Steamy Kitchen Recipes | RSS Feed http://steamykitchen.com Steamy Kitchen Food Blog: fast recipes, simple recipes, with fresh ingredients to create delicious meals. Fri, 24 Jul 2015 17:57:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.3 Thai Pork Chops in Ginger Coconut Sauce http://steamykitchen.com/32921-thai-pork-chops-in-ginger-coconut-sauce-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/32921-thai-pork-chops-in-ginger-coconut-sauce-recipe-video.html#comments Thu, 27 Mar 2014 16:36:33 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=32921 My husband has only a couple of hobbies, but my oh my, he did choose them well. What I mean to say, is that HIS hobbies benefits ME directly.  It’s a selfish way to look at things, but he could have chosen silly things like NASCAR, model rocket building or golfing — none of which have any side perks that ...

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Thai Pork Chops in Ginger Coconut Sauce Recipe

My husband has only a couple of hobbies, but my oh my, he did choose them well. What I mean to say, is that HIS hobbies benefits ME directly.  It’s a selfish way to look at things, but he could have chosen silly things like NASCAR, model rocket building or golfing — none of which have any side perks that funnel towards my way.

So hurray to my amazing husband for choosing growing food, building a grow house and for shooting wild hogs. See? Direct benefits. I’ll never leave him.

Yummy Thai Pork Chops in Ginger Coconut Sauce

My freezer has been bare of wild hog for the past couple of years – Scott and his friend, Shawn, lost their usual location where they were shooting the hogs. But recently, they scored another.

Sidenote #1: I technically can’t say “hunting” since the guys really aren’t perched up in some tree waiting for a random hog to appear – but rather they bait the hogs with an automatic feeder and infrared camera. Then they hide in the bushes and shoot. Quite easy targets.)

Sidenote #2: Shooting the wild hogs are a good thing. They are everywhere, destroying property and reproducing at a crazy rate second only to horny rabbits in a cage. They’re an environmental hazard, since they aren’t native to Florida and seem to destroy everything. They’re like hungry bulldozers.

Surprisingly, the meat is not gamey. It’s the best meat in the world. No chemicals, no antibiotics, all natural, organic, free-roaming….damn good pork.

Healthy Thai Pork Chops in Ginger Coconut Sauce

60 Recipes for Living High on the HogWith my friend, Ray Lampe’s new book, Pork Chop: 60 Recipes for Living High on the Hog, we’ve been having fun playing with porky recipes.

Ray Lampe's bookRay lives close by, and I’m lucky enough to see him a couple of times a year. He’s quite possibly the most entertaining friend I have. For some odd reason, women are attracted to men who cook, especially BBQ. And somehow, Ray is always in the middle of it all.

Ray’s book features creative recipes, all celebrating the pork chop:

Pork Chop Noodle Soup (homemade pork stock, pasta, thyme, basil)
Pork Chop Carnitas (garlic, jalapeño, lime, orange)
Broiled Pork Chop with Pineapple Chutney
Buffalo Hot Chop Sandwiches (blue cheese, Frank’s Red Hot Sauce, buns)
Arroz con Peurco Chops (saffron, bell pepper, garlic, onion, rice)
Pork Chops Saltimbocca (prosciutto, sage, white wine)

Ray’s original recipe for the dish I’ve cooked is Thai Pork Chops in Banana Leaves – I’ve modified the recipe to be sans banana leaves, since it can be difficult to find fresh banana leaves at the market. I’ve also added more vegetables to make it a complete meal once served over rice. Such wonderful flavors! If you love Thai food, this is a super easy recipe to make. It’s not spicy (though you can add more chili sauce if you’d like!)

Buy Ray’s book: Pork Chop: 60 Recipes for Living High On the Hog

Thai Pork Chops in Ginger Coconut Sauce Recipe Video

 

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Thai Pork Chops with Ginger Coconut Sauce Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes
Thai Pork Chops in Ginger Coconut Sauce Recipe

Adapted from Pork Chop: 60 Recipes for Living High on the Hog by Ray Lampe. I've used my homemade 20-minute Sriracha sauce (http://www.steamykitchen.com/31539-20-minute-sriracha-sauce-recipe-video.html)

Ingredients:

4 pork chops, about 3/4 inch thick
salt and pepper
1 can coconut milk
1 tablespoon fish sauce
1 teaspoon soy sauce
1 tablespoon lime juice
1 teaspoon Thai chili sauce (optional)
1 teaspoon sugar
2 tablespoons cooking oil, divided
1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger
2 garlic cloves, finely minced
1/2 red onion, sliced
1 red bell pepper, sliced
2 tomatoes, cut into 8 wedges each
1 handful cilantro, chopped

Directions:

1. Season both sides of each pork chop with salt and pepper.

2. Prepare the sauce: In a large bowl, whisk the coconut milk, fish sauce, soy sauce, lime juice, chili sauce and sugar until it is smooth and creamy.

3. In a large sauté pan over high heat, add cooking oil and swirl to coat the bottom of the pan. When the pan is very hot, add the pork chops and sear both sides, about 2 minutes each side. Remove the pork chops when they are about halfway cooked through and set aside.

4. Add the remaining of the cooking oil to the pan and swirl to coat. Add onions, pepper and tomatoes and saute for about a minute. Add the garlic and ginger and cook for another minute, until the ingredients become fragrant. Pour the coconut milk mixture into the pan and stir all to combine. Bring to a simmer and then turn the heat to medium.

5. Nestle the half-cooked pork chops into the sauce. Cook for 2-3 minutes, or until the pork chops are cooked just a shade of blush pink in the center and the sauce has thickened. Serve immediately, spooning sauce and vegetables over the pork chops.

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Wasabi Shrimp with Avocado on Rice Cracker http://steamykitchen.com/27098-wasabi-shrimp-avocado-cracker-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/27098-wasabi-shrimp-avocado-cracker-recipe-video.html#comments Tue, 11 Jun 2013 14:37:54 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=27098 If you’re not familiar with Gaby from What’s Gaby Cooking, let me give you a little introduction. Gaby LOVES avocado (we were in Mexico a couple of times together and she snarfed an entire bowl of guacamole the size of a soccer ball in one sitting!), is the only woman I know who can look totally glamorous in 95F Austin heat ...

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Wasabi Shrimp with Avocado on Rice Cracker Recipe

If you’re not familiar with Gaby from What’s Gaby Cooking, let me give you a little introduction. Gaby LOVES avocado (we were in Mexico a couple of times together and she snarfed an entire bowl of guacamole the size of a soccer ball in one sitting!), is the only woman I know who can look totally glamorous in 95F Austin heat at an outdoor bbq and Gaby is FUN. Loads of fun. You can’t help but be goofy around her!

Screen Shot 2013-06-10 at 2.45.17 PM

Left to right, that’s me (dork), Elise & Guy of Simply Recipes, Gaby and Catherine of Weelicious.

Screen Shot 2013-06-10 at 2.50.30 PMGaby’s brand new book, Absolutely Avocadoes just came out. If you’re a fan of the avocado, this is a must-get book. There are recipes for breakfast, lunch, dinner and even dessert.

Avocado in dessert!? Yep – Avocado Chocolate Chip Cookies and Pound Cake with Avocado!

I’ve made one of her recipes from the book – Gaby’s original recipe used sushi tuna on the rice cracker, but I’ve substituted with pre-cooked salad shrimp from the market. It’s the perfect finger-food for avocado lovers, like me.

 

 

Wasabi Shrimp with Avocado on Rice Cracker Recipe

 

Wasabi Shrimp with Avocado on Rice Cracker Video

Want to know how to make these fun curly green onions?

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Wasabi Shrimp with Avocado on Rice Cracker

Servings: 8 Prep Time: 5 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes
shrimp-avocado-bites-featured-9227

A quick 15 minute appetizer featuring avocado! Adapted from Gaby Dalkin's Absolutely Avocados cookbook.

Feel free to use sushi-grade ahi tuna instead of the shrimp.

Ingredients:

1 stalk green onion, green part only
1 tablespoon soy sauce
2 teaspoons sesame seeds
1 teaspoon prepared wasabi paste (or more)
1/4 teaspoon sesame oil salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
1/2 pound cooked shrimp, peeled, deveined and chopped
1/2 stalk green onions, chopped thinly
1/4 red pepper or red chili, finely minced
2 ripe avocados 1/2 lime, squeezed
24 rice crackers

Directions:

In a bowl, add a handful of ice cubes and cold water to cover. With a small or medium sharp knife, cut green onion stalks into 3" lengths. Slice the green onion lengthwise into long thin strips, as thin as possible (see video). Place green onion slivers into ice water. Set aside while you continue with rest of recipe.

In a bowl, whisk together the soy sauce, sesame seeds, wasabi, sesame oil, salt and pepper. Add in the cooked shrimp, green onion and red pepper and toss to coat. Cut the avocados in half lengthwise. Remove the pit from the avocado and discard. Remove the avocado from the skin and place the avocado into a separate bowl. Add in the lime juice and use a fork to mash the avocado.

Spread avocado on each cracker. Top with a spoonful of the wasabi shrimp. Garnish with green onion curls.

Want to know how to make these fun curly green onions

 

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Cod in Garlic-Ginger Broth http://steamykitchen.com/24195-cod-in-garlic-ginger-broth-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/24195-cod-in-garlic-ginger-broth-recipe-video.html#comments Mon, 14 Jan 2013 16:00:00 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=24195 I first met Melissa d’Arabian in Iowa during the winter. Why would a flip-flop wearing Florida gal travel to Iowa in January? It was a meeting to discuss bacon. I never miss meetings about bacon. Even in Iowa during winter! On the way home, Melissa and I sat across from each other on the plane. We were so engaged in animated ...

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Melissa d'Arabian's Ten Dollar Dinners on AmazonI first met Melissa d’Arabian in Iowa during the winter. Why would a flip-flop wearing Florida gal travel to Iowa in January?

It was a meeting to discuss bacon. I never miss meetings about bacon. Even in Iowa during winter! :-)

On the way home, Melissa and I sat across from each other on the plane. We were so engaged in animated conversation — it turns out we both talk not just with our hands, but apparently our entire arms, shoulders and head, too, because we kept bumping into the beverage cart!

Her Ten Dollar Dinners Cookbook came in the mail a couple of weeks ago and I love her approach to budget meals. Each meal for a family costs $10 or less.

We made the Cod in Garlic-Ginger Broth with Shiitake Mushrooms with a few tweaks. It’s light, healthy and the broth is warm and gingery.

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cod in garlic ginger broth recipe video

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Cod in Garlic-Ginger Broth

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 15 minutes Cook Time: 20 minutes
cod-in-garlic-ginger-broth-featured-9948.jpg

Dashi is a Japanese broth, used in place of chicken or vegetable broth, and is made of dried bonito flakes and kelp. It's the basis of most Japanese soups, sauces and braises. If you like miso soup, then you'll love dashi, as it's a what's used as the broth base! There are 2 ways to make dashi: the long way and the 30-second way. I choose the easy route - and use instant dashi, which comes in a concentrate form or granules that dissolve in water. Look for dashi in the Asian section of the market. If you don't want to use dashi, substitute with vegetable broth in the recipe.

Ingredients:

1/2 yellow onion, finely diced
1 1/2 teaspoons grated fresh ginger (use a rasp grater)
1 garlic clove, through a garlic press
1 teaspoon cooking oil
2 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce
3 cups dashi (see note above) or vegetable broth
1 teaspoon lime juice
1 (12-ounce) piece cod, skin removed
8 shiitake mushrooms, stems removed, caps thinly sliced
1 carrot, peeled and sliced into thin matchsticks (or 1 handful of matchstick-cut carrots)
3 scallions (white and green parts), finely chopped
2 tablespoons fresh cilantro, roughly chopped

Directions:

Heat a wok or large saute pan over medium-low heat. Immediately add in the onion, ginger and garlic. Stir constantly and cook slowly for 3 minutes, until the onion is softened and all the aromatics are fragrant. Take care not to burn them!

Stir in the soy sauce, dashi and lime juice. Place the cod fillet in the wok and turn the heat to medium. Cover and let the fish cook slowly, making sure that the broth stays at a bare simmer. Cook for 8 minutes. Uncover and stir in the shiitake mushrooms, carrots and green onions. Cover again and cook an additional 2 minutes or until cod flakes easily at thickest part. Top with cilantro and serve immediately.

 

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Hainanese Chicken Rice Recipe http://steamykitchen.com/5068-hainanese-chicken-rice.html http://steamykitchen.com/5068-hainanese-chicken-rice.html#comments Fri, 21 Aug 2009 01:58:34 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=5068 Recipe with step by step photos for Hainanese Chicken Rice and soup.

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Hainanese Chicken Rice Recipe

What you’ll learn:

  • Choosing the right chicken for your Hainanese Chicken Rice
  • How to cook the perfect Hainanese Chicken
  • The best way to prepare Hainanese Rice
  • Preparing Chilli dipping sauce for Hainanese Chicken Rice

Hi there! Please welcome guest writer (and Steamy Kitchen intern) Jess from  Jess’s Many Mini Adventures in Food and Farming. She’s an amazing, passionate gal who loves food as much as I do. She’s here to share her family’s Hainanese Chicken Rice Recipe.

-Jaden

Hey all,

Jess here, Steamy Kitchen’s new intern. That’s me chewing on a mango in my tiny kitchen preparing for a meal at Synergy Farm (a farm on an island!) where I intern at. I’m actually in my kitchen right now on my lunch break, looking out at the barn and the carrots in the north garden, IMG_2877munching on a quesadilla with beet greens and feeling amazed all over again at how I ended up here, on a farm, writing to all of you wonderful readers!

I’ve been here since late March, just after my 24th birthday. Before that, I was living in Cambodia helping girls get an education; before Cambodia, I was working at Google, and waaaaaay back before then (well not so long ago, actually) I ran an afterschool program in the bay area. I love adventure, and I love to consider the small ways I can change the world for the better, and over the past few years, I’ve become convinced that my way of making my world better is through food.

Growing up in Orange County, California, I never thought much about where my In-N-Out Burger or spicy tuna roll came from. Every since I was 4 years old perched on a kitchen stool, stirring up Betty Crocker, I’ve always been in love with food: cooking it, eating it, playing with it. I love cooking with friends; chopping veggies gives me a high like no other; but it was only recently that I’ve become fascinated with how our food is grown, processed and distributed to us and also how it affects our health, our environment and our communities. I figured it made sense to get down in the dirt and learn more about these issues firsthand, so I became an apprentice on a small organic farm in the beautiful San Juan Islands.

So what’s all this got to do with blogging? The food blogging community has been a way for me to connect with other people who think and care about food as much as I do. I’m completely inspired by all the amazing folks out there sharing their recipes and opinions and lives. Jaden’s agreed to transmit some of her samurai skills in cooking and food writing to me so I can join in the fun.

All this food love had to come from somewhere, and I tend to attribute a lot of it to good genes. My mum’s side of the family is Singaporean and I grew up in a whirlwind of popiah, freshly baked curry puffs, and beef rendang. Though I’m open to all kinds of cuisines, I hold a special place in my heart for a good plate of chili crab or chicken satay.

When I was small my family made many trips to my grandparents’ house back in Singapore. Early in the mornings, before it got unbearably hot, my grandpa would head down to the local hawker center (a food court with lots of different stalls) to pick up breakfast. He would come back to the house with a bag full of packets wrapped in banana leaves, still hot, shiny with oil, and intensely fragrant. We’d each carefully unwrap our packet, uncover the pieces of tender, perfectly steamed chicken on top of savory rice. We’d tuck in to the fragrant ginger-garlic-chickeny heaven, topped in our favorite combinations of magical sauces and eat till we were ready to face the sticky tropical day.

These days you can still find Hainanese chicken rice in hawker centers across the island for a couple of dollars a plate, and also in high-end restaurants serving up authentic cuisine. This is what a hawker center looks like — like a mall food court, only with mee goreng and peanut soup instead of Sbarro!

Hainanese Chicken Rice Recipe - Singaporean Hawker

Hainanese Chicken Rice often called Singapore’s national dish. When I was a kid and my family would go back to visit Singapore, I had three loves: fried bananas, paratha, and chicken rice. When I was visiting family last November, it was one of the first things they took me to eat — the carcasses in the stall beckoned to me with the promise of super-fresh tender chicken — some things just don’t change.

Hainanese Chicken Rice Recipe - Singaporean Hawker

Hainanese Chicken Rice Recipe - Authentic Singaporean Dish

Though Hainanese Chicken Rice gets its name from its origins in Hainan, China, it was really when overseas Chinese brought the dish to Singapore that it got a new personality and became famous.

According to my mom, this recipe is really only authentic when made with a “kampong” chicken, which means basically, a chicken from the village: the kind that roam around in the sun and eat whatever grubs and grass and scraps of rice are available. These kinds of chickens look pretty skinny by our standards, but they have an amazing flavor that I can only describe as “extremely chickeny.”

Here on the farm, we raise the closest equivalent to a “kampong” chicken that you’ll likely find in the US — not as scrawny, but pretty much as delicious. Our chickens are organically fed and pasture-raised, which means they get to spend their days outside, hanging out in the sun, roam in the grass, pecking at greens and grubs. We raise about 120 in each batch and they take about 8 weeks to go from chick to chicken rice. As my mentor, Farmer Susan likes to say, these chickens live a really really good life and then have one really bad day. They are ridiculously good just boiled plain in a pot of water and salted slightly.

IMG_2592

All that good care makes these chickens more pricey than your average bird and on a farmer’s salary, it’s tough to afford them, but thankfully in our chicken processing just a couple weeks ago, I was able to snag a couple of tiny 2-pounders that we wouldn’t be able to sell, that were just perfect for chicken rice.

Hello guys and gals, it’s Jaden back again – Jess gave me her recipe for Hainanese Chicken Rice and I made it to show you step by step instructions! It’s a multi-step recipe, with 4 components:

1) Chicken
2) Rice
3) Chili Dipping Sauce

oh yes, the soup too, but you don’t really have to do much other ladle into the bowls.

So, let’s start with the CHICKEN.

How to cook Hainanese Chicken

This is an organic supermarket chicken (I wish we were all as lucky as Jess to be able to have fresh chicken!) Here’s the deal about the chicken. You gotta buy the best. Because this Hainanese Chicken Rice dish is all about the pure taste of the chicken, you really want to go with organic. It’s worth the money for your health, the environment and taste buds.

When you buy a whole chicken and are cooking it skin-on, and ESPECIALLY if you’re steaming or poaching the thing, you want to make sure you get the “nasties” off.

Hainanese Chicken Rice Recipe - Step by step photos

I’m sure by looking at this photo you know what I mean. What I’m after is smooth, unblemished skin.

So I give my guy a facial.

Yes, I’m totally serious!

I exfoliate my chicken.

Wow, I can’t believe I just confessed to you that I give my chickens a spa treatment. Please don’t think I’m strange! Please tell me that you do this too!??????

Start with a small handful of kosher salt. Regular table salt is too fine to use to exfoliate. Sea salt is too expensive. Just use kosher salt. Oh and even if you don’t have that loose skin on your chicken, it doesn’t mean you don’t need to exfoliate — there’s still hidden guck and yuck that is trapped in that chicken skin. TRUST ME. Your chicken will look and taste better this way.

Hainanese Chicken Rice Recipe - Rub chicken with salt

Now RUB RUB RUB!!

Be gone wrinkles!

Be gone trapped guck!

Be gone dead skin! <- yes, I know that sounded ridiculous on so many levels.

Work those pores!

Hainanese Chicken Rice Recipe - Rub chicken with salt

Rinse, pat dry and ta-da!!!

Glistening.

Glowing.

Soft.

Smooth.

Taut.

Chicken.

Hainanese Chicken Rice Recipe - Step by step photos

Check those lovely pores.

Hainanese Chicken Rice Recipe - Step by step photos

Season the inside and outside the chicken with salt and stuff the bird with ginger and green onions. Remember, you are not only seasoning the chicken, but also the poaching water too, so be generous with the salt. I generally double the amount of salt that I would normally use on a chicken. I’ll show you how much water we’re adding in a sec.

Hainanese Chicken Rice Recipe - Stuff chicken with ginger and green onions

Put it in a big pot and fill with water to just cover by 1 inch. Note that some of the stuffing might fall out. Which is totally okay. Don’t worry.

Hainanese Chicken Rice Recipe - Put chicken in big pot and fill with water

Bring that baby to a boil and then immediately turn the heat to low to keep a simmer. You’ll begin to see some of that scum. Now hey, if we didn’t exfoliate our chicken, I bet that scum would be a lot browner. I have a handy dandy scum skimmer. If you don’t have a scum skimmer, buy one, it’s only $2!

Hainanese Chicken Rice Recipe - Boil chicken with stuffings

After simmering on the lowest heat (just enough for little tiny bubbles to break surface) and your chicken reaches the correct temp (take the chicken temperature at the thickest part of the thigh that’s not touching bone, it should read 170F). This is is done!

Hainanese Chicken Rice Recipe - Boil chicken with stuffings

Prepare an ice bath and immediately lift the chicken out of the pot with 2 big slotted spoons or 2 big fat spatulas.

Here’s a tip. Don’t try to grab the chicken legs to pull the chicken out. You’ll end up tearing the skin and heh, maybe even tearing the drumsticks outta the chicken which results in you standing there holding two drumsticks and the rest of the chicken plopping back into the boiling hot broth which then splashes back on your arms and face. Speaking from experience, of course.

Oh, and don’t even THINK about pouring that clean, delicious broth down the sink! We’ll be using that to cook the rice, prepare the sauce and to drink as soup! So, remember, gently lift the chicken out from under and try not to disturb its delicate (and exfoliated!) skin.

My pot of ice water wasn’t big enough, but it worked, I just turned the chicken over a few times to make sure both sides were cooled. Why are we doing this, you ask!? Ha! I thought you’d never ask. Well let me tell ya. Plunging in an ice bath stops the cooking process immediately AND tightens the skin, making it springy and firm. The quality of the chicken skin is important in this dish! It’s all about the skin texture.

Hainanese Chicken Rice Recipe - Plunge chicken in ice bath

See here? That’s your soup! Season with salt if necessary.

Hainanese Chicken Rice Recipe - Step by step photos

How to cook Hainanese Rice

I use Jasmine rice, or long grained rice. Of course, feel free to sub with whatever rice you want, but I prefer Jasmine white rice. I’m using 2 cups of rice. Rinse the rice grains several times in water to get rid of excess starch and other rice cling-ons. Then let the rice soak in water for 10 minutes.

Hainanese Chicken Rice Recipe - Hainanese Rice

Drain the rice completely, as much as possible.

Grab a pot and saute the garlic and the ginger. Mmmm…can you smell that??

Hainanese Chicken Rice Recipe - Hainanese Rice

Add the drained rice to the pot.

Hainanese Chicken Rice Recipe - Hainanese Rice

Fry the rice grains for a couple of minutes…this gives the rice SO much flavor! I like to add a bit of salt to the rice if the broth isn’t already salted.

Hainanese Chicken Rice Recipe - Hainanese Rice

Remember that broth? Well, pour 2 cups of this into the pot. Normally when cooking rice, I’d go with a ratio of 1 cup rice : 1.25 cups water/broth. But since we’ve already soaked the rice and the rice has absorbed some of the water, I’m going with 1:1. Bring the rice to a boil, then immediately turn the heat to low, cover tightly and cook for 15 minutes. Remove from heat and let rest (still covered! no peeking!) for 5-10 more minutes. Done.

Oh, if you have a rice cooker, even better! After sauteing the garlic, ginger, rice – just add that into your rice cooker with the broth.

Hainanese Chicken Rice Recipe - Hainanese Rice

Perfect rice.

Hainanese Chicken Rice Recipe - Hainanese Rice

Chili Sauce for Hainanese Chicken Rice

If you’re a fan of sriracha chili sauce, this will knock your socks off. Jess puts sriracha, lime, sugar, salt, couple tablespoons of that lovely chicken broth, garlic and ginger into a blender and wheeeeeee:

Hainanese Chicken Rice Recipe - Chilli Sauce

Voila….Jess’s Hainanese Chicken Rice:

Hainanese Chicken Rice Recipe - Garnish with cucumber and cilantro

Enjoy!

Hainanese Chicken Rice Recipe

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Hainanese Chicken Rice Recipe

Servings: 6 Prep Time: 20 minutes Cook Time: 1 hour
hainanese-chicken-lg-691

While your chicken is cooking, it helps to prepare the ingredients for your chili sauce and rice. Both of these are usually assembled after the chicken is done because they require the chicken broth, but you can get started washing and soaking the rice, chopping the garlic and ginger before then. In this recipe, all of the poaching broth is reserved -- some is used in the rice, a small amount is used in the chili sauce, and the remainder is saved to be heated and served as a simple soup to accompany the chicken.

Ingredients:

1 whole chicken (3.5 lbs, 1.8kg), preferably organic
kosher salt
4'' section of fresh ginger, in 1/4'' slices
2 stalks green onions, cut into 1" sections (both the green and white parts)
1 teaspoon sesame oilFOR THE RICE
2 tablespoon chicken fat or 2 tbsp vegetable oil
3 cloves garlic, finely minced
1'' section of ginger, finely minced
2 cups long-grain uncooked rice, washed and soaked in cool water for 10 min or longer
2 cups reserved chicken poaching broth
1/2 teaspoon sesame oil
1 teaspoon kosher saltFOR THE CHILI SAUCE
1 tablespoon lime juice
2 tablespoon reserved chicken poaching broth
2 teaspoon sugar
4 tablespoon sriracha chili sauce
4 cloves garlic
1'' ginger
a generous pinch of salt, to tasteFOR THE TABLE
1/4 cup dark soy sauce
Few sprigs cilantro
1 cucumber, thinly sliced or cut into bite-sized chunks

Directions:

1. To clean the chicken, with a small handful of kosher salt, rub the chicken all over, getting rid of any loose skin and dirt. Rinse chicken well, inside and outside. Season generously with salt inside and outside. Stuff the chicken with the ginger slices and the green onion. Place the chicken in a large stockpot and fill with cold water to cover by 1 inch. Bring the pot to a boil over high heat, then immediately turn the heat to low to keep a simmer. Cook for about 30 minutes more (less if you're using a smaller chicken). Check for doneness by sticking a chopstick into the flesh under the leg and see if the juices run clear or insert a thermometer into the thickest part of the thigh not touching bone. It should read 170F.

2. When the chicken is cooked through, turn off the heat and remove the pot from the burner. Immediately lift and transfer the chicken into a bath of ice water to cool and discard the ginger and green onion. Don't forget to reserve the poaching broth for your rice, your sauce, and the accompanying soup. The quick cooling will stop the cooking process, keeping the meat soft and tender, and giving the skin a lovely firm texture.

3. To cook the rice: Drain the rice. In a wok or sauce pan (use a medium sauce pan if you plan on cooking the rice on the stove top), heat 2 tablespoons of cooking oil over medium-high heat. When hot, add the ginger and the garlic and fry until your kitchen smells like heaven. Be careful not to burn the aromatics! Add in your drained rice and stir to coat, cook for 2 minutes. Add the sesame oil, mix well.

To make the rice on the stove: In the same sauce pan, add 2 cups of your reserved poaching broth, add salt and bring to a boil. Immediately turn the heat down to low, cover the pot and cook for 15 minutes. Remove from heat and let sit (with lid still on) for 5-10 minutes more.

To cook rice in a rice cooker: Pour aromatics and rice (after frying) into your rice cooker, add 2 1/2 cups of your reserved poaching broth and salt. Follow the instructions for your model (usually this will just mean "turn it on!")

4. While your rice is cooking, remove the chicken from the ice bath and rub the outside of the chicken with the sesame oil. Carve the chicken for serving.

5. To make the chili sauce: Blend your chili sauce ingredients in a blender until smooth and bright red.

6. To make the soup: You should have six or seven cups of the reserved poaching broth left over to serve as soup. Just before serving, heat up the soup, taste and season with salt as necessary.

Serve the chicken rice with chili sauce, dark soy sauce, cucumber slices, and a bowl of hot broth garnished with cilantro or scallions

More Recipes to Explore:

Chinese Boiled Peanuts Recipe (Steamy Kitchen)

Chinese Spring Rolls with Chicken Recipe (Steamy Kitchen)

Aged Sriracha Hot Sauce Recipe (Steamy Kitchen)

Sichuan Red Oil Wontons (Rasa Malaysia)

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Red Lantern Crisp Parcels (Cha Gio or Spring Rolls) http://steamykitchen.com/2456-vietnamese-spring-rolls.html http://steamykitchen.com/2456-vietnamese-spring-rolls.html#comments Sat, 07 Feb 2009 20:42:48 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/?p=2456 A fabulous recipe for Vietnamese Spring Rolls (Cha Gio) from award-winning author Pauline Nguyen of Secrets of the Red Lantern.

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Photo of Vietnamese Spring Rolls (Cha Gio) courtesy of Secrets of the Red Lantern Cookbook! It’s gorgeous!

secrets-red-lanternOne of the books that is always near my nighstand is the absolutely stunning Secrets of the Red Lantern by Pauline Nguyen. I was in Los Angeles at the famous Cook’s Libarary bookstore and was drawn in by the gorgeous cover artwork. I picked up the volumous 345 page book and simply could not put it down. No, seriously, I did not let this baby out of my sight the rest of the trip and even chose to pack my laptop in my suitcase and instead brought Secrets of the Red Lantern in my carry-on baggage.

Baby, that’s true love.

I got a chance to chat with the lovely Pauline Nguyen last night and just couldn’t wait to share her recipe for Vietnamese Spring Rolls or Cha Gio with you. At her restaurant, Red Lantern, this dish is called “Red Lantern Crisp Parcels.”

Secrets of the Red Lantern book is part cookbook, part bittersweet memoir of the Nguyen family’s escape from war-ravaged Vietnam and their struggles as they adapt to the harsh refugee life and finally making their lives in Australia. Pauline bares her soul in this debut book – it will make you smile, laugh, cry and even fume with anger. There are links at end of post to others who have written fabulous reviews of her book, so I won’t go in much detail here, but I wanted to give you a glimpse of Pauline, mom of Mia and soon to be mom of baby #2. Oh yes, and to give you her recipe for Vietnamese Spring Rolls too!

Pauline Nguyen, author of Secrets of the Red Lantern

pauline-nguyen-secrets-red-lantern

Pauline lives in Australia and I live in Florida, so you can imagine the very thin snippet of the day where our two schedules can meet for an uninterrupted phone call! Luckily, I’m a total night owl and call her 12:30AM my time, which was 4:30PM her time. And guess where she took my call?

Summer.

35C/95F degrees

Beach.

Sydney, Australia.

Ooooh….I wanted to be right there on the beach with her! Oh yeah.

Pauline Nguyen took two years off from the busy restaurant business (oh yes, Red Lantern is the name of her restaurant she owns with her brother Luke and partner Mark) to write this book, and she penned this memoir as a heirloom for her now 4-year old daughter, Mia.

More on my phone chat with Pauline Nguyen in another post (and yes, another recipe from her book in the next post too). In the meantime, enjoy her recipe for Vietnamese Spring Rolls (Cha Gio).

mother-famous-chinese-egg-rolls-recipeIf you’d like to learn step by step photo instructions on how to roll the Vietnamese Spring Rolls correctly – come see the recipe of My Mother’s Famous Chinese Egg Rolls.

The Chinese version uses similar wrapper and same wrapping technique, just different filling inside. If you’d like a gluten-free version, use rice paper instead of these Spring Roll or Egg Roll wrappers. These are wonderful fried  as well. Just follow instructions on package of rice paper to use.

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Vietnamese Spring Rolls Recipe (Cha Gio) (Red Lantern Crisp Parcels)

Servings: Makes 40 spring rolls Prep Time: Cook Time:
vietnamese-cha-gio-spring-roll-recipe

From Secrets of the Red Lantern by Pauline Nguyen with recipes by Luke Nguyen and Mark Jensen
These can be cooked and eaten on their own, dipped in dipping fish sauce, or placed on top of a dressed vermicelli salad. At Red Lantern, we like to wrap the parcels in lettuce with herbs and serve with dipping fish sauce.
Note: Be sure you use the spring roll wrappers as soon as they thaw.

Ingredients:

For the Vietnamese Spring Rolls
2 ¾ ounces dried bean thread noodles (or mung bean noodles)
1 ¾ ounces dried mushroom strips, such as wood ear mushrooms or Chinese black fungus
½ pound ground pork
½ pound ground chicken
1 pound carrots, grated
½ onion, finely diced
1 tablespoon sugar
1 tablespoon salt
2 teaspoons fine white pepper
1 tablespoon Asian fish sauce
20 spring (egg) roll wrappers, 8½ inches square
Dipping fish sauce, for serving
**
For the Dipping Sauce Recipe (Nuoc Mam Cham)
3 tablespoons Asian fish sauce
3 tablespoons rice vinegar
2 tablespoons sugar
2 cloves garlic
1 bird's-eye chili
2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lime juice

Directions:

Soak the noodles and mushroom strips separately in cold water for 20 minutes, then drain and drip dry in a colander. Cut the noodles into 1½-inch-long pieces, then combine with all of the filling ingredients in a large bowl and mix well.

Cut the spring roll wrappers diagonally to form two triangles, then separate them into single sheets. Place a piece of wrapper on a plate with the base of the triangle facing you. Spoon about 1 tablespoon of the mixture onto the middle of the bottom edge of the wrapper and fold the two adjacent sides, one on top of the other into the center. Roll toward the apex to form a nice firm roll, and secure with a dab of flour mixed with some water. Repeat until you have filled all of the wrappers.

When freshly rolled, the cha gio can be deep-fried in oil preheated to 350 degrees F or until a cube of bread dropped in the oil browns in 15 seconds. Alternatively, you can store them in the freezer and cook when needed. Just carefully slide frozen spring rolls (do not defrots) in the oil and cook an additional minute or so.

To make the Dipping Sauce (Nuoc Mam Cham)
Combine the fish sauce, rice vinegar, 1/2 cup of water, and sugar in a saucepan and place over medium heat. Stir well and cook until just before boiling point is reached, then allow to cool. To serve, finely chop the garlic and chile and stir in the lime juice. To liven it up, add pickled vegetables.Combine the fish sauce, rice vinegar, 1/2 cup of water, and sugar in a saucepan and place over medium heat. Stir well and cook until just before boiling point is reached, then allow to cool. To serve, finely chop the garlic and chile and stir in the lime juice. To liven it up, add pickled vegetables.

***

Reviews on Pauline Nguyen’s Secrets of the Red Lantern Cookbook

White On Rice Couple – plus recipe for Tamarind Crab and Tamarind Shrimp

In Mama’s Kitchen review

Global Gourmet – plus recipe for Steamed Cockles or Periwinkle, Bittermelon Stuffed with Pork and Black Fungus, Wok-tossed Water Spinach
with Fermented Bean Curd Sauce

and of course good ‘ol Amazon.com where you can purchase the Secrets of the Red Lantern book.

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Thai Curry Beef Skewers + Guest Writer for Martha Stewart http://steamykitchen.com/1417-thai-grilled-beef-skewers.html http://steamykitchen.com/1417-thai-grilled-beef-skewers.html#comments Wed, 10 Sep 2008 14:17:59 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/?p=1417 I’m a guest writer over at Martha Stewart Everyday Food! Have you been to their website? They’ve got thousands of recipes, all of them simple and perfect for dinner tonight. My kids made Thai Curry Beef Skewers and Grilled Banana with Dark Chocolate for them. Come on over to Martha Stewart Everyday Food’s website and take a look. The recipe ...

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I’m a guest writer over at Dinner Tonight Martha Stewart Everyday Food! Have you been to their website? They’ve got thousands of recipes, all of them simple and perfect for dinner tonight.

My kids made Thai Curry Beef Skewers and Grilled Banana with Dark Chocolate for them. Come on over to Martha Stewart Everyday Food’s website and take a look. The recipe for the MUST MAKE dessert inspired by the lovely Andreaa is over there.

I love it when my two young sons — 3 years old and 5 years old — help me in the kitchen. It’s good to nurture an interest in responsible nutrition and teach them correct food pairings, like how super-thin, shatter-crisp Lay’s potato chips are much better stacked between a hamburger bun and patty than something big and smushy like a chocolate Ho-Ho.

We have one small rolling stool in the kitchen perfect for just one little boy to stand on. Why not two? Well, because physically, my two arms and two eyes can keep track of only one child within arms reach of a smorgasbord of spices and seasonings. Trust me when I tell you that behind my back, they’ve dumped a jar of chili powder in the fried rice just because it needed more color. Well, that evening magically turned into a Happy Meal night. Which, now looking back, seems like an awfully suspicious trick that I’m sure a certain trouble-stirring uncle taught them recently.

But the kids do love to come tinker in the kitchen, especially when it involves food on a stick. You could put anything on a stick and my kids will think it’s like the best meal ever. How do you think I got them to eat brussels sprouts? You skewer them between chocolate dipped marshmallows. To get to the next marshmallow, you’ve got to eat that brussels sprout.

Once Andrew heard we were making Thai Curry Beef Skewers with his favorite fruit in the world, pineapple, on sticks, he went totally nuts and called dibs on skewering duty. One piece of pineapple for the Thai Curry Beef Skewer, one piece of pineapple for Andrew. One for the Thai Curry Beef Skewer, two for Andrew. It took two cans of pineapples to finish the job, but I guess he got his recommended vitamin C ration for the week.

Andrew Making Beef Skewers

Grilled Thai Curry Beef Skewers Recipe

Serves 4
Inspired by Martha Stewart Everyday Food

I have tweaked Martha Stewart Everyday Food’s Grilled Thai Curry Beef Skewers recipe just a little, adding fresh lime juice and using pineapple juice in place of some of the honey and brown sugar. The pineapple juice will also help tenderize the meat. Thai curry paste can be found in any Asian market and in the international aisle of your supermarket. Although Thai curry is normally spicy, we’re using only 1 tablespoon of the curry paste so that even the little ones can enjoy this dish. If you do enjoy spice, feel free to add another tablespoon to the recipe. Store the remaining paste in a covered jar or plastic container in the refrigerator. It will last several weeks if properly stored.

Grilled Thai Curry Beef Skewers Recipe

Ingredients
1 can (20 ounces) pineapple chunks, 2 tablespoons of the juice reserved
2 tablespoons honey
2 tablespoons packed brown sugar
1/4 cup soy sauce
2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lime juice
1 teaspoon vegetable, canola, or peanut oil
1 tablespoon Thai red curry paste
1 1/2 pounds top sirloin beef, cut into 1 inch cubes
1 red onion, quartered, layers separated

Directions
1. If grilling outdoors, prepare your grill for high, direct heat. If broiling in your kitchen, heat the broiler with rack set 4 inches from heat. Line a rimmed baking sheet with aluminum foil. Soak 8 wooden skewers (12 inches each) in a pan of water.

2. In a medium bowl, whisk together the 2 tablespoons of the reserved pineapple juice, honey, brown sugar, soy sauce, lime juice, oil, and red curry paste. Reserve half of the sauce for serving (pour into a separate bowl.)

3. Add the beef to the marinade and let sit for 10 minutes at room temperature. Thread the beef, onion, and pineapple onto skewers. Grill on your outdoor grill or under broiler for 5 to 7 minutes, flipping halfway, until medium-rare.

Andrew enjoying Thai Curry Beef Skewers

Andrew enjoying Thai Curry Beef Skewers

***

Free Signed Cookbook

Don’t forget to enter the random drawing for a signed copy of Dave Lieberman’s cookbook!

Dave Lieberman Cookbook

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Roasted Duck and Pomelo Salad http://steamykitchen.com/309-roasted-duck-pomelo-salad.html http://steamykitchen.com/309-roasted-duck-pomelo-salad.html#comments Wed, 30 Apr 2008 11:50:07 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/?p=309 I know this photo sucks – my kids played with the camera and did something with the settings and I didn’t find out until after the food was eaten! from my column in Tampa Tribune Two weeks ago, I took a trip to Los Angeles to teach a couple of cooking classes and to visit family. So, I thought it ...

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I know this photo sucks – my kids played with the camera and did something with the settings and I didn’t find out until after the food was eaten!

Roasted Duck and Pomelo Salad

from my column in Tampa Tribune

Two weeks ago, I took a trip to Los Angeles to teach a couple of cooking classes and to visit family. So, I thought it would be a great idea to bring both of my boys along with me since tickets were only $250 each round-trip for a direct flight from Tampa to Los Angeles.

It was a deal too good to pass up, as I’m a Wal-Mart shopper and easily wooed by a bargain. I wouldn’t normally buy tangerine-flavored fingernail polish, but if it’s on sale for 35 percent off? OMG. I cannot resist. Give me the entire lot of them.

So, when I saw that the airfare was practically half off, I quickly purchased the tickets, not really thinking of the consequences of spending five hours in a small, enclosed flying contraption with no easy access to reinforcements, aka husband, teachers or relatives. Tag team, FAIL.

Thank goodness for the rolling minibar and $3 Snickers. That newlywed couple in the next aisle going to Hawaii for their honeymoon? My money says they probably swore off having children for the next 11 years. Who knew that flying with kids would be such great birth control? Next time your teenager talks about sex, have ’em sit next to us on an airplane. Cheaper than an intervention or therapy.

We arrived safely, and after wading through the thick smog and maneuvering in traffic, all I wanted was to clear my body with a light, refreshing salad. Mom knew exactly what to fix to make us feel welcome at her home.

Pomelo is a Chinese grapefruit. The skin is thick, rather fibrous, but easily peeled away after scoring with a knife. Like a grapefruit, you don’t eat the membrane because it can be pretty bitter and tough. The flesh is firmer, the flavor more delicate. You can find pomelos at most Asian markets, though also look in your regular market too – they are yellow, bigger than a grapefruit and sometimes as big as a soccer ball!

To eat, score the thick skin with a sharp knife and peel away as you would an orange. Open up the pomelo and with your fingers, pry apart each segment, peeling the flesh away from the membrane and pith. For the recipe, you can substitute with grapefruit or orange.

OK, now let’s talk about one of my favorite foods in the world: roast duck. It’s a pain in the butt to make at home, mostly because it’s difficult to find fresh duck in supermarkets. But why bother when for $15, you can buy a whole, perfectly roasted duck at the Asian market. Its sweet, shiny, mahogany-colored skin is highly addictive. You’ll see it hanging whole, displayed in a glass case, and workers will chop it up Chinese-style for you to take home. Usually most stores will sell the duck either half or whole.

For this recipe, buy a half-duck, which will leave you with plenty of leftovers for midnight noshing. You can certainly substitute with a roast or grilled chicken.

This recipe is adapted from “Street Food in Vietnam,” by Michelle Lo (which is a great book, Andrea recommends it too. but Mom bought it in Hong Kong and I can’t find it on Amazon)

Awesome recipe – I’m tagging it as one of my favorites.

Roasted Duck and Pomelo Salad

1/2 small pomelo
1 cup cucumber slices
3 cups shredded cabbage
1 cup shredded carrots
2 breasts of roasted duck, shredded
Handful of mint and Thai basil (or regular basil)
3 tablespoons roasted peanuts, chopped

Dressing:
2 tablespoons fish sauce
11/2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
1 tablespoon water
11/2 tablespoons sugar
1 teaspoons minced chilies (I omitted the chilies in my salad cuz the kids were also eating it)

Peel the pomelo, and remove all membrane from the pulp. Cut pulp into small sections. Toss pomelo with cucumber, cabbage and carrots, and place on large platter. Arrange shredded duck, mint and basil on platter. Top with chopped peanuts. Whisk dressing ingredients in a medium-sized bowl, and serve alongside the salad platter.

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One of my favorite moments

at the Aquarium

Aquarium

***

What happens when you let ignorant idiots be in charge of product development

Japanese Tea

Wouldn’t you be bothered if Starbucks sold, “Italian Coffee…..beans from France”???

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Fried Green Tomato Salad with Sweet Chili Dressing + Menu For Hope http://steamykitchen.com/216-fried-green-tomato-salad-with-sweet-chili-dressing-menu-for-hope.html http://steamykitchen.com/216-fried-green-tomato-salad-with-sweet-chili-dressing-menu-for-hope.html#comments Mon, 10 Dec 2007 05:21:56 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/2007/12/10/fried-green-tomato-salad-with-sweet-chili-dressing-menu-for-hope/ Because I live in one of the hottest states in the United States, and by "hot" I mean the moment you step outside, the crease in the back of your knees sweat as fast as spinach in a fry pan. In the summer, I curse the humidity, especially when my friends back in San Francisco brag about having lunch alfresco ...

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Fried Green Tomato Salad with Sweet Chili Dressing

Because I live in one of the hottest states in the United States, and by “hot” I mean the moment you step outside, the crease in the back of your knees sweat as fast as spinach in a fry pan. In the summer, I curse the humidity, especially when my friends back in San Francisco brag about having lunch alfresco on happy-sunshiney-afternoons. But then along comes December, and guess what. I am still growing tomatoes, gardening in shorts and a tank top in almost 80F degree weather. Love it.

Na na na na boo boo!

In October, I bought a few Earthboxes – and began growing 3 tomato plants, lettuce, herbs, cauliflower, peppers and broccoli. The tomatoes took off like like a dog in heat and within weeks grew to 3 ft tall with a gazillion flowers. That’s the beauty of the Earthboxes…low maintenance…high productivity. Kinda like me, right Scott?! :-)

Anyways, they grew so friggin’ fast that one day I came home to find all 3 tomato plants toppled over because the wire trellis couldn’t support the plants’ weight. One plant broke and therefore the 2 months of tomatoes which i had lovingly massaged, sang to and kissed, were left dangling helplessly on the stem. The other plants were ok, so today Scott built a massive wooden trellis system, about the size of a small bathroom just for them to “grow into.” I really should take a photo for you (next time).

18 small green tomatoes…perfect for Elise’s Fried Green Tomato recipe paired with my Sweet Chili Dressing and home-grown greens. These green babies are goin’ out in style.

I have another Earthbox just dedicated to different kinds of salad greens – our little family can’t keep up with all the lettuce we are producing. I’ve become a lettuce-pusher….presenting bags of lettuce and herbs to my friends every time I visit. This Fried Green Tomato Salad with Sweet Chili Dressing was so satisfying that I have a feeling that many of the remaining tomatoes will be plucked before ripening. Panko breadcrumbs were a perfect breading – so incredibly light yet packs a massive crunch when fried…..continued….

Fried Green Tomato Salad

pssst….I forgot to drizzle with the Sweet Chili Dressing before taking the photo.

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Fried Green Tomato Salad with Sweet Chili Dressing

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 8 minutes
Screen Shot 2014-02-26 at 3.02.13 PM

adapted from Elise who adapted it from Better Homes & Garden New Cook Book. For my GF friends, substitute flour and breadcrumbs. The sweet chili sauce below in the dressing recipe is GF.

Ingredients:

3 medium, firm green tomatoes
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
1/4 cup milk
2 beaten eggs
2/3 cup panko breadcrumbs
1/4 cup olive oil
1 tsp kosher or sea salt
1/4 tsp fresh ground pepper
large pinch of chili powder
salad greens

Directions:

1. Slice unpeeled tomatoes into 1/2" slices. Season both sides with salt, pepper and chili powder and let sit. In meantime, make salad dressing (recipe below) and prep the following in separate bowls in this order: milk, flour, egg, panko.

2. Heat a large skillet with olive oil on medium-high heat. Dip tomato slices in milk, then flour, then eggs, then panko. In skillet, fry slices 3-5 minutes each side until golden brown.

Sweet Chili Dressing

1 tbl bottled sweet chili sauce (I use Mae Ploy brand) Sweet chili sauce
1 tbl tomato ketchup
1 tsp olive oil
1/2 tsp sesame oil
1 tbl sugar
1 tbl water
1 tbl lime juice
1 tsp minced cilantro leaves

Combine ingredients and mix well.

The Sweet Chili Dressing recipe is adapted from Asian Tapas cookbook. I've been playing with the recipes in this gorgeous book - every recipe has a photo!


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Menu for Hope

Menu for Hope

This is my first year participating in Menu For Hope, and rather than me and my chinglish fumble a description, here is the program, from the words of the founder herself, Chez Pim:

“Menu for Hope is an annual fundraising event in support of the UN World Food Programme.  Five years ago, the devastating tsunami in Southeast Asia inspired me to find a way to help, and the very first Menu for Hope was born.  In 2006, Menu for Hope raised US$60,925.12 to help the UN World Food Programme feed the hungry.

Each year, food bloggers from all over the world join forces to host the Menu for Hope online raffle, offering an array of delectable culinary prizes.  For every US$10, the donor receive a virtual raffle ticket toward a prize of their choice.  This year, the prizes include once in a lifetime experiences such as touring the elBulli laboratory with Ferran Adrià, dining on a historic British meal prepared by Heston Blumenthal, or joining Harold McGee on a lunch date to satisfy a lifetime’s worth of cooking curiosity.  You can also tag along with your favorite blogger on a tour of their favorite markets, restaurants, or even receive a care package fashioned especially for you from your favorite bloggers themselves.  All you need is $10 and a bit of luck.

We may never eradicate hunger from the face of the earth, but why should that stop us from trying?”

Our East Coast host is Serious Eats, one of my fav food sites. Come support the worthy cause and see the full list of prizes!

My donation is 1 ounce of saffron threads from Saffron.com. This, my friends, is an entire ounce – more than you can ever use!  The prize code is UE-05.

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