, and if you cut into huge chunks, you’ll end up chewing like a cow. Not so lady-like.

For the Kaffir, take a single leaf and tear in several spaces, stopping at the spine to keep the leaf intact. You won’t actually eat this leaf, but exposing the inner part of the leaf will fragrance your entire dish.

Vienna Sausage Fried Rice with Kaffir and Lemongrass

Even the bowl is sleek and slimming!

Vienna Sausage Fried Rice with Kaffir and Lemongrass

Vienna Sausage Fried Rice with Kaffir and Lemongrass

3 teaspoons cooking oil, divided
1/2 cup Vienna sausage, each link cut into 4 pieces
1 tablespoon fine rings of lemongrass (see note)
3 kaffir lime leaves, torn in several places to spine
1 tablespoon sliced chilies
2 eggs, beaten
2 cups cooked, leftover rice (grains separated)
1 1/2 teaspoons fish sauce (substitute with 1-2 teaspoons soy sauce)

In a wok or large saute pan, heat just 2 teaspoons of cooking oil over medium-high heat. When the oil is hot but not smoking, add the Vienna sausage and fry until browned, about 1 minute. Push the sausage towards the outer edges of the wok, clearing a space in the middle to fry. You should still have a bit of oil left that is pooled in the middle of the wok. Turn the heat to low, add the lemongrass, kaffir leaves and chilies. . Stir fry for 30 seconds, until fragrant.

Now push those aromatics up to the sides of the wok to clear space again in the middle. Turn the heat to high and add the remaining 1 teaspoon of cooking oil and let that heat up to hot but not smoking. Add the egg and fry the egg, swirling gently to break up the egg. Cook the egg until firm, about 1 minute.

Add the rice. Use your spatula to mix all the ingredients thoroughly and at the same time spreading the rice and ingredients to use as much of the cooking surface of the wok as possible.

Now just leave it alone for 30 seconds. Don’t stir, poke or prod. Let the rice grains heat up, which basically will re-steam the rice. Once the rice has heated up, use your spatula to stir and flip the mixture. Pour the fish sauce slowly around the outer edges of the wok – the heat of the wok will help evaporate the sauce as it moves down the sides. Immediately, stir and flip the rice well again, to mix the ingredients throughout. Let rice continue to cook until each of rice grain is hot.

***
If you enjoyed this post, will you please click on “Stumble This” or “Digg” for me? The icons are right below this area here. Thank you!

The post “Meat” Fried Rice – Four Ways appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/613-meat-fried-rice-four-ways.html/feed 75
Sesame Shrimp with Honey Mustard Sauce http://steamykitchen.com/571-sesame-shrimp-with-honey-mustard-sauce.html http://steamykitchen.com/571-sesame-shrimp-with-honey-mustard-sauce.html#comments Wed, 18 Jun 2008 17:07:32 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/?p=571 It never fails that at least twice a day, I'm asked, "so when are you gonna start your own restaurant?" My reply is always the same, "only when I have an extra million in the bank and I don't have to worry about making money." I know a restaurant is just too much...

The post Sesame Shrimp with Honey Mustard Sauce appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
Sesame Shrimp with Honey Mustard Sauce

from Steamy Kitchen food column in Tampa Tribune

It never fails that at least twice a day, I’m asked, “so when are you gonna start your own restaurant?” My reply is always the same, “only when I have an extra million in the bank and I don’t have to worry about making money.”

I know a restaurant is just too much for to handle for my delicate psyche. How would I ever explain to the IRS why “weekly psychotherapy” is part of operating expenses? And the only way I’d be able to handle the long hours and hard work is with back to back shots of double espressos followed by a Red Bull chaser. But really, with that regimen, I’d scare off innocent, unsuspecting people with, “DUDE! YOU! NEED! TO! TRY! MY! SESAME! SHRIMP!” leaping out of the doorway and shoving a sample in any open mouth passing by. Yeah, maybe hyperactive, assertive marketing wouldn’t work well.

Which is why I have so much respect for anyone working in the industry. I just spent the afternoon at a food and wine festival called Forks and Corks in Sarasota, and I’ve gotta say, it was simply fantastic. The festival was sponsored by the Sarasota Originals, a group of 50 independently owned restaurants in the area, and held in the exquisite, palatial courtyard of the Ringling Museum of Art. It was very Sarasota-esque, I felt under-accessorized without a boob job and lip plump.

Behind every restaurant’s sample booth was the owner, generously dishing out sample portions of their signature menu item. Despite being on their feet with only 4 hours of sleep in 90F heat, they rocked on with graciousness.

Independent restaurant owners: I bow down to you

If I ever find that extra million in the bank, you can bet that I’ll be out there thrusting a deep fried sesame shrimp pierced by cocktail sword atcha’. Aya! that sounded naughty.

Chinese Sesame Shrimp with Honey Mustard Dipping Sauce

Adapted from The Seventh Daughter, Cecilia Chiang

Sesame Shrimp with Honey Mustard Dipping Sauce

Serves 6-8

1 pound medium shrimp, shelled and deveined, with tails attached
2 teaspoons kosher salt
1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
2 cups white sesame seeds
1 teaspoon Asian sesame oil
2 tablespoons Chinese rice wine
2 large eggs
1/2 cup cornstarch
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 cup peanut oil, plus additional for deep frying
1 cup water

Chinese Honey-Mustard Dipping Sauce
1/4 cup Dijon mustard
2 tablespoons honey
2 tablespoons peanut oil
2 tablespoons soy sauce

To make sauce – whisk together the mustard, honey, oil and soy sauce until well combined. Set aside until ready to serve.

In a bowl, gently mix the shrimp with salt to coat salt. Cover with cold water, slosh around a few times, drain the shrimp well, and then transfer to a cutting board. Line up 3 shallow bowls and put flour in one, in the second, whisk together sesame oil, wine, eggs, cornstarch, baking soda and the remaining 1/2 cup of flour, 1/2 cup of the peanut oil and the 1 cup of water until well combined. In the third bowl, add sesame seeds.

Heat a wok or large pot with peanut oil for deep frying over high heat until 360F. Work in batches of 4-5 shrimp at a time. For each shrimp, hold by tail, dip in flour, then batter, then sesame seeds. Deep fry in batches of 4-5 shrimp until golden brown, about 2 minutes. Serve with dipping sauce.

***

You might also like these other Chinese dishes:

Firecracker Shrimp with Sweet Chili Sauce – Super easy, always a crowd favorite. Here is also a video of me making the Firecracker Shrimp.

Steamed Spareribs in Black Bean Sauce – a dim sum dish! Video here.

The post Sesame Shrimp with Honey Mustard Sauce appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/571-sesame-shrimp-with-honey-mustard-sauce.html/feed 43
Pan Seared Steak Rolls http://steamykitchen.com/363-pan-seared-steak-rolls.html http://steamykitchen.com/363-pan-seared-steak-rolls.html#comments Wed, 28 May 2008 02:23:14 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/?p=363 from my column in Tampa Tribune Tat-tat-taaaat-tat-tat-taaaat-tat! That, my friends, is the beautiful sing-song sound of Chef Martin Yan’s cleaver as he chops bok choy. In fact, everything about Martin is musical, from the lyrical harmony of his Chinese accent (yes, it’s real – I asked) to the way he rhythmically pulses the food processor. Brrrrrr-brr.brr-brrrrr. I met Martin Yan ...

The post Pan Seared Steak Rolls appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
Pan Seared Steak Rolls

from my column in Tampa Tribune

Tat-tat-taaaat-tat-tat-taaaat-tat! That, my friends, is the beautiful sing-song sound of Chef Martin Yan’s cleaver as he chops bok choy. In fact, everything about Martin is musical, from the lyrical harmony of his Chinese accent (yes, it’s real – I asked) to the way he rhythmically pulses the food processor. Brrrrrr-brr.brr-brrrrr.

I met Martin Yan last week at his special class held at Aprons cooking school, and it really was a childhood dream come true. When I was kid, I watched “Yan Can Cook.” Back then, in the 80’s, it was a big deal to me, not for the cooking aspect of the show, but because he was Chinese, with a thick accent, starring in his very own show on television. He created an entire brand empire around his kung fu-esque knife action and very funny, punny jokes.

But, putting showmanship aside, he gave the class very useful cooking tips:

  • Tsingtao beer is great for steaming mussels
  • If you;re running low on Hoisin sauce, just add a bit of soy sauce, sugar and Sriracha hot sauce to the bottle, close and shake to mix
  • Don’t waste leftover bits of vegetables, seafood or meat -chop them up and simmer in canned chicken broth for an instant soup
  • Deep-fried chiffonade strips of bok choy leaves makes a crisp, nutty and sweet topping for a stir-fry

You know what though, I don’t think I can fully express my admiration for the Yan man in words. I mean, this is the guy who’s hosted over 2,000 cooking shows, authored 28 cookbooks, carves a chicken in 18 seconds flat and minces a garlic clove in a split-second, single-handed thwack. He’s totally my kitchen super-hero and get this, he mentioned writing a blurb for the back of my cookbook! He showed me where Jackie Chan had blurbed the back of his book and called him a “man of perpetual motion.” And yes, he is.

Oh, please excuse that whoosh of air. That’s just silly me sucking up.

From “Martin Yan’s China” Martin Yan's Chinacookbook

Pan Seared Steak Rolls

8 ounces flank steak (4 inch x 6 inch piece) or 8 thin sliced sirloin (found at Publix)

Marinade
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1 teaspoon vegetable oil
freshly ground pepper

Sauce
1 tablespoon oyster sauce
1 tablespoon Chinese rice wine or dry sherry
2 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
¼ cup canned chicken broth

Filling
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
1 teaspoon minced garlic
1 teaspoon minced ginger
1 carrot, cut into 2 inch matchsticks
½ red bell pepper, cut into 2 inch matchsticks
2 ribs celery, sliced thin on diagonal
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1 teaspoon sesame oil
12 chives, cut into 3 inches long
4 ounces enoki mushrooms
2 teaspoons vegetable oil
2 teaspoons butter
¼ teaspoon sesame seeds

Freeze steak for 30 minutes until partially frozen. Slice steak against the grain, on the diagonal, into 8 equally thin pieces. Use a meat mallet to pound each piece of meat to 1/8 inch thick. If using thin sliced sirloin, skip this step.

Combine marinade ingredients in a bowl and add meat slices. Let stand 15 minutes to 2 hours.

In a separate bowl, combine sauce ingredients.

To prepare filling, heat a wok or skillet over high heat. When hot, add vegetable oil, swirling to coat the sides. Add garlic and ginger and fry for 20 seconds. Add carrot, bell pepper, celery and stir fry for 1 minute. Add soy sauce, sesame oil and stir. Transfer to bowl and let cool.

To make the beef rolls, lay beef slices out with short side facing you. Equally divide chives, enoki mushrooms and vegetable mixture among the pieces of meat. Roll the beef up, over the filling and secure with toothpick.

Place a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the vegetable oil and butter, swirling to coat bottom. When hot, add beef rolls, seam side down, not touching and pan fry for 1 minute, turn roll. Add sauce to the pan. Cover and simmer over medium heat until beef is just cooked through, 1-2 minutes. Remove toothpick, sprinkle with sesame seeds to serve.

Yields 4 servings

***

Video

To see Martin in action – watch a video of him carving a chicken in 18 seconds!

The post Pan Seared Steak Rolls appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/363-pan-seared-steak-rolls.html/feed 49
Long Life Fertility Noodles Recipe with Happy Shrimp http://steamykitchen.com/316-long-life-fertility-noodles-with-happy-shrimp.html http://steamykitchen.com/316-long-life-fertility-noodles-with-happy-shrimp.html#comments Wed, 14 May 2008 12:26:51 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/?p=316     The Chinese culture is filled with food traditions and symbolisms, so much in fact that I could never keep up and remember them all. During the entire 6 days surrounding my wedding, I deferred to my mother to tell me what to eat to please the Gods of good fortune and fertility. Oh, did I want to have ...

The post Long Life Fertility Noodles Recipe with Happy Shrimp appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
Long Life Fertility Noodles Recipe with Happy Shrimp

 

 

The Chinese culture is filled with food traditions and symbolisms, so much in fact that I could never keep up and remember them all. During the entire 6 days surrounding my wedding, I deferred to my mother to tell me what to eat to please the Gods of good fortune and fertility. Oh, did I want to have some grapes? I had to eat five of them, not one less because that number that I must not utter, one less than five, means something bad in Chinese. In fact, I am choosing each and every word very carefully in this column so that in case YOU are the one getting married, I do not want to be blamed for any misfortune!

My wedding with Scott was a nice blend of his culture (Scottish-German) and mine. We exchanged vows at Pebble Beach’s legendary 18th hole (ok, Scott just corrected me and said “fairway” not “hole” because I don’t think they’d let 10 pairs of three-inch stilettos aerate the baby-soft skinny grass at the hole), but included Chinese customs throughout the entire week

One custom that we opted out of was serving a whole roast suckling pig at the wedding banquet. According to the Chinese, the pig symbolizes the virginity of the bride, and um, you know where I’m going with that. I say, no sense in pretending or misrepping what is not true, because that would be a lousy way to begin a marriage! Plus, where the heck would we find a whole suckling pig in the middle of a gucci golf resort? Can you even imagine the chef struggling to fit the fat pig on his fancy rotisserie grill?

There is one tradition that I would like to share with you, eating noodles. For birthdays, new year and weddings, noodles are served to represent long life. Don’t be tempted to cut the noodles, or you’ll be “cutting your life short.” You may not be Chinese, but really, there’s no harm in covering all your bases. I mean, who knows what deity drew the short straw and was appointed to be in charge something so boring like “lifespan?”

So, I created this Long Life Fertility Noodles Recipe that covered all your important bases – sort of cramming in as much good fortune as possible on one plate. The sesame seeds and pea pods in the noodles symbolize fertility (remember, if you don’t want children, substitute with any greens, bean sprouts or sliced bamboo shoots.) Shrimp, in Chinese, is pronounced “haa” which sounds like laughter, and may your marriage be full of happiness.

And of course, this column has 688 words, my way of wishing you a smooth path to double prosperity.

Long Life Fertility Noodles Recipe with Happy Shrimp

***

My Photo Setup

Long Life Fertility Noodles Recipe with Happy Shrimp - Photo Setup

This was a simple setup, with the big glass window the the right. Yup, that’s my kid’s breakfast table that I’m using. I’ve been noticing that both Bon Appetit and Gourmet magazines have been lots of overhead shots of food. Not a style that I’m fond of – the food isn’t as intimate and you lose a lot of texture from above. But, I wanted to try it and see on this dish.

Take a look at the second photo (above) Do you know how (*&$!!%! hard it was to stand on an itty bitty stool and balance while holding camera still enough to focus? Half my shots were blurry! heehee!

And yes, I know I could have just put the entire thing on the floor and used my tripod…but at that moment in time, I just wasn’t smart enough to think of that. Plus, that was going to be our dinner and who know what random toy airplane, spaceship or car would roll right over the food. Usually, when a toy car goes whizzing by, 2 pairs of pitter patter bare feet are chasing it.

Yum
Print

Long Life Fertility Noodles Recipe with Happy Shrimp

Servings: Yields 2 auspicious servings Prep Time: Cook Time:
2491506182_8472a73107

Ingredients:

6 ounces thin spaghetti noodles
7 ounces shrimp, deveined
1 ½ teaspoon kosher or sea salt, divided
½ teaspoon cornstarch
1 tablespoon cooking oil
1 teaspoon finely minced garlic
1/4 cup snow peas, sliced thin on diagonal
1/4 cup matchstick cut carrots
1 1/2 teaspoons soy sauce
1 teaspoon Chinese rice wine (or dry sherry)
1/4 teaspoon sesame oil
1 tablespoon sesame seeds

Directions:

Bring a stockpot of water to boil. Add 1 tsp of salt to water and cook thin spaghetti, according to package directions. Drain. While pasta is cooking, place shrimp in a small bowl and add the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and the cornstarch. Mix well and let sit for 8 minutes. Rinse the shrimp well, washing off the salt and cornstarch. Pat very dry with paper towels.

In a wok or large skillet, heat cooking oil on high until a bead of water sizzles and evaporates upon contact. Add the shrimp and fry until halfway cooked through, about 1 minute each side. Dish out the shrimp to a plate, keeping as much oil in wok as possible (you should have about 1 teaspoon of oil left and you may add an just a bit of oil into the pan if needed.)

Turn heat down to medium and add garlic. Fry until fragrant, about 15 seconds then add the snow peas and carrots. Fry for 1 minute, until the carrots and snow peas are cooked but still retain a nice crunch. Add the soy sauce and rice wine. Turn heat to high and add the drained spaghetti noodles and shrimp. Toss well to combine. Let cook for 2 minutes, until shrimp is cooked through. Toss with sesame oil and sesame seeds.

More food photography posts

Sparkling Ginger Lime Mint Cooler Sparkling Ginger Lime Mint Cooler

Escargot with Garlic Butter and Splash of Cognac Escargot with Garlic Butter and Splash of Cognac

 Lowel EGO lighting Lowel EGO lighting

The post Long Life Fertility Noodles Recipe with Happy Shrimp appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/316-long-life-fertility-noodles-with-happy-shrimp.html/feed 45