Steamy Kitchen Recipes | RSS Feed http://steamykitchen.com Steamy Kitchen Food Blog: fast recipes, simple recipes, with fresh ingredients to create delicious meals. Fri, 01 May 2015 15:39:44 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.1 Healthy General Tso’s Chicken http://steamykitchen.com/30918-healthy-general-tsos-chicken-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/30918-healthy-general-tsos-chicken-recipe-video.html#comments Mon, 20 Jan 2014 22:00:32 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=30918 White meat or dark meat? I’m definitely a wing and dark meat gal, preferring the juicier, more flavorful, more tender and harder-to-overcook parts of the chicken. I think most Asians prize the dark meat (I know it’s a gross generalization, but I’ve never met an Asian who didn’t like dark meat!) Scott, on the other hand, is breast meat all ...

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Healthy General Tso's Chicken Recipe

White meat or dark meat? I’m definitely a wing and dark meat gal, preferring the juicier, more flavorful, more tender and harder-to-overcook parts of the chicken. I think most Asians prize the dark meat (I know it’s a gross generalization, but I’ve never met an Asian who didn’t like dark meat!)

Scott, on the other hand, is breast meat all the way. When we first started dating, I had to re-learn how to cook chicken properly. All I used to care about was roasting, stir-frying or grilling the thigh, wing and leg portions perfectly, not even giving a second thought to the breast, which cooks faster than its dark brothas and sistahs. Most of the time, the breast meat and bones went into broth-making anyways. I also had a Jack Russell terrier who was spoiled with slightly overcooked and a touch dry chicken breast dinners.

Yummy and Healthy General Tso's Chicken Recipe

The argument for eating chicken breast is that “it’s healthier” – but just HOW MUCH healthier?

White Meat versus Dark MeatAccording to an article from Josh Ozersky on Time Magazine, the difference isn’t as great as you might think.

From U.S. Department of Agriculture:

100 grams of white meat – 0.56 g of saturated fat and 114 calories
100 grams of dark meat has 1 g of saturated fat and 119 calories. 

To save .46 grams + 3 calories, I’ll take the dark meat any day!

 

Men’s Health article: “The extra fat in dark turkey or chicken meat raises your levels of cholecystokinin (CCK), a hormone that makes you feel fuller, longer.”

Live Science: “A nutrient called taurine, found abundantly in poultry dark meat, significantly lowered the risk of coronary heart disease in women with high cholesterol, the study revealed. The researchers said that taurine also might help protect against diabetes and high blood pressure.”

Slate: The Dark Side of the Bird: “Dark chicken meat is also nutrient rich, containing higher levels of iron, zinc, riboflavin, thiamine, and vitamins B6 and B12 than white meat.”

Despite this research, Scott still prefers the breast. Which is just fine by me – we don’t have to fight over who gets which part of the chicken! We each call dibs on our own section.

Steam Kitchen Healthy General Tso's Chicken Recipe

I’ve made a Healthy version of General Tso’s Chicken – one of Scott’s favorites – using white meat, of course – but feel free to substitute with boneless, skinless dark meat :-)

Healthy General Tso’s Chicken Recipe Video

 

 

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Healthy General Tso's Chicken Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 15 minutes
Healthy General Tso's Chicken Recipe

Feel free to substitute the chicken for thinly sliced lean pork or beef. For a vegetarian version, use extra firm tofu cut into cubes and vegetable broth.

Ingredients:

2 tablespoons soy sauce
2 teaspoons rice vinegar (or white vinegar)
1 tablespoon honey
1 to 2 teaspoons garlic chili sauce
1/2 cup chicken broth
3 teaspoons cornstarch, divided
1 large head broccoli, cut into small florets
1 pound boneless chicken meat, cut into 1-inch pieces
freshly ground black pepper
1-1/2 tablespoon of cooking oil
1 to 2 cloves garlic, finely minced
1 teaspoon ginger, finely minced (or grated on rasp grater)
4 stalks green onion, chopped
1 teaspoon roasted sesame seeds

Directions:

1. In a bowl, make the General Tso sauce: Whisk together the soy sauce, vinegar, honey, garlic chili sauce, chicken broth, just 1 teaspoon of the cornstarch. Set aside.

2. In a wok or large sauté pan over high heat, add 1/2 cup water and bring to a boil. Add broccoli to the pan and cover. Steam for 2 minutes or until broccoli has turned bright green and is crunchy-tender (just shy of cooked through.) Remove broccoli from pan, drain and rinse with cool water to stop cooking. Set broccoli aside. Empty water from wok or pan and dry well. Return wok or pan to stove.

3. In a medium bowl, add chicken, remaining 2 teaspoons of cornstarch, salt and pepper and stir to coat chicken evenly.

4. Heat the wok over high heat. When very hot, add cooking oil and swirl to coat. To get a nice crust on the chicken, you'll cook them in a single layer, giving them plenty of space to brown. Add half the chicken to pan in a single layer. Let cook undisturbed for 1-2 minutes, until the bottom of chicken is browned, flip chicken, cook until other side is browned. The chicken should be halfway cooked through - remove the half-cooked chicken pieces to a plate to set aside. As you take chicken pieces out, continually add in more of the raw chicken to the pan to cook.

5. When all the chicken have cooked, turn heat to medium. Let the pan cool a bit before adding the rest of the ingredients (so they don't burn). The pan should still have some cooking oil left from the chicken. To the pan, add the green onions, garlic and ginger . Stir fry until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Control your heat so that the ingredients don't burn.

6. Pour in the General Tso's sauce to pan and bring mixture to a simmer. Return the chicken and broccoli to the pan, toss and cook for 1 minute. The sauce should thicken and the chicken should be cooked through completely. Sprinkle with sesame seeds and serve immediately.

 

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Sweet and Sour Chicken with Cherries http://steamykitchen.com/27925-sweet-and-sour-chicken-with-cherries-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/27925-sweet-and-sour-chicken-with-cherries-recipe-video.html#comments Mon, 12 Aug 2013 17:32:26 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=27925 Growing up in Nebraska, the closest family was nearly 8,000 miles away in Hong Kong and so our “family” was made of neighbors and co-workers of my Dad at the city utility offices. On the weekends, the adults would play cards, mah-jong (my parents taught everyone!) and have grand potlucks. We spent many weekends with one of Dad’s co-workers, Walt ...

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sweet and sour chicken cherries recipe featured-9533

Growing up in Nebraska, the closest family was nearly 8,000 miles away in Hong Kong and so our “family” was made of neighbors and co-workers of my Dad at the city utility offices. On the weekends, the adults would play cards, mah-jong (my parents taught everyone!) and have grand potlucks.

We spent many weekends with one of Dad’s co-workers, Walt and his wife Alice, who had a lovely backyard full of fruit trees. They were an older couple and became Jay and my substitute “Grandma and Grandpa.” I remember vividly the massive netting contraption that Walt would drape over the majestic cherry tree once the fruit started ripening to prevent darting bird-theives from snatching the prized fruit.

sweet and sour chicken cherries recipe featured-9535

Every year in the summer, we’d be invited over for cherry harvesting, where the netting would be gently lifted off like a veil, revealing the layers and layers of branches holding bright red cherries ready for picking. The rest of the evening and days that followed were dedicated to pitting, pie-making and canning.

Walt and Alice both passed away long ago and I wonder if that cherry tree still stands? I’ve been temped to ask my parents for their old address to use Google Earth to peer into the backyard, but that thought just kinda creeped me out!

sweet and sour chicken cherries recipe featured-9545

This recipe, Sweet and Sour Chicken with Cherries is a tribute to Walt and Alice. When we first moved to the United States, they welcomed us into their home and we became part of their family. Alice taught Mom how to bake Cherry Pie, Mom taught her how to Chinese Egg Rolls. They babysat me and my brother so that my parents could go out on a date. Alice patiently read some of my very first children’s books to me and helped me learn English!

You can use either sweet or tart cherries with this recipe – this is a sweet and sour dish, so adjust the amount of honey or vinegar based on how sweet your cherries are. I love my Sweet and Sour Sauce – it’s a healthy version that uses orange juice for a nice fruity zing. If fresh cherries aren’t in your life right now, feel free to use another fruit – both fresh pineapple and mango work great. Oh, I’ve even used frozen, pitted cherries in the recipe with great results as well.

Sweet and Sour Chicken with Cherries Recipe Video

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Sweet and Sour Chicken with Cherries

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes
sweet and sour chicken with cherries recipe featured-9534

You can use either breast meat or thigh meat (or even thinly sliced pork). For a vegetarian version, substitute the meat with extra firm tofu cubes (still following the same recipe instructions)

If fresh cherries aren't available, use fresh pineapple or mango chunks. Also, frozen cherries work well too. Canned cherries are too sweet.

Ingredients:

6 ounces boneless chicken, cut into bite sized pieces
1 tablespoon soy sauce
½ teaspoon cornstarch
2 tablespoons cooking oil, divided
½ onion, cut into 1” chunks
1 ½ cups fresh cherries (2 handfuls), pitted and halved
1/2 red pepper, cut into 1” chunks
1/2 yellow pepper, cut into 1” chunksFor the Sweet and Sour Sauce
1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger
2 tablespoons honey or agave nectar
3 tablespoons orange juice
3 tablespoons ketchup
3 tablespoons white vinegar

Directions:

In a bowl, toss the chicken meat with the soy sauce and cornstarch.

In a separate bowl, whisk together the ingredients for the sweet and sour sauce.

Heat a wok or saute pan over high heat. Swirl in just 1 tablespoon of the cooking oil. When hot, add in the marinated chicken. Spread chicken out all over the surface of wok in single layer. Let cook for 2 minutes, undisturbed, until browned. Flip chicken pieces and brown the other side, about 1 minute. Chicken should be browned but still uncooked in the middle. Remove chicken from wok and set aside.

Keep the wok on stove and turn the heat to medium-high. Swirl in the remaining cooking oil. When hot, add the onions and stir fry for 1 minute. Add in the cherries, red and yellow bell peppers. Stir fry for 2 minutes, until the bell peppers are cooked, but still colorful and crunchy.

Add the partially cooked chicken back into the wok and pour in the sweet and sour sauce. Bring to a simmer and cook an additional minute, or until the chicken is fully cooked through. Careful not to overcook the chicken!

 

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Curried Beef Dumplings http://steamykitchen.com/25753-curried-beef-dumplings-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/25753-curried-beef-dumplings-recipe-video.html#comments Tue, 05 Mar 2013 18:11:06 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=25753 This recipe for Curried Beef Dumplings is from Carla Hall’s brand new book, Cooking with Love. Carla is a co-host on ABC’s The Chew and a “Fan Favorite on Bravo’s Top Chef All Stars. What I love about this recipe is that it’s sort of a cross between steamed sui mai (dim sum dumpling) and pan-fried potstickers. It’s the best ...

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Curried Beef Dumplings Recipe

This recipe for Curried Beef Dumplings is from Carla Hall’s brand new book, Cooking with Love. Carla is a co-host on ABC’s The Chew and a “Fan Favorite on Bravo’s Top Chef All Stars.

Curried Beef Dumplings Recipe

What I love about this recipe is that it’s sort of a cross between steamed sui mai (dim sum dumpling) and pan-fried potstickers. It’s the best of both worlds! The beautiful fluted, flowery shape of the dumpling wrapper gives you a peek of the beef and curry filling. But they are pan fried so you get the nice crisp, browned bottom.

Curried Beef Dumplings Recipe

The curry spice used in these dumplings is mild (but feel free to use a spicer version). Yellow curry powder is made up of an array of spices: coriander, cumin, turmeric, chiles, mustard seeds, etc.  You can make your own or buy either mild or spice at the Spice House.

Curried Beef Dumplings Recipe

Yellow curry powder is mostly associated with Indian cooking here in America, but did you know that it’s used throughout Asia? Curry is simply a term for spice blend. The actual ingredients in yellow curry powder may vary a bit, but the powder is a main ingredient in Singapore Rice Noodle Stir Fry (a recipe in my new book!), Chinese curry stews and noodle soups.

Mom used make baked puff triangles filled with ground beef and spiced with yellow curry powder (I think she used S&B Curry Powder), so these dumplings remind me of her. At the store, look for “Yellow Curry Powder” or “Madras Curry Powder”.

Curried Beef Dumplings Recipe Video

 

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Curried Beef Dumplings

Servings: Makes 40 dumplings Prep Time: 90 minutes Cook Time: 15 minutes
Curried Beef Dumplings Recipe

You can use either wonton wrappers (square, thinner) or gyoza dumpling wrappers (round, a little thicker). You can find these frozen at the Asian market (preferred over the refrigerated kind found in regular supermarkets near the tofu section - which are too "doughy" for my taste)

Dumpling wrappers (and dumplings) dry out very easily. Make sure you cover the unused wrappers and any folded dumplings with a barely damp towel or plastic wrap until you are ready to cook.

We loved these dumplings as little appetizers. There's no need for a dipping sauce (the dumplings are so flavorful with the warming curry powder!) but if you like one, try using Mae Ploy Sweet Chili Sauce, it provides a nice sweet and fruity contrast.

Carla's tip: Set up an assembly line! Or better yet, get your kids or friends to help you out. There's little difference between making 25 or 125, so why not make more and freeze for later? To cook frozen dumplings, no need to defrost. Just add 'em to the pan and let them cook for additional 5 minutes.

Recipe adapted from Cooking with Love by Carla Hall

Ingredients:

3/4 pound lean (90%) ground beef sirloin
1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger
1-2 garlic cloves, finely minced
1 tablespoon yellow curry powder
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1 tablespoons cornstarch
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon dark sesame oil
2 large eggs, divided
1 red bell pepper, finely diced
1 stalk green onion, finely chopped
cooking oil, for pan frying
40 round wonton wrappers or round dumpling wrappers (about 3-1/2-inch diameter)

Directions:

In a large bowl, combine: ground beef, ginger, garlic, curry powder, soy sauce cornstarch, salt, sesame oil, just ONE of the eggs, bell pepper and green onion. Mix thoroughly.

In a small bowl, combine the final egg and 1 tablespoon water and whisk to make the egg wash.

Place one wonton wrapper in your hand or flat on the table. Lightly brush a thin layer of the egg wash around the edges of the wrapper. Scoop 1 tablespoon of the beef mixture into the center of the wrapper. Pull the sides of the wrapper up and push together slightly to stick to the meat mixture. The bottom of the dumpling should be flat so it can stand up in the pan.

Repeat until all the wrappers and filling are used up, making sure to cover any finished dumplings and the unused wrappers with plastic wrap or a barely damp towel to keep them from drying out.

Dumplings can be cooked immediately or frozen for up to 1 month. If freezing, make sure they are not touching when they are first frozen, then once they're frozen, they can be gathered together and stored in a freezer bag.

To cook, in a large nonstick sauté pan or skillet, heat 1 tablespoon of cooking oil over medium heat. Add dumplings to the pan, making sure they are not too crowded. Cook for about 2 minutes, or until the bottoms are lightly browned.

Once the bottoms are browned, it's ready to finish cooking them by steaming. Hold the sauté pan lid (like a shield) to protect you from splatters. Carefully pour in 3-4 tablespoons of water into the pan and immediately cover. Turn heat down to medium-low and let the dumplings steam until they are cooked through and the water has mostly evaporated. This should take about 2 minutes.

Transfer the cooked dumplings to a plate and tent with a piece of foil to keep them warm. Repeat with the remaining dumplings. Serve immediately.

 

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You can also pick up a copy on Amazon for $13.98!

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Chinese Egg Drop Soup http://steamykitchen.com/25746-chinese-egg-drop-soup-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/25746-chinese-egg-drop-soup-recipe-video.html#comments Wed, 13 Feb 2013 15:28:45 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=25746 Chinese Egg Drop Soup is one of those dishes that can be made incredibly well as a warming start to a meal…..or done terribly, horribly, no-no wrong. There’s an Asian restaurant near my house, not naming names but *cough* on 53rd Avenue *cough*, who serves Egg Drop Soup that has so much food coloring that it practically glows in the ...

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Chinese Egg Drop Soup Recipe

Chinese Egg Drop Soup is one of those dishes that can be made incredibly well as a warming start to a meal…..or done terribly, horribly, no-no wrong. There’s an Asian restaurant near my house, not naming names but *cough* on 53rd Avenue *cough*, who serves Egg Drop Soup that has so much food coloring that it practically glows in the dark. In fact, when the server comes out with it, the lights flicker with a low *ddzzzzddzzz* sound due to the soup’s radioactive contents.

Chinese Egg Drop Soup Recipe

You know what I mean, right?

So let me show you how to make the soup right. Chinese Egg Drop Soup should be savory, soothing, a little warming heat from the white pepper. The eggs should be delicate, floating, whisper-thin silky strands. Do I have you craving for a bowl now?

Chinese Egg Drop Soup Recipe

This recipe is from Diana Kuan’s new book, The Chinese Takeout Cookbook. Diana and I have not only gotten to know each other through blogging about Asian food (go Chinese sistahs!) but we’ve also shared a meal together early on, when she came to visit in Tampa. We also share the same literary agent (hi Janis!) and I’m proud to share with you her recipe for Egg Drop Soup.

The Chinese Takeout Cookbook by Diana Kuan

Chinese Egg Drop Soup Recipe

A note about ground white pepper: Buy it! Ground while pepper is lovely. Ignore anyone who claims it tastes strange. white peppercorn is basically a regular peppercorn, with the black outer coating removed. It’s less pungent, and the effect is more of an all-over warming than hot. Plus, since it’s a powder, it dissolves well in soup (no harsh black flakes to bite on).

Chinese Egg Drop Soup Recipe Video

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Chinese Egg Drop Soup

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 5 Cook Time: 10
Chinese Egg Drop Soup Recipe

Adapted from The Chinese Takeout Cookbook by Diana Kuan

You can use either dried Chinese black mushrooms or fresh shiitake mushrooms. If you use dried - soak them in water overnight or in very hot water for an hour. Drain, cut off and discard tough stems.

Ingredients:

6 shiitake mushrooms, thinly sliced
6 cups chicken or vegetable stock
1 tablespoon Chinese rice wine or dry sherry
1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger
1/2 teaspoon salt (or to taste)
1/4 teaspoon ground white pepper (or to taste)
1 tablespoon cornstarch, dissolved in 3 tablespoons water
1 large egg
handful thinly sliced green onion

Directions:

In a medium saucepan over high heat, add the mushrooms, chicken stock, rice wine and ginger and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer and stir in the salt and pepper.

Add the cornstarch mixture to the simmering soup and stir until the soup has slightly thickened (enough to coat the back of a spoon).

In a small bowl, whisk the egg lightly with a fork. Slowly pour the egg into the soup in a steady stream while continuouslly stirring with a ladle. The egg should cook immediately Turn off the heat to prevent from overcooking the egg. Sprinkle the green onions on top and serve.

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Steamy Kitchen's Healthy Asian Favorites cookbook cover

My new cookbook is available for purchase now wherever books are sold!

You can also pick up a copy on Amazon for $13.98!

 

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Vegetable Spring Rolls Recipe (Egg Rolls) http://steamykitchen.com/25778-vegetable-egg-rolls-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/25778-vegetable-egg-rolls-recipe-video.html#comments Fri, 08 Feb 2013 17:35:54 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=25778 This Sunday is Chinese New Year, the year of the s-s-s-snake! I haven’t fully researched what the forecast for the year will look like, but according to Chinese feng shui master, it’s best to wear a monkey around your neck to avoid getting bit by the snake. Here is a great infographic I created to show what to and not ...

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Vegetable Spring Rolls Recipe

This Sunday is Chinese New Year, the year of the s-s-s-snake! I haven’t fully researched what the forecast for the year will look like, but according to Chinese feng shui master, it’s best to wear a monkey around your neck to avoid getting bit by the snake. Here is a great infographic I created to show what to and not to eat:

Screen Shot 2013-02-08 at 12.28.35 PM

Vegetable Spring Rolls Recipe

Those crazy Chinese superstitions!


Vegetable Spring Rolls Recipe

Along with celebrating Chinese New Year, I’m also celebrating that Steamy Kitchen’s Healthy Asian Favorites debuting as the #1 Asian cookbook on Amazon! whoop! whoop! Did you get your copy yet?! :-)

Vegetable Spring Rolls Recipe

We’ll be enjoying these Vegetable Spring Rolls (or what I call Egg Rolls) on Chinese New Year – they represent wealth and prosperity.  As you can see, I tend to only believe in the Chinese superstitions that are beneficial.

Vegetable Spring Rolls Recipe

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Vegetable Spring Rolls Recipe Video (Egg Rolls)

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Vegetable Egg Rolls Recipe

Servings: 50 egg rolls Prep Time: 25 minutes Cook Time: 30 minutes
Vegetable Egg Rolls Recipe

Ingredients:

8 fresh shiitake mushroom caps or Chinese dried mushroom* caps, julienned
1/2 small cabbage (about 3 cups), shredded (napa or regular cabbage)
2 medium carrots, julienned
8-ounce can bamboo shoots, drained and julienned
cooking oil
2 cloves garlic, finely minced
2 teaspoons grated fresh ginger
1 stalk green onion, finely chopped
2 handfuls of fresh bean sprouts
1 tablespoon low sodium soy sauce
1 teaspoon dark sesame oil
1 tablespoon cornstarch
50 spring roll wrappers, defrosted
cooking oil, for frying

Directions:

*If using Chinese dried mushrooms, soak them in very hot water for 20 minutes to rehydrate. Cut off and discard the stem.

In a large saute pan or wok, swirl in 1 tablespoon of the cooking oil. Turn on the heat to medium-high and immediately add garlic, ginger and green onion, stirring frequently. By the time the oil is hot, add the mushrooms, cabbage, carrots and bamboo shoots.

Turn heat to high and stir-fry the vegetables for about 2 minutes. and then toss in the bean sprouts. Add in the soy sauce and sesame oil. Cook for another minute. Then spread the filling out onto a large baking sheet. Prop the baking sheet up on one side to allow any sauce or oil to accumulate at the bottom (and discard)

In a small bowl, whisk together the cornstarch and 1/4 cup of cool water to form a slurry.

Place a wonton or spring roll wrapper on a flat surface, add 1 tablespoon of the vegetable mixture into a corner of the wrapper, and then roll the edge of the wrapper tightly around the mixture. Fold the two side corners towards the middle of the wrapper while continuing to roll up. Paint the top edge with the cornstarch slurry mixture and wrap tightly the rest of the way. Make sure all edges are tightly sealed. Place seam side down. Cover with plastic wrap to avoid drying out.

In a large wok or saucepan over high heat, add about 1-2 inches of cooking oil

Slide several egg rolls into the oil and allow them to cook for 2-3 minutes, turning them over a couple times, or until the wonton wrappers are golden brown. Remove the egg rolls to a cooling rack or paper-towel-covered plate to allow them to drain. Serve hot.

 

  Vegetable Spring Rolls Recipe

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Steamy Kitchen's Healthy Asian Favorites cookbook cover

My new cookbook is available for purchase now wherever books are sold!

You can also pick up a copy on Amazon for $13.98!

More recipes to explore:

My Mother’s Famous Chinese Egg Rolls Recipe (Steamy Kitchen)

Chinese Spring Rolls with Chicken Recipe  (Steamy Kitchen)

Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Orange-Almond Sauce (Steamy Kitchen)

Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork (Steamy Kitchen)

Thai Shrimp Spring Rolls (Food Network)

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Pork and Spinach Wonton http://steamykitchen.com/23790-pork-and-spinach-wontons-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/23790-pork-and-spinach-wontons-recipe-video.html#comments Mon, 10 Dec 2012 16:14:00 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=23790 Learn how to make and fold wonton! Pork and Spinach Wonton recipe & video.

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Pork and Spinach Wontons Recipe

I think the ultimate Chinese comfort food is handmade wonton in soup. Warm, soothing, gingery broth…..delicate, floating “clouds.” In Cantonese, wonton is pronounced wun tun 雲吞, which means “swallowing clouds.”  The wonton wrapper is so delicate and thin. the wonton appear to be floating in the soup.

Pork and Spinach Wontons Recipe

When I was in college, my girlfriends and I would get together and make hundreds of these and freeze them. It was cheap, easy to make and we had quite a bit of fun as we turned it into a “dumpling party.” It’s the best quick meal, as wonton can be cooked directly from the freezer into simmering broth.

Pork and Spinach Wontons Recipe

There’s all sorts of ingredients that you can use to fill wonton. Shrimp, ground beef, ground pork, cabbage, spinach, bamboo shoots, scallops, mushrooms….really, anything that you want. When snow crab or king crab legs are on sale, I’ll make crab and napa cabbage wonton.

Pork and Spinach Wontons Recipe

I normally eat wonton with a small dipping bowl of red vinegar and slivers of fresh ginger. That’s the Cantonese way! Add in some noodles to make wonton noodle soup and I’m in heaven.

Pork and Spinach Wontons Recipe

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Pork and Spinach Wonton Recipe Video

 

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Pork and Spinach Wonton Recipe

Servings: 50 dumplings Prep Time: 40 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes
pswontons

Don't worry about the amount of salt used for the cabbage and spinach. The majority of the salt stays in the water and is discarded. The salt is used to release water from the vegetables (hey, remember osmosis from high school!?)

You can add cooked noodles to this dish to make wonton noodle soup - but just remember to cook the noodles in a separate pot of water (and not the broth) to prevent excess starch from the noodles from clouding up the good broth.

If you want, serve wonton with a dipping bowl of red wine vinegar and slivers of fresh ginger. Peel ginger, then use a vegetable peeler to peel paper-thin slices of ginger. Use knife to further chop into fine slivers. Combine with the red vinegar. To eat, place a wonton on your spoon. With chopsticks, pick up a few slivers of ginger and place on top of wonton. Eat!

Ingredients:

10-ounce package frozen spinach, defrosted
1/4 cabbage, grated on large holes of box grater
2 teaspoons salt
1 pound ground pork
2 teaspoons grated fresh ginger
2 cloves garlic, finely minced
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1 tablespoon Chinese rice wine (or dry sherry)
2 teaspoons roasted sesame oil
1 tablespoon cornstarch
16-ounce package of wonton wrappers (about 50 wrappers), defrosted (see note)
For the slurry: 1/4 cup cool water + 1 tablespoon cornstarch

FOR THE GINGER BROTH
2 quarts vegetable or chicken broth
2 thumb-sized pieces of ginger, sliced
sprigs of cilantro, optional

Directions:

1. Squeeze as much water out of the spinach and discard the water (or water your plants!). Place the spinach and cabbage in a large bowl. Sprinkle with salt and mix well. Let sit for 10 minutes. In large handfuls (or a cheesecloth), squeeze the water out of the cabbage/spinach and discard the water.

2. Add in the ground pork, ginger, garlic, soy sauce, wine, sesame oil and cornstarch. Mix well.

OPTIONAL: Heat up a small frying pan over medium heat, add in a touch of cooking oil. Cook a spoonful of the dumpling filling and taste. Adjust seasonings to the dumpling filling if you wish.

3. In a small bowl, mix together the water and cornstarch for the slurry.

4. Take one wonton wrapper, place 1 scant teaspoon of the dumpling mixture in the middle. Paint the outer edge of the wonton wrapper with the slurry. Fold wrapper over like in a triangle shape and seal tightly all around. Make sure there are no air pockets or holes in the wonton. Fold the two triangle points together and seal to make the wonton shape. Place folded wonton on a clean, dry plate and cover with plastic wrap or barely damp towel to avoid drying out.

5. When wonton are all folded, you can store or freeze.

6. For the broth: Set aside 2 cups of the broth. Bring the remaining broth and ginger to a simmer in a large stock pot and turn the heat to medium-high. Add in a batch of wonton. When the broth returns to a simmer again, pour in 1 cup of the reserved broth. Again, let the broth return to a simmer and then pour in the last 1 cup of reserved broth. Once the broth comes back to a simmer, the wonton should be done. Discard the ginger slices. Serve wonton and broth with few cilantro leaves if desired!

TO STORE:

- If you want to freeze the wonton, place all the UNCOOKED wonton flat on a plate. Do not crowd. Cover with plastic wrap and freeze. Once the wonton are frozen, you can gather them up and store in freezer bag. This ensures that the wonton freeze individually (otherwise if the wonton froze and stuck together, it would be nearly impossible to cook.

- When ready to cook wonton, they can go from freezer to simmering broth. Follow exact same cooking instructions. Since the wonton is frozen, it will take longer time for the broth to return to a simmer -- so it's self timing!.

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Braised Tofu with Ground Pork http://steamykitchen.com/23559-chinese-braised-tofu-with-ground-pork-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/23559-chinese-braised-tofu-with-ground-pork-recipe.html#comments Fri, 05 Oct 2012 15:32:01 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=23559 Learn how to cook traditional Chinese recipe for Braised Tofu with Ground Pork. Step-by-step video included!

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Chinese Braised Tofu with Ground Pork Recipe

I must be feeling a little homesick lately, I’ve been making Chinese homestyle dishes that my Mom would cook. Tofu has always been a regular staple at our house, Mom would serve it about once a week. Tofu USED to be inexpensive years ago – but that was before it was being marketed to the American market. Tofu companies never had to “market” to the Asian crowd – we have always loved it!

Chinese Braised Tofu with Ground Pork Recipe

At some Chinese markets (and all of Asia), you can buy freshly made tofu – large blocks would be submerged in water, and you scooped out what you wanted.

Chinese Braised Tofu with Ground Pork Recipe

Did you know that not all tofu tastes the same? There are big differences in taste and texture (I know some of you are saying, “what, not all tofu is BLAND!?”) My favorite brand  that is easily found in most regular grocery stores is Nasoya. Here’s Serious Eat’s Tofu Taste Test.

Chinese Braised Tofu with Ground Pork Recipe

For this recipe, make sure you buy Firm or Extra Firm Tofu. Anything softer will fall apart in the dish.

Chinese Braised Tofu with Ground Pork Recipe

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Chinese Braised Tofu with Ground Pork Recipe

Servings: Serve 4 Prep Time: 15 minutes Cook Time: 15 minutes
Chinese Braised Tofu with Ground Pork Recipe

You can use either ground pork, beef, turkey or chicken. For a little more Chinese flavor, when you are seasoning the tofu with salt and pepper, sprinkle a little bit of Chinese Five Spice Powder on both sides (you'll use a total of about 1/4 teaspoon - a little goes a long ways!)

I'm a big fan of green onion as a topping to give the dish a little bite - however if your family isn't, you can leave it out. Another option is to add the green onion in the wok at the same time as the garlic and ginger. This way, the green onion gets stir fried and softens.

Serve this with rice.

Ingredients:

1 block firm or extra firm tofu
salt and freshly ground black pepper
1 tablespoon cooking oil
1 pound ground pork, beef, turkey or chicken
1 clove garlic, very finely minced
1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger
1 cup chicken broth
2 tablespoons oyster sauce
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1/4 cup cool water
1 teaspoon cornstarch1/2 stalk green onion, chopped

Directions:

1. Drain the tofu and place on towels or paper towels. To get rid excess water in the tofu, place another towel on top of the tofu, then place something flat and heavy (like a cutting board or a cast iron frying pan) on top. You can weigh the cutting board down by putting a couple of cans of soup on top. Let sit for 10 minutes. Cut the tofu into several slices 3/4" thick. Season on both sides with salt, pepper.

2. Heat a wok or large saute pan over medium-high heat. When hot, swirl in the cooking oil. Very carefully and slowely slide in the tofu slices in one layer. Fry for 1 minutes, then flip to fry the other side for 1 minute until both sides are browned. Remove the seared tofu to a clean plate.

3. To the same wok, add in the ground meat. Saute until browned, about 2 minutes. Add in the garlic and the ginger and stir fry for 30 seconds.

4. Add in the chicken broth, oyster sauce and soy sauce. In a small bowl, whisk together the water and the cornstarch. In the wok, stir in the water and cornstarch mixture and bring everything to a simmer. Add the cooked tofu back in the pot. Lower the heat to medium-low. Let simmer for 5 minutes, until thickened. Mix in green onion. Serve with rice.

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Black Pepper Steak http://steamykitchen.com/18298-black-pepper-steak.html http://steamykitchen.com/18298-black-pepper-steak.html#comments Wed, 14 Sep 2011 14:32:34 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=18298 One of my very first blogging friends is Bee from Rasa Malaysia. In the early days of the blog, we used to chat on the phone after my kids went to bed about the technical side of blogging — silly acronyms like SEO, PHP, CSS and HTML. Back then (I say “back then” like it was decades ago, but in reality ...

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One of my very first blogging friends is Bee from Rasa Malaysia. In the early days of the blog, we used to chat on the phone after my kids went to bed about the technical side of blogging — silly acronyms like SEO, PHP, CSS and HTML. Back then (I say “back then” like it was decades ago, but in reality it was just 4 1/2 years ago!) there weren’t a ton of plug-ins and support forums weren’t available for food bloggers. Wow, have we come a long way! 

She asked me to write the Foreword for her brand new book, Easy Chinese Recipes, it’s a beautiful book with simple recipes that you’d find at your favorite Chinese restaurant, like Shrimp Fried Rice, Kung Pao Chicken and Homestyle Chow Mein Noodles. I hope you enjoy this recipe for Black Pepper Steak from her book. ~Jaden

***

Hi all, I am Bee of Rasa Malaysia, a food blog about easy Asian recipes. I am extremely thrilled to be on Steamy Kitchen today, sharing a recipe from my cookbook “Easy Chinese Recipes.” Jaden and I met some four years ago through our blogs; we also share the same publisher, Tuttle Publishing. I wanted to take this special opportunity to thank Jaden for writing the Foreword of the book and hervaluable advice when I was working on the project. Truth be told, I wouldn’t have done it if she didn’t tell me to “do it” when I got the offer!

Easy Chinese Recipes is a compilation of 80+ popular Chinese recipes: all-time favorites, Chinese takeout dishes, dim sum, dumplings, and more. Some recipes reflect my many travels in China and Hong Kong. Others are my interpretation of classic Chinese recipes, perfected through years of preparing them at home.

Black Pepper Beef is one of my favorite recipes in the cookbook as I love the combination of bell pepper and black pepper in Chinese stir-fries. These two ingredients, coupled with the right cut of beef—I like beef tenderloin, flank steak or flap meat—will often guarantee a successful dish. If you love the sweetness and slightly charred taste of caramelized onions, stir-fry the onions and bell peppers slightly longer before adding  the beef to the stir-fry. You will be rewarded with a richer flavored Black Pepper Beef. Enjoy! ~ Bee

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Black Pepper Steak Recipe

Servings: Serves 2 as a main dish with rice or 4 as part of a multicourse meal Prep Time: 15 minutes Cook Time:
Black Pepper Steak Recipe

If you are using Flank Steak - make sure you cut ACROSS the grain, otherwise the steak will be chewy and tough.

Ingredients:

8 oz (250 g) beef tenderloin, flank steak or flap meat, thinly sliced
2 1/2 tablespoons cooking oil
1 clove garlic, minced
1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger
1/2 small green bell pepper, deseeded and cut into pieces
1/2 small red bell pepper, deseeded and cut into pieces
1/2 onion, sliced
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
Salt, to tasteFor the Marinade
1 teaspoons soy sauce
1 tablespoon oyster sauce
1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
1 teaspoon Chinese rice wine or sherry
1/2 teaspoon cornstarch
1/2 teaspoon sesame oil
1/2 teaspoon sugar

Directions:

1. Marinate the beef with all the Marinade ingredients, about 15
minutes.
2. Heat 1 tablespoon of the oil in a wok or skillet over high heat.
Stir-fry the beef until the beef is browned on the outside but still pink
inside. Dish out and set aside.
3. Heat the remaining oil in a wok or skillet over high heat. Stir-fry
the garlic and the ginger until aromatic, and then add the green bell
pepper, red bell pepper, onion, and black pepper. Stir-fry until you smell
the aroma from the ingredients in the wok.
4. Transfer the beef back into the wok or skillet. Stir-fry until the
beef is cooked through and the center of the meat is no longer pink, about
1-2 minutes. Dish out and serve immediately with steamed rice.

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My Mother’s Famous Chinese Egg Rolls Recipe http://steamykitchen.com/13029-my-mothers-famous-chinese-egg-rolls-2.html http://steamykitchen.com/13029-my-mothers-famous-chinese-egg-rolls-2.html#comments Sat, 15 Jan 2011 08:05:46 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=13029 Authentic (but easy!) Chinese Egg Rolls Recipe from cookbook author Jaden Hair's mother.

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Mothers Chinese Egg Rolls Recipe

Things you’ll learn:

  • The best way to make non-soggy egg rolls.
  • The right size and kind of wrapper to use.
  • The do’s and don’t’s of egg roll wrapping.

 

This is one of those recipes that is a little more time consuming to make, but one that’s my favorite because 1) it’s my Mom’s recipe 2) everyone who has tried them instantly declare they are the best they’ve ever had 3) you can make a big batch of them and freeze them. I usually call a couple of my girlfriends over and we have an eggrollin’ party where we’ll make a massive batch of them, enjoy them fresh that night and have enough for all to take home and freeze. If you are making these with friends, I’d suggest doubling the recipe so each person has some to take home to freeze. I promise you they will taste just as good fried after frozen and you will never taste better egg rolls than these. BUT – you must follow my Mama’s rules.

Ready?

Mama Ruthie’s Chinese Egg Rolls Recipe Rules

Mama’s Rule #1: Your egg roll filling ingredients must be drained of excess moisture and cooled before rolling. Soggy, hot filling makes soggy egg rolls.

Mama’s Rule #2: Use the right kind of wrapper. The size I get is 8 x 8 inches (20 x 20 cm) around and come 25 wrappers to a package. These wrappers are light, paper-thin and fry up to a shatteringly crisp crunch.  Oh yes, before I forget – “spring roll” and “egg roll” are interchangeable and mean the same thing. Sometimes my regular American grocery store will have “spring roll pasta sheets” that are in the refrigerated produce section. Do not use those – they are way too thick! Let’s just say that if it has Italian writing on the package, it probably ain’t the good stuff for Chinese egg rolls.

Rule#2A. Treat the wrapper right. You also want to keep the wrappers covered with a damp towel at all times to prevent the edges from drying and cracking.

Mama’s Rule #3: Roll small and tight! Sloppy and loosely rolled egg rolls will break apart and allow oil to seep into the inside of the roll. Mama says baaaad. One time I was watching a celebrity chef on television making monster egg rolls the size of a cola can. Who in the heck can wrap their mouths around that thing? It looked hideous. Mama’s egg rolls are elegant and skinny. Don’t be too greedy and overstuff them!  And roll them tight so that the filling doesn’t fall out while frying! Remember the days when you were younger and rolled your own…um…cigarette? Channel those rolling skills back.

Mama’s Rule #4: Lay the rolled egg rolls neatly with a piece of parchment, foil or wax paper in between each layer if you are stacking them on top of each other. Keep them covered with plastic wrap or a towel to prevent drying. If you are freezing, freeze them in like this first. Once frozen, you can gather them up and transfer them to a plastic freezer bag. If you roll them out and jumble them all together in a big pile, they’ll eventually stick to each other and you’ll tear the delicate skin trying to pry them apart.

How to make my Mother’s Famous Chinese Egg Rolls

The printable recipe is below, but here are step by step photos on how to wrap. This Chinese egg rolls recipe is for ground pork as the filling, but as you can see in these photos, the filling is very flexible. I’ve used chopped shrimp, ground chicken, ground beef, ground turkey, very thinly sliced pork (almost like matchstick sized). In these photos, I used crawfish and diced Chinese sausage!

These photos are just a guideline to teach you how to wrap (and the wrong way to wrap Chinese Egg Rolls!)

After you fry the filling, you’ll want to spread it out to cool on a baking sheet. Tilt the baking sheet and prop it up so that all the juices accumulate. You’ll discard this juice. Too much juice in filling makes soggy eggrolls.

Mothers Chinese Egg Rolls Recipe Filling

Lay the wrapper on a clean, dry surface as shown. Spoon just a heaping tablespoon of filling near the bottom corner. Resist the urge to over stuff with too much filling!

Chinese Egg Rolls Recipe Wrapping Step 1

Lift the bottom corner up and begin rolling until you reach halfway up.

Chinese Egg Rolls Recipe Wrapping Step 2

Fold over the left side, and then the right side towards the center.

Chinese Egg Rolls Recipe Wrapping Step 3

Continue folding up with a tuck-roll-tuck-roll motion. Dip your fingers into the cornstarch slurry and brush all over the final top corner. Finish up the roll, seal and place seam side down.

Chinese Egg Rolls Recipe Wrapping Step 4

See how tightly the egg roll wrapped? Any holes or large air pockets will allow oil to seep in, resulting in a greasy egg roll! The width or diameter of the egg roll should ONLY be 1.25-inches. If you make them any larger (i.e. too much filling) you’ll end up with less egg rolls.

Chinese Egg Rolls Recipe Wrapping Step 5

The wrong way:

Common mistake is to not fold over and tuck good enough. See that big space? Oil seeps in and will make your egg roll greasy.

Chinese Egg Rolls Recipe Wrapping Mistake #1

Big holes = your egg roll will fall apart while frying.

Chinese Egg Rolls Recipe Wrapping Mistake #2

See the difference between the above photo and this one?

Chinese Egg Rolls Recipe Wrapping Mistake #1

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Mother's Famous Chinese Egg Rolls Recipe

Servings: Makes 50 egg rolls Prep Time: 60 hours Cook Time:
Chinese Egg Rolls Recipe

Once you make these egg rolls, you'll never make them any other way! Make sure you get the correct egg roll wrappers. They should be FROZEN and very thin, almost paper thin. Do not use egg roll wrapper found in the refrigerated section (usually near tofu) in Western supermarket - they make starchy, thick, gooey egg rolls with big bubbles on outside when you fry. It's important to make sure you keep your wrapper and rolled egg rolls under plastic wrap so that they do not dry out!

Ingredients:

50 Spring/Egg Roll Wrappers (about 2 packages), defrosted unopened at room temperature for 45 minutes or in the refrigerator overnight
1 tablespoon cornstarch mixed with ¼ cup of cool water to seal egg roll
Cooking oil, for fryingFOR THE PORK
1 pound ground pork
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1 teaspoon cornstarchFOR THE VEGETABLES
2 cloves garlic, very finely minced
½ head of cabbage (about 11 ounces)
3 carrots
1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger
10 fresh shiitake mushrooms, stems discarded
1 tablespoon Chinese rice wine (or dry sherry)
1 1/2 tablespoons soy sauce
1/4 teaspoon sugar
1 teaspoon sesame oil
Freshly ground black pepper1. To make the filling, combine the ingredients for the ground pork together. Marinate at least 10 minutes. 2. To a food processor, add the shiitake mushrooms. Pulse a few times until the mushrooms are finely chopped. Insert shredder disk (large holes) and shred the cabbage and carrots. 3. Heat a wok or large saute pan over medium-high heat. Add just 1 tablespoon of cooking oil and swirl to coat. Add in the garlic and ginger and quickly stir-fry until fragrant. Add in the contents of the food processor (cabbage, carrots and shiitake). Turn heat to high and stir-fry for 1 minute until the vegetables are beginning to soften. 4. Use your tongs to make a large, empty spot in the middle of the pan (push the vegetables aside), swirl in an additional 1 teaspoon of cooking oil. When hot, add in the ground pork. Cook the ground pork in the middle of the pan until beginning to turn brown. Now use your tongs to mix the pork with the vegetables.5. Add the rice wine, soy sauce, sugar, sesame oil and black pepper. Continue to stir-fry for another 1-2 minutes until the pork is cooked through. 6. Scoop out the filling to a baking sheet and spread out to cool. Prop up one end of the baking sheet slightly to allow excess the moisture to drain to one end. Let cool for 15 minutes and then discard all of the accumulated juices. 7. Now, you're ready to wrap (see photos for instructions on how to wrap). IMPORTANT: Only use 1 heaping tablespoon of filling for each egg roll. These are slender egg rolls, the width of the egg roll should only be 1.25" diameter. Keep the rolled egg rolls in neat, single layer and covered with plastic wrap to prevent drying. If you want to stack the egg rolls, make sure you have layer of parchment paper in between the layers to prevent sticking. Keep wrappers also covered with plastic wrap to prevent drying. Refrigerate up to 4 hours until ready to fry or freeze.8. To fry the egg rolls, fill a wok or pot with 2 inches of high-heat cooking oil. Heat the oil to 350°F (175°C) or until a cube of bread will fry to golden brown within 10 seconds. Gently slide in or lower the egg rolls, frying 4 to 6 at a time, turning occasionally until golden brown about 1½ minutes. Place on wire rack to drain and cool.NOTE: To fry frozen egg rolls, do not defrost the egg rolls – just add them to the oil frozen, frying 4 to 6 at a time. Add an additional 1½ minutes to the frying time since they are frozen.

Directions:

1. To make the filling, combine the ingredients for the ground pork together. Marinate at least 10 minutes. In the meantime, shred the cabbage and the carrots using your food processor or by hand. Slice the mushrooms into very thin strips (or you could use your food processer and pulse a few times to get a fine dice.

2. Heat a wok or large saute pan over high heat. Add the cooking oil and swirl to coat. Add the pork and stir-fry until no longer pink, about 2-3 minutes. Turn heat to medium-low, push the meat to one side of the pan. Add the garlic, cabbage, carrots, ginger and the mushrooms and stir-fry for 1 minute, until the vegetables are softened. Add the rice wine, soy sauce, sugar, sesame oil and black pepper. Continue to stir-fry for another minute. Scoop out the filling to a baking sheet and spread out to cool. Prop up one end of the baking sheet so that it tilts and will allow all the moisture to drain to one end. Let cool for 15 minutes.

3. Discard all of the accumulated juices. Use paper towels to blot the filling to rid of extra oil or juice. Now, you're ready to wrap (see photos for instructions on how to wrap). IMPORTANT: Only use 1 heaping tablespoon of filling for each egg roll. These are slender egg rolls, the width of the egg roll should only be 1.25" diameter.

Keep the rolled egg rolls in neat, single layer and covered with plastic wrap to prevent drying. If you want to stack the egg rolls, make sure you have layer of parchment paper in between the layers to prevent sticking. Keep wrappers also covered with plastic wrap to prevent drying. Refrigerate up to 4 hours until ready to fry or freeze.

4. To fry the egg rolls, fill a wok or pot with 2 inches of high-heat cooking oil. Heat the oil to 350°F (175°C) or until a cube of bread will fry to golden brown within 10 seconds. Gently slide in or lower the egg rolls, frying 4 to 6 at a time, turning occasionally until golden brown about 1½ minutes. Place on wire rack to drain and cool.

NOTE: To fry frozen egg rolls, do not defrost the egg rolls – just add them to the oil frozen, frying 4 to 6 at a time. Add an additional 1½ minutes to the frying time since they are frozen.

More recipes to explore

Red Lantern Vietnamese Spring Roll Recipe Cha Gio (Steamy Kitchen)

Vegetable Spring Rolls Recipe (Egg Rolls) (Steamy Kitchen)

Firecracker Shrimp with Sweet Chili Dipping Sauce (Steamy Kitchen)

Chinese Spring Rolls with Chicken (Steamy Kitchen)

Egg Roll Recipe (Rasa Malaysia)

Vietnamese Curried Tofu Spring Roll (not fried!) (White On Rice Couple)

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Agedashi Tofu http://steamykitchen.com/11654-agedashi-tofu.html http://steamykitchen.com/11654-agedashi-tofu.html#comments Fri, 22 Oct 2010 17:17:53 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=11654 Japanese Agedashi Tofu recipe on my other website, New Asian Cuisine

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Japanese Agedashi Tofu recipe on my other website, New Asian Cuisine

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