Steamy Kitchen Recipes | RSS Feed http://steamykitchen.com Steamy Kitchen Food Blog: fast recipes, simple recipes, with fresh ingredients to create delicious meals. Fri, 24 Jul 2015 17:57:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.3 Vietnamese Pho Pressure Cooker – Paleo Friendly http://steamykitchen.com/31369-vietnamese-pho-pressure-cooker-noodle-soup-paleo-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/31369-vietnamese-pho-pressure-cooker-noodle-soup-paleo-recipe.html#comments Mon, 10 Mar 2014 15:45:10 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=31369 It’s been a loooong time since I’ve made home made pho – much too long! Normally I make beef pho the long and slow way – either in the slow cooker or barely bubbling on the stovetop: Slow Cooker Vietnamese Pho Recipe Vietnamese Beef Pho Recipe Chicken Pho Recipe (Pho Ga) But a very persistent reader has been emailing me ...

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It’s been a loooong time since I’ve made home made pho – much too long! Normally I make beef pho the long and slow way – either in the slow cooker or barely bubbling on the stovetop:

Slow Cooker Vietnamese Pho Recipe
Vietnamese Beef Pho Recipe
Chicken Pho Recipe (Pho Ga)

But a very persistent reader has been emailing me about creating a Pressure Cooker Vietnamese Pho recipe for the past 2 years. If you can make awesome Pho in the slow cooker, why not a pressure cooker?

Vietnamese Pho Pressure Cooker (Noodle Soup)

The only limitation of using a slow cooker or pressure cooker is space. Both appliances aren’t that big, and if I’m going to take the time to make Vietnamese Pho, I want to make a BIG BATCH of it! Well, enough to serve 4 people and some broth for the freezer too (freeze in quart containers or bags to make the best “instant noodle” broth ever.)

My solution for Pressure Cooker Pho is to treat the pressure cooker as a “pho broth concentrator” – the ingredients in the recipe are sufficient enough to create such a rich pho broth concentrate. You can add water to adjust after the broth is complete.

Vietnamese Pho Pressure Cooker (Noodle Soup)

Paleo Friendly Vietnamese Pho!

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Here’s a bonus. The recipe is Paleo friendly.

Big thanks to Nom Nom Paleo Food for Humans Cookbook by my friends Michelle Tam and Henry Fong for another stellar recipe. LOVE this cookbook, I can’t recommend it enough and have purchased copies for my friends.

If you’re non-Paleo, don’t worry. I’m creating notes for Paleo and non-Paleo recipe the Vietnamese Beef Pho using the pressure cooker.

 

 

20 Minute Sriracha Sauce Recipe

20 Minute Sriracha Sauce Recipe – Paleo Friendly –

Cauliflower Fried Rice Paleo Recipe

Cauliflower Fried Rice Recipe – > – Paleo Friendly

Non-Paleo Notes: Vietnamese Pho is generally Paleo friendly, as-is. The only ingredient substitution is the type of oil and noodles. Paleo grain-free “noodles” can be Shirotaki noodles (slippery little noodles made from Asian mountain potatoes – found in refrigerated section next to tofu at the store), Zucchini noodles (watch my video reviewing different gadgets to cut zucchini noodles), Kelp noodles made from seaweed.

Traditional Vietnamese Pho Ingredients

If you’re regular eatin’ folk, the traditional Vietnamese Pho noodles are rice noodles. You can find fresh rice noodles at Asian markets or you can get dried rice noodles at your grocery store. They come in different widths, just get one that you like. Generally, I can easily find the 1/4″ thick noodles very easily.

Dried rice noodles cook differently from the regular wheat-based Italian style pasta that you’re used to. The great news its that it’s faster! Dried rice noodles cook in as quickly as 1-3 minutes! If you overcook the noodles, they become mushy and pretty much inedible.

Here’s the best way to cook the dried rice noodles:

  1. Soak the dried noodles in hot water (not boiling water, just hot water from tap) for about 10 minutes. This will soften up the rice noodles. Drain.
  2. Bring a small pot of water to a simmer. You don’t really need a ton of water (like you do for pasta) – just enough so that all the noodles can be submerged in the hot water. Turn off heat.
  3. Add drained rice noodles to the hot water. Let it sit for 1 minute. Very thin noodles will be ready after 1 minute. Thicker rice noodles will need a couple of minutes. Drain.

Cooking noodles in the Pho broth?

I know you’re gonna ask me: why not cook the noodles directly in the Pho broth? I never do this. Here’s why:

  1. Because the rice noodles cook so darn quickly, it’s so easy to over cook them. I don’t want to ruin a batch of hard-earned broth with overcooked noodles!
  2. Cooking any type of noodles releases starch. For example, when you cook noodles, the water becomes cloudy from the extra flour. I don’t want that in my Pho broth!
  3. Related to #1 is that because the rice noodles can get mushy if submerged in boiling water too long, I add the noodles to each personal bowl first. When everyone is ready to eat (at the table, all staring at me, impatiently tapping their chopsticks on the table) – I will pour the Pho broth INTO the bowls one by one and serve immediately. Basically, I make the bowls to-serve.

No Pressure Cooker? No problem!

Just follow all instructions and simmer the broth for 4 hours on your stovetop. Put all ingredients into a large pot. Fill with 2-1/2 quarts of water. Bring to a boil, reduce heat so that the water is BARELY simmering – just tiny bubbles here and there. Simmer slightly covered for 3-4 hours. Skim surface of fats and stuff that floats frequently.

Vietnamese Pho Pressure Cooker (Noodle Soup) Recipe Video


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Vietnamese Pho Pressure Cooker (Noodle Soup)

Servings: 6 Prep Time: 15 minutes Cook Time: 2 hours
vietnamese pho pressure cooker noodle soup recipe featured-0888

Adapted from Nom Nom Paleo Cookbook by Henry Fong and Michelle Tam. This recipe makes a Vietnamese Pho Soup concentrate.

A tip for the Beef Eye of Round. The key to this is to very thinly slice. These slices will be added to each person's bowl RAW. When you pour the simmering hot pho broth into each bowl, it will cook the beef perfectly! To slice very thin, space the Eye of Round roast into the freezer for 20 minutes. This will firm up the roast and make it easier to slice very thin.

OR - sometimes you can find already-sliced beef at your grocery store. My store sells pre-sliced beef that you use for cheesesteak sandwiches. Even if it's not eye-of-round roast, just use what they are selling pre-sliced!

Ingredients:

3 whole star anise
2 tablespoons whole coriander seeds
1 cinnamon stick
3 whole cloves
1 green cardamom pod
2 tablespoons butter, divided (Non-Paleo version: cooking oil)
8 slices fresh ginger, unpeeled, 1/2 inch thick
1/2 large yellow onion, peeled
2 pound beef cross shanks, 1-1/2 inches thick
1-1/2 pound oxtails
1-1/2 pound beef brisket
3-1/2 tablespoons fish sauce
1 pound beef eye of round roast, very thinly sliced (keep refrigerated until ready to serve)
8 cups shirotaki noodles (Non-Paleo version: dried rice noodles)FOR THE TABLE:2 limes, cut into wedges
2 jalapeño peppers, sliced
1 bunch fresh cilantro
1 bunch fresh Thai basil (or regular Italian basil)
1 bunch fresh mint
2 cups bean sprouts
Sriracha sauce (store bought or 20 Minute Sriracha Recipe)

Directions:

1. In a large saucepan over medium-high heat, add all spices and toast until they become fragrant. Take care not to burn them! Place them in a coffee filter or piece of cheesecloth and tie it up. Place the sachet into the pressure cooker pot.
2. In the same sauce pan over medium-high heat, add 1 tablespoon butter (or oil) and add onion and ginger pieces. Brown until there is a nice sear on them. Remove them from the pan and place them in the pressure cooker.
3. Sear the meat in batches: add the remaining tablespoon of butter to the pan and sear the shank, oxtail and brisket. You'll do this in batches, all in a single layer. Give everything plenty of space so that they SEAR and brown. Crowding the pan will not brown the meat. Sear each side, remove each meat from the pan and add them to the pressure cooker.

4. Cover the contents of the pressure cooker with water or up to the fill line. Set your pressure cooker to cook for 60 minutes. This means it will cook under pressure for 60 minutes. It will take time to build up pressure (usually 30 minutes) and additional time to release pressure after cooking (usually 30 minutes).
Approximately: 30 minutes to build up pressure + 60 minutes under pressure + 30 minutes to release pressure. Exact timing is really not that important - and also depends on your pressure cooker system. Follow manufacturer instructions.

5. Once finished cooking and safe to open, open the pressure cooker and using a fine mesh or ladle, remove the top layer of fatty liquid that has accumulated on the surface of the broth and discard (there will be lots of it.) Remove the onion, ginger and spice sachet and discard. Remove the meat to your cutting board. Shred the brisket using two forks. Remove any other meat from bone.

6. The resulting broth is a concentrate. Dilute the pho concentrate with 4-6 cups of water. Season the Pho broth with fish sauce. Taste and add additional fish sauce if needed. Bring to a simmer on stovetop right before you are ready to serve.

Assemble the Pho Bowls:
Serve to order. In a large bowl for each person, add shirotaki noodles and meat (including the sliced eye of round). Pour the just-simmering hot broth into each bowl. Hot broth will cook the sliced eye of round. Serve with the remaining sides a la carte so each person can add whatever they'd like to their soup.

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Satay Noodles and Greens http://steamykitchen.com/28957-satay-noodles-and-greens-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/28957-satay-noodles-and-greens-recipe-video.html#comments Fri, 06 Dec 2013 18:33:47 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=28957 What you’ll learn: Vegetarian noodle dish with Peanut Satay Sauce Recipe from Chef Dale Pinnock of The Medicinal Chef Cookbook 20 minute recipe, start to finish Satay is generally grilled meat on a skewer, served with a peanut-y dipping sauce on the side.  You know, something like this: or this: or this: Asian shish-kabob, right? Well, not this recipe! We’ve ...

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Satay Noodles and Greens Recipe

What you’ll learn:

  • Vegetarian noodle dish with Peanut Satay Sauce
  • Recipe from Chef Dale Pinnock of The Medicinal Chef Cookbook
  • 20 minute recipe, start to finish

Satay is generally grilled meat on a skewer, served with a peanut-y dipping sauce on the side.  You know, something like this:

or this:

or this:

Asian shish-kabob, right? Well, not this recipe! We’ve taken all the savory, nutty flavors of meat satay and made it a vegetarian noodle dish, with the help of my favorite cookbook of the year, The Medicinal Chef by Dale Pinnock.

Satay Noodles and Greens Recipe

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If there’s one book to add to your wishlist, this is it. Dale’s philosophy about food is that it should not only nourish your stomach, but should also heal your body.

Satay Noodles and Greens Recipe

Each recipe is accompanied by a little chart to highlight ailments the ingredients can help.

Satay Noodles and Greens Recipe

In this instance, Satay Noodles and Greens Recipe with the peanut-y sauce is great for:

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With fresh greens that we picked from our garden, Asian dried rice noodles and a simply stir-together sauce, it’s an easy, filling and healthy meal.

Satay Noodles and Greens Recipe

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Satay Noodles and Greens Recipe Video

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Satay Noodles and Greens Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes
satay noodles and greens recipe-0146

Recipe adapted from The Medicinal Chef: Eat Your Way to Better Health by Dale Pinnock.

Ingredients:

8 ounces dry rice noodles
1 tablespoon cooking oil
1 large leek
2 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
1 small green or red chili pepper, minced
4 handfuls shredded greens, such as cabbage, napa cabbage, bok choy and tatsoi
2 tablespoons hot water
4 tablespoons chunky peanut butter
2 tablespoons dark soy sauce (or 2 tablespoons regular soy sauce + 1 tablespoon brown sugar)
1 tablespoon honey
1 teaspoon Chinese five-spice powder
1/2 teaspoon sea or kosher salt

Directions:

Soak the dry rice noodles in warm water for 5-8 minutes. In a bowl, whisk together the hot water, peanut butter, dark soy sauce, honey, five-spice powder, salt and set aside. We'll be only using the white part of the leek (compost or use the green part to make broth). Wash the leek very well, separating the layers a bit to rinse out any dirt. Very thinly slice the leek.

Heat the cooking oil in a large saute pan or wok over medium heat until just shimmering. Add the leek, garlic and chili pepper. Cook for 2 minutes (take care to not burn the garlic).

Add the shredded greens and continue to cook until they have softened slightly, about 1 minute. Turn heat to medium-high and add in the soy sauce mixture

Drain the rice noodles. When sauce begins to bubble a bit, add in the rice noodles and cook for 1-2 minutes or until the rice noodles are cooked.

Legend image reprinted with permission from The Medicinal Chef © 2013 Dale Pinnock, Sterling Publishing Inc. Co. Photography by Martin Poole.

 

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Kofta Meatballs with Sweet and Sour Cherry Sauce http://steamykitchen.com/25044-kofta-meatballs-with-sweet-and-sour-cherry-sauce-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/25044-kofta-meatballs-with-sweet-and-sour-cherry-sauce-recipe-video.html#comments Mon, 18 Mar 2013 18:35:08 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=25044 Last week, the boys were on spring break (does anyone remember when spring break was actually in Spring?) and we decided as a family to staycation the week instead of braving the crowds at Disney or spending money on traveling. With 5 acres, 2 dogs, 10 chickens, 150 koi fish, it costs us more than just the flight + hotel to ...

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Last week, the boys were on spring break (does anyone remember when spring break was actually in Spring?) and we decided as a family to staycation the week instead of braving the crowds at Disney or spending money on traveling. With 5 acres, 2 dogs, 10 chickens, 150 koi fish, it costs us more than just the flight + hotel to travel somewhere. We gotta pay someone responsible to watch over the compound when we’re gone. Plus, this year, we’re toying with the idea of taking the boys to Hong Kong/Laos/Cambodia and a summer trip to see Redwood National Park in California.

Kofta Meatballs with Sweet and Sour Cherry Sauce Recipe

Plus, Scott and I are headed to Pebble Beach Wine Festival, IACP in San Francisco in a few weeks. Oh and BlogHer Food in Austin, BlogHer in Chicago, Food Blogger Connect in London. This, all before August.

Kofta Meatballs with Sweet and Sour Cherry Sauce Recipe

So, home we were last week….and it was a week of indulging in the kitchen. We had guests over for grilled lobsters, steamed mussels, skirt steak and meatballs. All different meals, of course! Scott’s birthday party potluck was thrown in there somewhere too. All I know is that last Friday, on recycle pick-up day, our bin overfloweth and I was quite embarrassed to put out SO MANY empties –  so I divided the bottles into two piles, one for last week and one for this week’s pick-up.

Kofta Meatballs with Sweet and Sour Cherry Sauce Recipe

One of the recipes we tried for the party was an Arabian dish – Kofta, or Meatballs with Sweet and Sour Cherry Sauce. It’s from a cookbook called “Modern Flavors of Arabia” by Suzanne Husseini, one of most popular cooking show personalities in the Middle East. The sweet and sour cherry sauce complemented the rich lamb meatballs (though of course you could use ground pork/beef/chicken/turkey instead).

Kofta Meatballs with Sweet and Sour Cherry Sauce Recipe

I rehydrated dried cherries in honey and lemon (also – ahem, I may or may not have added a little splash of Brandy). The sauce simmers quietly while the meatballs cook in the oven or on the stove.

Kofta Meatballs with Sweet and Sour Cherry Sauce Recipe

It’s a fabulous party food – skewer each meatball with a cute pick.

Kofta Meatballs with Sweet and Sour Cherry Sauce Recipe Video

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Kofta Meatballs with Sweet and Sour Cherry Sauce

Servings: 8-10 Prep Time: 5 minutes Cook Time: 20 minutes
Kofta Meatballs with Sweet and Sour Cherry Sauce Recipe

Feel free to sub the lamb with ground meat of your choice.

Ingredients:

FOR THE CHERRY SAUCE

1 tablespoon olive oil
1 shallot, chopped (or 2 tablespoons diced red onion)
1 cup dried cherries
3 teaspoons honey
splash of Brandy (optional)
1/2 lemon, juiced
1/2 cup water
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
1 tablespoon minced fresh mintsalt and freshly ground black pepper, to tasteFor the Meatballs

1 pound ground lamb
1/4 cup sparkling water
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced fresh parsley
1/2 teaspoon cloves
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon cumin
1/2 teaspoon allspice
salt and pepper to taste
3 tablespoons olive oil

Directions:

To make the Cherry Sauce

In a small saucepan over medium-high heat, add the olive oil and shallot and saute until tender. Add the cherries, honey, lemon juice, water and cinnamon and bring mixture to a boil. Lower the heat and allow to simmer for 5 minutes or until the sauce has thickened. Add salt and pepper to taste. Stir in the mint.

To make the Meatballs
Preheat oven to 375F.

In a large mixing bowl, add the ground lamb, sparkling water, garlic, cloves, cinnamon, cumin, allspice, salt and pepper. Mix lightly to incorporate all ingredients. Form mixture into small meatballs.

In a large frying pan over medium high, add olive oil. Add meatballs and fry, turning often to brown all over, about 5-7 minutes. You might have to cook meatballs in batches if your pan is too small. After browning all the meatballs, place meatballs on a baking sheet and bake in oven for 10 minutes to cook through. Drizzle with the cherry sauce just before serving.

 


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Steamy Kitchen's Healthy Asian Favorites cookbook cover

My new cookbook is available for purchase now wherever books are sold!

You can also pick up a copy on Amazon for $13.98!

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Chicken Vindaloo http://steamykitchen.com/16512-chicken-vindaloo.html http://steamykitchen.com/16512-chicken-vindaloo.html#comments Sun, 26 Jun 2011 19:47:13 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=16512 *waving hello!* Hey guys! I’m still in the middle of getting the new house ready and packing boxes in our old house. We’re almost done painting every single wall, baseboard and ceiling trays. Three more days until the big move! I’ll post some photos later today. Lots of love, Jaden We are so thrilled to introduce you to Prerna, from Indian Simmer. ...

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*waving hello!* Hey guys! I’m still in the middle of getting the new house ready and packing boxes in our old house. We’re almost done painting every single wall, baseboard and ceiling trays. Three more days until the big move! I’ll post some photos later today. Lots of love, Jaden

We are so thrilled to introduce you to Prerna, from Indian Simmer. Today, she is sharing her recipe for Chicken Vindaloo, one of our absolute favorites, packed with flavor from chilies, garlic, cardamon, cinnamon and more. We know you will love Prerna and her blog, with photography that inspires, charged with brilliant and bold colors, and recipes from the heart, like Chicken Tikka Masala and Cumin scented Green Peas Pulao or Matar Paneer. Enjoy! – adam and joanne

A few weeks back I got a message from someone with the email address jaden at steamykitchen.com and it said will you “guest post for me?” My first reaction was to check whether that it was really written to me. Why?  Because never in my wildest dreams would I expect that JADEN from STEAMY KITCHEN would ask little me to guest post on her blog. And even when I found out that it was actually Jaden, I was in complete disbelief! Just like millions of other bloggers and food lovers, I have always been inspired by Jaden. It is an honor to be featured on Steamy Kitchen and thanks so much Jaden for the opportunity!

When asked about what I should be cooking for her, Jaden said she loves Chicken Vindaloo and would love to share its recipe with her readers. So Chicken Vindaloo it is! It is a dish which, if not most popular, must be one of the most popular Indian dishes in the world. Vindaloo is a popular curry that hails from a tiny little state of Goa in India. Portuguese had their colony in Goa for decades and so the state has a great influence from Portuguese culture. It is believed that the name Vindaloo was also derived from Portuguese dish where “vinho” means wine and “alhos” is garlic. Usually the recipe asks for pork and wine along with garlic. In course of time Vindaloo evolved and cooks started making it with chicken or lamb and wine was substituted with vinegar.

I am sure you will always notice that the Chicken Vindaloos served in restaurants have potatoes in them. Aloo in hindi means potatoes and since Vind- aloo has aloo in it, I assumed that potatoes are a must in the dish. But after doing a little bit of a research I found that potatoes are not really an essential ingredient. A traditional Vindaloo just asks for meat, garlic, wine or vinegar and lots of chilies in it. So the potatoes you see in the Vindaloo they serve at your favorite Indian restaurant are probably because they either want to make the gravy thicker or increase the volume but definitely not because the recipe asks for it!

Most important part of a Vindaloo masala (spice mix) is the chilies in it. The dish is mostly fiery hot because Vindaloo masala is a chili based preparation and that is where it gets all its flavors. In my recipe I used the dry whole red chilies found at Indian markets. You can make it milder to your taste and use Kasmiri Mirch (a mild form of red chili). This will help make the curry red and pretty but still not very hot.

So here’s the recipe for Chicken Vindaloo. Again, you can tweak the amount of spices and heat according to your taste. Also if you want, you can add diced boiled potatoes in the curry but if you do so, do it right after the chicken is almost cooked and you are giving it a final boil.

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Chicken Vindaloo Recipe

Servings: serves 4 Prep Time: 1 hour 30 minutes Cook Time: 20 minutes
chicken-vindaloo-recipe-1

Ingredients:

1 ½ lb chicken thighs (cut into cubes)
1 cup diced onions
4-5 whole red chilies
6-7 cloves of garlic
1 inch ginger
¼ cup white wine vinegar (add more if you like)
For dry spice mix:
1 teaspoon cloves
3-4 whole cardamoms
1 teaspoon cinammon powder
1/2 tablespoon peppercorns
1 tablespoon cumin
1 teaspoon turmeric powder
1 1/2 teaspoons mustard seeds
2 cups diced potatoes (optional)
4 tablespoons olive oil
Salt

Directions:

1) Soak whole chilies, garlic cloves and ginger in the white wine vinegar for about half an hour. Grind and make a paste of it.
2) Marinate chicken in the chili paste and let it sit in a refrigerator for at least an hour.
3) For the dry spice: mix cloves, cumin, cardamom, cinnamon, turmeric and peppercorn. Grind them in a spice or coffee grinder. Set aside.
4) Heat oil in a thick bottom pan, add mustard seeds.
5) Once they start to pop, add onions and fry them in oil until they turn light golden brown.
6) Add marinated chicken with all the juices and stir fry for a few minutes.
7) Add dry spices along with salt, mix it all together and cover the pan with a lid.
8) Let it simmer and cook until the chicken is done and curry is thick (stirring in between from time to time).
9) Garnish with chopped cilantro and serve hot with rice or your choice of bread.

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Slow Cooker Vietnamese Chicken Pho Ga http://steamykitchen.com/13332-slow-cooker-vietnamese-chicken-pho-ga.html http://steamykitchen.com/13332-slow-cooker-vietnamese-chicken-pho-ga.html#comments Fri, 21 Jan 2011 22:53:54 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=13332 Cook Vietnamese chicken pho in a slow cooker! From cookbook author Jaden Hair.

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Bon Appétit and I are celebrating slow cookers this month — I’ve created three incredible slow cooker recipes for them, Slow Cooker Vietnamese Pho Ga Noodle Soup; Slow Cooker Cedar Planked Salmon and Slow Cooker Moroccan Lamb Stew. Oh, and if you don’t have a slow cooker, guess what? Bon Appétit is giving away a $150 KitchenAid Slow Cooker to one lucky duck.

For the full recipe for Slow Cooker Vietnamese Chicken Pho Ga Noodle Soup, head over to Bon Appetit. I’ll go into more detail about 3 of the secrets to the recipe.

Slow Cooker Vietnamese Chicken Pho Ga Noodle Soup

Vietnamese Slow Cooker Chicken Pho Ga Recipe

Secret #1: The Moist Chicken

See how moist and tender that chicken is? The secret is to separate your chicken. Chicken bones and parts for the broth; and 1 chicken breast reserved for slicing and eating with your Pho Ga.

The chicken bones and parts go into the slow cooker to make the soup.

The chicken breast is thinly sliced and poached just before serving – cooks in 3-4 minutes. If I had cooked the chicken-for-eating in the slow cooker, it would be flavorless and tough. All of the flavor would have transferred into the broth….and chicken cooked for hours on end in a slow cooker ends up chewy and tough.

Secret #2: Size Matters

Let’s talk about the Pho Ga soup for a bit. I add 2 pounds of chicken parts, whole coriander seeds, half an onion, ginger slices, whole cloves, star anise, and a bundle of cilantro.

Of the 2 pounds of chicken, 1/2 pound of that should be wing tips. Most slow cooker have capacity of 7 quarts. The chunkier the chicken, the less room you have left for broth.

Chicken wing TIPS (the section that really has no meat anyways) have maximum flavor, minimum size. That’s why I love using wing tips. Or chicken feet, if you can find them (did I hear someone squeal?! chicken feet is great for soup!) So remember, size matters. A 7-quart slow cooker will make enough Pho Ga soup for 4 big bowls.

After taking out the big chicken parts, I’ll strain through cheesecloth just to ensure that the broth is clean and clear. For cooking noobs, here’s something to remember. Anytime you are cooking raw chicken in simmering water, you’ll get quite a bit of “white stuff” in the water. Don’t be afraid of it, it’s just chicken protein. If you have time on your hands, you could parboil the bones first in a stock pot, discard water (and “white stuff”) and then proceed with the recipe. But if you have time on your hands, you could just make Pho Ga without the slow cooker.

Straining the broth gives you golden, richly colored, clean soup.

Secret # 3: The Noodles

Soak the dried noodles in COOL water first then DRAIN. This helps makes them pliable, soft and cook better.

To cook the noodles, bring a pot of water to boil and then put the cool drained noodles into the hot water and simmer for 1 minute. After 1 minute — the noodles are DONE!!! That’s it. Don’t overcook the rice noodles, they’ll get too soft and soggy.

Oh and a note on why I boil my noodles in water instead of the pho ga broth we made? Well, I always boil my noodles and pasta separately from my precious soup. That’s because dried noodles/pasta tend to have excess starch that boils out into the water (that’s why boiled pasta water is murky) and many times the dried noodles might have itty bitty weevils or dirt particles that I just don’t want in my soup.

Not so secret secret:

I love garnishing with shaved onions, fresh bean sprouts, cilantro and a squeeze of lime. No Sriracha or Hoisin for me, though many people do enjoy those condiments in their Pho Ga, I think it totally overpowers the beautiful broth.

For the full recipe for Slow Cooker Vietnamese Chicken Pho Ga Noodle Soup, head over to Bon Appetit.

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Easter Ham Recipe with Mango Ginger Glaze (6 ingredients!) http://steamykitchen.com/7897-00-easter-ham-with-mango-ginger-glaze-6-ingredients.html http://steamykitchen.com/7897-00-easter-ham-with-mango-ginger-glaze-6-ingredients.html#comments Tue, 23 Mar 2010 05:48:11 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=7897 Step by Step photos for Easter Ham with Mango Ginger Glaze recipe using only 6 ingredients!

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Easter Ham with Mango Ginger Glaze

I’ve found people to be in one of two ham categories: the spiral camp who loves the thin, orderly even slices….or the thicker, ragged hand-cut hearty slices. Well, okay, three….there’s the people who don’t even eat ham, and if that’s you, then I suggest you move on to the cheerful strawberries.

I think most are spiraly people who love the way the slices fold over and fan so elegantly. We just live in such a crazy world that maybe people crave order and evenness in their ham.

But please, please resist the urge to get the spiral. And I understand my request may disrupt your desire for uniformity, but I have good reason. Ham that’s pre-cut into fancy spirals don’t taste as good. It’s more susceptible to drying out in the oven.

You know how an oven is hot and dry like the desert? Well, a spiral cut ham exposes a lot of surface area to that desert. A ham that’s uncut just has limited surface area that’s exposed, resulting in a moister, more succulent ham.

If following my advice leads you to sweat and fret over having to hand-cut your ham slices, counter it by also serving green beans that you can stack evenly in a nice, neat row. That should hold you over.

How to Cook Easter Ham with Mango Ginger Glaze

aka my “6 Ingredients Easter Ham recipe with Mango Ginger Glaze”

I think “cooking” is a misnomer — it’s really “warming up.” Did you know that ham is already cooked? All you need to do is warm it back up and slather it with a nice sticky-sweet glaze. And I’m gonna teach you the Mango-Ginger Glaze.

Get this – this Easter ham is 5 ingredients + the ham.

And it will be fabulous. I promise. I made this on Daytime a couple of weeks ago and the moment the cameras shut off, the crew zipped on over to the kitchen and hovered over the ham for an hour, picking at the pieces as they pretended to be in the studio kitchen talking with me.

Oh yeah, they totally pretended like they were in the kitchen chit-chattin’ with me as an excuse to eat the ham.

It was all about the pork.

When you’re buying ham, look for “Ham” or “Ham with Natural Juices” — don’t bother with anything labeled “with water.” Trust me on this. There are many grades of ham – and the best quality is the one with the least amount of water/additives.

First step is to score the skin with a knife in a diamond pattern. Go one direction diagonally, then the other way so that you get “diamonds.” The scoring is totally not necessary, but it looks really pretty and also will help the glaze really stick onto the ham in a later step.

Place your ham in a oven-safe vessel not too much larger than the ham itself. Either a roasting pan, or large saute pan will do. Here’s my beloved cast iron. See how there’s only a couple inches of space around the ham?

Take the mango nectar and shake! shake! shake!

Pour it in the pan so that it goes — oh— until it reaches about 1/2 inch up the sides. The juice helps with keeping the ham moist.

Cover with foil…which in the oven will help create steam with the mango juice. So, instead of just warming your ham in the hot, dry oven – you’re creating a moist, flavorful (mango!) environment. You’re gonna do 15 minutes per pound.

Stick it in the oven 275F. We’re gonna warm this baby up low ‘n slow….

In the meantime, let’s make the glaze. Grate some fresh ginger. Sure, you could chop it with a knife…but why?

This is a better way….the tough fiber stays on top of the microplane grater:

In a sauce pot, add the ginger and the mango preserves:

Some ground cloves:

And brown sugar:

Warm and whisk!

Until you get this:

Hey, remember that ham!? Well after the 15 minutes per pound is up (for me it was about 1 1/2 hours) it will look like this:

Glorious.

Now’s the time to crank your oven to 425F while the oven is coming up to temp, brush with some of the Mango-Ginger Glaze. (You’ll only use some of the glaze, reserve the rest):

Alllll over the ham:

And then….15 minutes later…..it’s DONE. That sticky-sweet Mango-Ginger Glaze is perfect:

Remove the ham to a cutting board and let rest. In meantime, let’s finish the glaze for serving. There’s  a lot of pan juice left:

Pour some of that into the Mango-Ginger Glaze that’s left over — just to thin it out a bit and add more depth of flavor:

Hello….well rested ham!

Here’s how to slice the ham. See that bone in the middle? That gets in the way – so we’re going to take a knife and cut horizontally right above the bone:

And then go the other way:

Now, we’re ready to slice:

How beautiful is that?!

Drizzle a bit of the Mango-Ginger Glaze on top of each serving:

So, there you have it. 6 ingredients for Easter Ham.

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Easter Ham with Mango Ginger Glaze Recipe

Servings: 10-12 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 15 minutes per pound
easter ham mango glazed ginger recipe

Ingredients:

6-7 pound ham (preferably "ham with natural juices")
1-2 cups mango nectar or juice
1 1/2 cups mango jam (or apricot jam)
3/4 cup light brown sugar
1 1/2 teaspoons grated fresh ginger
1/2 teaspoon ground cloves

Directions:

1. Let the ham stand at room temperature for 90 minutes.

2. Preheat oven to 275F and set the rack at the lowest position. Rinse and pat dry the ham. Using a sharp knife, score the skin of the ham in a criss-cross pattern. Place ham on oven-safe skillet with high sides or a large pot. Pour the mango juice into the pan, and add additional water if necessary to bring the liquid level to 1/2 inch. Cover the pan tightly with tin foil. Roast in oven for 1 1/2 to 2 hours (about 15 minutes per pound) or until the internal temperature of the ham reaches 100F.

3. While the ham is cooking, prepare the glaze. Combine the mango jam, brown sugar, ginger and cloves in a small sauce pot and cook over low heat until the glaze is thick and sticky. Turn off heat and set aside.

4. When the ham has finished cooking (step 2), take the ham out of the oven. Turn the oven to 425F. Brush the ham with about 1/4 of the glaze all over. You should have some mango juice in the pan, if not, add additional mango juice or water to reach 1/4". Once the oven comes to temperature, return the ham, uncovered to oven. Bake for 15 minutes until the liquid is bubbly and the ham has turned to a nice, deep golden brown. The internal temperature of the ham should be 120F. Remove ham to a cutting board and let rest for 15 minutes.

5. Return the remaining glaze to the stove on medium-low heat. Your roasting pan should have some mango juice left - carefully pour about 1/2 cup of the mango pan juice into the glaze. Whisk and adjust with either more juice or mango jam to create a beautiful, slightly thick glaze for serving.

6. Carve the ham and serve with the Mango-Ginger Glaze.

More Easter Ham recipes

Blackberry Rum Glazed Ham Recipe (15 minute recipe for 2-4 people)

Easter Blackberry Rum Glazed Ham Recipe

Cola-Pineapple Glazed Ham Recipe (6 ingredients)

Easter Ham Cola Glazed Recipe

Ham with Grilled Peaches 

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Cloves http://steamykitchen.com/7204-cloves.html http://steamykitchen.com/7204-cloves.html#comments Tue, 16 Feb 2010 18:16:00 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=7204 Cloves have a very strong distinct flavor. This spice is traditionally used in savory dishes. When purchasing clove you should look for a large whole clove with plump buds. Whole cloves can be stored in a cool dry place, ground clove should be stored in small amount is an air tight container away from light.

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Cloves have a very strong distinct flavor. This spice is traditionally used in savory dishes. When purchasing clove you should look for a large whole clove with plump buds. Whole cloves can be stored in a cool dry place, ground clove should be stored in small amount is an air tight container away from light.

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Sweet Pumpkin Fried Wonton Desserts http://steamykitchen.com/6689-sweet-pumpkin-fried-wonton-desserts.html http://steamykitchen.com/6689-sweet-pumpkin-fried-wonton-desserts.html#comments Tue, 24 Nov 2009 19:46:25 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=6689 If you are not up to making pumpkin pie (me) these little treats are perfect. Bite sized, filled with pumpkin puree, cream cheese and pumpkin spices- like clove, nutmeg and cinnamon. Fry ’em up and an instant dessert that even the kids will love. Oh, and serve them with a scoop of ice cream and you’re golden. I made these ...

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If you are not up to making pumpkin pie (me) these little treats are perfect. Bite sized, filled with pumpkin puree, cream cheese and pumpkin spices- like clove, nutmeg and cinnamon.

Fry ’em up and an instant dessert that even the kids will love.

Oh, and serve them with a scoop of ice cream and you’re golden.

I made these this morning on Fox13 Tampa Bay along with Turkey and Roasted Chestnut Lettuce Wraps. Both recipes are a riff from recipes from The Steamy Kitchen Cookbook!

When you’re shopping for wonton wrappers, pick out the THICKEST wonton wrappers possible – because the pumpkin/cream cheese mixture is not solid but creamy, the thin wrappers may burst in the hot oil. You can find these wonton wrappers in the refrigerated produce section of your grocery store – sometimes in the tofu section. The brand I used is Nasoya, which is thick enough.

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I definitely want to stress how important it is to seal that baby tight. Paint each edge with egg wash…spoon just a teaspoon of filling in the middle. Lift up a corner to seal tightly, and then pinch together again to make sure the edges are sealed.

sweet-pumpkin-fried-wonton

Then you can fry them up in cooking oil (canola, vegetable, peanut) for a minute or so each side. Any wontons that are NOT closed properly will leak and possibly splatter!

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Sweet Pumpkin Fried Wonton Recipe

makes 40

You can find wonton wrappers in the refrigerated produce section of the regular supermarket or the frozen section of an Asian market. These wrappers were provided by Nasoya.

3/4 cup canned pumpkin puree
3 tablespoons brown sugar
1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/4 cup cream cheese, softened at room temperature
40 wonton wrappers
1 egg
1 tablespoon water
oil, for frying (canola, peanut, vegetable)
powdered sugar

Mix together the pumpkin, brown sugar, cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, vanilla and cream cheese. Set aside.

In a small bowl, whisk together the egg and the water for the egg wash.

Place one wonton wrapper on a clean, dry surface. With a small pastry brush or a spoon, paint the edges of the wonton wrapper with the egg wash. Then spoon 1 teaspoon of the pumpkin filling in the middle. Fold over to form a triangle and seal very well. Repeat for remaining.

It’s important to make sure you have a good, tight seal, otherwise the filling will leak out and cause oil splatters.

Heat 1 1/2-inches of oil in a pot, wok or small frying pan. When the oil reaches 300F, carefully slide in a few wontons into the oil with a long-handled spoon. It’s best to use a screen to protect you from the oil. Fry for 1 minute on each side, until golden brown. Drain on rack to let cool.

Sprinkle with powdered sugar.

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Crock Pot Pho (Vietnamese Beef Noodle Soup) http://steamykitchen.com/3136-crock-pot-pho.html http://steamykitchen.com/3136-crock-pot-pho.html#comments Mon, 04 May 2009 12:00:16 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/?p=3136     It’s no secret that good Pho broth requires a gazillion hours of simmering time. Time that I just don’t have. Tony, a boyfriend from a lifetime ago, told me his Dad used to simmer giant vats of pho broth overnight for his little pho restaurant in Houston. So, one day, I thought it would be really genius to ...

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Crockpot Pho Recipe   

It’s no secret that good Pho broth requires a gazillion hours of simmering time. Time that I just don’t have. Tony, a boyfriend from a lifetime ago, told me his Dad used to simmer giant vats of pho broth overnight for his little pho restaurant in Houston. So, one day, I thought it would be really genius to do the same. Dump a bunch of beefy, tendony, knuckley, marrowey bones into the largest stockpot that I have and let it simmer away while I slept.

Crockpot Pho Recipe

It didn’t quite work out as I had intended:

11:30pm Initial hard boil of the bones to get all the yuck, guck and scum off. Char ginger and onion.

11:38pm Dumped out water, added clean water, the clean bones, spices, ginger and onion. Let the dance begin.

11:45pm Nighty-night

12:35am Is the flame low enough? Maybe I need to check to see.

1:23am Hmmm…I smell something funny. Go check.

2:41am What if it boiled over? Go check.

3:24am What if there’s a gas bubble in the pipe and the the stove spontaneously bursts out in big flames? Maybe I should sleep on the couch closer to the kitchen.

4:45am Gosh I’m hungry. Sneak a big spoonful of Ben & Jerry’s Pistachio Ice Cream.

4:51am Did I forget to put ice cream back in freezer? What if the gas bubble really does happen and stove spontaneously bursts out in flames? Then sleeping on couch is a dumbass idea. Crawl back to bed.

6:00am Kids wake up. Jumps up and down on my belly trying to wake me up.

6:15am PHO-KING TIRED

Enter the Slow Cooker

A few weeks later, I was contacted by the peeps at Crock-Pot® The Original Slow Cooker <- yes, they are insanely paranoid about me using their correct trademarked name, so much that they’ve given me very specific instructions 4 separate times on how to properly spell/mark their product names.) They sent me their new eLume Crock-Pot® Programmable Slow Cooker with Touch Screen Technology to test.

crock-pot-elume <- shiny, pretty and fancy. Oh crap, I forgot the ™ after eLume™.

It’s the perfect size (6.5 quarts) for a big mean mama pot of PHO!!!

Oh yeah, baby! It solves my problem of paranoia when leaving stove on all night.

What I love about the eLume™ Crock Pot® is© its™ lighted™© touchscreen®™©. Just a light tap is all that you need and it’s totally programmable from 30 minutes to 20 hours of cooking time. You can also set it to start cooking at a certain time, but when making my Crock Pot Pho Recipe, I don’t recommend a delayed start time since we are working with raw meat bones.

Crockpot Pho Recipe

How to make Crock Pot Pho

Whether you use the Crock Pot Pho method or the traditional stove top method, there are a couple of steps that you’ll need to do before throwing it all in the Crock Pot or slow cooker. Namely, toasting the spices, grilling the onion/ginger and pre-boiling the bones. These aren’t absolutely necessary steps…you’ll still make great pho…BUT these extra steps will make the difference between good pho and pho-bulous pho.

Toasting the Vietnamese Pho Spices

Toasting spices for Crock pot Vietnamese pho

You can buy Pho spices at most Asian supermarkets – you can buy the spices separately (coriander seeds, cloves, cinnamon, star anise, fennel and cardamom pod) or purchase them already mixed up in a package (which also includes a small mesh bag). The quality of these pre-mixed spices are just okay – but sometimes it’s just convenient to pick up a bag, not to mention much cheaper if you don’t already have many of these spices. A Pho spice pack will typically sell for $1-$3.

This day that I made the Crock Pot Pho, I used individual spices. I didn’t have cardamom pod. So yes, if you are missing one of couple of the spices, it’s okay. To get the best flavor from these spices, you’ll toast them in a dry skillet.

Grilling Ginger and Onion

This is a totally optional step, but it really gives the ginger and the onion a deep, sweet, mellow flavor. When I’m making Pho the traditional stovetop way, I’ll char them in the broiler. But with the crock pot method, I didn’t want to use the oven at all. After toasting the spices (above) in a frying pan, I add a bit of oil and grilled the onion half and thick ginger slices.

crockpot-pho-beef_090418__004_onion-web

Pre-Boiling the Bones

Knuckles, leg bones with lots of marrow are the best for making soup. The marrow will also make the soup rich and thick. The bones are pre-boiled for a few minutes on high heat to clean the bones and get rid of the nasty scum.

You’ll bring a big stockpot of water to a boil on high heat. Add the bones and boil hard for 10 minutes. You’ll see brownish scum rise to the surface. If you hadn’t taken the time to pre-boil the bones, all that scummy stuff ends up in your soup.

crockpot-pho-beef_090418__003_scum-web <– nasty pho-reaky scum

Drain, discard the scummy water and briefly rinse the bones.

Now you’ll add the spices, ginger, onion and bones to the slow cooker.

crockpot-pho-beef_090418__008_pot-web

Fill with fresh, clean, cool water about 1-1/2 inches below the surface. Set your slow cooker on low for 8 hours. I haven’t tried this method on high, but I’m sure it would be just fine.

So let this cook during all day while you’re at work or at night while you sleep and you’ll be rewarded with the cleanest, best tasting pho soups ever. Because the slow cooker doesn’t let the stock boil hard, it’s safe, easy and convenient.

Here’s what the stock looks like when it’s been cooking for 8 hours on low. Notice that the level of the liquid is still pretty high. The low, even setting doesn’t evaporate the precious liquid as much as a stove top can. The stock is strained before serving.

Crock Pot Pho Soup

Other Pho Ingredients

I used different ingredients than my previous version of traditional Vietnamese Pho and I wanted to highlight them. Instead of using dried rice noodles, I used fresh rice noodles found at Asian markets, in the refrigerated section because all these need is a quick dip in boiling water. Very fast!

Crock Pot Pho Noodles

I also bought a package of Vietnamese Beef Balls (called Bo Vien Dan). There are all sorts of balls – beef, pork, chicken, fish, crab, and my favorite – beef tendon. They come frozen in a package and they are pre-cooked, so all you need to do is throw the frozen balls into the same pot of boiling water as you cooked your noodles in. Just boil for a couple of minutes until the beef balls are heated through. I like cutting these beef balls in half, so make them easier to eat. It’s not so pretty trying to stick an entire beef ball in your mouth. Unless…you’re like really into that.

Crock Pot Pho Beef Balls

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Crockpot Pho Recipe

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Crock Pot Pho Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: Cook Time:
crockpot vietnamese pho

This is a recipe for a 6.5 quart (or larger) Crock Pot. Any smaller really isn't that great - you won't get enough stock out of it...because the beef bones are really chunky and big. The thinly sliced meat for the bowls may be easier to slice if you freeze the chunk of meat for 15 minutes prior to slicing. You really want them as thin a possible. You can also do what I do - palm your butcher a $5 bill and he'll slice the meat for you on his fancy slicing machine

Ingredients:

For the Pho Stock:
4 pounds beef bones
1/2 onion
4 inch section of ginger, sliced
1 package Vietnamese Pho Spices (or as many of these spices as you have: 2 cinnamon sticks, 2 teaspoons whole coriander, 1 teaspooon fennel, 3 whole star anise, 3 whole cloves, 1 cardamom pod)
9 cups water
2 1/2 tablespoons fish sauce or to taste
1 teaspoon sugarFor the Pho Bowls
16 ounces fresh or dried rice noodles
1/2 pound flank, london broil, sirloin or eye of round steak, sliced as thinly as possible.
11 ounces Vietnamese beef balls, cut into halfFor the table
1-2 limes, cut into wedges
fresh herbs: cilantro, Thai basil, mint
2-3 chili peppers, sliced
2 big handfuls of bean sprouts
Hoisin sauce
Sriracha hot chili sauce

Directions:

1. Bring a large stockpot with water to boil over high heat. When it comes to a rolling boil, add the beef bones and boil vigourously for 10 minutes.

2. In the meantime, heat a frying pan on medium-low heat. Add the Vietnamese Pho Spices and toast until fragrant, about 2-3 minutes. Dump the spices to the empty Crock Pot or slow cooker immediately. Return frying pan to medium-high heat and add 1 tablespoon of oil. When the oil is hot, add the ginger slices and the onion half. Cook until the ginger is browned on both sides and the onion half is nicely browned and softened. Add the ginger and the onion to the Crock Pot or slow cooker.

3. When the bones have been pre-boiled, drain, discard water and rinse bones briefly to clean them. Add the bones to the Crock Pot or slow cooker. Fill the Crock Pot with fresh, clean, cool water to just 1-1/2 inches below surface, add the fish sauce and sugar. Cover and set the Crock Pot or slow cooker to cook on low for 8 hours. Taste and season with additional fish sauce if needed.

4. When you are just about ready to eat, you'll prep the rest of the ingredients for the Pho bowls. Bring a pot of water to a boil. Add the beef balls and cook until heated through, about 2 minutes. Remove the balls, keeping the water boiling and now cook the noodles according to package instructions. If you are using fresh noodles, all they need is a couple of minutes. Drain immediately.

5. Strain the stock with a fine meshed sieve. Discard the solids.

6. Line up 4 large bowls on counter. Distribute the noodles, beef balls and thin steak slices evenly amongst the bowls. Ladle the hot Pho stock into each bowl. The hot stock should cook the thin steak slices. Serve with lime wedges, fresh herbs, chili peppers, Hoisin sauce and Sriracha hot chili sauce at the table.

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vietnamese-pho-beef-noodle-soup-recipe Vietnamese Pho Recipe (cooked the traditional, long, slow, stovetop method)

vietnamese-chicken-pho-recipe Vietnamese Chicken Pho Recipe (Pho Ga)

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Grilled Shrimp with Lemongrass and Ginger http://steamykitchen.com/2470-lemongrass-ginger-grilled-shrimp.html http://steamykitchen.com/2470-lemongrass-ginger-grilled-shrimp.html#comments Fri, 06 Feb 2009 07:13:29 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/?p=2470 I can never resist buying jumbo shrimp when they are on sale. I’m talking GIGANTOR shrimp, that really could be mistaken for small lobster tail. The best thing to do with this monsters is to grill them whole, shell-on with a lemongrass and ginger marinade. So, how do you prepare Lemongrass-Ginger Grilled Shrimp this big? I’ll show you how to ...

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I can never resist buying jumbo shrimp when they are on sale. I’m talking GIGANTOR shrimp, that really could be mistaken for small lobster tail. The best thing to do with this monsters is to grill them whole, shell-on with a lemongrass and ginger marinade.

So, how do you prepare Lemongrass-Ginger Grilled Shrimp this big? I’ll show you how to clean them and de-vein them without removing the shell.

How to devein shrimp with shell-on

It’s really easy to devein shrimp with the shell-on. The larger the shrimp, the easier it is too – because the vein is much larger, making it easy to grab and remove. Here’s how to devein shrimp (which really isn’t a vein, you know that right? it sure sounds better than digestive tract). I have 2 methods for you:

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First, you want to take a pair of kitchen shears and snip off the little feet of the shrimp.

Method #1: Deveining Shrimp with Shell on

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Now take a pair of sharp kitchen shears (small pointy sharp ones) I loooove my Joyce Chen Kitchen Shears and snip the shell along the back of the shrimp. All the way along the back of the shrimp, stopping just before you reach the tail. Don’t go too deep- you want to keep the vein intact for easy removal. Basically, you are splitting open the shell along the back of the shrimp.

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Now you can remove the shrimp’s vein. The shell stays intact and you can just lift that vein out.

Method #2: Deveining Shrimp with Shell on

If you don’t want to split open the shell of the shrimp along its back, here’s another method:

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Take a toothpick and go right between the shell segment, just under the “vein”

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With your toothpick, now you can gently pull out the “vein” of the shrimp and discard. The vein should come out cleanly in one piece.

Lemongrass Ginger Grilled Shrimp

Lemongrass Ginger Grilled Shrimp

If you like spicy, you can add finely minced fresh chili pepper or a dash of chili powder to this recipe. The finer you chop the lemongrass, ginger and garlic, the more flavorful the shrimp.

I suggest using a microplane grater to grate the lemongrass and ginger, and a garlic press for the garlic. If you don’t have lemongrass, substitute with 1 teaspoon fresh lemon zest. For grilling, I say the bigger the shrimp the better! And I like grilling or broiling with the shrimp shell on; it protects the delicate meat, and I just enjoy eating foods that require a bit of work. But feel free to remove the shell before marinating, or buy already shelled shrimp.

1 stalk lemongrass, outer leaves discarded, bottom 3 inches finely minced or grated
1-inch piece of ginger, finely minced or grated
2 or 3 garlic cloves, finely minced
1 stalk green onion, finely minced
2 tablespoons cooking oil
1/2 teaspoon salt
Freshly ground black pepper
1 pound shell-on shrimp
12 bamboo skewers
Cooking oil, for brushing on grill grates
Lime wedges, for serving

In a bowl, combine the lemongrass, ginger, garlic, green onion, oil, salt and pepper together.

Devein the shrimp using a pair of small sharp shears. Starting from the head end of the shrimp, snip along the top (the shrimp’s back) just deep enough to pull out the black vein. Pat the shrimp very dry. Marinate them in lemongrass-ginger mixture for 15 to 20 minutes.

Meanwhile, soak the bamboo skewers in water for 15 to 20 minutes before skewering the shrimp.

When ready to cook, preheat your barbecue grill or broiler. If grilling, brush the grill grates with cooking oil so the shrimp won’t stick. Grill the shrimp 2 to 3 minutes on each side until they are cooked through. If broiling, brush cooking oil on your broiler pan. Broil shrimp 2 to 3 minutes each side. Serve with lime wedges.

Makes 4 servings

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