Steamy Kitchen Recipes | RSS Feed http://steamykitchen.com Steamy Kitchen Food Blog: fast recipes, simple recipes, with fresh ingredients to create delicious meals. Mon, 20 Apr 2015 17:58:08 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.1.1 Thai Hot and Sour Chicken Soup http://steamykitchen.com/28246-thai-hot-and-sour-chicken-soup-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/28246-thai-hot-and-sour-chicken-soup-recipe-video.html#comments Tue, 03 Sep 2013 16:09:11 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=28246 I’m overwhelmed by all the Internet love! You all have made last week so much more bearable, and the healing over the sudden loss of Buster easier. I think the one most affected by Buster’s passing was Coco. There were times when we came home, and Coco would greet us and then immediately looked behind us to see if Buster ...

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Thai Hot and Sour Chicken Soup Recipe

I’m overwhelmed by all the Internet love! You all have made last week so much more bearable, and the healing over the sudden loss of Buster easier. I think the one most affected by Buster’s passing was Coco. There were times when we came home, and Coco would greet us and then immediately looked behind us to see if Buster was following.

Poor Coco – I know it will take time.

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Last week called for comfort food and that means soup. We’ve been doing a lot of soups in the electric pressure cooker (just throw everything in a hit a few buttons) or the super-quick 20 minute on the stovetop soups. Basically, I like unfussy soups. What hit the spot last week was hot-spicy-tangy-savory Thai Hot and Sour Chicken Soup. This is the type of soup that Pavlov would love – the flavors are so distinct and powerful, that every time even just think about this soup, certain reactions that I cannot control begin happening. Mouth starts watering from the sharp lime, tip of tongue reacts to the slight sweetness of the fish sauce,  and the warming of the throat from the slow, lingering effects of the steeped chile slices.

Thai Hot and Sour Chicken Soup Recipe

While the soup contains ingredients that are difficult to find outside of an Asian market – don’t worry. I have a simple substitution! The citrusy flavor of the soup comes from lemongrass and kaffir lime leaf. If you can’t find one or both, the peel of the lime will work just fine.

Thai Hot and Sour Chicken Soup Recipe

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The ingredients are flexible – I’ve added shrimp, tofu and even spinach to the soup. Make it your own! This is a recipe that I’ve adapted from Katie Chin’s brand new Everyday Thai Cooking cookbook.

I was fortunate enough to receive an advanced copy (and loved the book so much that I wrote a little quote for the back cover!)

If you like Thai food as much as I do, you’ll love Katie’s Thai recipes that are designed for the home cook. Some of the recipes in the book:

  • Steamed Mussels in Lemongrass and Basil
  • Chang Mai Chicken Lettuce Cups
  • Chicken with Cashews and Thai Chilies
  • Grilled Halibut in Mango Coconut Sauce
  • Spicy Peanut Noodles
  • Thai Garlicky Eggplant
  • Pad Thai

Thai Hot and Sour Chicken Soup Recipe Video

 

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 Thai Hot and Sour Chicken Soup Recipe

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Thai Hot and Sour Chicken Soup

Servings: 15 minutes Prep Time: 4 Cook Time: 5 minutes
Thai Hot and Sour Chicken Soup Recipe featured-9650

Kaffir lime leaves and fresh lemongrass may be difficult to fine outside of an Asian market. You can substitute with lime peel. In the recipe, you'll be using the juice of a fresh lime. Before cutting the lime, take a vegetable peeler and peel long strips of the lime skin. Use your fingers and squeeze/wring the peel a bit to release its flavors and fragrant oil. Adapted from Everyday Thai Cooking by Katie Chin. The more chile slices you use - and the longer you let it steep in the broth, the spicier it will be.'

Other ingredients you can add: spinach leaves, tofu, shrimp, zucchini slices, bean thread noodles or rice noodles, snow peas, bamboo shoots, etc.

Ingredients:

3 cups chicken stock
4 slices fresh ginger
4 kaffir lime leaves, torn (substitute with lime peel)
2 stalks lemongrass, cut into 2" lengths and bruised (substitute with lime peel)
1 fresh hot chile pepper, sliced (I used 2 large slices)
1/2 pound skinless, boneless chicken, cut into bite-sized pieces
1 cup cherry tomato (or 1 whole tomato, cut into wedges)
One 15-oz can straw mushrooms (or handful fresh sliced mushrooms)
3 tablespoons fish sauce
1 lime, squeezed (about 2 tablespoons lime juice)
fresh cilantro leaves

Directions:

In a pot, add the chicken stock, ginger, kaffir lime, lemongrass and chile slices. Bring to a simmer, cover, and then turn the heat to low. Let simmer for 10 minutes. Strain out and discard the spent herbs. (You can taste the soup at this point, if you would like it more spicy, keep the chile pepper slices in the stock and discard just before serving.)

Add in the chicken pieces, cherry tomato and mushrooms. Bring back to a simmer on medium heat and then cook for an additional 5 minutes.

Stir in the fish sauce, lime juice and cilantro leaves.

 

 

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Green Bean and Shiitake Mushroom Stir Fry http://steamykitchen.com/20842-stir-fry-recipe-green-bean-shiitake-mushroom.html http://steamykitchen.com/20842-stir-fry-recipe-green-bean-shiitake-mushroom.html#comments Mon, 27 Feb 2012 16:42:06 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=20842 This recipe was originally slated for my cookbook, but I seem to have too many recipes already slated for the Vegetable chapter, so I’m puttin’ it here and sharing with you on the blog. Learning a good stir fry technique for home cooking is important – it will save you from throwing out the odds and ends of vegetables in ...

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This recipe was originally slated for my cookbook, but I seem to have too many recipes already slated for the Vegetable chapter, so I’m puttin’ it here and sharing with you on the blog.

Learning a good stir fry technique for home cooking is important – it will save you from throwing out the odds and ends of vegetables in the refrigerator, and give you countless recipe ideas to whip up at the last minute.

A stir fry usually only takes 10 minutes to cook and can be as flexible as you want. Here’s my technique for home cooks.

 

How to Stir Fry Green Bean and Shiitake Mushrooms

You can use either a saute pan (a fry pan with high straight sides + lid) or a wok. The first step is to cook the green beans because they will have a difficult time cooking in the stir fry without overcooking the rest of the ingredients. Other vegetables that require pre-cooking include: broccoli, cauliflower and any thick, hard vegetable.

I like to steam them instead of boiling/blanching them because it takes less time to bring a small amount of water to boil for steaming.

Fill the wok with about 1 cup of water and bring to a boil. Add in the green beans and cover.

Once the green beans are cooked to crisp-tender (just taste one, if it doesn’t taste raw anymore, it should be fine), remove the beans and drain. Wipe the wok clean with a towel and return to the stove.

You need to make sure that the wok has no water – not even a drop – as you’ll be adding in cooking oil. Hot wok + water + oil = splatter and burns.

When the wok is hot again, swirl in the cooking oil and add in the mushrooms and onions. Stir fry for a couple of minutes. Then add in the garlic, ginger and green beans.

Why do we not add in the ginger and garlic in an earlier step with onions? Because they’ll burn. Burnt ginger and garlic is bitter. So we add it AFTER the mushrooms and the onions have cooked.

The next step is to add in the oyster sauce and water and stir fry until the sauce is just beginning to bubble. That’s it!

 

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Stir Fry Recipe: Green Bean and Shiitake Mushrooms

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 8 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes
green-bean-mushroom-stirfry-recipe-354

Ingredients:

1/2 pound green beans, trimmed
2 teaspoons cooking oil
1/2 onion, thinly sliced
6 ounces fresh mushrooms, sliced
1 clove garlic, finelly minced
1 teaspoon finely grated fresh ginger
1 1/2 tablespoon oyster sauce + 2 tablespoons water

Directions:

1. Fill the wok or saute pan with about 1 cup of water. Bring to a boil and then add the green beans. Cover and let steam for 4-5 minutes or until crisp-tender. Drain the beans, wipe the wok dry and return wok to the stove.

2. Heat the wok over high heat and swirl in the cooking oil. When very hot, add in the onions and mushrooms and stir fry for 3 minutes. Turn the heat to medium, add in the cooked green beans, ginger and the garlic and quickly stir fry for an additional 30 seconds or until fragrant. Take care not to burn the ginger or garlic.

3. Stir in the oyster sauce and the 2 tablespoons of water. Cook for 1 minute.

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Seafood Miso Noodle Soup http://steamykitchen.com/20507-seafood-miso-noodle-soup.html http://steamykitchen.com/20507-seafood-miso-noodle-soup.html#comments Fri, 24 Feb 2012 16:30:11 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=20507 A couple of weeks ago, we had a massive Temaki sushi party with friends. If you’ve never been to one, I highly suggest making friends with the fine folks at I Love Blue Sea  or head over to Casson Trenor’s site, Sustainable Sushi and host a sushi party of your own. Since I’m a type of person who always over-cooks for dinner parties ...

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A couple of weeks ago, we had a massive Temaki sushi party with friends. If you’ve never been to one, I highly suggest making friends with the fine folks at I Love Blue Sea  or head over to Casson Trenor’s site, Sustainable Sushi and host a sushi party of your own.

Since I’m a type of person who always over-cooks for dinner parties (oh, not overcook as in sawdust meat, but over-cooks as in I prepare enough food to feed triple the amount of guests I’m expecting), there was plenty of seafood leftover for the weekend to make Seafood Miso Noodle Soup.

Like nearly all of my recipes, this meal is fast ‘n flexible, especially when you use rice noodles, which take a quick soak and 30 second boil. Dried rice noodles are soaked in cool or warm water for a few minutes to soften and rehydrate a bit. Then a swirl in your boiling broth and it’s done.

Japanese miso flavors the broth – you can use regular miso paste (any kind, though I recommend Shiro Miso, which is white miso, the most mild of all) or check out my client, Miso & Easy, which is prepared miso paste already mixed with dashi and conveniently packaged in a squeeze bottle. Just add water.

The rest of the ingredients are really up to you – assorted seafood, any vegetable and any fresh mushrooms that you like. I’ve used Japanese mushrooms (Brown Beech Mushroom), but regular sliced white mushrooms will work just as well.

Ingredients for Seafood Miso Noodle Soup

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Seafood Miso Noodle Soup

Servings: 2 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes
seafood-miso-noodle-soup-recipe

Ingredients:

4 ounces dried rice noodles
3 ounces fresh mushrooms
2 bok choy, leaves separated
8-10 ounces assorted seafood (fish, shrimp, scallops)
1 stalk green onion, sliced
If using Miso & Easy:
4 cups water
2 tablespoons Miso & Easy
If using regular Miso paste:
4 cups vegetable or chicken broth
2 tablespoons miso paste

Directions:

1. Soak the rice noodles in a bowl of cold water.

2. In a pot, bring the water (if using Miso & Easy) or broth (if using regular miso paste) to a simmer. Add in the vegetables, mushrooms and the seafood. Cook for 2-3 minutes or until the seafood is almost cooked through.

3. Drain the rice noodles and add to the simmering broth. Cook for 30 seconds then turn off the heat.

4. Stir in the Miso & Easy or miso paste.

5. Divide into bowls and garnish with green onions.

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Steak Teriyaki http://steamykitchen.com/17758-steak-teriyaki-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/17758-steak-teriyaki-recipe.html#comments Wed, 17 Aug 2011 13:59:30 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=17758 Recipe for Steak Teriyaki - 3-ingredient teriyaki sauce that takes only a few minutes to make.

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Did you know teriyaki sauce is made of only 3 ingredients? You could always add more, like sesame seeds, a little grated ginger and garlic. But plain and simple, teriyaki sauce is equal parts sugar, sweet cooking wine (mirin) and soy sauce. In addition to the sauce, you will need steak of your choice, button mushrooms and a selection of bell peppers.

what is mirin?

Mirin is Japanese sweet rice wine and contains sugar mixed with rice wine. You can find mirin in Asian grocery stores and I’ve seen it sold in most regular grocery stores in the “Asian” or ethnic section. I’m working with Mitsukan to show off how simple teriyaki sauce is to make using their mirin.

Mirin is used in many of your favorite Japanese dishes (like teriyaki!), tempura sauce, seafood dishes and sukiyaki, adding that slightly sweet flavor to the dish. It’s gluten-free.

Other recipes that use mirin:

Nobu’s Famous Black Cod with Miso (RasaMalaysia)
Misoyaki Roast Chicken (Food52)
Teriyaki Chicken Wings (White on Rice Couple)
Cucumber Salad Recipe (Eating Out Loud)
Meatballs with Soy-Mirin Glaze (Humble Recipes)
Teriyaki Chicken (No Recipes)

the ingredients for steak teriyaki

Here are the ingredients needed for teriyaki sauce with steak (you can use any type of steak, not just flank steak)

how to make teriyaki sauce

To make the Teriyaki sauce, just bring all three ingredients to a simmer until all the sugar dissolves, about 1 minute. That’s it! In a small saucepan, over low heat, add the soy sauce.

Next, add the same amount of mirin.

Then, add the sugar. Simmer the sauce for a few minutes and you’re done!

how to make steak teriyaki

First, prepare the peppers by slicing into thin long strips.

Next, slice the button mushrooms.

Heat a large pan to medium-high heat, add a tablespoon or so of cooking oil and sear the steak on both sides then remove from pan, while you sauté the mushrooms and peppers.

Add a little more cooking oil, then mushrooms and cook for a few minutes.

Next, add the peppers and cook for about two minutes.

Place the steak back into the pan. Then, pour the sauce over the steak, mushrooms and peppers.

Cover and lower the heat until preferred doneness.

To serve, slice the steak against the grain and top with peppers, mushrooms and extra teriyaki sauce.

 

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Steak with Teriyaki Sauce

Servings: serves 4 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 15 minutes
Steak Teriyaki recipe

Ingredients:

FOR THE STEAK, MUSHROOMS and PEPPERS:
2 pounds flank steak (or use steak of your choice)
salt and freshly ground pepper
8 ounces button mushrooms, sliced
1 red bell pepper, seeded and sliced into strips
1 yellow bell pepper, seeded and sliced into strips
1 and 1/2 tablespoons canola or vegetable oil, separated
FOR THE TERIYAKI SAUCE
1/4 cup soy sauce
1/4 cup mirin (Japanese sweet rice wine)
2 tablespoons sugar (or more if you like a sweet teriyaki)

Directions:

1) To make the teriyaki sauce, whisk all the sauce ingredients in a small sauce pan and simmer on low for 3 minutes, until the sauce has thickened slightly then remove from heat.

2) Add one tablespoon of the cooking oil to a pan over medium-high. Season steak with salt and pepper then sear the steak 2 minutes on each side and remove from pan.

3) Add the remaining 1/2 tablespoon of cooking oil. Add the mushrooms and sauté until mushrooms are lightly browned, 2 minutes, and then add the peppers and cook until crisp tender, another 2 minutes.

4) Place the steak back into the pan, reduce heat to low and add the teriyaki sauce, let simmer for 1 minute. Serve the teriyaki sauce, mushrooms and peppers on top of the steak.

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Warm Maitake Pasta with Citrus Soy Dressing http://steamykitchen.com/11254-warm-maitake-pasta-with-citrus-soy-dressing.html http://steamykitchen.com/11254-warm-maitake-pasta-with-citrus-soy-dressing.html#comments Mon, 20 Sep 2010 16:29:38 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=11254 Recipe for Warm Maitake Pasta with Citrus Soy Dressing on my food column on Discovery Heath.

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Recipe for Warm Maitake Pasta with Citrus Soy Dressing on my food column on Discovery Heath.

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10-Minute Shrimp and Mushroom Thai Curry http://steamykitchen.com/10910-10-minute-shrimp-and-mushroom-thai-curry.html http://steamykitchen.com/10910-10-minute-shrimp-and-mushroom-thai-curry.html#comments Fri, 20 Aug 2010 15:17:55 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=10910 When all else fails, there’s always curry to fall back on. Despite all the beautiful food you see on this blog, I do have my share of kitchen disasters (that blob of charcoal was supposed to be fried chicken). Thai curry is my “break in case of emergency” meal – as I always have a can of coconut milk, a ...

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When all else fails, there’s always curry to fall back on. Despite all the beautiful food you see on this blog, I do have my share of kitchen disasters (that blob of charcoal was supposed to be fried chicken).

Thai curry is my “break in case of emergency” meal – as I always have a can of coconut milk, a can of curry paste, shrimp in the freezer and miscellaneous vegetables in the refrigerator. Rice is only a one-finger trigger button away or already cooked, stored in the freezer.

Here’s what I used:

Fresh mushrooms: I love the meatiness of large King Trumpet mushrooms, but you can use fresh shiitake or even regular white mushrooms. By the way, there are quite a few mushroom recipes on Hokto’s site that I’ve developed for them…their mushrooms are organic and grown in California)

Thai curry: Comes in a can (like above), a plastic tub or envelope packet. If you buy a big tub of it, you can store unused portion in refrigerator for a few months. But I prefer to get the small cans.

Coconut milk: Which is not coco-loco (used for cocktails). Look in the Asian aisle of supermarket. If there are many different brands, shake the cans. The ones that sounds watery will be…well…watery and tasteless. Go for the cans that sounds like its full of thick liquid.

Shrimp: Tail on or off, up to you.

Vegetables: Bell peppers and fresh basil leaves (not pictured) – you can use Thai basil if you have, or just regular sweet basil is fine too.

Step 1: You’ll want to cook the curry paste just a bit, just to release the oils and the flavors. The amount of curry paste you use is totally up to you (and you can always add more in later after tasting the curry).

Step 2: Now pour in the coconut milk and whisk to incorporate the curry. This helps the curry paste break down and become smooth.

Step 3: add in the vegetables to cook for a couple of minutes. At this point, taste the curry, and if you want it more spicy, then whisk in additional curry paste.

Step 4: Now for the shrimp. cook until shrimp is cooked through.

Step 5: Throw in the basil leaves, stir and you’re done.

Serve over cooked rice.

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Thai Shrimp Curry

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 4 Cook Time: 6
shrimp-thai-curry-recipe-2753.jpg

The amount of curry paste you use is totally up to you. I've used 2 tablespoons, which is about medium spice level. You can always add more curry paste after tasting, so it's best to start with a little bit and work your way up. If you're cooking rice, make extra and freeze for next time.

Ingredients:

1 teaspoon cooking oil
2 tablespoons red curry paste (or more)
12 ounces coconut milk
1 red bell pepper, seeded and cut into strips
8 ounces fresh mushrooms (I used King Trumpet mushrooms)
1 pound shrimp, peeled and deveined
16 basil leaves (optional)
Cooked rice

Directions:

Heat a skillet over medium high heat, once hot add in the cooking oil and red curry paste. Whisk for about 30 seconds. Pour in the coconut milk and whisk to combine. When it comes to a simmer, add in the mushrooms and the red peppers and continue cooking for 3 minutes. Taste and whisk in additional curry paste if you want. Add the shrimp to the curry and cook for another 2-3 minutes, until the shrimp is cooked through. Stir in the basil and serve over rice.

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Vegetarian Mushroom Omelet http://steamykitchen.com/10738-brown-beech-omelet.html http://steamykitchen.com/10738-brown-beech-omelet.html#comments Tue, 10 Aug 2010 11:45:19 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=10738 A simple vegetarian omelet with Japanese Brown Beech Mushrooms, fresh spinach and fresh tomatoes. Recipe on New Asian Cuisine.

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A simple vegetarian omelet with Japanese Brown Beech Mushrooms, fresh spinach and fresh tomatoes. Recipe on New Asian Cuisine.

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15 Minute Japanese Mushroom Flatbread http://steamykitchen.com/7856-00-15-minutejapanese-mushroom-flatbread.html http://steamykitchen.com/7856-00-15-minutejapanese-mushroom-flatbread.html#comments Mon, 12 Apr 2010 10:45:25 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=7856 The intentions of making my own pesto sauce from scratch was certainly there, but something silly like I-killed-my-basil-plant got in the way of my plans. There’s nothing more sad than walking out to my mini-garden and seeing a sad, shriveled and shrunken herb. Oh poor little thing! You had such potential! I have a feeling that the mint got a ...

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Japanese Mushroom Flatbread Recipe

The intentions of making my own pesto sauce from scratch was certainly there, but something silly like I-killed-my-basil-plant got in the way of my plans. There’s nothing more sad than walking out to my mini-garden and seeing a sad, shriveled and shrunken herb.

Oh poor little thing! You had such potential!

I have a feeling that the mint got a bit jealous and decided the only way to win would be to overgrow and squeeze the poor little basil out. Bad mint! If it wasn’t for Sparkling Ginger Lime and Mint Cooler, I would surely punish by pruning.

So, off to the grocery store I went to buy enough fresh basil to make a batch of pesto.

That is, until I saw the price of fresh herbs at the market.

$3.99 for a small pathetic pinch of basil stems? That’s such a rip-off! Because I can grow herbs pretty much year round here in Florida (during the hot hot summers, the herbs grow on my covered lanai) I can’t remember the last time I bought fresh basil.

Too cheap to spend the money on enough basil to make pesto, I opted for plucking the 4 remaining leaves from my sad plant and bought a jar of prepared basil (same aisle as pasta sauce). Not quite the same as homemade, but cheap, satisfying and I ended up creating a 15 minute appetizer with a pre-baked naan flatbread, a package of Japanese Brown Beech Mushrooms (from client Hokto) and a half an onion in the refrigerator.

It’s the quickest gourmet-y appetizer ever and I love using naan flatbreads as the base. It’s pre-baked, which is a fantastic shortcut for when I don’t have time to roll out my own pizza dough. Naan is Indian-style flatbread, normally baked in a clay oven (though I doubt these commercials ones are) and I’m just in love with the irregular teardrop shapes. You can substitute with pita bread, double-stacked flour tortillas) if you can’t find naan.

The mushrooms are flexible too. I’m using brown beech mushrooms, but sub with any type of fresh mushroom you’d like.

And hey, if you’ve got better luck with basil than I have (just remember to keep the jealous mint plant away from the basil), feel free to make your home made pesto.

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Japanese Mushroom Flatbread Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: Cook Time:
japanese-mushroom-flatbread-8954

Ingredients:

1 teaspoon olive oil
2 cups Japanese Brown Beech Mushrooms (or other Asian mushrooms like fresh shiitake)
1/2 small onion, very thinly sliced
1 large piece naan flatbread, about 8x14 inches
2 tablespoons prepared basil pesto sauce
1/2 cup shredded mozzarella cheese
1 tablespoon grated parmesan cheese
3 to 4 fresh basil leaves, chiffonade

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 400F degrees.

2. Heat a skillet over medium high heat, when hot, add the olive oil. Add the mushrooms and the onions, and saute until slightly soft, about 2 minutes.

3. On the flatbread, spread the basil pesto, avoiding the outer one inch edge. Top the flat bread with the mozzarella cheese. Add the mushroom and onion mixture; and top with the parmesan cheese.

4. Bake for 7 to 10 minutes until the cheese has melted and the flatbread is toasted. Sprinkle with the fresh basil.

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Steak with Creamy Whiskey Mushroom Sauce http://steamykitchen.com/7069-creamy-mushroom-whiskey-steak-sauce.html http://steamykitchen.com/7069-creamy-mushroom-whiskey-steak-sauce.html#comments Thu, 07 Jan 2010 13:19:31 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=7069 Every cook should have a great steak topping in their repertoire. Either because you A) enjoy having a sauce smothering your steak B) want to to stretch out a piece of meat to feed the family or C) attempt cover up a botched steak job. I’m in category A, especially if it involves heavy cream and whisky, but I’ve been ...

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Every cook should have a great steak topping in their repertoire. Either because you

A) enjoy having a sauce smothering your steak

B) want to to stretch out a piece of meat to feed the family or

C) attempt cover up a botched steak job. I’m in category A, especially if it involves heavy cream and whisky, but I’ve been known to practice C more often that I care to admit.

When my in-laws are in town, there’s always whiskey in the house. It makes for a more pleasant stay. But your in-laws might prefer bourbon, white wine or other such happy-drink. That’s fine too. Just don’t use red wine, as it makes your cream sauce pink and people in my house don’t eat pink food, especially if it’s on a steak.

How to make a creamy mushroom sauce (with booze)

For this recipe, I’ve used morel mushrooms, but you can use any type of fresh mushrooms you like. Anything from shiitake, crimini, baby portobello, Hokto Kinoko’s maitake, brown/white beech, king trumpet, to even the old standby white button mushroom. The mushrooms can be cut into big chunks, halved or sliced, depending on the type and the size. The general rule about mushrooms is to avoid washing them under water, and instead use a paper towel to brush off any dirt. Mushrooms are like sponges, and when you soak them or even rinse them, they will absorb the water, which makes it difficult to get a good browning in the saute pan.

1. Start with fresh mushrooms, clean the mushrooms by wiping surface with a damp cloth and trimming the stems off.
2. Saute onions slowly in butter or oil (or combo) so that they gently cook.
3. Once the onions are softened and browned (not burnt!) add the mushrooms and saute for just a couple of minutes.
4. It’s time. For the booze. Add a glug of bourbon, whiskey or even beer. Let it bubble a bit to burn off the alcohol.

5. Pour in some heavy cream – the amount is up to you. You can add as little as a tablespoon if you want. I like a lot of cream. I guess that’s why my jeans don’t fit.
6. Let it reduce for a bit.
7. And here’s the secrete ingredient….pour in just a touch of balsamic vinegar. This is to balance out the creaminess of the sauce….because the steak, the mushrooms and the cream is so rich, you need that little acid (or tang) to balance out the flavors. Trust me on this.

And here you go:

This steak was dry aged – see Dry Aging Steaks at Home.

It’s rich, decadent and the best part is that the recipe is flexible. In fact, check out Pioneer Woman’s cookbook – I made her Whiskey Sauce and then used it to top grilled LOBSTER. Oh yeah.


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Steak with Creamy Whiskey Mushroom Sauce Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 15 minutes Cook Time: 15 minutes
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Ingredients:

4 steak cuts of your choice (filet, ribeye, sirloin, strip, etc)
cooking oil
salt and pepper
2 tablespoons butter
1/2 onion, minced
1 clove garlic, finely minced
2-3 cups sliced fresh mushrooms
1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg
3 tablespoons whiskey, bourbon, beer or white wine
1 tablespoon good quality balsamic vinegar
1/2 cup heavy cream (though you can use as little as 1 tablespoon)
1 tablespoon finely minced fresh herb of your choice (chives, parsley, tarragon, basil, etc.)

Directions:

1. Rub both sides of each of the steaks with some cooking oil. Season steaks with salt and pepper on both sides.

2. Heat a large frying pan or grill pan over high heat. When very hot, add the steaks. Cook both sides until desired doneness - timing depends on thickness of steak. Generally, for 1-inch thick steak, I grill 5 minutes per side then check with meat thermometer (145F is medium-rare, 160F is medium). Remove steaks to a plate and tent with tin foil to rest.

3. Return the same frying pan to the stove, heat the butter over medium heat. When the butter starts bubbling, add the onions and saute until the onions are soft, transluscent and just slightly golden. Take care not to burn the onions by keeping your heat on medium or even medium-low. This will take about 3 minutes. Add the garlic and saute for an additional minute until the garlic is fragrant.

4. Turn your heat to medium-high and add the mushrooms all at once. Immediately start tossing so that the onion/garlic/butter mixture is evenly distributed amongst the mushrooms. Saute the mushrooms until they are browned and softened, about 3-5 minutes depending on the thickness and size of your mushrooms.

5. Season with salt, pepper and nutmeg. Pour in the whiskey and the balsamic vinegar and let the mixture bubble a bit to burn off some of the alcohol. Turn the heat down just a bit and add in the heavy cream. Let it bubble for another 30 seconds and then taste to adjust the salt. Stir in the freshly minced herbs and pour over just-grilled steak.

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Matsutake Mushroom Dobin Mushi Recipe http://steamykitchen.com/6015-matsutake-mushroom-dobin-mushi-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/6015-matsutake-mushroom-dobin-mushi-recipe.html#comments Mon, 12 Oct 2009 04:03:01 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=6015 One of my favorite cooking shows of all time is the original Iron Chef. No, not the modern version that plays over and over on Food Network right now, but the one taped in Japan with the silly English dubbing that always cracks me up. The episode that I drooled most over was “Battle Matsutake.” Matsutake Tempura?! Oh hello lover! ...

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One of my favorite cooking shows of all time is the original Iron Chef. No, not the modern version that plays over and over on Food Network right now, but the one taped in Japan with the silly English dubbing that always cracks me up. The episode that I drooled most over was “Battle Matsutake.” Matsutake Tempura?! Oh hello lover!

So since that episode, I’ve been pining for Matsutake mushrooms. I kept hearing that in Japan, it’s a seasonal, rare, expensive thing….so I just sorta passed it up as, “okay, one day…” type of food.

And a couple of weeks ago I found out that Matsutake mushrooms are harvested here in the Pacific Northwest (okay, not really “here” as I’m in Florida, but I mean here as in American soil!) and this year is one of abundance. My good friend Dave from Earthy sent me an email when they first started arriving, and I almost canceled the rest of my travel plans to come home so I could play with the ‘shrooms.

But how to cook?

Marc of No Recipes and Stephan of Zen Can Cook came to the rescue with ideas and recipes. I had dinner with both of them a few months ago in NYC, but we don’t have a photo to prove it.

Because we were too damn busy eating, laughing and stuffing our faces at dinner. Oh and drinking lots too. No wonder!

So, if you’re lucky enough to get your hands on a few Matsutake mushrooms, remember to keep the recipe simple. The mushroom is so fragrant and earthy that you don’t want manipulate it too much. Keep it simple, with few good quality ingredients and enjoy its natural aroma and taste.

What is Matsutake Mushroom?

Fall is the season of Matsutake mushrooms. In Japan, it’s a highly prized mushroom, perfect specimens selling for as much as $250 for 6 small Matsutake mushrooms! I compare it to truffles – the Matsutake has a penetrating, deep earthy aroma. It’s texture is thick, meaty and hearty.

Matsu = pine
Take = mushroom

The Matsutake grows only under pine trees, and I’ve heard that the never grow in the same place twice. How frustrating for mushroom hunters, eh? American Matsutake is a little different from the Japanese species, but just as fragrant and delicious.

Hsiao-Ching Chou wrote, “In that regard, the matsutake resembles the truffle, which lends its perfume to any preparation it encounters. A broth with several slices of a pine mushroom would be served in a lidded bowl or pot, for example, so that the scent of earthy pine with a tinge of cinnamon swirls within the container until it is finally released.”

Hurry! Matsutake mushrooms are only available September through November!

How to make Matsutake Dobin Mushi

First, clean your mushroom with a damp cloth, wiping off as much dirt as possible. Cut off the tough bottom nub of the mushroom. Use a paring knife, turn the knife around so that you’re using the upper dull edge, and scrape off the thin outer layer on the stem.

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Cleaned mushrooms and trimmed stems

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We’ll be making dashi broth from scratch. You’ll need 3 ingredients to make dashi – water, bonito flakes and dried kelp.

To make dashi, use large bonito flakes or katsuobushi. They come in a big package at the Asian market. Look for the big flakes. The little flakes are for garnishing. Big flakes should be the size of a cornflake.

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Look how beautiful these bonito fish flakes are! So light, airy, flakey. Don’t sneeze.

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You’ll also need a 6-inch piece of dried kelp (seaweed) or kombu for dashi:

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They usually come long, folded and then dried. You’ll only need 6-inches and just a single layer, so break it apart.

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Do not soak the kelp or even rinse it. Just take a damp cloth and wipe it down to clean any dirt off the seaweed. Add the kelp to water and turn the heat to medium-low.

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Just before it comes to a boil, add two big handfuls of bonito flakes, stir and turn off the heat immediately.

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Then strain.

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The kombu is still good! Don’t throw it away….

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Just rinse and pat dry. Let dry on your counter top and then when the kelp is completely dry, store back in your pantry. You can reuse.

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Now it’s time to make the dobin mushi. Ladle the strained dashi into a teapot.

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Next, add the ingredients. Today, I had sliced fish, sliced carrots and sliced Matsutake mushrooms. I have also make dobin mushi with chicken, shrimp and ginko nuts. What you add to your dobin mushi is up to you. Below, I have a list of links to dobin mushi recipes that you can look at.

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Place all ingredients into the teapot. Also add Japanese sake, a touch of soy sauce and just a sliver of lime peel.

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Dobin mushi is steamed, not boiled directly on a flame. I have a wok here and have inserted a steamer stand. Bring water to a boil.

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Place the teapot on the steamer rack.

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Cover with lid.

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Steam for 8 minutes.

Pour the aromatic broth into a teacup.

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And then enjoy the goodies inside the pot.

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Treasure hunting!

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Matsutake Mushroom Dobin Mushi Recipe

If you don’t have a wok or a tea pot, you can use a large, wide stockpot (or dutch oven) and ramekins for steaming the dobin mushi. Divide the ingredients between the ramekins. Cover with a parchment circle (or tin foil) and steam in your large pot. If you don’t have a steamer rack, you can use a shallow bowl, turned upside down or a few inverted shot glasses.

This dish is all about the mushroom. Keep the ingredients simple and light to showcase the Matsutake! Matsutake mushrooms provided by Earthy.com

serves 2 as part of multi-course meal

For the dashi
4 cups water
6-inch piece kombu or kelp
2 handfuls of katsuobushi or bonito flakes (about 2 cups loosely packed)

For the dobin mushi
2 matsutake mushrooms, sliced (about 2 ounces)
few thinly sliced white fish (about 2 ounces)
few very thin slices carrots (about 1/4 carrot)
1 tablespoon good quality sake
1 tablespoon good quality Japanese soy sauce

1. Make the dashi: Place the kelp into a pot with the water. Let soak for 10 minutes. Turn the heat to low. When the water starts quivering, remove the kelp, add in the bonito flakes, stir and turn off the heat. (Do not let boil) Let sit until bonito flakes sink to the bottom. Strain (don’t squeeze the bonito flakes) and reserve the dashi stock.

2. Clean the Matsutake mushrooms by using a damp terry cloth to wipe the dirt off the mushrooms. Use the back of a paring knife to scrape the thin, outer layer of the stem off. Cut the tough bottom of the mushroom off and discard. Ladle the dashi into your teapot, add in the remaining ingredients.

3. Prepare your steamer as shown in the photos or directions above. Cover and steam for 7 minutes (longer if you are using chicken) on medium-low heat. Serve immediately.

More Matsutake

Matsutake Mushrooms from Earthy.com

Fantastic Forage

A Recipe to Savor the Autumn: Kinoko Dobin Mushi

Matsutake Dobin Mushi Recipe

Mad About Matsutake

Introduction to Matsutake

Wild about Matsutake

Hunting for Matsutake Mushrooms

 

 

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