Steamy Kitchen Recipes | RSS Feed http://steamykitchen.com Steamy Kitchen Food Blog: fast recipes, simple recipes, with fresh ingredients to create delicious meals. Tue, 21 Jul 2015 18:52:51 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.2 Slow Cooker Bone Broth – Asian Style http://steamykitchen.com/39418-slow-cooker-bone-broth-asian-style.html http://steamykitchen.com/39418-slow-cooker-bone-broth-asian-style.html#comments Wed, 28 Jan 2015 22:23:46 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=39418 In Asian culture, soups and broths are part of everyday meals. A traditional Japanese breakfast would include a bowl of Miso Soup to warm the body. Chinese restaurants feature a long list of house soups, from an appetite stimulating Hot and Sour Soup to even a light broth served after dinner to cleanse the palate and complete the meal. Growing up, Mom ...

The post Slow Cooker Bone Broth – Asian Style appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian

In Asian culture, soups and broths are part of everyday meals. A traditional Japanese breakfast would include a bowl of Miso Soup to warm the body. Chinese restaurants feature a long list of house soups, from an appetite stimulating Hot and Sour Soup to even a light broth served after dinner to cleanse the palate and complete the meal.

Growing up, Mom always had soup simmering on the stove. Every night, without doubt, there was a Chinese style soup on the table. I remember saving the soup for last, as a ritual to conclude a delightful home-cooked meal.

I’ve tried to emulate Mom, but we’ve got such an active lifestyle that a pot simmering for hours on the stove isn’t feasible. Instead, we use a large 6-quart slow cooker to make an Asian-style bone broth that will last the entire week for our family.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian

What is bone broth?

Bone broth is often gently simmered for 24 hours (or more!) to extract as much nutrients from the bones of an animal, whether it be fish, chicken, pork or beef. The long cooking time breaks down bone to release vitamins, collagen and calcium phosphate — nutrients that are good for us.

Sure, it’s a trendy thing right now, with restaurants offering drive-through bone broth served in a coffee cup for $9, cookbooks dedicated to the art of bone broths (I highly recommend The Nourished Kitchen Cookbook which features bone broth) and even an entire line of bone broth concentrates that you can buy.

What’s the difference between broth, bone broth and soups?

Generally, soups are made with meats, bones, vegetables, herbs, added grains, sometimes thickened with starches – and simmered for a couple of hours.

Broths are mostly made from meats or vegetables and left clear without very much else added. Broths are also simmered for a couple of hours, resulting in a light colored, light flavored broth.

Bone broths are cooked for a day or even longer. Your favorite Vietnamese restaurant most likely simmer their pho broth overnight, which is why the broth is so rich and flavorful.

The long cooking time extracts so many nutrients and flavor! How do you know when you’ve extracted maximum nutrients and flavor? When the bones literally disintegrate just by giving a little pressure with your fingers.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe Asian Style

Like Nourished Kitchen, we make our bone broth in the slow cooker, and it will last us all week long. The process starts on Sunday night, and the slow cooker will do its magic all night long.

In the morning, we’ll enjoy bone broth as part of our breakfast. Every day, I’ll top off the pot with more water and keep the slow cooker humming along.

Each day, I’ll add a vegetable, switch out for fresh herbs, throw in a couple of umami-boosting Asian ingredients.

As the days progress, the bone broth develops new flavor, gets richer, smoother, fuller. We get the benefit of the valuable nutrition that’s normally locked inside the bones.

Some days, we’ll top off the bone broth with chopped herbs, or shredded seaweed just before serving. Or a spoonful of leftover rice in the bone broth is great too.

Secrets to Clear, Clean Bone Broth

Key to bone broth – be gentle. The cooking process is slow and gentle, coaxing out flavor with very little bubbles (no violent boiling!)

Don’t stir. Especially after the first 2 days. The bones will be come very soft and will crumble if you stir the pot too vigorously, resulting in a gritty broth.

Use cheesecloth or herb/tea bags to contain any herbs, aromatics or spices that are very small (see below.) This avoids having you dig around, stir around to fish these items out.

Use a very fine mesh skimmer to skim the surface of the broth every day, especially during the first 6-8 hours. The “scum” will cloud your broth during these first few hours of cooking. What’s the scum made out of? Proteins, fats, microscopic bone fragments (especially if the bones were cut), oils, impurities. Get rid of it!

Ready for the next batch? Jumpstart your next batch with a little of the last batch of concentrated “liquid gold!” We call this “Infinite Bone Broth.” Restaurants do the same with broths, sauces and sourdough bread too. Seed the next batch with rich flavor you’ve already built.

Bone Broth, Chinese Style

The “holy trinity” of Chinese cooking is garlic, ginger and green onion.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Garlic, Ginger & Green Onion

I’m not a fan of fishing out little pieces of ingredients, so I try to cut herbs so that they are easy to find and spoon out. The garlic head is cut in half. Sometimes, the cloves will separate (like above) but I’ll use a bag made for for DIY teabags or as an herb pouch (100 bags for $5.67)

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian DIY Herb Pouch

Fill it up with the garlic cloves that are loose. Fold the top over and the cloves or anything you put inside will stay put. You can also make your own with cheesecloth. I like to use these teabags for other spices too, like whole peppercorns or star anise – anything that would be hard to find and fish out.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Fill Herb Pouch with loose garlic cloves

The green onions are tied with twine, again for easy removal. The ginger is a big hunk, just sliced in half.  I reserve the other half of the ginger + the garlic cloves in the bag + more green onion  – to add to the bone broth a couple of days later (I’ll discard the spent herbs/aromatics, replace with fresh.)

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Tie green onions with twine and slice ginger in half

This week, I’m making bone broth with spareribs (it was on sale). Pork broth is very popular in Chinese cuisine. It’s just as popular as chicken broth is here in the U.S. Most of the Chinese soups that I make start with pork – for a lighter, more neutral flavor than beef or chicken.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Spareribs for bone broth

Some people like to cut off the excess fat, but I just leave it on. I’ll skim out the fats and oils later with a skimmer.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Everything goes into the slow cooker

Everything goes into the slow cooker, set it on low and let it go. If you plan on making slow cooker bone broth often, I suggest getting the largest slow cooker you can find. This one is a Cuisinart 6 1/2 Quart Slow Cooker ($99) that works really well. It’s never failed us.

After a few hours, I’ll skim the scuzz with a very fine mesh skimmer. This skimmer mesh is so fine that it catches all particles AND surface oils and fats.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian skim skuzz with very fine mesh skimmer

Look how rich this bone broth is the next day! Season with salt, or fish sauce. Season to taste.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian

I’ll discard the spent green onion, garlic and ginger, and add fresh to replace. This time, I’m adding garlic chives and cilantro from the garden – again, tied  up to make it easier to remove.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian discard spent herbs and add garlic chives and cilantro

Top it off with fresh water. The slow cooker stays on all week, on low.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian top off with fresh water

Chinese Bone Broth

After a couple of days, I might throw in some Chinese dried ingredients for a massive flavor and umami-boost:

Dried scallops, dried shrimp or dried black mushrooms (shitake).

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian dried scallops, dried shrimp and black mushrooms

You can also add in sliced daikon and carrots for one of my very favorite home-style soups! Every trip back to my Mom’s house, I request her Daikon Carrot soup.

If you like cilantro, you can also add in a bunch of cilantro stems, which have just as much flavor as the leaves. I often use the stems for soups.

Japanese Bone Broth

If you’d like Japanese flavor for a bone broth, add a small 6-inch piece of dried kombu and a handful of bonito flakes (place these in the tea bag.) By the way, kombu can be used over, and over again. Just rinse, wipe, and let dry completely before storing for next use.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian dried kombu and bonito flakes

My favorite breakfast? Bone broth with a spoonful of leftover rice or grains, top with roasted seaweed. This type of seaweed is called Kizame Nori – or sliced, roasted seaweed.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian with a spoonful of leftover rice or grains and roasted seaweed

By the way, have you ever tried Ochazuke?

Also, if you’d like to fortify the Japanese bone broth with miso paste – do this separately. Miso paste cooked at high heat or for too long will break apart and become gritty. Ladle some bone broth into a separate saucepan. Bring to simmer if you need to, but if it’s coming straight from the slow cooker, there’s no need to heat it up. Turn off heat. Whisk just a couple tablespoons of miso paste into the soup. Be careful of how much miso you add, especially if you’ve already added salt to the bone broth. I prefer shiro miso (white miso paste) as it’s lighter and less salty than the others. Miso paste is always added off heat.

Vietnamese Bone Broth

Add Vietnamese pho spices to a mesh bag or the tea bag (Here’s a recipe for Slow Cooker Vietnamese Pho.)

If you visit an Asian market, you can often find all these spices packaged, ready to go. Look for “Pho Spice Pack.” Instead of seasoning the broth with salt, season the bone broth with fish sauce. Start with 1 tablespoon, taste, and then add 1 teaspoon at a time until perfect.

What’s my favorite fish sauce? Right there in the sidebar is a free “Asian Masters of Flavor” ebook I wrote that includes my favorite brand! There’s a big difference between good quality fish sauce and crap, chemical-laden fish sauce.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Vietnamese Bone Broth Spices

More notes

If you’re concerned with the cost of running a slow cooker throughout the week, it costs pennies per day!

We grow all of our own herbs and most of our own vegetables in our aquaponics garden and greenhouse. Here’s a tip for green onion.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Our aquaphonics garden

You can even start with store-bought green onion. Make sure you buy ones that have nice, wet, strong roots (no dry or wilted!) Just stick’em in soil. The green onions will continue to grow their roots and sprout more leaves. I just snip off what I need (leafy part only) and new ones will continue to grow throughout the entire growing season!

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian grow your own green onion

Recommended Cooking Equipment

More recipes to explore

Vietnamese Pho Pressure Cooker – Paleo Friendly  (Steam Kitchen)

Mom’s Chinese Chicken Soup  (Steam Kitchen)

Vegetable Thai Curry Noodle Soup  (Steam Kitchen)

Tofu and Mushroom Miso Soup  (Steam Kitchen)

Chinese Daikon and Carrot Soup  (Steam Kitchen)

15 Minute Udon Miso Noodle Soup  (Steam Kitchen)

Thai Fish Soup  (Steam Kitchen)

Soba Noodles in Shiitake-Shoyu Broth with Spring Vegetables (Serious Eats)

Spicy Korean Seafood Soup (Serious Eats)

Yum
Print

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Style

Servings: Prep Time: 5 minutes Cook Time:
slow-cooker-bone-broth-recipe-asian-3832

I prefer using pork or chicken for Chinese or Japanese style bone broth. If you'd like to use beef bones (great for Vietnamese bone broth), I suggest roasting the bones (350F for 30 minutes) first before adding them to your slow cooker. Not necessary, but it will give a richer bone broth. I don't normally roast pork or chicken bones - I just add them to the pot. Grassfed, organic is best.

PORK: spareribs, neck, hock, really anything.


CHICKEN: whole, raw chicken, or just the frame of a rotisserie chicken you've already enjoyed. You can also use chicken wings or chicken feet. Turkey works great too.


BEEF: oxtail, knuckle, neck, short ribs. I also use beef bone marrow as well - but after roasting, I"ll spoon out the marrow, spread it on bread and sprinkle with sea salt for a little treat. Basically, too much marrow in the bone broth will make the broth greasy tasting. Short ribs have amazing flavor - I like to add them to any beef bone broth that I make.


FISH: Fish bones and head. I like to do this traditional Chinese style with garlic, lots of ginger and green onion. Remove the fish skin and the thin, silvery lining in the gut area (very fishy taste). If the fish is raw, I prefer to roast the fish bones (350F for 20 minutes) - as this tames the fishiness smell and flavor of the bone broth. Most fish will work except for oily fish like mackerel.

Ingredients:

4 pounds spareribs
1 head garlic, halved
big knob of fresh ginger (about the size of 2 fingers), halved
3-4 stalks green onions, cut in half

Directions:

1. Reserve half of the garlic, ginger and green onion for later in the week. Tie the green onion bundles with twine.

2. In a slow-cooker, add green onion, garlic and ginger. Fill slow cooker with water, up to 1-inch below rim. Set to cook on high heat at first. When the bone broth comes to a simmer after an hour or so, you'll see lots of scum. Skim and discard. Set slow cooker on low and let the bone broth cook for at least 6 hours.

3. Use a skimmer to skim the surface of any particles and oil. Season with salt, to taste.

4. After drinking some of the bone broth, top off the slow cooker with additional fresh water. You can also discard the spent herbs and add the reserved garlic, onion and green onion. Continue to add additional vegetables, aromatics, dried ingredients (see post above for details) as you wish. Keep the setting on low.

The post Slow Cooker Bone Broth – Asian Style appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/39418-slow-cooker-bone-broth-asian-style.html/feed 50
Chinese Daikon and Carrot Soup http://steamykitchen.com/26933-chinese-daikon-and-carrot-soup-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/26933-chinese-daikon-and-carrot-soup-recipe-video.html#comments Tue, 14 May 2013 15:38:21 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=26933 I’ve been making a lot of Chinese home-style soups lately – Nathan has been going through some health challenges lately and all he wants to eat is clear soup. My house smells like Mom’s house when I simmer a pot of soup. One most frequently asked questions I get is, “what’s your favorite recipe from your Mom?” It’s tough to ...

The post Chinese Daikon and Carrot Soup appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
Chinese Daikon and Carrot Soup Recipe

I’ve been making a lot of Chinese home-style soups lately – Nathan has been going through some health challenges lately and all he wants to eat is clear soup. My house smells like Mom’s house when I simmer a pot of soup.

One most frequently asked questions I get is, “what’s your favorite recipe from your Mom?” It’s tough to just pick ONE single recipe so I’ll pick my top 3 categories – Fried Rice, Crispy Spring Rolls and Soup – any Chinese soup.

Soup is easy to make, but tough to master. Simply boiling ingredients and adding enough salt will make anything from flavored water to somewhat decent soup. I’m talking about making a broth that’s rich and concentrated but also clear and clean.

What is clear and clean soup? Well the French technique to making clear soup, or consommé, is to stir in egg whites. The proteins of the egg whites will collect and trap all of the sediment and fat from the soup, which then gets discarded.

The Asian way is different:

  • Par-boil the meats and/or bones to get rid of the fats and other “muckity muck” that would otherwise cloud and taint your soup. (i.e. skin, blood, bone fragments, dirt – the stuff that makes for cloudy soup)
  • Use umami-boosting dried or preserved ingredients to create nutritional benefits, richness and savoryness – dried Chinese mushroom, dried shrimp, dried scallops, dried abalone, preserved turnip, dried dates, dried lily buds, dried figs….well, you get the picture. If it can be preserved/dried, it will….and the Chinese will use it for soup!

In this recipe for Chinese Diakon and Carrot soup – you can use one or both techniques. I bring a big pot full of water to a rapid boil, then add in my meat/bones. I let it boil like crazy. This violent boiling action “scrubs” the meat and bones, forcing the impurities to be released. Let this happen for 10 minutes and then discard the water and fill the pot with new, clean water to create the broth.

I know your next question….”Doesn’t the par-boiling take away a lot of the flavor?”

The answer is no. Unless you count that scuzzy stuff as flavor. You don’t want that crap in your soup anyways. The real flavor of soup comes from a long, slow, gentle simmer of the meat and bones. Unless you use a pressure cooker, which I sometimes do too. But that’s a different sort of cooking technique.

This recipe, like all of my recipes, is flexible. Don’t eat pork? Use chicken instead. No daikon? Try potato. No dried shrimp/scallops? It’s optional.


Chinese Daikon and Carrot Soup Recipe

Chinese Daikon and Carrot Soup Recipe Video

 

 

Yum
Print

Chinese Daikon and Carrot Soup

Servings: 8-10 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 30 minutes
Chinese Daikon and Carrot Soup

Use whatever pork is on sale. If it comes with a bone - even better. In place of salt, you can use a few dashes of fish sauce. The dried scallops and shrimp can be found in an Asian market -- but if you can't find these ingredients, feel free to leave them out. The dried scallops/shrimp add incredible savory and ocean-salty flavor (you'll use less salt to season the soup).

Ingredients:

1 pound pork, cut into large chunks
6-8 dried shrimp
2-3 dried scallops
One 2-inch piece of ginger, cut into chunks
2 whole cloves garlic
1 large Daikon radish, peeled and cut into chunks
3 large carrots, peeled and cut into chunks
2-3 tomatoes, cut into quarters
Salt to taste

Directions:

Bring a large soup pot filled with water to a rolling boil. Add pork and bones and let boil rapidly for 10 minutes. Remove pork and set aside. Drain and discard the water, clean the pot if needed. Fill the pot with new water to make the broth (approximately 4 quarts) and add in the pork, bones, shrimp, scallops, ginger, garlic. Bring to a simmer and then turn the heat to medium-low, or hot enough to just produce a gentle simmer for 30-40 minutes.

Occassionally, skim the soup of any fats or particles and discard. Add radish, carrots and tomatoes to the soup and simmer for another 15-20 minutes. Season with salt (or fish sauce) to taste.

The post Chinese Daikon and Carrot Soup appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/26933-chinese-daikon-and-carrot-soup-recipe-video.html/feed 21
Red Lantern Grilled Sirloin with Chile, Garlic, and Ginger http://steamykitchen.com/2631-red-lantern-grilled-sirloin.html http://steamykitchen.com/2631-red-lantern-grilled-sirloin.html#comments Sun, 22 Feb 2009 16:58:01 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/?p=2631 Photo of Red Lantern’s Grilled Sirloin with Chile, Garlic and Ginger courtesy of Secrets of the Red Lantern Cookbook I love my friends! I needed a few more shots for the cookbook, and asked my good friends Matt and Dannika of MattikaArts if he’d like to take a shot {pun intended..haha i soooo funny! snort.} at photographing some Asian ingredients ...

The post Red Lantern Grilled Sirloin with Chile, Garlic, and Ginger appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
red-lantern-cookbook-steak1

Photo of Red Lantern’s Grilled Sirloin with Chile, Garlic and Ginger courtesy of Secrets of the Red Lantern Cookbook

I love my friends!

I needed a few more shots for the cookbook, and asked my good friends Matt and Dannika of MattikaArts if he’d like to take a shot {pun intended..haha i soooo funny! snort.} at photographing some Asian ingredients and be published in the Steamy Kitchen Cookbook!

This all happened via email and I swear to Buddha that I heard him giggle.

matt <– this guy…he giggled in his email, I could hear it between the commas!

And look at the beautiful photos he took – they will be in the Ingredients section of the Steamy Kitchen Cookbook!

Click on the photo below for the slideshow – there are a total of 7 photos.

matt-wright-photos-01-2

(click on photo for slideshow of 7 photos)

How could you not fall in love with this man???

***

Cookbook Giveaway Winner

Time sure flies by…one minute I’m posting Red Lantern’s Crisp Parcels or Vietnamese Spring Rolls (Cha Gio) and giving away a copy of the caress-me-now cookbook, secrets-red-lantern Secrets of the Red Lantern by Pauline Nguyen – and then a week passes by. I was supposed to draw a random name as the winner. Oops! Got busy, missed deadline…so what’s another day? Well, then another week passes by and here I am, totally apologizing to you for being late announcing the lucky winner of Secrets of the Red Lantern Cookbook!

So, without further delay (cuz you know I’m good at that!) the winner of the cookbook is

Grace says:

Just by reading your post I’m completely sold and intensely craving spring rolls. I prefer my with bean thread/veggie/pork filling but when necessity and/or boredom strikes I grab just about anything from the fridge.

Congrats Grace! Email me your deets and I’ll have the publisher send the book to you: jaden{at}steamykitchen{dot}com.

Red Lantern’s Grilled Sirloin with Chile, Garlic, and Ginger Recipe

Bo Nuong Toi Gung
Two 1/2 pound sirloin steaks
2 handfuls shredded green papaya
1 small handful mixed herbs (perilla, Vietnamese mint, and basil)
1 tablespoon fried shallots
1 tablespoon dried shrimp, soaked in hot water for 5 minutes and drained
3 tablespoons dipping fish sauce

MARINADE
2 teaspoons pickled chili
2 cloves garlic, finely minced
¾-inch piece of ginger, grated with microplane grater
2 tablespoons Asian fish sauce
1 tablespoon superfine sugar
2 teaspoons vegetable oil
Pinch of salt
Mix all the marinade ingredients together until the sugar dissolves. Add the steaks and marinate for 2 hours in the fridge. Grill the steaks over medium to high heat, to your preference (6 minutes for rare, 10 minutes for medium), then rest the steaks for 5 minutes. Reheat the steaks on the grill pan, then cut into thin slices.
Serve with a salad of green papaya, mixed herbs, fried shallots, and dried shrimp, dressed with dipping fish sauce.
SERVES 4

Dipping Fish Sauce

Nuoc Mam Cham

3 tablespoons Asian fish sauce
3 tablespoons rice vinegar
2 tablespoons sugar
2 cloves garlic
1 bird’s-eye chili
2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lime juice

Combine the fish sauce, rice vinegar, ½ cup of water, and sugar in a saucepan and place over medium heat. Stir well and cook until just before boiling point is reached, then allow to cool. To serve, finely chop the garlic and chile and stir in the lime juice.
MAKES 1 CUP

Fried Shallots

Hanh Phi

½ pound shallots, peeled
4 cups vegetable oil

Finely slice the shallots and wash under cold water. Dry the shallots with a cloth, then set them aside on some paper towel until they are completely dry.
Put the oil in a wok and heat to 350 degrees F, or until a cube of bread dropped in the oil browns in 15 seconds. Fry the shallots in small batches until they turn golden brown, then remove with a slotted spoon to a paper towel.
The fried shallots are best eaten freshly fried but will keep for up to 2 days in an airtight container.

—Recipe from secrets-red-lantern Secrets of the Red Lantern by Pauline Nguyen

The post Red Lantern Grilled Sirloin with Chile, Garlic, and Ginger appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/2631-red-lantern-grilled-sirloin.html/feed 14
Leftover Turkey Recipe: Chinese Congee (Rice Porridge or Jook) http://steamykitchen.com/211-turkey-congee-rice-porridge.html http://steamykitchen.com/211-turkey-congee-rice-porridge.html#comments Sat, 24 Nov 2007 14:39:17 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/2007/11/24/turkey-congee-rice-porridge/ Use leftover turkey bones to make Chinese Turkey Congee (Rice Porridge or jook)

The post Leftover Turkey Recipe: Chinese Congee (Rice Porridge or Jook) appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
Turkey Congee

Update 11/25/11 Happy Thanksgiving! Guess what my Mom’s got simmerin’ on the stove!? Yep – Chinese Turkey Rice Porridge. Yum…….

On Thanksgiving, we packed the kids in the minivan and headed to Orlando to my brother-in-law’s for a “Boston Market Takeout Thanksgiving.” Oh, don’t groan, it really wasn’t bad at all. While you were all scrubbing layers of grease off your pans, all we did was crumple up take out containers. The best part of celebrating the holidays with people who don’t cook is knowing that the entire turkey carcass is MINE…..ALL MINE.

Such a silly thing to be smug about, but I consider the endless potential of leftover bones just as exciting as the roasted turkey itself. And since we only have turkey once or twice a year, I act like Tom of Tom & Jerry with icons of turkey flashing in my eyes. I could make stock (freeze and use throughout the year), gumbo, casserole, soup and my favorite….Turkey Congee (rice porridge)

Normally, when I spend holiday dinners with other cooks and chefs, it’s a silent game of strategy. But how would you politely and tactfully be the first to lay dibs on the turkey bones if you are a guest? Since many of you will have turkey again for Christmas dinner, I’m going to share my secrets with you. But if you continue through to read…you’ve just waived away your right to use these tricks against me. Deal?

How to tactfully lay dibs on the turkey bones

I’m going to divide this strategy lessons into 3 parts. Before, during and after the meal.

Before the meal

  • The moment you hang up your jacket and take off your shoes – begin your distraction technique. The cook has been up since 4 a.m. washing, chopping, baking, boiling, roasting for this one meal. Their mind is totally focused all the way up to the point of END OF DESSERT COURSE. Talk only about the meal itself. Do not bring up the subject of “leftovers” or “turkey bones.” If anyone else brings up the subject, quickly cut them off and say:

“Do I smell something burning?” BUT you can only play this “burning card” this ONCE in the evening. Any more than that, you might not be invited back next year.

  • Offer to carve the turkey. Do NOT let that turkey go uncarved to the table. If the turkey gets carved at the table, those sexy turkey bones are exposed in front of the entire table and game over. Now everyone is thinking about potential recipes for turkey bones.

Turkey Congee

During the meal

  • The seat closest to the kitchen is the MONEY SEAT. Before everyone else arrives, discreetly crumple up the napkin and take a drink from the water glass at that seat to lay claim.
  • When the cook triumphantly announces, “Dinner is ready!” elegantly (but quickly) sashay to the table and stand behind the chair that you want. You can’t be the first to sit down, that would be rude and way too obvious. But just one hand casually leaning against the back of the chair is fine.
  • Towards end of the meal, keep an eye for anyone finishing early. Do whatever you can to keep them at the table. Strike up engaging conversation with them. Ask OPEN ENDED QUESTIONS.

After the meal

  • Be the first to signal the end of dinner and establish dominance by puffing up your chest, stretching arms out and pushing your chair out.

“Thank you for a lovely meal, name of host. It was truly a delightful Thanksgiving dinner! Let me help you clear the table.” and proceed to take your plate to the kitchen. Your host will surely follow behind you with an armful of dishes.

  • If someone other than cook follows you before host can get to kitchen, BLOCK and REDIRECT.

“Oh, is that cranberry on your collar? That is going to stain! Quick! Take my Tide to Go stain pen.”

  • With only you and cook in kitchen, stand over the turkey carcass, make a big SIGH, and say:

“Wow, that’s a lot of leftover turkey. You’ll be eating turkey for weeks!”

  • By now, the host will be so stuffed of turkey, sick of turkey, focused on the piles of dirty dishes that she/he will not even think twice when you say:

“I’d love to take the bones home, may I?”

SCORE.

Now you can make Turkey Congee, or rice porridge:

***

To me, the most successful leftover turkey dishes do NOT TASTE LIKE LEFTOVER TURKEY. There are countless recipes floating out on the web, but if it just tastes like Thanksgiving turkey but in a different form, what’s the point?

Here’s the secret to making your turkey congee taste incredibly wonderful – dried scallops and dried shrimp.

dried scallops and dried shrimp

You can find both in Asian markets. You only use a few pieces of each and it adds that mysterious “umami” dimension to your turkey congee. If you don’t have either, that is fine, you can substitute with any of the following:

  • 2 tsp fish sauce
  • 1 cup instant dashi stock
  • 3-4 DRIED shitake black mushrooms
  • saute 1/2 diced onion + 4 ounces chopped fresh mushrooms

Turkey congee Recipe

Yum
Print

Turkey Congee (Rice Porridge) Recipe

Servings: Prep Time: Cook Time:
recipe for turkey rice porridge

Ingredients:

Leftover turkey bones (about 1/2 of the bones - save the other half for making stock or whatever)
2 carrots, cut into large dice
3 stalks of celery, cut into large dice
2 tablespoons dried shrimp (optional)
6 whole dried scallops (optional)
9 cups water
1 cup raw rice
2 tablespoons cooking oil
2 cups cooked turkey meat, shredded
fish sauce or soy sauce to taste

Directions:

1. Soak dried scallops and shrimp in 1 cup of hot water for 10 minutes. With your hands, separate the bones into large pieces (no smaller than 3"). In a large stockpot, heat cooking oil over medium-low heat. When hot, add carrots and celery and cook for 3-5 minutes until soft. Add turkey bones and water to pot.

2. With your fingers, shred the scallops into small pieces. Add scallops, shrimp and the soaking water to broth. Turn heat to high and let boil. Immediately turn heat to low and add raw rice.Simmer uncovered or partially covered for 45 minutes, up to 2 hours until rice has thickened into congee. Do not stir while it is cooking. Just leave it alone so that the rice can thicken undisturbed. Stir in cooked turkey meat.

3. Taste, add fish sauce or soy sauce to taste. Start with 1 tablespoon first and add in 1/2 tsp at a time until you reach perfect seasoning.

More Recipes:

Vegetable Fried Rice Why we ate nothing but vegetables for 2 weeks.

Vietnamese Chicken Pho Chicken Pho (Vietnamese Noodle Soup)

The post Leftover Turkey Recipe: Chinese Congee (Rice Porridge or Jook) appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/211-turkey-congee-rice-porridge.html/feed 67