Steamy Kitchen Recipes | RSS Feed http://steamykitchen.com Steamy Kitchen Food Blog: fast recipes, simple recipes, with fresh ingredients to create delicious meals. Fri, 01 May 2015 15:39:44 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.1 Lychees, Longan, Rambutan! http://steamykitchen.com/2224-asian-tropical-fruit-salad-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/2224-asian-tropical-fruit-salad-recipe.html#comments Fri, 23 Jan 2009 16:44:24 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/?p=2224 A beautiful Asian tropical salad with a pineapple “bowl” – canned longan, lychee, rambutan paired with some fresh tropical fruits. Some of my favorite fruit come in cans. I’m not talking about tasteless, mushy pears or the stained red maraschino cherries, but the Asian stuff like lychee, longan and rambutan. These are fruits that I can rarely find fresh in ...

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Asian Tropical Fruit Salad Recipe

A beautiful Asian tropical salad with a pineapple “bowl” – canned longan, lychee, rambutan paired with some fresh tropical fruits.

Some of my favorite fruit come in cans. I’m not talking about tasteless, mushy pears or the stained red maraschino cherries, but the Asian stuff like lychee, longan and rambutan. These are fruits that I can rarely find fresh in the Tampa Bay markets where I live, so it’s nice to have a tinned alternative. When mixed with other tropical fruits like mangoes, kiwi and pineapple, it becomes a super way to end an Asian inspired meal.

Actually, you won’t find many sweet desserts in my cooking repertoire, as I really like to end my dinner with refreshing, light fruit like lychee, longan and rambutan instead of a heavy, overly sweet baked dessert. You’ll find that true in most of Asia, too. Oh, but don’t think that I don’t have a sweet tooth…au contraire! My sugar rush happens twice a day: smack dab in the middle of the afternoon (nothing accompanies work procrastination better than chocolate!) and then in the tippy-toe-wee hours after all is shush-quiet and I sneak a teeny bite of chocolate right before bed.

Oh, I’m getting sidetracked, aren’t I? Back to fruit. Let’s talk a bit about each type of canned goodness: the lychee, longan and rambutan

Continue reading ASIAN FRUIT SALAD RECIPE and learn why my kids go BONKERS for fresh rambutan!

Lychee

lychee fruit

Fresh lychee photo from About.com – they have step by step photo on how to peel lychee

Lychee (or Litchi) is pronounced “lie CHEE” in Cantonese and is found in all parts of Southeast Asia and southern China. And yes, you can grow lychee here in Florida too, as it prefers a tropical climate. The fresh fruit has a thin, red, bumpy skin and the good quality lychee is sweet with a small seed. The canned versions are packaged in sugary water, which I always reserve as they make excellent juice for lychee martinis or added to champagne (ah…but for another column). Lychee has a delicate, floral taste, similar to the texture of peeled grapes.

Longan

Longan Fruit

photo from Wikipedia

The name in Chinese means “dragon’s eye,” and is my personal favorite of the bunch. I love the firmer texture and honey-like flavor. Fresh longans are smaller than lychees, and have a brown, leathery skin that easily peels off. Mom also uses dried longan in savory soups, as it has many health properties. When my brother, Jay, and I were kids, we used to pop a longan on each of our fingers and chase each other around the house.

Longan is pronounced “long AN” in Cantonese.

Rambutan

Rambutan Fruit

Photo from me! I found fresh rambutan last year at the Asian market.

This Southeast Asian fruit one is my kids’ favorite, not because of the sweet fruit itself, but for the hairy skin the times I can find rambutan fresh:

rambutan_bear_hatrambutan hat

oh, yeah, the kids had a ton of fun with the rambutan “hats”

When I can find rambutans fresh, the skin is like a soft, hairy, ticklish ball! In fact, part of the name “rambutan” means “hairy” to the people of Malaysia. The canned version taste similar to longan, but is more oval in shape. Sometimes you’ll see the rambutan stuffed with pineapple bits, which is whatI like.

To make a tropical fruit salad, try combining any of these canned fruits with whatever fresh fruit your market has!
Asian Tropical Fruit Salad

Asian Tropical Fruit Salad

To make the pineapple ring (it’s not really a bowl – there is no bottom), lop the green, spiny head off of the pineapple and the bottom stem off. Cut the pineapple into 3-4 pieces, crosswise. For each piece, use a small paring knife to run all along the inside edge of the pineapple. Push out the flesh to use in your salad (you’ll have to also cut the fruit off the tough, center core before adding to the salad). Place the ring on the plate and fill with fruit salad.

One can rambutan, drained
One can lychee, syrup reserved
One can longan, drained
1/2 fresh pineapple, cut into chunks
1 mango, cut into chunks
2 kiwi fruits, cut into small chunks
1 pint strawberries
juice of ½ lime
fresh mint leaves, julienned (optional)

In a large bowl, combine all of the ingredients and toss. You can add the reserved lychee syrup to the fruit bowl – it’s more of a sweet water, not like a sticky syrup. In fact, any of the syrups from the longan, lychee or rambutan can be used and mixed into other fruit juices or in place of simple syrup in mixed drinks. Try it mixed with sparkling water!

Serves 6-8

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How To Open A Pomegranate http://steamykitchen.com/1758-how-to-open-a-pomegranate.html http://steamykitchen.com/1758-how-to-open-a-pomegranate.html#comments Fri, 28 Nov 2008 18:28:33 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/?p=1758 (click on above photo for a slideshow of 7 photos on how to open a pomegranate) Pomegranate is one of the messiest fruits in the world! The ruby red juice stains anything and everything it comes in contact with. Mom used to make all of us wear our rattiest, nastiest shirts when we had pomegranates because after eating, we’d just ...

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How To Open A Pomegranate

(click on above photo for a slideshow of 7 photos on how to open a pomegranate)

Pomegranate is one of the messiest fruits in the world! The ruby red juice stains anything and everything it comes in contact with.

Mom used to make all of us wear our rattiest, nastiest shirts when we had pomegranates because after eating, we’d just throw our shirts away. A few times when we didn’t have an old shirt to spare so we donned those silly lobster bibs that we grabbed from a restaurant.

But there is a MUCH easier way to open a pomegranate with zero squiring mess. Really, there is! I was recently on both CBS and ABC in the Tampa, Florida area demonstrating the trick to opening and extracting the jewels without having to repaint your walls red…come see the video  and 2 recipes – (video starts automatically after the jump)

Pomegranate Seeds

Pomegranate & Prosciutto Salad

Serves 4

4 ounces ounces thinly sliced prosciutto
1 cup walnut halves
1/4 cup brown sugar
Pinch salt
4 handfuls of baby greens
4 ounces gorgonzola cheese
1/2 cup pomegranate seeds
Store-bought pomegranate salad dressing

Place the prosciutto slices on a baking sheet and broil for 3-4 minutes until crisp. Heat a nonstick frying pan over medium heat. Add the walnut halves and toast the walnuts for 1-2 minutes. Sprinkle the brown sugar and salt on top and stir. The brown sugar will begin to melt and the walnuts will get a bit sticky. Once the brown sugar has all melted, remove from heat and place the walnuts on a plate to cool.

Assemble salad with baby greens, gorgonzola cheese, pomegranate seeds, walnuts and the crispy prosciutto. Toss with the pomegranate dressing.

Pama Pomegranate Liqueur

Here’s my latest obession – Pama Pomegranate Liqueur – it’s the absolute perfect sweet/tart taste and made from all natural pomegranate juice. I use it to deglaze my pan in place of wine when cooking chicken or pork chops.

PamaPama

photos courtesy of Pama Liqueur

Pama and Soda

2 ounces Pama pomegranate liqueur
club soda (or ginger ale)
lime wedge or lemon peel spiral for garnish

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Stir Fried Beef and Nectarines Recipe http://steamykitchen.com/1712-stir-fried-beef-and-nectarines.html http://steamykitchen.com/1712-stir-fried-beef-and-nectarines.html#comments Wed, 12 Nov 2008 20:28:04 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/?p=1712 Click on image for a photoset of 9 additional images (including one shot taken with my point and shoot camera) What you’ll learn: How to properly cut your nectarines (or peaches!) for this Stir Fried Beef and Nectarines Recipe The ideal way to fry (not steam!) beef and give it a nice sear without overcooking it I’ve also used peaches the ...

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Stir Fried Beef and Nectarines Recipe

Click on image for a photoset of 9 additional images (including one shot taken with my point and shoot camera)

What you’ll learn:

  • How to properly cut your nectarines (or peaches!) for this Stir Fried Beef and Nectarines Recipe
  • The ideal way to fry (not steam!) beef and give it a nice sear without overcooking it

I’ve also used peaches the same way – the firmer ones work well. Just cut your peach or your nectarine into thin wedges or thick slices – and add them to your beef stir fry.

As in most of my stir fry recipes, this Stir Fried Beef and Nectarines recipe will instruct you to fry the beef first, then removing it from the pan and then adding it back in later. This helps give the beef room to fry (too many ingredients in the wok and you’ll end up steaming your beef, not frying) and to give it a nice sear without overcooking it. If you use flank steak, make sure you slice ACROSS the grain to get tender meat.

Hmmm…I bet canned lychees would be great in this recipe too!

Stir Fried Beef and Nectarines Recipe

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Stir Fried Beef and Nectarines Recipe

Servings: Prep Time: Cook Time:

Ingredients:

2 teaspoons soy sauce
1/4 teaspoon sugar
1 teaspoon cornstarch
freshly ground black pepper
1 teaspoon + 1 tablespoon cooking oil
1 pound beef (top sirloin, flank, eye of round) cut into 1/8" slices
1/2 red onion, sliced into thin wedges
1 clove garlic, finely minced
1 nectarine, cut into thin wedges or 1" chunks
1 tablespoon oyster sauce

Directions:

In a bowl, combine the soy sauce, sugar, cornstarch, black pepper and the 1 teaspoon of cooking oil. Add the beef slices and mix to coat well. Let marinate 10 minutes at room temperature or up to overnight in the refrigerator.

Heat a wok or large fry pan over high heat until a bead of water sizzles and evaporates upon contact. Add the remaining 1 tablespoon of cooking oil and swirl to coat.

Add the beef slices to the wok in a single layer, laying out the slices all around the surface of the wok or pan. Fry 30 seconds, flip and fry another 30 seconds to 1 minute, depending on thickness of your steak, until just cooked through. Dish out, keeping as much sauce and oil in the wok as possible.

Turn the heat to medium and add the red onions and the garlic. Fry for 1 minute. Add the nectarine slices and let those get nice and warm, about 1 minute. Add the beef back into the wok, add the oyster sauce and toss to coat.

More recipes to explore:

Fried Green Tomato Salad with Sweet Chili Dressing (Steamy Kitchen)

Shitake and Cognac Faux Gras (Steamy Kitchen)

Beef Congee (Rice Porridge) + PBS Show (Steamy Kitchen)

Easy Beef and Broccoli Stir Fry (Food.com)

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A Nifty Trick: How To Peel and Cut Kiwi Fruit http://steamykitchen.com/1692-how-to-peel-and-cut-kiwi-fruit.html http://steamykitchen.com/1692-how-to-peel-and-cut-kiwi-fruit.html#comments Fri, 07 Nov 2008 19:14:53 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/?p=1692 These little fuzzy kiwi fruits are fussy to peel, because the skin is so incredibly thin, and a perfectly ripe kiwi is delicate to handle. But it’s still one of my favorite tropical fruits, as I love the sweet, tart, juicy fruit with the crunchy little black seeds! Wanna know my trick to peeling kiwi fruit? It’s super simple, the ...

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peel_kiwi_fruit

These little fuzzy kiwi fruits are fussy to peel, because the skin is so incredibly thin, and a perfectly ripe kiwi is delicate to handle.

But it’s still one of my favorite tropical fruits, as I love the sweet, tart, juicy fruit with the crunchy little black seeds!

Wanna know my trick to peeling kiwi fruit? It’s super simple, the fruit stays whole and look at how little fruit I’ve wasted on the peel! I was recently on both ABC7 and CBS10 showing off my kiwi fruit peeling skills.

How to peel Kiwi Fruit

Well crap! The television station must have taken down the video (I was live on CBS doing this kiwi slicing trick!)

But no worries – here’s my friend, beautiful Alejandra from Always Order Dessert peeling kiwi the same way.

What are some of your fruit peeling/cutting/storing/serving secrets? Would love to know!

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Andrew’s Debut on TV http://steamykitchen.com/1366-andrews-debut-on-tv.html http://steamykitchen.com/1366-andrews-debut-on-tv.html#comments Sun, 31 Aug 2008 04:32:51 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/?p=1366 For the past year, Andrew has been asking me, "Mama, can I do a cooking show with you?" and I've kinda resisted, mainly because a 5 year old boy...specifically MY 5 year old boy is quite unpredictable. How do I know that he's not just going to blurt out my dirty laundry on LIVE TV?...

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Andrew's Debut on TV

For the past year, Andrew has been asking me, “Mama, can I do a cooking show with you?” and I’ve kinda resisted, mainly because a 5 year old boy…specifically MY 5 year old boy is quite unpredictable. How do I know that he’s not just going to blurt out my dirty laundry on LIVE TV???

There’s no bleep button on the control board (I’ve checked) and even if there was, how would I signal the producer to bleep out the part when Andrew would spontaneously shout out, “My mama dances naked on the bed to ‘Careless Whisper.'”

Like, totally embarrassing to let the world know that I still, even after the gerbil incident (wait, was that a different dude?) and knowing that he’s so totally gay that I’d fling my naked body at George Michael if he rang my doorbell.

Last Christmas I asked my husband for George Michael concert tickets. But of course, I Believe he got jealous of my Fast Love for George Michael. Husband was furious and told me that I Can’t Make You Love Me, I’m just Waitin’ For The Day that you leave me for G.

I said, “Honey…I just have A Last Request. Try not to Wake Me up Before You Go-Go. Oh, and can you take the trash out first? I’ve had an Amazing…Hard Day.”

That was 10 songs!!! Can you do better?

But Andrew PROMISED he wouldn’t blurt out that, “when my friend at Kindergarten pushed me and hit me, my Mama told me next time he does that to kick his ass and tell him that he has ears like a donkey.”

So I let him come with me. Oh. My. Buddha. He was soooo excited that he skipped around the house all and even did the dishes, laundry and mopping for me that night. Since it was his cooking show, I asked him what would he like to cook.

“Chocolate.”

Come see TV Debut Andrew’s debut on TV. Just click on the “Featured Video” link.

Weatherdude, John Scalzi,  said to Andrew, “Come with me! I’ll show you the control room!”

Andrew was mic’d up from the beginning (and was afraid to go to the restroom because he thought, “my teacher will hear me go peepee.” Cute.

Studio

Andrew brought a little Beanie Baby frog that his Mimi gave to him.

Studio

He said, “SO! MANY! TVs! and BUTTONS!”

Studio

I was a bit nervous that he’d be scared of these monsters. There are three of them in the studio, all moving around depending on the shot.

Studio

Waking up at 5am was easy…staying awake waiting for our spot to come on was tough.

We went on air for about 4 minutes to do our thing. Then we had another 20 minutes til the end of the news broadcast where we’d come back on to show the final dish and say goodbye (video doesn’t show that part.)

During those 20 minutes, we have to finish the fondue, cut up all the fruit and make a pretty platter for the beauty shot. Here’s Andrew making the fondue.

TV Debut

Stirring the melted chocolate…

But of course chopping fruit doesn’t take long and we had plenty of time left. Without talking, Andrew just stood there on his stool, tired as all hell. He did what any 5 year old would do…

Andrew's Debut

Just started eating the chocolate during the commercial break…


Andrew Sneaking Chocolate from Jaden Hair on Vimeo.

***

Saving a Mother’s Life

We are very fortunate to have good health, but can you imagine not being able to afford an operation and medication to stay alive?

Blog-friend Srivalli is sponsoring a fundraiser to help 28 year old mother of 2, Anita Lakshmi. Will you please help – even by just donating a few dollars? It could mean the difference between life and death for this young woman who is running out of time and options. My heart goes out to her…big hugs.

xoxo

Jaden

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Grilled Shrimp Lettuce Cups with Tropical Fruit Salsa http://steamykitchen.com/588-shrimp-lettuce-cups.html http://steamykitchen.com/588-shrimp-lettuce-cups.html#comments Wed, 25 Jun 2008 16:51:42 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/?p=588 I just read an article about a man in India who created a tree that grows 300 varieties of mangoes. Although the original tree is more than 80 years old, this man has grafted different mango saplings onto it. It’s kind of neat and strange at the same time. But, it got me thinking: If I could have one tree ...

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Grilled Shrimp Lettuce Cups with Tropical Fruit Salsa

I just read an article about a man in India who created a tree that grows 300 varieties of mangoes.

Although the original tree is more than 80 years old, this man has grafted different mango saplings onto it. It’s kind of neat and strange at the same time.

But, it got me thinking: If I could have one tree in my backyard that could grow 300 varieties of something, what would I want? Three hundred is a big number, and I’d probably get tired of that one thing – even if it were chocolate: dark, milk, semisweet, truffle, bittersweet, cordial-filled, pistachio-topped, caramel-injected, syrup, frosting, nibs, bacon-flavored, powdered, and on and on.

For the first two weeks, I would be in chocolate nirvana, a constant state of bliss. But there is a fine line between swimming in chocolaty indulgence and waking up one morning with a massive, head-pounding hangover and wishing that someone – please, anyone – would grab a turkey bulb baster and suck that sugar out of my bloodstream. I call that killing me softly with cocoa.

No, I think I’d ask for a tree that grew more than just one thing. Maybe a salad tree? Radicchio, romaine, celery, fat croutons, fancy olives, shaved Parmesan, real bacon bits.

I could even go for a Bern’s Steakhouse appetizer tree: a selection of expensive caviars, lump crab cakes, shrimp cocktail, black truffle steak tartare, charcoal-grilled chicken skewers – all ripe for plucking. I guess their dessert bar growing from the back of the tree wouldn’t be bad, either.

But honestly, I think the tree that I would choose would be the frozen fruit daiquiri tree: blackberries, limes, lemons, strawberries, passion fruit, raspberries and a little spout on the trunk that dispenses aged rum on tap. Oh, yes, can I get the deluxe model that comes with a scantily dressed cabana boy to serve me drinks and do laundry?

Husband just chimed in for his request: Can the cabana boy also recaulk the kitchen because that really needs to get done this week. This is probably the only time in my life my husband and I are daydreaming about the same cabana boy – and I’m not freaking out.

Well, if you’re big into variety, and I don’t mean 300 mutations of the same fruit, I know you’ll like this recipe. The fruit salsa is flexible – use whatever fruit you like or what’s on sale. Actually, I think pineapple and blueberries would be great in the salsa. And shrimp? If you don’t like shrimp, substitute with large, dry-packed scallops, chicken strips or thin-sliced sirloin. Instead of carrots and cucumbers, serve with matchstick-cut zucchini, radishes or cooked edamame pods.

There’s one thing that you do have to have, and it’s lettuce leaves that can serve as cups. Boston bibb, iceberg and butterhead lettuce all work great. But wait – I guess if you’re not into cutesy cups, grab any type of lettuce and just make this into a salad!

p.s. If you think I cut those perfect carrots by hand, NOPE! I used the Oxo Julienne Tool $5.99 – totally indispensable in my kitchen and I can julienne an entire carrot or cucumber in 20 seconds:

Grilled Shrimp Lettuce Cups with Tropical Fruit Salsa

 

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Grilled Shrimp Lettuce Cups with Tropical Fruit Salsa

Servings: 4 servings Prep Time: 20 minutes Cook Time: 5 minutes
grilled-shrimp-lettuce-cups

Ingredients:

FOR THE SHRIMP:
1 pound shrimp, shelled and deveined
2 teaspoons soy sauce
1 teaspoon freshly grated orange zest
1/2 teaspoon ground coriander
1/2 teaspoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon sesame oil
Bamboo skewers, soaked in water for 30 minutes
1 cup matchstick-cut carrots
1 cup matchstick-cut cucumbers
1 head iceberg, butterhead or Boston bibb lettuce, leaves separated into "cups"
Sriracha hot sauce (or any hot chili sauce)
FOR THE SALSA:
1 cup diced mango
1 cup diced papaya
1/2 cup diced kiwi
Pinch of chili powder
1/4 teaspoon kosher or sea salt, or to taste
Freshly ground black pepper

Directions:

For the Tropical Fruit Salsa: Combine ingredients and set aside until ready to use.
For the Shrimp Lettuce Cups:
Marinate shrimp in soy, orange zest, coriander, chili powder and sesame oil for 15 minutes. Skewer the shrimp on bamboo skewers. Grill shrimp on medium-high, direct heat about 2 minutes on each side or until cooked through. Serve with Fruit Salsa, carrots, cucumber, lettuce cups and hot sauce.

From Steamy Kitchen food column in Tampa Tribune

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Food Column: Coconut Frozen Yogurt with Tropical Fruit http://steamykitchen.com/179-food-column-coconut-frozen-yogurt-with-tropical-fruit.html http://steamykitchen.com/179-food-column-coconut-frozen-yogurt-with-tropical-fruit.html#comments Fri, 21 Sep 2007 21:27:54 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/2007/09/21/food-column-coconut-frozen-yogurt-with-tropical-fruit/ I haven't been publishing my weekly print food column online - but since so many have asked, I'll be posting the column each week as it comes out. This column is published in this week's issue Creative Loafing in Tampa Bay & Sarasota, Florida. I've published this recipe before on the blog, this is a new photo and I've got a new story to share with you....

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Coconut Frozen Yogurt

I from my food column in Creative Loafing

Co-Co Fro-Yo, Baby

About once every few months, I get an undeniable compulsion to fill my lungs with thick, gritty smog, sit in a three-hour traffic bottleneck and stuff my face with an In-N-Out Double-Double burger. Fifteen years of living in Los Angeles and I just can’t let go! I hate it so much that I love it — like flossing my teeth, the aftertaste of Tequila or certain family members. L.A. is my drug, and I must return to get my fix.

A few months ago I flew back to the City of Angels and immediately noticed that every third person had a blissful, dreamy look while moving a plastic spoon rhythmically from Styrofoam cup to Botox’d lips. It was as if someone had staged a hostile takeover of caffeinated beverages and replaced them with … fro-yo. Huh?! I hated the stuff the first time it came around in the ’80s, so WTF, was frozen yogurt coming back? It was only last week that I saw a Geico commercial featuring Cabbage Patch Kids and a YouTube clip showing Philippine prisoners performing Michael Jackson’s Thriller as part of their rehabilitation program. But fro-yo? Like, gag me with a spoon. For the first time, I felt the umbilical cord of L.A. snag, as if the city was finally getting back at me for choosing to live in the Sunshine State.

Despite all this, I asked my brother to take me to a Pinkberry, the company that started the Frozen Yogurt 2.0 craze a couple of years ago. What was behind the phenomenon that had copycats such as Red Mango, Iceberry and Kiwiberry popping up like prairie weasels? What kind of frozen concoction could start a war so heated chilled that cameras were banned in the shops for fear of corporate espionage?

I had to find out.

A half-hour wait in line and one parking ticket later, I had a $7 cup-o’-fro-yo in hand. It was tart and tangy with a clean, crisp sensation — nothing at all like its airy, tasteless predecessor. Crackberry describes itself as “soft swirls of chilly bliss with a distinct pouty peak.” They forget to mention the free spoon-pipe you get with every purchase. The craze hasn’t wound its way down to us in Florida yet — it’s currently blanketing Chicago, Las Vegas and New York — but don’t worry, I’ve got you covered: Here’s a recipe that tastes just like Pinkberry’s famous frozen yogurt. Try it for yourself and you might just get smitten by fro-yo, all over again.

Recipe is adapted from Perfect Scoop <–which by the way is written by fellow food blogger David. If you’ve never visited his website before..then…. STOP. Collaborate and Listen. Go visit D’s blog for a brand new sensation… Ice Ice Fro-Yo Baby. Fro-Yo Baby…. sorry. I couldn’t help it. I’m still stuck on the 80’s thing….

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Coconut Frozen Yogurt with Tropical Fruit

Servings: Prep Time: Cook Time:
Screen Shot 2014-02-26 at 11.03.30 AM

Ingredients:

6 cups of low-fat/whole plain flavored yogurt to yield 3 cups, strained (see below) or 3 cups Greek-style yogurt
3/4 cup sugar
1 tsp coconut extract
1/2 cup sweetened coconut flakes
mixed tropical fruit (mango, kiwi, papaya, etc.)
Ice cream maker (remember to freeze your insert if you have one)

Directions:

1. Strain the yogurt: If you are using regular yogurt, you'll need to strain out the water. Line your mesh strainer with a double-layer of cheesecloth. Spoon the yogurt in, and let it sit propped over a deep bowl in the refrigerator for at least four hours. Discard the water. If you are using Greek-style yogurt (like Fage -- found at Whole Foods), you don't need to strain.

2. Mix and rest: Mix the strained yogurt with the sugar and coconut extract. Let it chill in the refrigerator for one hour to let the sugar dissolve.

3. Churn, baby, churn: Following instructions that came with your ice cream maker, churn until the mixture is the consistency of soft ice cream.

4. Toast coconut and dice fruit: While the fro-yo is churning, toast coconut. Take a dry skillet. Set on medium heat and add the coconut flakes. Stir constantly until flakes toast to a golden brown. Remove from heat immediately, and set aside. To serve, sprinkle the toasted coconut and spoon the diced tropical fruit on top of your frozen concoction.

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German Oven Pancakes Recipe – Sunday Morning Family Tradition http://steamykitchen.com/131-sunday-morning-family-tradition-german-oven-pancakes-2.html http://steamykitchen.com/131-sunday-morning-family-tradition-german-oven-pancakes-2.html#comments Wed, 04 Jul 2007 01:05:37 +0000 http://s198136598.onlinehome.us/blog/2007/07/03/sunday-morning-family-tradition-german-oven-pancakes-2/ Recipe for our Sunday Morning Family Tradition - German Oven Pancake

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gGerman Oven Pancake Recipe

I’m Chinese, born in Hong Kong. My husband, Scott, is Scottish-German, born in Buffalo, New York. Boy oh boy, our kids are insanely lucky! Not only do they get red envelopes full of money during Chinese New Year, but they also score big time on Halloween, Lunar Festival, Christmas, birthdays, Dragon Festival and Easter.

German Oven Pancake Recipe

Neither Scott nor I are overly religious (meaning, if I was in deep-shit, praying “Dear God” probably wouldn’t get past His screener.) We decided early on that perhaps we could skirt around the religious aspect of holidays and Sundays by creating meaning through special family rituals that we celebrated when we were kids. For example, hand-knitting our Christmas stockings, eating long-life noodles for birthdays and baking pumpkin-shaped cookies from a cutter made by PaPa.

Family traditions, passed on from generation to generation are more meaningful than just chocolate Easter bunnies, a Santa who picks the lock at our front door and prancing around the neighborhood dressed as Elvis or Elvira.

German Oven Pancakes

Our little kids, who are 2 1/2 years old and 4 years old, don’t fully understand the meaning of “tradition” quite yet, but they know that every Sunday morning is reserved for German Oven Pancakes. It’s an incredibly easy recipe that even the youngest can help out with. Go ahead, ditch the electric mixer and make this by hand in a big glass bowl and a whisk.

german-oven-pancakes

Instead of cooking individual pancakes on the stovetop, the entire batch of batter bakes in a skillet. Since our kids make the whole thing – from beginning to end, we really never know what shape will emerge- sometimes the German Oven Pancake is flat with a high curved edge, sometimes it has puffs, valleys and crevices perfect for hiding chocolate chips.

German Oven Pancakes Recipe

We all gather in front of the oven window and watch the German Oven Pancake rise and form. The edges are light and crisp, perfectly browned. We usually top it with in season fruits, slather it with whipped cream and eat it right out of the skillet, tearing pieces with our hands. My older son, Andrew, loves the golden edges while Nathan goes straight for the soft pillows in the middle. It’s our Sunday morning family tradition and hopefully, it will be one that will be passed on for many more generations to come.

Straight out of the oven: it can come out with a giant puff in the middle:

german-oven-pancake

or a German Oven Pancake with really super-high sides:

German Oven Pancake: Family Tradition

but either way, the German Oven Pancake is really YUMMY!

German Oven Pancake

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German Oven Pancakes Recipe

Servings: Prep Time: Cook Time:
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Ingredients:

1/2 cup of all-purpose flour, sifted
3 eggs, lightly beaten
1/2 cup milk
2 tablespoons melted butter
1 tablespoon sugar
1/4 teaspoon of salt

Directions:

Preheat oven to 450F. If you have a convection oven, set it at 425F - the pancakes rise even higher on the convection setting.

Lightly beat eggs in a large bowl. Stir in the milk, melted butter, salt and sugar. Gradually add flour to egg mixture, a spoonful at a time. Have your child help you by spooning the flour in while you whisk by hand. Make sure the flour is well incorporated in the batter with no lumps, but do not over-mix, as you want to keep the pancake light.

Lightly spray a 9"-11" oven-safe skillet with cooking spray. Pour batter in the skillet. Bake 12-18 minutes, just until the edges are golden. Check your pancake at the 12 minute mark. It's fun to turn on the oven light and watch the pancake form!

Note: Try experimenting with different pans and skillets - just as long as you use something at least 9" wide and oven-safe. You could also divide the batter into two smaller pans and have them bake side by side and see which one rises higher. Just make sure that your oven rack is in the middle position or lower. Top with fruit granola, yogurt, powdered sugar, syrup, toasted almonds or fruit butters. Drizzle with caramel, chocolate syrup, honey or maple syrup.


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Other recipes that my kids love:

Spam Fried Rice Spam Fried Rice

French Bread The Perfect Loaf of French Bread

Baby Back Ribs Baby Back Ribs with Asian Orange Ginger Glaze

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Look who won the Szechuan Peppercorn contest!

LPC- email me your address! jan (at) steamykitchen (dot) com

The post German Oven Pancakes Recipe – Sunday Morning Family Tradition appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

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