Steamy Kitchen Recipes | RSS Feed http://steamykitchen.com Steamy Kitchen Food Blog: fast recipes, simple recipes, with fresh ingredients to create delicious meals. Fri, 17 Apr 2015 18:16:53 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.1.1 Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Orange-Almond Sauce http://steamykitchen.com/34185-vietnamese-spring-rolls-with-orange-almond-sauce-from-the-blender-girl-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/34185-vietnamese-spring-rolls-with-orange-almond-sauce-from-the-blender-girl-recipe-video.html#comments Wed, 07 May 2014 11:45:54 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=34185 I very rarely veer off my “tried and true” basic recipe for Vietnamese Nuoc Cham (dipping sauce with lime juice, fish sauce, chili peppers, sugar, water) for Vietnamese Spring Rolls. It’s easy, predictable and I can make the sauce just by taste without measuring anything! But just because I *LOVE* something doesn’t mean that my entire family loves it too. My fish-fearing ...

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spring rolls with orange almond sauce recipe-1663

I very rarely veer off my “tried and true” basic recipe for Vietnamese Nuoc Cham (dipping sauce with lime juice, fish sauce, chili peppers, sugar, water) for Vietnamese Spring Rolls. It’s easy, predictable and I can make the sauce just by taste without measuring anything!

spring rolls with orange almond sauce recipe-1654

But just because I *LOVE* something doesn’t mean that my entire family loves it too. My fish-fearing husband won’t touch it….and therefore my kids won’t dip in it either. Sigh. I keep telling the kids that, “Buddha is a happy eater (see his belly!?) and he would want you to eat like Mama, not Dad.”

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My friend, Blender Girl (okay, her name is really Tess) just came out with a cookbook called The Blender Girl: Super-Easy, Super-Healthy Meals, Snacks, Desserts, and Drinks–100 Gluten-Free, Vegan Recipes.

I found a recipe for Orange Almond Sauce for Vietnamese Spring Rolls. Big massive hit all around. It’s creamy, light and made with almond butter and fresh citrus juices for something a little different.

If you vow to cook a little healthier this summer – take a look at Tess’ book with 100 recipes that are good for you. The blender does all the hard work! The book features smoothies you’d expect from a blender book – as well as sauces, soups, marinades, dressings and desserts.

The book is currently #3 cookbook on Amazon!

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Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Orange Almond Sauce Recipe Video

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Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Orange Almond Sauce Recipe

Servings: Makes 16 rolls Prep Time: 15 minutes Cook Time: 15 minutes
spring rolls with orange almond sauce recipe-1654

You can make these rolls up to a day ahead. Here's what you need to remember: Place the rolls on a clean, dry plate in a single layer. If you want to stack multiple layers, place a sheet of plastic wrap between each layer. This prevents the rolls from sticking to each other. When all rolls are done, make sure you cover everything with plastic wrap - this prevents the rice paper from drying out in the refrigerator.

If you can't find almond butter - you can use any type of nut butter.

OPTIONAL: Soak the matchstick carrots and julienned cucumbers in 3 tablespoons of seasoned rice vinegar. It will add the amazing "zing" that you'll love!

Recipe adapted from The Blender Girl by Tess Masters

Ingredients:

FOR THE SPRING ROLLS
6 ounces dried rice vermicelli noodles
16 large dried rice paper wrappers
8 large lettuce leaves, preferably soft ones, halved and hard ribs removed
1 cup, matchstick cut carrots
2 cucumbers, julienned
1-2 avocado, pitted, peeled and sliced
1-2 bell pepper, cored, julienned
1 cup loosely packed cilantro
1 cup loosely packed mint
1 cup loosely packed basil




FOR THE ORANGE ALMOND SAUCE
1/4 cup water, plus more as needed
2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lime juice
3 tablespoons freshly squeezed orange juice
1/2 cup raw almond butter
1/2 teaspoon minced ginger
1 teaspoon honey or coconut nectar
1/2 teaspoon finely chopped garlic
1/2 teaspoon wheat-free tamari or soy sauce
1 teaspoon roasted sesame seeds

Directions:

Soak the noodles in hot water for about 20 minutes, until soft. Drain.

To assemble the rolls, fill a shallow dish half full with hot water (hot to the touch but not boiling. and submerge one rice paper wrapper for 5 seconds, let excess water drop off.  Place wrapper on a clean, dry surface and fold in half to form a half-circle. The wrapper should still be a bit stiff, but will soften by the time you've finished filling with vegetables.

Place a lettuce leaf in the middle of the half-circle and top it with a forkful of noodles, and then add a bit of each of the vegetables and herbs.  Carefully roll up the Vietnamese Spring Roll and set it on a dish, seam-side down in single layer. Repeat with the remaining wrappers and filling. If not serving immediately, chill in the fridge, covered with plastic wrap. 

To make the dipping sauce, throw all of the ingredients into your blender and puree on high for about 1 minute, until well combined. You may want to add an additional tablespoon or two of water to thin out the sauce. Stir in sesame seeds. Serve alongside the rolls.

 

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Kale Kumquat Salad http://steamykitchen.com/30289-kale-kumquat-salad-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/30289-kale-kumquat-salad-recipe-video.html#comments Fri, 27 Dec 2013 17:10:25 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=30289 Have you ever had a kumquat before? It’s a small little thing, and the way you eat a kumquat is somewhat counter-intuitive to any other citrus that you may be familiar with. First off, the skin is the sweetest part of the fruit – and thank goodness too – can you imagine peeling that tiny kumquat with a knife!? The ...

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Kale Kumquat Salad Recipe

Have you ever had a kumquat before? It’s a small little thing, and the way you eat a kumquat is somewhat counter-intuitive to any other citrus that you may be familiar with.

Kale Kumquat Salad Recipe

First off, the skin is the sweetest part of the fruit – and thank goodness too – can you imagine peeling that tiny kumquat with a knife!? The entire kumquat is edible, though I flick out the seeds. The thin skin is sweet with a slight bitter edge and there’s very little flesh involved on the inside.

This salad with sliced kumquat, fresh mushrooms and walnuts with a citrus vinaigrette was inspired by a stop at Los Angeles International Airport! Watch the video to find out what restaurant is a must-stop at LAX.

Kale Kumquat Salad Recipe Video

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Kale Kumquat Salad Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 5 minutes Cook Time:
Kale Kumquat Salad Recipe

Citrus dressing makes enough for recipe plus leftover for another day!

Ingredients:

FOR THE DRESSING
1/2 orange, juiced
2 tablespoons champagne vinegar (or red wine, white wine vinegar)
1 clove garlic, finely minced
freshly ground black pepper
1 1/2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
1 tablespoon honey
2 tablespoons olive oilFOR THE SALAD
1/2 pound kale, chopped, tough stems discarded
1/2 pound arugula
pinch of sea salt
1/2 cup kumquats, thinly sliced and seeds removed
3/4 cup mushrooms, sliced
1/4 cup walnuts, chopped

Directions:

Make the salad dressing by combining the vinaigrette ingredients in a jar with a tight fitting lid (like a mason jar) and shake well to combine.

Place the kale in a large bowl. Sprinkle with salt. Using massaging motion, rub the kale leaves together to break up and soften the kale.

To serve, toss kale with some of the dressing (I used about 1/4 cup of the dressing), nuts, mushrooms and kumquats.

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Grilled Shrimp with Cantaloupe Lime Salsa http://steamykitchen.com/27517-grilled-shrimp-with-cantaloupe-lime-salsa-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/27517-grilled-shrimp-with-cantaloupe-lime-salsa-recipe-video.html#comments Fri, 05 Jul 2013 18:13:14 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=27517 I’m a horrible grocery shopper. I’m compulsive, obsessive and spontaneous all packed into one short human form, pushing a shopping cart. In short, I’m every advertiser’s dream. Grocery shopping and farmer’s markets are my absolute favorite activities (next to petting yarn and fabric, as an avid knitter and new quilter). Some of my most creative time is walking back and ...

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Grilled Shrimp with Cantaloupe-Lime Salsa Recipe

I’m a horrible grocery shopper. I’m compulsive, obsessive and spontaneous all packed into one short human form, pushing a shopping cart. In short, I’m every advertiser’s dream.

Grilled Shrimp with Cantaloupe-Lime Salsa Recipe

Grocery shopping and farmer’s markets are my absolute favorite activities (next to petting yarn and fabric, as an avid knitter and new quilter). Some of my most creative time is walking back and forth between the produce section and different aisles, creating recipes on the fly.

The shopping cart ends up being an anatomy of a recipe, the grocery clerks are fascinated with the ingredients that go in, get swapped, moved around as I develop a new recipe in my head.

Grilled Shrimp with Cantaloupe-Lime Salsa Recipe

*Sidenote: You know what grocery stores need? A recipe consultant in the produce section! Instead of, “Can I help you find something?” — it should be — “Can I help you create a recipe?” <– great idea, huh?

But what ends up at the end of the grocery journey is A LOT of food in my cart. While it’s a “business expense” for Steamy Kitchen, it’s still very costly and unfortunately one of the side effects of recipe testing is a lot of food waste.

Grilled Shrimp with Cantaloupe-Lime Salsa Recipe

I’m a “DON’T” — one of these days, I’ll find myself in the back of a magazine with the black bar over my eyes, pushing a grocery cart piled high with food! (Though, don’t fret, my friends, I’m working on being more efficient and conscious of my food waste.)

One of the flavors that I was compiling at the store recently was pairing cantaloupe with basil. The two ingredients are amazingly refreshing as a  sorbet and I wanted to try the combo in a savory dish.

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A cookbook called Fresh Food Nation came to the rescue with a Cantaloupe Lime Salsa. The sweetness of cantaloupe, bite of jalapeño and lingering herbal basil is a perfect harmony of summer flavors. Pair with grilled shrimp, chicken, fish or pork. I’ve even had this salsa on top of a bed of greens as a salad.

 

Grilled Shrimp with Cantaloupe-Lime Salsa Recipe

Screen Shot 2013-07-05 at 2.26.02 PMFresh Food Nation cookbook by Martha Holmberg. Simple, seasonal recipes from America’s farmers. Cantaloupe Lime Salsa recipe from Lattin Farms in Fallon, Nevada. Owned by Rick Lattin and B. Ann Lattin. The Lattin’s CSA is the largest in northern Nevada. It is also home to one of the largest corn mazes in the United States.

Rick and B. Ann Lattin

Grilled Shrimp with Cantaloupe-Lime Salsa Recipe Video

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Grilled Shrimp with Cantaloupe-Lime Salsa Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 8 minutes
grilled-shrimp-with-cantaloupe-lime-salsa-featured-9441

Ingredients:

FOR THE CANTALOUPE LIME SALSA
1/2 small cantaloupe, diced
2 large tomatoes, diced
1/4 red onion, diced (or sweet onion)
1 teaspoon jalapeño pepper, seeded and minced (to taste)
1 lime, juiced
1 orange, zested and juiced
1/4 teaspoon kosher salt, to taste
freshly ground black pepper
handful fresh basil leaves, torn into small pieces
FOR THE GRILLED SHRIMP
1 pound shrimp, shelled (though you can leave the tail on if you wish)
1 tablespoon olive oil
salt and freshly ground black pepper

Directions:

FOR THE CANTALOUPE LIME SALSA

In a large bowl, combine all ingredients and toss to combine well. Taste and adjust seasoning, if needed.

FOR THE GRILLED SHRIMP

Pat the shrimp very dry. Toss the shrimp with the olive oil and then season with salt and pepper.

There are several ways you can prepare the shrimp:
-BBQ grill: Skewer and grill over high heat, 2-3 minutes per side.
-Broil: Lay on baking sheet, broil for 3-4 minutes per side on high, with rack set 6-8 inches under heat.
-Grill pan on stove: Heat a grill pan on high heat, grill shrimp 2-3 minutes per side
-Stir fry: Heat wok over high heat, swirl in a bit of cooking oil. When hot, add shrimp and spread out so that they are not overlapping (Give each shrimp some personal space!) Cook 2 minutes. Give it a good toss and spread out again. Cook the other side another 2 minutes.

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Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork http://steamykitchen.com/23642-vietnamese-spring-rolls-slow-cooker-pork-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/23642-vietnamese-spring-rolls-slow-cooker-pork-recipe.html#comments Wed, 10 Oct 2012 19:41:35 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=23642 (Video) Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Orange Coriander Pork. Simple slow cooker recipe! Watch step by step video on how to roll Vietnamese Spring Rolls.

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Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork Recipe

I’ve been waiting MONTHS to share this video with you! We shot a series of cooking videos in Seattle back in June, when I was in town speaking at the BlogHer Food conference and tickling oysters.  The videos were produced by the National Pork Board and Costco, featuring pork and a few of my blogger friends – Sandy & Paul (Reluctant Entertainer), Diana (Eating Richly), Jenny (Picky Palate), Jessica (The Novice Chef), Lauren (Lauren’s Latest), Amanda (Kevin & Amanda).

I wanted to create a magical day for the gals, so we arranged to have a B-I-G stretch limo pick up all of us.

The limo was complete with sparkling disco lights, rockin’ music, lava lamps (all we were missing was a stripper pole in the middle).

Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork Recipe

Prior to shooting the video, each of us went through hair, makeup, food styling and video talent coaching. Some of the gals had never been on camera before, so it was important to get some tips and guidance from an industry pro.

Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork Recipe

So um, what does a video coach teach you? Well, uh….

Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork Recipe

You don’t realize how much you use these filler words until you tape yourself. I tend to use these fillers when I’m transitioning between finishing one sentence and not knowing what my next sentence would be quite yet.

Coach’s advice to me?

Now.

Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork Recipe

Honestly, I don’t remember what he said. Something about NOW.

Next up, hair and makeup. This is what it takes to make me “camera-ready.”

Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork Recipe

HOLD STILL, JADEN! | That’s the lovely Diana, who’s expecting a BOY!

Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork RecipeVietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork Recipe

Since we were shooting 5 different recipes with multiple bloggers, we also had a couple of food stylists help us cook, prep and pretty up the food. Each dish had to be planned out, including colors of napkins, the type of platter and what ingredient goes where.

Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork Recipe

And…..ACTION! (look closely! It’s an iPad!)

Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork Recipe

The cameras and lights can be a little intimidating if you’re not used to them. There were 3 cameramen, a sound guy, a lighting guy, a producer, food stylists, PR reps, the Pork team and then all of us.

Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork Recipe

In between takes, hair and makeup sneak in to touch up.

Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork Recipe

Put 8 food bloggers in a room, turn on a video camera, and you’re sure to get some bloopers! See end of post for the blooper reel!

Big thanks to Pork Board and to Costco for producing these videos! My dish that I made with pork was Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork. I used Sirloin Tip Roast – a very lean and flavorful cut perfect for roasting and slow cooking. It feeds a big crowd on a small budget! Enjoy the recipe!

Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork Recipe

How to roll Vietnamese Spring Rolls

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Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork Recipe

Servings: 8 to 10 Prep Time: 10 minutes for the pork + 25 minutes for assembly Cook Time: 3 3/4 hours
Vietnamese-Spring-Roll-Pork-Recipe-feature-16

Please watch the video for detailed wrapping instructions. For the dipping sauce, purchase Sweet Chili Sauce, usually found in regular supermarkets, in the Asian section. It's sold in glass bottles and is bright orange/red in color. The Sweet Chili Sauce is sweet, and not too spicy. Alternatively, you could use other sweet sauces like "Duck Sauce" or "Sweet Plum Sauce".

If you don't have a slow cooker - roast the pork in the oven, 275F for 4 hours.

Ingredients:

FOR THE ORANGE CORIANDER PORK
2 pound boneless pork sirloin tip roast
1 teaspoon ground coriander
3/4 teaspoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 onion, cut into thick slices
1 orange, cut into 1/4-inch-thick rounds (do not peel)
1 cup orange juice
1 cup canned chicken broth
2 tablespoons fish sauce or soy sauce
2 teaspoons finely chopped fresh ginger
6 garlic cloves, smashed under a knife & peeled

FOR THE ROLL ASSEMBLY
one 8-oz. package (8-inch-diameter) rice spring roll wrappers (22 wrappers)
2 cups matchstick cut carrots
1 cucumber, cut into matchstick (English or Japanese cucumber preferred)
1 medium red bell pepper, cut into matchsticks
2 cups packed baby spinach leaves
sprigs of fresh mint and basil leaves
1 cup prepared Sweet Chili Sauce

Directions:

FOR THE SLOW COOKER PORK
Season pork roast with coriander, salt and pepper. To the slow cooker, add orange juice, broth, fish sauce, garlic and ginger. Scatter half the onion and orange in the slow cooker, top with pork, then add remaining onion and orange on top of the pork. Cover and cook on low until an instant-read thermometer inserted in the center of the pork registers 160F, about 3-4 hours. Transfer the pork to a carving board. Rest for at least 15 minutes.

FOR THE ASSEMBLY:
Slice pork across the grain into very thin slices. Divide into 22 portions. Half-fill a wide bowl with warm water. For each roll, dip 1 wrapper for 5 seconds. Shake
off the excess water from the wrapper and place on clean and dry surface. The rice paper will still be a little stiff, but don't worry, it will soften up. Fold the rice paper in half to make half-moon shape. Place 1 portion of pork at the bottom of the wrapper and top with carrot, cucumber, bell pepper, spinach leaves and herbs. Roll up the wrapper tightly. Place roll on a platter and cover with a barely damp towel to keep moist. The rolls can be made and refrigerated up to 2 hours ahead. Serve chilled with the Sweet Chili Sauce for dipping.

Our Blooper Reel!

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Miso Salmon with Orange and Fennel Recipe http://steamykitchen.com/21477-miso-salmon-with-orange-and-fennel-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/21477-miso-salmon-with-orange-and-fennel-recipe.html#comments Tue, 08 May 2012 17:51:00 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=21477 When we first moved into our house, I had carved out a small patch of land for the herb garden. Since the irrigation was a little messed up, the gardenette was close to a hose and small enough to be manageable daily. Once the main garden was built last October, I had transferred all my energy, plants and herbs into ...

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Miso Salmon Orange Fennel Recipe

When we first moved into our house, I had carved out a small patch of land for the herb garden. Since the irrigation was a little messed up, the gardenette was close to a hose and small enough to be manageable daily.

Once the main garden was built last October, I had transferred all my energy, plants and herbs into raised beds and sort of neglected the temporary gardenette. Most everything had died (that patch is still without automatic irrigation) except for the weeds and the fennel plants, which had miraculously thrived with no attention and no water. I have no idea what super-strain of fennel this is, but heck, I’m grateful.

I’ve got more fennel than I can ever eat myself, so I’ve been inserting both the bulb and the fragrant fronds into salads and grilling recipes when we entertain. People say fennel is licorice-y, but it’s so much more than that. Fennel is refreshing, slightly minty with the fragrance and “mist” of anise. I think the word, “licorice flavor” is too strong of a description — I don’t taste the licorice flavor straight on my tongue, it’s more of an overall delicate aroma. Kind of like how fresh basil, mint or dill tastes in your mouth.

Fennel is perfect to pair with miso, honey and orange. It’s an herb that can stand on its own – the fresh crunch of the bulb and don’t forget the lovely fronds, which are equally fragrant with a more floral slant.

If you’re not a big fan of fennel – I’ve got substitutes for you in the recipe.

Miso Salmon with Orange and Fennel Recipe

This is another miso inspired recipe I’ve developed for my client, Miso & Easy, a ready-to-use miso paste. Use any miso paste that you wish!

Here’s what ya need:

The first step is to marinate your salmon (or any fish of your choice) with miso, honey, ginger, sake (or white wine – or omit the alcohol altogether). Marinate in refrigerator for 1 hour or even overnight is fine.

On a baking sheet, layer sliced fennel bulb and a few orange slices. Substitute onion for the fennel, omit the orange if you’d like.

Lay the marinated salmon on top.

 

Top with fennel fronds – or fresh herb of your choice (basil, parsley, etc) You can even top it with more orange slices if you want.

Bake until done and serve with rice.

 

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Miso Salmon with Orange and Fennel Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 20 minutes
miso-salmon-recipe-7769-2.jpg

The fennel and orange gives the salmon amazing aroma. They also serve another purpose - they keep the salmon elevated so that heat can circulate all over the salmon fillet. If you do not have fennel, substitute with thinly sliced onion and fresh herb of your choice (parsley, basil, thyme, oregano, etc.) The miso marinade pairs perfectly with salmon.

Ingredients:

4 salmon fillets
salt and pepper
1/4 cup Miso & Easy (or 2 tablespoons miso paste)
1 tablespoon honey
2 tablespoons sake (or dry white wine)
1/2 teaspoon grated fresh ginger
1/2 orange
1 bulb fennel (with fronds)

Directions:

1. Marinate the salmon with the salt, pepper, Miso & Easy, honey, sake and ginger at least 1 hour or overnight in the refrigerator. It is easiest do this in a resealable bag.

2. When ready to cook, Preheat oven to 375F. Thinly slice the orange (you can keep the peel on) and thinly slices the fennel bulb. Layer the orange slices and fennel slices on a baking sheet. Place the marinated salmon on top (discard the leftover marinade.) Cover the salmon with several sprigs of the fennel fronds. Bake for 15-18 minutes or until desired level of doneness.

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Asian Orange Ginger Vinaigrette http://steamykitchen.com/20007-asian-orange-ginger-vinaigrette-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/20007-asian-orange-ginger-vinaigrette-recipe.html#comments Tue, 03 Jan 2012 19:02:54 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=20007 Homemade Asian Orange Vinaigrette is so incredibly fresh and vibrant tasting and only takes a few minutes.

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I’ve paired the Orange Ginger Vinaigrette with fresh tomatoes from my garden – the tomatoes are going absolutely nuts right now here in my Florida garden.

A few weeks ago, I bought a bottle of Asian Orange Ginger Salad Dressing and after only one use, it sat in the back of the refrigerator looking a little sad and rejected. I guess I was expecting so much more from the words, “orange” and “ginger” on the label – words that provoke an immediate emotional and sensory response in me: fresh, zingy, clean and tingly from the heat of the ginger.

Unfortunately for the maker of the dressing, who shall remain unnamed in this little rant, the dressing was overly sweet with a fake candy-like orange flavor and there was no hint of ginger whatsoever.

I should have known better than to buy the bottle in the first place. Making my own salad dressing only takes 10 minutes and I always have the ingredients on hand in the kitchen.

To me, making dressing is all about balance of flavor: lively and tangy, slightly sweet, a little heat and just enough sea salt to bring out all of the flavor notes.

In Asian-style dressing, tangy comes from sweetened or seasoned rice vinegar (see photos above of Mitsukan rice vinegars)  – which is vinegar made from rice and seasoned with just a bit of sugar. You can also used unsweetened or unseasoned rice vinegar too. I always have both on in my pantry.

As for the slightly sweet, I love using a bit of honey to balance out the vinegar. The oil I use for Asian dressings is neutral flavored light vegetable oil – olive oil is too strong in flavor. I’ve also used grapeseed oil and rice oil.

Freshly grated ginger provides the heat, no need to even peel the ginger, unless the brown outer skin is dry and thick. Use a rasp or microplane grater and go at it until you have about 1 teaspoon.

The fruit in the dressing is flexible – use any citrus: orange, lemon, lime, tangerine, blood orange or go a little more exotic with passion fruit (cut in half spoon out fruit only).

In this photo, I’ve paired the Orange Ginger Vinaigrette with heirloom tomatoes, fresh mozzarella and basil – just to change up the normal caprese salad into something more lively.

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Asian Orange Ginger Vinaigrette

Servings: serves 4 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 0 minutes
Orange Ginger Vinaigrette Recipe

Making dressing is all about balance of flavor: lively and tangy, slightly sweet, a little heat and just enough sea salt to bring out all of the flavor notes.The fruit in the dressing is flexible – use any citrus: orange, lemon, lime, tangerine, blood orange or go a little more exotic with passion fruit (cut in half spoon out fruit only).

Ingredients:

1 teaspoon orange zest
Juice from ½ large orange
1 teaspoon finely grated fresh ginger
2 tablespoons seasoned rice vinegar (I prefer Mitsukan brand)
1 teaspoon honey
sea salt to taste
¼ cup light vegetable oil

Directions:

Whisk together all of the ingredients.

*I’ve developed this recipe for a client, Mitsukan, the maker of rice vinegar shown above.

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Bouillabaisse http://steamykitchen.com/15777-bouillabaisse-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/15777-bouillabaisse-recipe.html#comments Mon, 06 Jun 2011 18:30:04 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=15777 A couple of weeks ago, I hosted my buddy Hank Shaw of the award-winning Hunter Gardener Angler Cook at our home and hit 2 out of the 4 activities from his blog name: fishing and cooking. If you must know why those 2 specific activities, our garden is winding down for its summer rest and hunting involves either a gun, ...

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bouillabaisse-recipe

A couple of weeks ago, I hosted my buddy Hank Shaw of the award-winning Hunter Gardener Angler Cook at our home and hit 2 out of the 4 activities from his blog name: fishing and cooking. If you must know why those 2 specific activities, our garden is winding down for its summer rest and hunting involves either a gun, spear, snare or crossbow – none of which I know how to use.

Hank is traveling the U.S. as part of his book tour for Hunt, Gather, Cook: Finding the Forgotten Feast, where he will be visiting each of the 50 States to experience each native species. For us here in Florida, we were out to snag a grouper. You can read about our experience on my blog post. Oh, and if you have a chance, you must read the glowing review by the NY Times of Hank’s book.

Not only did we catch the grouper – but also (from left to right): Bonito, Grouper, 5 Amberjack, 3 Snapper.

bouillabaisse-recipe fishine photo

So what do you make with all this fish, but more importantly the heads and tails of fresh fish? Bouillabaisse, of course.

This Mediterranean seafood stew’s uniqueness comes from the herb and spice combination of orange peel, fennel and saffron, which is what gives the soup its deep golden color.

bouillabaisse-recipe final shot

How to Cook Bouillabaisse

You start with leek, onion and garlic – and saute in olive oil.

Bouillabaisse - leek, onion, garlic

Just a few minutes over medium heat is all you need.

The next step is to add in the herbs. Fennel is essential, but you can also add in other fresh herbs like parsley, oregano and thyme. I only use the green fronds of the fennel (save the white bulb to use in another recipe, like a salad)

bouillabaisse-recipe fennelbouillabaisse-recipe herbs

Use a vegetable peeler to peel strips off the orange.

bouillabaisse-recipe orange peel

This is saffron that I’ve gently crushed with my fingers – I want to get the saffron threads into smaller pieces, almost in a powder form.

 

I’m part of the McCormick Gourmet team, bringing you in-depth information about everyday spices. From McCormick Gourmet’s Enspicelopedia:

About Saffron

Observe the stigma, the tiny strands at the flower’s center, of any crocus in your garden, and you’ll begin to understand why saffron is so expensive. It takes 220,000 dried stigmas from a specific variety of crocus, Crocus sativus, to make one pound of saffron. The flowers appear over a two-week period only, usually in October. Saffron is available as strands and also ground.

The deep orange red color and unique flavor of the famous Spanish rice dish paella, the Indian dessert kheer and French seafood soup bouillabaisse are the work of tiny saffron threads steeped in liquid during cooking. Used both for color and flavor, saffron is a prized spice in Mediterranean, North African and Asian cuisines and in bread and pastries around the world.

Originating in the Middle East, this spice is planted, harvested, dried and packaged by hand. Today, Iran is the largest producer, while India and Spain are much smaller growers, Spain holds the honor of producing the highest quality saffron.

Cultivated in Southern Europe since the 3rd century or before, saffron has found use in medicine, religious offerings, perfume, make-up, potpourri and, of course, cooking. Its vivid orange red color gives it great use as a fabric dye, which makes it humorous to imagine what Greeks and Romans must have looked like after using it perfume luxurious baths.

Chop up 3 tomatoes.

bouillabaisse-recipe- tomatoes

Throw everything into the same pot that has the leek/onion/garlic, water, wine along with the fish trimmings. I’ll spare you the photo of the fish trimmings.

After simmering for 30 minutes, strain the bouillabaisse into another pot.

Now let’s talk about seafood. You can use whatever you want, though traditional Bouillabaisse recipes will call for 3 different kinds of fish along with shellfish. I used Amberjack and Grouper (from our fishing trip), salmon, shrimp, scallops, clams and mussels. Okay, I went a little overboard :-)  Bring the strained Bouillabaisse soup back to a simmer and cook the seafood for just a few minutes.

bouillabaisse-recipe seafood

Ladle into bowls, garnish with fennel and serve.

bouillabaisse-recipe

 

More Bouillabaisse Recipes

Simply Recipes: Bouillabaisse
Family Style Food: Julia Child’s Bouillabaisse
La Tartine Gourmande: My Simplified Bouillabaisse
Use Real Butter: Bouillabaisse Fish Stew
NY Times: Provençal Potato “Bouillabaisse”
All Things Nice: Bouillabaisse

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Bouillabaisse Recipe

Servings: 6 Prep Time: 15 minutes Cook Time: 40 minutes
bouillabaisse-recipe-9350

Bouillabaisse Recipe adapted from Julia Child's Mastering the Art of French Cooking

Ingredients:

3 tablespoons olive oil
1 leek, white part only, chopped
1 onion, chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
peel of 1 orange, orange part only (use vegetable peeler)
3 tomatoes, chopped
1/3 cup chopped fennel fronds
fresh herbs (in any combination): thyme, parsley, oregano
1/2 teaspoon saffron threads, crushed
3-4 pounds of fish trimmings (heads, bones, tail), shrimp shells
10 cups water
1 cup dry white wine
1 tablespoon sea salt
3 pounds of assorted fish and shellfish (clams and mussels should be scrubbed clean)

Directions:

1. In a large stockpot, heat the olive oil on medium heat. When hot, add in the leek, onion and garlic. Saute for 5 minutes until softened but not brown.

2. Add in the orange peel, tomatoes, fennel, fresh herbs, saffron, fish trimmings, water, wine, salt turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Then turn the heat to low and simmer for 30 minutes. Strain the soup into another large pot.

3. Bring the strained soup to a boil over medium high heat. Taste and adjust with additional salt if needed. The soup should be slightly salty (remember we still have unseasoned seafood to add into the soup). Now we'll cook the seafood, adding in the items that require the most cooking time first. If you have whole lobster tails or large crab claws, add them in first and give them a 2-minute head start. Clams next, then the mussels and extra-large shrimp, lastly the fish, scallops and any smaller shrimp. You want to be careful not to overcook the seafood, so 4-5 minutes max then turn off the heat.

4. Ladle bouillabaisse into each bowl with the seafood and garnish with fresh fennel fronds.

 

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Fish with Citrus Caper Sauce http://steamykitchen.com/15433-fish-with-citru-caper-sauce.html http://steamykitchen.com/15433-fish-with-citru-caper-sauce.html#comments Mon, 16 May 2011 14:56:45 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=15433 When it comes to fish, simple is best. This Fish with Citrus Caper Sauce Recipe only takes 10 minutes to cook, start to finish. I've used a combination of orange and lemon, capers, white wine and then finished it with a bit of butter.

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We planted a few citrus trees in our backyard 7 years ago, but shhhh….don’t tell anyone in my neighborhood watch program because technically us homeowners in this lovely planned community are not allowed to plant anything that’s not on THE LIST OF APPROVED GREENERY and citrus trees are not on the list. Which means I have contraband kumquat limes, illegal lemons, hot calamansi and bootleg kaffir.

The trees are in my backyard, hidden from the road and everytime I go out in the backyard to tend to the trees, I feel like a naughty girl. Yes, all it takes is a few citrus trees to make me feel like a rebel. I feel so easy and cheap.

So it’s been 7 years of careful tending, trimming, showering of love and of course, hiding with without a single fruit from year 1 to 6. I’ve heard  that with fruit trees, it takes a few seasons for the plant to get settled in and bear fruit, so I’ve been extremely patient, each season daydreaming of next season’s lemonade.

Finally, last year my calamansi bore fruit (woohoo!) and this year all of the trees are popping out fruit so fast I liken it to watching popcorn explode. pop! pop! POP! Citrus galore!

But now we’re moving and I can’t take the trees with me :-( though I’ve tried to reason to my husband that digging out the 20-foot tall kaffir lime tree and dragging it to our new home would be a fun adventure. NOT.

When we move, I’ll have to start all over again. But in the meantime, I’ll enjoy the fruits of my patience and lovely trees while I can.

This recipe is dedicated to my friend Joe Yonan, food editor of the Washington Post. Joe recently came out with his book called Serve Yourself, Nightly Adventures in Cooking for One.

I don’t normally cook for just myself as I have an entire pack of hungry mouths to feed every night. But since we both work from home and Scott doesn’t eat seafood, sometimes lunch is a simple fish fillet for one (Scott makes a PBJ for himself).

What I love about Joe’s book is that recipes sound like they come from a restaurant menu, but the ingredients and instructions are so unfussy and simple that it’s totally do-able for a party of one.

The recipes are also easily scalable so that you could feed 2 (fancy date!) or 4 (dinner party!) – we’ve made the Catfish Tacos with Chipotle Slaw for the family and it was a big hit.

This Fish with Citrus Caper Sauce recipe isn’t in his book, it’s just something I threw together for a quiet lunch with me, myself and I.  Since most of my readers are cooking for more than one person, I’ve written the recipe out for both serving one (in the body of this post with photos) and four people (in the printable recipe).

How to Cook Fish with Citrus Caper Sauce

Text below is recipe for one serving (see printable recipe at bottom for four servings)

You’ll need:

1 fish fillet (or 1/3 pound shrimp), patted very dry
salt and pepper
2 teaspoons olive oil
1/2 orange (slice 1/4 of the orange into thin slices, the rest will be used for juice)
1/2 lemon (slice 1/4 of the lemon into thin slices, the rest will be used for juice)
1 teaspoon capers (drained)
2 tablespoons white wine
2 teaspoons butter

Season the fish on both sides with salt and pepper. Add olive oil to a hot skillet* and sear the fish fillet on one side.

*I like using a wok when cooking. It gives me the flexibility to cook for one or 8 people – look at all the available surface for cooking!

When you begin to see the color change from opaque to white creep up to halfway up the sides of the fillet, flip the fish over.

Add in the wine, orange/lemon slices, capers and the butter. Squeeze the remaining orange and lemon juice into the pan. Season sauce with a bit more salt and pepper if you’d like. When the sauce begins to bubble, turn heat to medium-low and cook until the fish is cooked through, about 1-2 minutes.

Throw in the fresh parsley and you’re done.

10 minute meal for party of 1.

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Fish with Citrus Caper Sauce Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 5 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes
fish-lemon-caper-sauce-recipe-8668

When it comes to fish, simple is best. This fish recipe only takes 10 minutes to cook, start to finish. I've used a combination of orange and lemon, capers, white wine and then finished it with a bit of butter.

Ingredients:

4 fish fillets of your choice, patted very dry
salt and pepper
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 orange
1 lemon
1 tablespoon capers (drained)
1/2 cup white wine
2 tablespoons butter

Directions:

1. Cut the orange in half. Juice one half of the orange and slice the other half into thin half-moon slices. Repeat with the lemon.

2. Season the fish on both sides with salt and pepper. Heat a large skillet over medium heat. Swirl in the olive oil. When hot, add the fish fillets. Once the cooked edge has reach almost halfway up the fillet, flip the fish.

3. Add in the wine, orange juice, lemon juice, orange/lemon slices, capers and the butter. Season the sauce with a bit of salt and pepper. When the liquid begins bubbling, turn the heat to medium-low, cover and cook until the fish is cooked through, about 1-2 minutes depending on the thickness of your fillet. Serve immediately.

 

 

 

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Orange Ginger Flank Steak http://steamykitchen.com/14994-orange-ginger-flank-steak.html http://steamykitchen.com/14994-orange-ginger-flank-steak.html#comments Thu, 14 Apr 2011 12:45:04 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=14994 Simple and easy recipe for Asian-inspired Orange Ginger Flank Steak.

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Flank steak is quickly becoming one of my favorite steak cuts, and it’s taken me this long to really fall in love with it because I normally opt for the skirt steak when shopping flatter cuts for grilling, tacos, fajitas, etc.

It wasn’t until the price of skirt steak skyrocketed at my market (skirt steak shortage? skirt steak price gouging?) that I started buying flank steak regularly. Thinly sliced flank steak are ribbons of steak that’s as tender as a good filet mignon but with the power-beef flavor.

This Asian-inspired marinade works so well – fresh squeeze orange juice (for the tang and to help tenderize), grated fresh ginger (for the zing) and ground coriander (for a warm flavor note). Pair the steak with a simple salad and brown rice to complete the meal.

Normally, when I’m cooking steak (errr….when my husband cooks the steak) I let the steak rest on the counter for 30 minutes or so to take the chill off the meat. However, because the flank steak (and skirt steak) is so thin, I’ve found that if I keep the steak in the refrigerator to until just before we want to grill, it’s easier to achieve the perfect medium-rare.

Flank Steak Goat Cheese Tapas Bruschetta RecipeAlso, you want to make sure you’re slicing across the grain for the most tender steak.

The grain in the photo to the left is going from left to right (the fibers of the meat, not the grill marks) so you want to slice across.

If you slice with the grain, you’ll end up with stringy, tough, hard to chew meat.

I prefer to slice flank steak before serving to guests, it’s easier to get very thin ribbons with a big chef’s knife and then you also don’t have to lecture your guests on how to cut their steak. :-)

 

Orange Ginger Flank Steak Marinade

About Coriander

I’m part of the McCormick Gourmet team, bringing you in-depth information about everyday spices. From McCormick Gourmet’s Enspicelopedia:

Coriander Seed, an ancient plant, is said to be the color of manna, the bread from heaven. From the Mediterranean basin, it has a slight lemon flavor. Use with sweet or savory dishes.

BOTANICALLY SPEAKING

Coriander is the dried, ripe fruit of the herb Coriandum sativum, which also produces leaves known as cilantro. The tannish brown seeds add a subtle note of citrus, with hints of sage in the background. Coriander is available as whole seed and ground.

YUM FACTOR

Valued as much for their aroma as for their flavor, coriander seeds lend a lemony flavor to European pastries, sweet breads and cakes. That same profile adds citrusy flair to such Southeast Asian and North African spice blends as Indian garam masala and Ethiopian berbere. A gentle dusting brightens simply steamed and buttered vegetables, and vegetable and chicken soups, as well as home-made curry and chili powders.

GLOBETROTTER’S GUIDE

Coriander is indigenous to Southern Europe and the Mediterranean, although Canada is now a primary source.

BELIEVE IT…OR NOT

The ancient Greeks and Romans may have used coriander to create love potions, but it was the fragrance of this Persian delight that attracted visitors at the Hanging Gardens of Babylon in 600 B.C. As civilization spread, so did its popularity as both a condiment and a medicinal ingredient. Introduced in the state of Massachusetts in 1670, it was one of the first herbs grown by colonists in America.

 

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Orange Ginger Flank Steak Recipe

Servings: 4-6 Prep Time: 5 minutes with 4 hours marinating time Cook Time: 10 minutes
Orange Ginger Flank Steak Recipe

Ingredients:

1 orange, juiced
1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 teaspoon ground coriander
sea salt (I used 1 1/2 teaspoons sea salt)
freshly ground black pepper
2 pounds flank steak

Directions:

1. In a large resealable bag, add all of the ingredients. Squeeze out all of the air and seal. Refrigerate for 4 hours or overnight.

2. When ready to cook, preheat grill on high heat. Grill the flank steak (discard the marinade) 3-5 minutes each side, depending on thickness. Let rest of cutting board for 10 minutes.

3. Slice across the grain into thin slices and serve immediately.

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Citrus Shrimp Cocktail http://steamykitchen.com/7161-citrus-shrimp-cocktail.html http://steamykitchen.com/7161-citrus-shrimp-cocktail.html#comments Thu, 21 Jan 2010 14:12:31 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=7161 It’s not your normal Shrimp Cocktail — find out what makes this a “cocktail” — recipe at Steamy Kitchen on TLC (btw, this sparkly, citrus shrimp cocktail recipe makes a perfect app for Valentines Day!)

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Citrus Shrimp Cocktail

It’s not your normal Shrimp Cocktail — find out what makes this a “cocktail” — recipe at Steamy Kitchen on TLC

(btw, this sparkly, citrus shrimp cocktail recipe makes a perfect app for Valentines Day!)

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