Steamy Kitchen Recipes | RSS Feed http://steamykitchen.com Steamy Kitchen Food Blog: fast recipes, simple recipes, with fresh ingredients to create delicious meals. Fri, 01 May 2015 15:39:44 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.1 Vegetarian Korean Japchae Noodle Recipe http://steamykitchen.com/36179-vegetarian-korean-japchae-noodle-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/36179-vegetarian-korean-japchae-noodle-recipe.html#comments Thu, 12 Jun 2014 13:53:18 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=36179 Make Korean Japchae Noodles (Glass Noodles) - Recipe and how-to video from cookbook author Jaden Hair of Steamy Kitchen. This recipe is vegetarian and includes sweet potato, kale and swiss chard providing a nutrient rich meal!

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Korean Japchae Noodles Recipe Vegetarian

Scott’s garden yielded a bucket of sweet potatoes and my raised beds finished the Spring growing season sputtering out the last of the kale and swiss chard. Summer is when we put the raised beds to rest – it’s just too darn hot to grow anything except hot chile peppers and okra (which sounds kinda good together too!)

We decided on making one of Korea’s most popular dishes, Japchae, or Glass Noodles. If you have friends or family on this or that diet, this is a dish that just might please everyone (well, except for meat-only eaters).

Korean Japchae Noodles Recipe Vegetarian

So what are dang myung noodles??

Dang Myung noodles are made from sweet potato starch, so they are vegan, gluten-free, paleo-friendly, dairy-free, soy-free and peanut-free. The back of every package that I’ve found at the Asian market states that the only ingredient is Sweet Potato Starch. I’m not so sure of that. There’s got to be some other ingredient in these noodles – can anyone confirm?

The noodles are stretchy, neutral flavored (duh!), slightly chewy and springy in texture. What they are great for is soaking up all of the flavors in the dish. Not much seasoning is needed because the noodles really act like a sponge.

FOOD FIGHT!!!

The other thing these noodles are fantastic for is FOOD FIGHT! Because they are so elastic, you can flick your wrist and SLAP your opponents face with a tangle mess of stinging wet noodles. Watch the recipe video…and at the end and see how well this works. I let the boys go at it with each other!

But beware….10 Minutes of food fighting fun, 40 minutes of cleanup. But the boys said it was all worth it. My camera lens….not so happy. I got hit too!

Korean Japchae Noodle Recipe Video

 

 

Korean Japchae Noodles Recipe Vegetarian

 

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Korean Japchae Glass Noodles Recipe - Super Foods Version!

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 15 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes
Korean Japchae Noodles Recipe Vegetarian

The key to this recipe is adding each ingredient separately - in the video, the sweet potato takes the longest to cook, so it goes in first.

Feel free to customize! Add mushrooms (add with the onions); matchstick carrots or fresh spinach leaves (add them the same time as the kale/swiss chard).

Ingredients:

6 ounces dried Korean glass noodles (sweet potato)
1 medium sweet potato
4 big handfuls kale and swiss chard
1 onion
1 stalk green onion
3-4 cloves garlic
1/2 cup soy sauce
2 tablespoons brown sugar
1 tablespoon sesame oil
1 tablespoon roasted sesame seeds
1 tablespoon cooking oil

Directions:

PREP INGREDIENTS:
1. Boil a pot of water (about 2 quarts). Turn off heat and add in the glass noodles. Let sit for 10 minutes.
2. Vegetables:
-Kale/Swiss Chard: Fold leaves in half, tear away the leafy part from tough stem (discard stem). Cut or tear leaves into bite sized pieces.
-Dice the sweet potatoes into 1/2" dice (the smaller you dice, the quicker it will cook)
-Onion: Slice onion into thin slices.
-Green Onion: chop.
-Finely mince the garlic.
3. In bowl, whisk together soy sauce, brown sugar and sesame oil.
4. If 10 minutes have passed for the noodles, drain the noodles.

COOK:
1. Heat wok with cooking oil over medium heat. Add in the sweet potatoes and cook for 3 minutes each side. The sweet potatoes should be lightly browned, darker orange and just nearly cooked through.
2. Turn heat to medium-high and add in the onions. Stir-fry for 2 minutes, until onions become translucent.
3. Add in the garlic and green onion. Toss well and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute.
4. Add in the leafy vegetables. Use tongs to toss well and cook for 1 1/2 minutes or until the vegetables are wilting.
5. Add in the noodles and pour in the sauce. Toss well again to combine everything. Finish off with sesame seeds.

 

Items I use (and love!)

This baby is my favorite way to mince garlic. It can do up to 4 cloves at the same time!
Since we’ve sold out of the Steamy Kitchen Woks (thank you to all the customers!) I’ve been using and loving this Anolon Wok – it’s got a flat bottom, hard-anodized aluminum with nonstick, a great lid that you can see through and heat resistant handles. And, the price is amazing! Great for gas or electric.

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Garlic Noodles with Miso Butter http://steamykitchen.com/21276-garlic-noodles-musmiso-butter-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/21276-garlic-noodles-musmiso-butter-recipe.html#comments Mon, 23 Apr 2012 13:52:10 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=21276 This is a variation of one of the most popular recipes from my cookbook (Todd & Diane posted the recipe for Garlic Butter Noodles) and SteamyKitchen.com (Garlic Scallion Noodles). I’ve one-upped the recipe by adding in a spoonful of miso paste and throwing in fresh mushrooms, which is like upgrading from (okay, I just deleted a lame analogy of something ...

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Garlic Noodles Miso Butter Recipe

This is a variation of one of the most popular recipes from my cookbook (Todd & Diane posted the recipe for Garlic Butter Noodles) and SteamyKitchen.com (Garlic Scallion Noodles).

I’ve one-upped the recipe by adding in a spoonful of miso paste and throwing in fresh mushrooms, which is like upgrading from (okay, I just deleted a lame analogy of something related to stereos….too doiky, too predicable….deerrrrrr….)

Anyways, the miso paste, even just just a spoonful of it, melted into butter gives the entire dish richness (without adding meat!) I’ve created this recipe for my client, Miso & Easy, who makes ready-to-use miso paste. 

Garlic Noodles with Miso Butter

You can use any type of noodles that you want, Asian noodles or even spaghetti noodles (which is what I used). The secret ingredient is miso paste and Maggi Sauce….but soy sauce will work just as well.

 

Get your wok out (or a large saute pan with high sides) and add saute the garlic and green onions in butter, but for the love of Buddha, don’t burn the garlic – keep the heat in control!

Add in the mushrooms.

Just as the mushooms are softening, add in the miso (you might want to make a little space in the pan and stir the miso with the butter to melt it)

Maggi or soy sauce.

Cooked noodles and toss! toss! toss!

And toss more!

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Garlic Noodles with Miso Butter Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 5 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes
garlic-noodles-miso-butter-recipe-7627.jpg

Use any noodles that you like - I prefer either Chinese egg noodles or thin spaghetti noodles.

Ingredients:

1/2 pound dry pasta or noodles of your choice
2 tablespoons butter
2 cloves garlic, finely minced
1 stalk green onion, chopped
12 ounces fresh mushrooms of your choice
2 tablespoons Miso & Easy (or 1 tablespoon regular miso paste)
2 teaspoons Maggi Sauce (or 1 1/2 tablespoons oyster sauce)

Directions:

1. Cook the pasta according to package directions. Drain and set aside.

2. Heat a wok or large saute pan over medium heat. When hot, add the butter, garlic and green onion. Cook for 1 minute or until very fragrant, making sure to keep an eye on the heat so that the garlic does not burn. Add in the mushrooms and cook for 2 minutes. Add in the miso, Maggi Sauce (or oyster sauce) and stir.

3. Add in the cooked pasta and toss well.

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Seafood Miso Noodle Soup http://steamykitchen.com/20507-seafood-miso-noodle-soup.html http://steamykitchen.com/20507-seafood-miso-noodle-soup.html#comments Fri, 24 Feb 2012 16:30:11 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=20507 A couple of weeks ago, we had a massive Temaki sushi party with friends. If you’ve never been to one, I highly suggest making friends with the fine folks at I Love Blue Sea  or head over to Casson Trenor’s site, Sustainable Sushi and host a sushi party of your own. Since I’m a type of person who always over-cooks for dinner parties ...

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A couple of weeks ago, we had a massive Temaki sushi party with friends. If you’ve never been to one, I highly suggest making friends with the fine folks at I Love Blue Sea  or head over to Casson Trenor’s site, Sustainable Sushi and host a sushi party of your own.

Since I’m a type of person who always over-cooks for dinner parties (oh, not overcook as in sawdust meat, but over-cooks as in I prepare enough food to feed triple the amount of guests I’m expecting), there was plenty of seafood leftover for the weekend to make Seafood Miso Noodle Soup.

Like nearly all of my recipes, this meal is fast ‘n flexible, especially when you use rice noodles, which take a quick soak and 30 second boil. Dried rice noodles are soaked in cool or warm water for a few minutes to soften and rehydrate a bit. Then a swirl in your boiling broth and it’s done.

Japanese miso flavors the broth – you can use regular miso paste (any kind, though I recommend Shiro Miso, which is white miso, the most mild of all) or check out my client, Miso & Easy, which is prepared miso paste already mixed with dashi and conveniently packaged in a squeeze bottle. Just add water.

The rest of the ingredients are really up to you – assorted seafood, any vegetable and any fresh mushrooms that you like. I’ve used Japanese mushrooms (Brown Beech Mushroom), but regular sliced white mushrooms will work just as well.

Ingredients for Seafood Miso Noodle Soup

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Seafood Miso Noodle Soup

Servings: 2 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes
seafood-miso-noodle-soup-recipe

Ingredients:

4 ounces dried rice noodles
3 ounces fresh mushrooms
2 bok choy, leaves separated
8-10 ounces assorted seafood (fish, shrimp, scallops)
1 stalk green onion, sliced
If using Miso & Easy:
4 cups water
2 tablespoons Miso & Easy
If using regular Miso paste:
4 cups vegetable or chicken broth
2 tablespoons miso paste

Directions:

1. Soak the rice noodles in a bowl of cold water.

2. In a pot, bring the water (if using Miso & Easy) or broth (if using regular miso paste) to a simmer. Add in the vegetables, mushrooms and the seafood. Cook for 2-3 minutes or until the seafood is almost cooked through.

3. Drain the rice noodles and add to the simmering broth. Cook for 30 seconds then turn off the heat.

4. Stir in the Miso & Easy or miso paste.

5. Divide into bowls and garnish with green onions.

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Chinese Stir Fried Sticky Rice Cakes (Nian Gao) http://steamykitchen.com/15288-chinese-stirfried-sticky-rice-cakes-nian-gao.html http://steamykitchen.com/15288-chinese-stirfried-sticky-rice-cakes-nian-gao.html#comments Thu, 28 Apr 2011 17:49:45 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=15288 Step by step photos for authentic Shanghainese Chinese Fried Sticky Rice Cake (Nian Gao) Recipe.

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Last week, on a surprise visit to see family, Mom made a couple of dishes that I normally don’t cook myself. One of them is this Chinese Fried Sticky Rice Cake Noodle dish (long name!) In Chinese, it’s called 炒年糕 Chǎo Nián Gāo.

The recipe is from my Dad’s hometown of NingBo in China.

What are Sticky Rice Cake Noodles (Nian Gao)

Nian Gao is normally eaten for Chinese New Year, as it signifies good fortune for the coming year. “Nian” means year and “gao” means high — translating loosely to “every year, may you reach higher and higher.”

Nian Gao can also mean sticky rice cakes that are fried in egg (savory) or fried with sugar (sweet). The Shanghainese and Korean version (TteokGuk photo) of nian gao is this recipe, where they take the glutinous rice cakes, cut them into ovals 2 inches long, 1 inch wide, and stir fry them like noodles.

You can find these rice cake noodles at Asian markets, either dried form (in the dried noodle section), frozen or in the refrigerated noodle section. Mom likes to buy frozen rice cake noodles, as they keep well in the freezer. They have to be soaked for 2 hours up to overnight in water. Purchase either the Korean or Chinese version, they are the same.

The rice cakes have to be soaked for 2 hours (up to overnight)

Dried or fresh Chinese mushrooms (or shiitake), canned bamboo shoots

Mom used mustard greens that she had salted overnight, but I’ve given easier instructions in the recipe to use Napa Cabbage.

and Pork marinated in soy, rice wine, pepper, cornstarch and a pinch of sugar.

The pork is first stir-fried until almost cooked through.

Then add the Chinese mushrooms.

Add in the bamboo shoots.

Then the vegetables.

Toss well.

Season with a bit of soy sauce. Taste first and add more if needed.

Add in the drained rice cakes.

Toss! Toss! Toss!

Pour in 1/4 cup of chicken broth or vegetable broth, cover, turn heat to low and let cook for 2-3 minutes until the rice cakes are softened.

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Stir Fried Chinese Sticky Rice Cakes (Nian Gao) Recipe (炒年糕 chǎo nián gāo)

Servings: 6 Prep Time: 15 minutes Cook Time: 15 minutes (with up to overnight soaking of noodles)
chinese-korean-sticky-rice-noodles-nian-goh-recipe.jpg-2840.jpg

Notes on the sticky rice cakes:
They rice cakes should be gluten-free, but please check the packaging.
If dried - soak in water at room temperature overnight or up to 2 days
If frozen - defrost then soak in water at room temperature for 2 hours up to overnight
If fresh (in refrigerated section) - soak 2 hours in water at room temperature up to overnight

Notes on mushrooms
Mom likes to use dried Chinese black mushrooms, as they have much more flavor than the fresh shiitake mushrooms you'll find in the refrigerated section. But feel free to use either.

Ingredients:

One 24-ounce package rice cake nian goh noodles (see notes above)
4 dried Chinese black mushrooms (or 8 fresh shiitake mushrooms)
2 teaspoons soy sauce
freshly ground black pepper
pinch of sugar
1 teaspoon Chinese rice wine (or dry sherry)
1 teaspoon cornstarch
8 ounces pork, cut into very thin strips
2 tablespoons cooking oil
6 ounces Chinese Napa Cabbage, shredded
One 6-ounce can julienne cut bamboo shoots, drained
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1/4 cup chicken or vegetable broth

Directions:

1. In a large bowl, soak the rice cakes according to the instructions in the headnotes. If you are using dried Chinese black mushrooms, in a small bowl, soak the dried Chinese mushrooms for 2 hours or up to overnight until softened. If you are using fresh shiitake mushrooms, skip this step.

2. In a medium bowl, combine the 2 tsp soy sauce, black pepper, sugar, rice wine, cornstarch together. Mix in the pork and marinate for 20 minutes or up to overnight in the refrigerator.

3. When you are ready to cook, have all of your ingredients ready. Drain the rice cakes. Drain the mushrooms and slice into very thin slices.

4. Heat a wok or large saute pan over high heat. When hot, swirl in the cooking oil. Add the pork and cook until browned and almost cooked through.

5. Add in the mushrooms and the bamboo shoots, stir fry for 1 minute. Add in the cabbage and stir fry for 2 minutes. Mix in the soy sauce.

6. Add in the rice cakes and toss very well. Pour in the broth, cover and lower the heat to medium-low. Cook for 2-3 minutes or until the rice cakes have browned a little and are softened. The sticky rice cakes will be just slightly chewy (but not hard to chew) similar to pasta cooked al-dente. Taste and add in additional soy sauce if needed. Serve immediately.

 

 

 

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Miso Ramen Recipe http://steamykitchen.com/15145-miso-ramen-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/15145-miso-ramen-recipe.html#comments Tue, 19 Apr 2011 12:46:01 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=15145 Recipe with photos of ingredients for Japanese style Miso Ramen Noodle Soup Recipe.

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Miso Ramen Recipe

Since last summer when I posted my 15 Minute Udon Miso Soup recipe, I’ve gotten so many requests for a recipe for Miso Ramen that I’ve decided to post this recipe that appears in the Steamy Kitchen Cookbook. Though truthfully, the only part of this recipe that I follow is a) the miso soup base and b) cooking the ramen noodles. All other toppings in my Miso Ramen varies each time I make it depending on what’s in my refrigerator, as most times when I’m craving this dish it’s usually pretty darn close to midnight. Or 2am.

Ramen Noodles

Ramen Noodle for Miso Ramen Recipe

These are dried ramen noodles, though the ones that are fresh are much better. But at 2am, I’ll take the dried kind. I’ve also been known to rip open one of those 29 cent instant ramen noodle packages and use the noodles from the package, throwing away the spice pack. A couple times, as an emergency measure, I even used…..dried spaghetti pasta *covering eyes*

So I guess what I’m saying is, keep a package of dried ramen noodles in your pantry.

The Miso

Miso for Miso Ramen Recipe

White miso, or shiro miso is my favorite. It’s more delicate and less salty than the other kinds of miso. This stuff lasts for 6 months in the refrigerator (just keep it well sealed and preferably in a plastic tub)

Not only do I use it for making Japanese style noodle soups, but if I’m making a whatever-soup that needs a kick of flavor, I’ll stir in a big tablespoon of miso paste, which is a natural umami-master.

The Dashi

Dashi for Miso Ramen Recipe

This is instant dashi, which like sand-colored tiny granueles. Dashi is Japanese bonito fish stock. Don’t be intimidated if you’ve never used dashi – there’s absolutely NO fishy taste at all. In fact, if you like miso soup, you like dashi. All miso soup is made with a dashi base.

This is always in my pantry too. Of course, you can make your own dashi from scratch from dried bonito shavings and seaweed – Fuji Mama shows you how.

The Toppings

Raid your freezer and refrigerator:

Fresh spinach – blanch, then squeeze all of the water out.
Frozen spinach – defrost, then squeeze all of the water out.
Corn – canned, fresh or frozen
Green onions – chopped
Bamboo shoots – Canned or fresh
Bamboo Shoots in Chili Oil – oh yummmm my favorite
Dried seaweed
Tofu – drained and cubed
Snow peas – blanched
Barbeque cha-siu pork
Enoki or shiitake mushrooms
Sliced Japanese fish cakes
Fresh bean sprouts

Yummy Miso Ramen

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Miso Ramen Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 15 minutes
Miso Ramen Recipe

Miso and dashi are both gluten free (though please double check the label of whatever you purchase). Instant dashi does contain MSG, so if you're concerned about that, make the dashi from scratch or leave it out entirely and add in an additional teaspoon or so of soy sauce.

For the broth, use pork-based or vegetable broth. Chicken and beef are too strong in flavor for this soup.

Ingredients:

4 eggs
10 oz (285 g) dried ramen noodles
1/2 cup (200 g) fresh or canned bamboo shoots, sliced
1/2 cup (170 g) fresh or canned corn kernels, drained
1/3 cup (80 g) defrosted frozen or fresh spinach
8 cups (2 liters) store-bought or homemade pork or vegetable broth
2 teaspoons instant dashi granules
1 tablespoon soy sauce, or to taste
4 tablespoons fresh miso paste
1 cup (100 g) fresh bean sprouts
1 stalk green onion (scallions), finely chopped
4 teaspoons chili oil (optional)

Directions:

Place the whole, un-cracked eggs in a medium pot and fill with water to cover eggs by 1 inch (2.5 cm). Turn the heat to high and when boiling, turn the heat off and let the eggs sit in the hot water for 10 minutes. Promptly use a slotted spoon to remove the eggs and peel the egg under cold running water. Slice each egg in half.

Return the same pot of water to a boil. Add the ramen noodles and cook according to package instructions (most ramen noodles only take 3 minutes to cook.) Drain and rinse with cold water to stop the cooking.

Divide the noodles, hardboiled eggs, bamboo shoots, corn and spinach among 4 large serving bowls.

In a large pot, add the stock, instant dashi and soy sauce. Bring to a boil over high heat. Remove from the heat and stir in the miso. Taste the soup and add an additional 1 to 2 tablespoons of miso if you’d like. Ladle soup into each bowl. Top each bowl with fresh bean sprouts, green onions and a drizzle of chili oil, if desired.

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Warm Maitake Pasta with Citrus Soy Dressing http://steamykitchen.com/11254-warm-maitake-pasta-with-citrus-soy-dressing.html http://steamykitchen.com/11254-warm-maitake-pasta-with-citrus-soy-dressing.html#comments Mon, 20 Sep 2010 16:29:38 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=11254 Recipe for Warm Maitake Pasta with Citrus Soy Dressing on my food column on Discovery Heath.

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Recipe for Warm Maitake Pasta with Citrus Soy Dressing on my food column on Discovery Heath.

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Chinese Broccoli Beef Noodle Stir Fry http://steamykitchen.com/4997-broccoli-beef-noodle-stir-fry.html http://steamykitchen.com/4997-broccoli-beef-noodle-stir-fry.html#comments Tue, 11 Aug 2009 03:22:35 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=4997 Simple 15 minute recipe for Chinese Broccoli Beef Noodle Stir Fry with step by step photos.

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broccoli-beef-noodles-59

Here’s what you’ll learn:

  • How to choose and buy the freshest Chinese broccoli (gai-lan)
  • The perfect marinade recipe
  • Secrets to no-fail Chinese stir fries

 

Chinese Broccoli (Gai-Lan)

Chinese broccoli should be almost all stem and green leaves. Look for Chinese broccoli with minimal open flowers (lots of open white flowers means that the Chinese broccoli is past its prime and bitter.

You can also tell from the cut stems if the Chinese broccoli will be perfect or too old. See the bottoms of these cut stems? It’s milky-translucent and smooth. If the bottoms of the stem have a hard white circle in the middle (instead of smooth, milky and translucent) it will probably be past its prime and taste tough and bitter.

Photo below is Chinese Broccoli…see the beautiful stem-bottoms?

broccoli-beef-noodles-17

For this Broccoli Beef Noodle Stir Fry recipe, you can use ANY type of noodles. Really, spaghetti noodles are fantastic in this dish. I happened to have Japanese style egg-noodles, so that’s what I used! Cook your noodles according to package directions.

broccoli-beef-noodles-1

While the noodles are cooking, marinate the beef slices in soy sauce, cornstarch, sugar, oyster sauce and rice wine. If you don’t have rice wine, use dry sherry or any dry white wine will do. The sugar and the oyster sauce will help the meat caramelize.

broccoli-beef-noodles-21

You want beautiful, carmelized meat in your stir fry?

Here’s the secret. DO NOT CROWD THE MEAT! Single layer, ladies and gents!

broccoli-beef-noodles-27

Once you add it to the wok or frying pan, LEAVE THE THING ALONE. Resist the temptation to shake, move it around or flip…until the first side has a chance to caramelize. Then flip.

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See the nicely caramelized bits?

broccoli-beef-noodles-31

Once the meat finishes cooking, remove to a plate. Now it’s time for Chinese Broccoli (Gai Lan).

broccoli-beef-noodles-36

Stir fry for a minute, scooping up the oils at the bottom of the wok all over the Chinese Broccoli. Bathe the oil over the Chinese Broccoli.

Now turn heat down, add 1/4 cup of water or browth and cover to let steam.

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A couple of minutes later…test the Chinese Broccoli to see if done! A knife should pierce easily into the steam.

broccoli-beef-noodles-38

Now its the cooked noodles turn to take a bath in the sauce.

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See it absorb all the juicy bits?

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Now return the beef and broccoli to the wok and serve!!

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Yum.

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broccoli-beef-noodles-77

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Chinese Broccoli Beef Noodle Stir Fry Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: Cook Time:
broccoli-beef-noodles-59

Ingredients:

3 tablespoons soy sauce
3 tablespoons oyster sauce
3 tablespoons Shaoxing wine, sake or dry white wine
1 tablespoon sugar
1 tablespoon tapioca starch or cornstarch
1 teaspoon dark sesame oil
1 pound beef sirloin, thinly sliced
1 pound fresh or 10 ounces dried noodles
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
3 large garlic cloves, crushed and finely chopped
1.25 cups chicken or vegetable stock
1 pound Chinese broccoli or regular common broccoli, cut into bite-size chunks or florets
Freshly ground black pepper

Directions:

In a medium bowl, whisk together 1 tablespoon each soy sauce, oyster sauce and rice wine. Add the sugar and continue to whisk until completely dissolved. Stir in the tapioca starch and continue stirring until smooth. Add the sesame oil and beef, and mix well. Marinate for 20 minutes. Drain and discard the excess marinade.

Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Cook the noodles until 1 minute shy of done and drain. (We'll finish cooking the noodles at the end)

Heat 1 tablespoon of the vegetable oil in a skillet or wok over high heat and stir-fry the garlic until fragrant, about 1o seconds. Add the beef and stir-fry until tender, 1 to 2 minutes. Transfer to a plate. Add the remaining tablespoon of oil and when hot, add the Chinese broccoli, stir frying so that the oil coats the Chinese broccoli. Pour in the 1/4 cup of the stock, turn the heat to medium-low and cover with a tight fitting lid. Cook the Chinese broccoli until tender, 3 to 5 minutes. Transfer the Chinese broccoli to the same plate.

Add the remaining cup of stock and the remaining 2 tablespoons each of soy sauce, oyster sauce, and rice wine to the same skillet and bring to a boil over
high heat.

Add the noodles and cook until the liquid has almost completely evaporated, leaving the noodles lightly moistened,2 to 3 minutes. Return the beef and broccoli to the skillet and toss to mix the ingredients thoroughly. Season with pepper to taste and serve.

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Beijing Noodles http://steamykitchen.com/662-ground-beef-with-beijing-sauce-over-noodles.html http://steamykitchen.com/662-ground-beef-with-beijing-sauce-over-noodles.html#comments Tue, 22 Jul 2008 18:06:43 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/?p=662 As promised, I’m doing a series of simple Chinese dishes as we lead up to the 2008 Beijing Olympics. I’m hoping to post a new recipe at least 4 times a week, though that might be a little ambitious and make my family very hungry for something like spaghetti or meatloaf. This dish, Ground Beef with Beijing Sauce over Noodles ...

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Ground Beef with Beijing Sauce Over Noodles

As promised, I’m doing a series of simple Chinese dishes as we lead up to the 2008 Beijing Olympics. I’m hoping to post a new recipe at least 4 times a week, though that might be a little ambitious and make my family very hungry for something like spaghetti or meatloaf. This dish, Ground Beef with Beijing Sauce over Noodles is so flexible – you can use ground turkey, chicken or even pork. If you don’t have Chinese noodles, serve over rice or any type of pasta. The greatest thing about this recipe is that the entire thing comes together in 15 minutes (if using noodles) and costs around $5 to feed a family of 4. How can you beat that?! Normally, I’d serve this over rice, but I had some of these wonton noodles leftover from my Crab and Pork Wonton Noodle Soup recipe that we’re currently testing for my Steamy Kitchen cookbook. (Come take a look and join the testing group if you’re interested!) So, as thrifty as I am, I’ve served this over noodles instead of rice. You can do either. There are certain dishes that my Mom always says in Chinese, “goes very good with rice,” meaning, You’re gonna eat A LOT of it and won’t be able to stop. This is one of those dishes where before you even know it, you’ve eaten the entire pot with rice or noodles!

 

This recipe is adapted from:

Chinese Rice and Noodles: With Appetizers, Soups and Sweets, published by the famous Wei Chuan Cooking School.

What is Chinese Ground Bean Sauce

There are several different kinds of bean sauce, the one I used is “ground bean sauce” made by Koon Chun, the “ground” referring to a smooth paste vs. having whole soybeans inside the sauce. Either one is fine. If it doesn’t say “ground,” chances are that it does include whole soy beans in the sauce.

If you prefer spicy, you can use the “hot bean sauce.”

On using frozen vegetables

I always have a package of peas/carrots in the freezer. One, they’re cheap; two, they are almost just as nutritious as fresh vegetables; and three they require no cooking. I also use the frozen vegetables for fried rice, ma po tofu (recipe coming) and anytime I’m being a total lazy fart and don’t want to go to the store. There are many different kinds of dried chilies, most Asian markets will have a finger length dried chili – about the size of your pinky. Though if you look in the dried chili section of your regular supermarket, you can use any of those. In a pinch, just use a teaspoon of regular chili flakes.

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Beijing Olympics

Olympics You must click over to James in Beijing’s site to see what this silliness is all about ***

Other great Chinese dishes

Martin Yan's Pan Seared Steak Rolls Martin Yan’s Pan Seared Steak Rolls

Baby Back Ribs with Orange Ginger Glaze</a Baby Back Ribs with Orange Ginger Glaze


Stir Fried Shrimp, Eggs and Peas + Stir Fry Secrets Stir Fried Shrimp, Eggs and Peas + Stir Fry Secrets

Pan Fried Shrimp and Pork Potstickers Pan Fried Shrimp and Pork Potstickers

Xiao Long Bao Xiao Long Bao – Steamed Shanghai Soup Dumplings

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Vietnamese Pho: Beef Noodle Soup http://steamykitchen.com/271-vietnamese-beef-noodle-soup-pho.html http://steamykitchen.com/271-vietnamese-beef-noodle-soup-pho.html#comments Sat, 09 Feb 2008 20:15:33 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/2008/02/09/vietnamese-beef-noodle-soup-pho/ What the Pho?! I’ve been working hard perfecting the techniques and recipe for Vietnamese Beef Noodle Soup, or Pho, just for you. It’s taken years of kitchen experiments, eating out and scouring for good recipes. Of all the cookbooks that I own, the best recipe that I’ve found for Pho is from: Andrea Nguyen’s Into the Vietnamese Kitchen, which is ...

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Vietnamese Pho Noodle Soup Recipe

What the Pho?!

I’ve been working hard perfecting the techniques and recipe for Vietnamese Beef Noodle Soup, or Pho, just for you. It’s taken years of kitchen experiments, eating out and scouring for good recipes. Of all the cookbooks that I own, the best recipe that I’ve found for Pho is from:

Andrea Nguyen’s Into the Vietnamese KitchenInto the Vietnamese Kitchen Cookbook, which is one of the most comprehensive books on the cuisine of Vietnam. The book also won nominations for a James Beard Foundation award and two International Association of Culinary Professionals (IACP). Definitely a must-have book for Asian food lovers.

So, let’s get right to the Vietnamese Beef Pho Recipe!

The dish is pronounced “fuh” and not “foo” or “foe” or “puh”

Yeah, Pho is cheap eat out…but to be able to make a home made version? Pretty Pho-king amazing, if you ask me.

Pho Spices

It’s best if you can get each spice separately, but I do find that the spice packets are pretty convenient. They cost less than $2.00 and even come with a mesh bag to put all the spices in. Spices include cinnamon sticks, cloves, coriander pods, star anise and cardamom. Whatever you do, don’t use the Pho spice paste that comes in a jar or can. Nasty stuff, that’s Pho-sho’.

Pho Spices use for Vietnamese Pho Recipe

Best Bones for Pho

Knuckle bones are the best to make the stock. The knobby knuckle bones, about the size of your fist, is full of gelatin – which gives body and richness to your broth. The knuckle bones make the biggest difference in your broth! You can find knuckle bones at Asian markets, but at regular supermarkets – you might have to ask your butcher.

Leg bones are also great for the pho broth. Take a look at the photo below. The bone that’s at 12-o’clock position is a leg bone that contains marrow. The marrow is good, but it’s extremely fatty. If I have a lot of marrow bones, I’ll scoop out the marrow with a small spoon or knife and discard after the par-boiling (see below). Having too much marrow will give you a greasy film on your pho broth.

But let’s say that you can’t find leg/knuckle bones. Go ahead and use whatever beef bones your supermarket has and just supplement with some oxtail bones or a pound of beef meat (rump, chuck, brisket, etc.) for extra flavor. Alternatively, you can buy knuckle bones online – Blue Valley Meats offers 100% grass fed knuckle bones for $9 per bag.

 

beef knuckle bones for pho

Blue Valley Meats knuckle bones

Bones are parboiled first for a good 10 minutes in rapidly boiling water – this gets rid of the yucky impurities like blood particles and extra fat. You’ll see gray foam float up to the surface as you boil. After 10 minutes, dump out all of the water, rinse out your pot, rinse the bones, and refill with clean, cool water. I know it’s an extra step, but this will give you the pure, clean-tasting broth.

If you have a lot of marrow bones, use a spoon or knife to scoop out and discard some of the marrow. Do this after the parboil, while the bones are still hot. The marrow can only be scooped out when the bones are hot, otherwise, it solidifies.

 

Charring Onions and Ginger

Charring or roasting the onions and ginger gives you a wonderfully mellow and naturally sweet flavor. I used to char over an open flame on my stovetop with a pair of tongs, but that got pretty tiring. Plus, metal tongs + long time over flame = very hothothot hands. So now, I just raise my oven rack to the highest position and turn my broiler on. See how golden the ginger gets?

Char onions and ginger for Vietnamese Pho Recipevietnamese-pho-recipe-ginger

Damn Scumbag!

So here is my broth boilin’ away with the mesh bag of spices, charred ginger, charred onions and beef bones. You can see floating bits of fat and the damn scumbag.

Fat & marrow bits = good eats. Try to keep that in the broth!

But gotta get rid of the scum! I use a very, very fine mesh strainer designed just for scum. heh. A scumbag strainer. Can you imagine if I had a line of cookware and tools – “Steamy Kitchen Scumbag Strainer.” Straining the scum keeps your broth pure and clean. The lower the simmer, the less scum you have.

A note on broth simmering time – I simmer the broth for 3 hours. According to both Andrea Nguyen and Corinne Trang (author of Authentic Vietnamese Cooking and former editor and director of Saveur’s test kitchen) – all of the flavors in the bone have been extracted after 3 hours.

Skim the Scum when making broth for Vietnamese Pho Recipe

Thin Sliced Meat

You can use a thinly sliced flank steak, london broil, sirloin, eye of round or tri-tip. Instead of beef slices, you could use beef balls (Bo Vien) found in the freezer section of your Asian market. The secret to cutting meat is to cut across the grain. You want your beef slices as thin as possible, and I always throw the whole chunk of meat in the freezer for 15 minutes to make it easier to slice thinly.

How to slice steak for Vietnamese Pho Recipe

Pho Noodles


Rice noodles for vietnamese pho recipe


Vietnamese Beef Noodle Soup typically uses rice noodles. You can buy them dried or fresh. I love the slippery softness of fresh noodles (look in the refrigerator or freezer section.) Most restaurants will use dried, flat rice noodles. Look for ones that are medium thickness and flat like these.

Pho Condiments


Condiments for Vietnamese Pho Recipe


Pho-tastic condiments! On the tables of every Pho restaurant, you’ll see these two condiments, Cock Sauce (Sriracha hot chili sauce) and Hoisin Sauce. You can squirt and slather as much of these two condiments as you want…but I’m a purist.If I’m going to spend a couple of hours carefully crafting a rich, flavor-packed, clean soup – I better taste every damn drop. Condiment sauces just get in the way. Sometimes, I’ll squirt a bit of each sauce in a little dish and dip my meat in the sauce as I take a bite. You ask….why do we call it Cock sauce? See that rooster on the bottle?

Pho Vegetables and Herbs

Fresh mint, cilantro, basil, bean sprouts, limees, sliced chili peppers are just some of my favorite accompaniments. Set a plate at the table and your guests can pick and choose what they like. Here’s a great Pho-tograph of fresh vegetables and herbs.

Fresh Herbs for Vietnamese Pho Recipe

Recommended Tools

These are tools that I recommend and use in my kitchen.




More Pho Recipes

Crock Pot/Slow Cooker Pho Recipe

Crock Pot Slow Cooker Pho
Don’t have time to man a stove? Use your crock pot or slow cooker!

Vietnamese Chicken Pho (Pho Ga) Recipe

vietnamese-chicken-pho-recipe Vietnamese Chicken Noodle Soup (Pho Ga)

Pho-Lovers Pho-Ever

Guilty Carnivore
Eat Drink & Be Merry

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Vietnamese Pho: Beef Noodle Soup Recipe

Servings: 8 Prep Time: 30 minutes Cook Time: 4 hours
vietnamese-pho-recipe-2

Adapted from my favorite Vietnamese cookbook
Into the Vietnamese Kitchen

Sometimes, I omit the 1 pound of beef meat in the broth (you'll see I've made it optional) - as I've found that as long as I have good bones, the broth will have enough flavor to not need the extra beef meat.

Ingredients:

THE BROTH



2 onions, halved
4" nub of ginger, halved lengthwise
5-6 pounds of good beef bones, preferably leg and knuckle
1 pound of beef meat - chuck, brisket, rump, cut into large slices [optional]6 quarts of water
1 package of Pho Spices [1 cinnamon stick, 1 tbl coriander seeds, 1 tbl fennel seeds, 5 whole star anise, 1 cardamom pod, 6 whole cloves - in mesh bag]1 1/2 tablespoons kosher salt (halve if using regular table salt)
1/4 cup fish sauce
1 inch chunk of yellow rock sugar (about 1 oz) - or 1oz of regular sugar

2 pounds rice noodles (dried or fresh)
Cooked beef from the broth (shredded or thinly sliced)
1/2 pound flank, london broil, sirloin or eye of round, sliced as thinly as possible.
big handful of each: mint, cilantro, basil
2 limes, cut into wedges
2-3 chili peppers, sliced
2 big handfuls of fresh bean sprouts
Hoisin sauce
Sriracha hot sauce

Directions:

Char: Turn your broiler on high and move rack to the highest spot. Place ginger and onions on baking sheet. Brush just a bit of cooking oil on the cut side of each. Broil on high until ginger and onions begin to char. Turn over and continue to char. This should take a total of 10-15 minutes.

Parboil the bones: Fill large pot (12-qt capacity) with cool water. Boil water, and then add the bones, keeping the heat on high. Boil vigorously for 10 minutes. Drain, rinse the bones and rinse out the pot. If you have a lot of marrow in the bones, use a small spoon to scoop out and discard some of the marrow. Refill pot with bones and 6 qts of cool water. Bring to boil over high heat and lower to simmer. Using a ladle or a fine mesh strainer, remove any scum that rises to the top.

Boil broth: Add ginger, onion, spice packet, beef, sugar, fish sauce, salt and simmer uncovered for 1 1/2 hours. Remove the beef meat and set aside (you'll be eating this meat later in the bowls) Continue simmering for another 1 1/2 hours. Strain broth and return the broth to the pot. Taste broth and adjust seasoning - this is a crucial step. If the broth's flavor doesn't quite shine yet, add 2 teaspoons more of fish sauce, large pinch of salt and a small nugget of rock sugar (or 1 teaspoon of regular sugar). Keep doing this until the broth tastes perfect.

Prepare noodles & meat: Slice your flank/london broil/sirloin as thin as possible - try freezing for 15 minutes prior to slicing to make it easier. Remember the cooked beef meat that was part of your broth? Cut or shred the meat and set aside. Arrange all other ingredients on a platter for the table. Your guests will "assemble" their own bowls. Follow the directions on your package of noodles - there are many different sizes and widths of rice noodles, so make sure you read the directions. For some fresh rice noodles, just a quick 5 second blanch in hot water is all that's needed. The package that I purchased (above) - needed about 45 seconds in boiling water.

Ladling: Bring your broth back to a boil. Line up your soup bowls next to the stove. Fill each bowl with rice noodles, shredded cooked beef and raw meat slices. As soon as the broth comes back to a boil, ladle into each bowl. the hot broth will cook your raw beef slices. Serve immediately. Guests can garnish their own bowls as they wish.

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Vietnamese Summer Rolls with Cashew Butter Dipping Sauce http://steamykitchen.com/265-vietnamese-summer-rolls.html http://steamykitchen.com/265-vietnamese-summer-rolls.html#comments Thu, 31 Jan 2008 16:23:14 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/2008/01/31/steamy-kitchen-cooks-oishii-eats/ I made Vietnamese Summer Rolls (Goi Cuon) with Cashew Nut Dipping Sauce this morning on television! They came out fantastic and the crew devoured them seconds after ......

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Goi Cuon Recipe

I made Oishii Eats Vietnamese Summer Rolls (Goi Cuon) with Cashew Nut Dipping Sauce this morning on television on ABC7! They came out fantastic and the crew devoured them seconds after the camera shut off.

 

BTW, if you happened to catch the TV segment, the host was referring to this  Steamy HOT magazine photo shoot!

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Both Oishii Eats and I enjoy our shrimp grilled rather than boiled. Below is the Vietnamese Summer Rolls (Goi Cuon) recipe and the Oishii Eats Cashew Butter Dipping Sauce.

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Vietnamese Shrimp Mango Summer Rolls Recipe

Servings: Makes 12 rolls Prep Time: 20 minutes Cook Time: 5 minutes
Vietnamese Summer Rolls

Traditionally, the shrimp is boiled in Vietnamese Summer Rolls (Goi Cuon). However, I love the flavor of marinated and grilled Lemongrass shrimp in these Summer Rolls. You can find lemongrass in most supermarkets - peel off the outer leaves. Use a microplane zester to zest the bottom 4" of the lemongrass stalk. If you can't find lemongrass, substitute with fresh lemon zest, or just leave it out. You could also marinate the shrimp in a little bit of garlic/ginger/soy.

About the Cashew Butter Dipping Sauce: Most recipes for dipping sauce call for Peanut Butter, however a Cashew Butter or even Almond Butter is more fragrant, delicate and oh-so-delicious. I like my sauce a little thin, so that when I dip my roll in the sauce, it lightly coats the roll and I can still taste the fresh, vibrant vegetables inside.

Ingredients:

FOR THE SUMMER ROLLS
½ tsp fish sauce (substitute with soy sauce)
½ tsp freshly grated lemongrass
freshly ground black pepper
¼ tsp sugar
24 small sized shrimp, shelled and deveined
6 oz dried rice vermicelli
12 round rice papers (8" diameter)
1 head of butter or Boston Bibb lettuce, leaves separated
1 cup julienned or shredded carrots
½ cup julienned red bell peppers
½ mango, sliced into thin slivers
24 mint leaves

FOR THE CASHEW BUTTER DIPPING SAUCE
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
3 garlic cloves, finely minced (about 3 teaspoons)
1/3 cup hoisin sauce
1 tablespoon sugar
1 tablespoon chili garlic sauce
3 tablespoons cashew butter
1/4 cup water

Directions:

In a medium sized bowl, whisk together the fish sauce, lemongrass, pepper and sugar. Add the shrimp and stir to coat. Marinate shrimp for 10 minutes. In meantime, boil a pot of water. Add vermicelli and cook for 4 minutes. Drain immediately, rinse with cold water, and drain again. Try to remove as much water as possible. Set aside.

Grill the shrimp in a large skillet with 1 tbl cooking oil on high heat until cooked through, about 2 minutes. You could also skewer the shrimp and grill on your outdoor grill. When shrimp is cool enough to handle, bisect each shrimp down the middle of its back so that you have two identical halves of shrimp. This makes the shrimp thin enough to wrap evenly.

Grab a pie plate or rectangular baking dish and fill it with about 1" of warm temperature water. Dip one rice paper round in the dish for a quick 2-seconds. Lift round and let the water drip off. Place on clean, dry work surface. Blot the top of the round with a paper towel. You'll work one roll at a time.

Now it's time to roll. The wrapper will still be a little stiff. By the time you finish piling on the ingredients, it will have softened enough to roll. Lay 4 halves of the shrimp in a line near the bottom 1/3 of the round. Top with some lettuce, vermicelli noodles, carrots, bell pepper, mango, and finishing with 2 mint leaves. Try to keep the ingredients compact and piled on top of the shrimp. Starting with the side closest to you, roll up the roll tight, stopping halfway to gently tug back on the roll to tighten. The wrapper is self-sealing. You can use a sharp knife to cut off the two ends to make it look neater.

Transfer to platter and cover with plastic wrap to prevent drying. Wipe counter or plate dry and repeat with remaining.

Some rice rounds are made thicker than others. If you find your wrapper is a little too stiff by the time you need to wrap, either blot less water off the rice round next time, let it sit for a few seconds before adding ingredients or dip in just slightly warmer water (but not hot!) Just remember to let the water drip off and wipe your working surface dry each time - a dry surface allows the rice paper to stick to the surface and create a little tension so that you can wrap.

Also, I've found it's best to work one roll at a time - since it only takes a few seconds for the rice round to soften, you really aren't saving a lot of time by dipping all your rice rounds at once. In fact, if 2 rounds touch each other - they will stick and you'll have a heck of a time getting them apart without tearing or wrinkling. If you must dip all at once, separate each wet round with a damp paper towel.

More great dishes for Chinese New Year

(Feb 7th, Year of the Rat)

Whole Grilled Fish on Banana Leaf – serving whole fish on Chinese New Year signifies abundance!

Chinese Style Steamed Fish

Chinese BBQ Pastries – super easy using store-bought puff pastry

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