Steamy Kitchen Recipes | RSS Feed http://steamykitchen.com Steamy Kitchen Food Blog: fast recipes, simple recipes, with fresh ingredients to create delicious meals. Fri, 24 Jul 2015 17:57:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.3 Quinoa Fried Rice Recipe http://steamykitchen.com/23332-quinoa-fried-rice-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/23332-quinoa-fried-rice-recipe.html#comments Tue, 18 Sep 2012 18:35:47 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=23332 I really had a lot of trouble naming this dish. It’s Fried Rice. But with quinoa, not rice. Fried Quinoa? That just sounds funky. Anyways, it’s subbing the heart-healthy, protein high ancient grain, QUINOA for the rice. I cook the Quinoa Fried Rice exactly in the same style that I cook Chinese Fried Rice. You know what? I like it ...

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Quinoa Fried Rice Recipe close-up

I really had a lot of trouble naming this dish. It’s Fried Rice. But with quinoa, not rice.

Fried Quinoa?

That just sounds funky. Anyways, it’s subbing the heart-healthy, protein high ancient grain, QUINOA for the rice. I cook the Quinoa Fried Rice exactly in the same style that I cook Chinese Fried Rice.

Quinoa Fried Rice Recipe main

You know what? I like it even better than rice. (shhhh…don’t tell my mama!)

If you’ve never cooked with quinoa before, don’t fret. It’s super easy. Easier than rice. Easier than mac ‘n cheese. Almost as easy as couscous.

Grab a box from the market and experiment with it. I promise quinoa is a friendly grain. It’s even got a cute curly-q tail!

Oh yes, don’t be a dork and pronounce it wrong like I did years ago.  It’s KEEN-wah.

Watch – this dish is easy to make – I’ll even show ya!

Other recipes that use quinoa:

Double Broccoli Quinoa Recipe (101 Cookbooks)
Zucchini, Fresh Corn and Quinoa Bowl with Feta and Basil (Aggie’s Kitchen)
Quinoa Breakfast Skillet (How Sweet It Is)
Quinoa Cakes with Lemon, Olive, and Parsley (Love & Olive Oil)
Stuffed Pattypan Squash with Quinoa and Fresh Corn (Oh My Veggies)
Quinoa Salad with Black Beans, Corn, and Tomatoes (Simply Recipes)
Cilantro Lime Quinoa (Two Peas & Their Pod)
Jaune Flamme Tomatoes & Quinoa Salad (White On Rice Couple)

Quinoa Fried Rice Recipe shot

 

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Quinoa Fried Rice Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes
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For best results, use leftover quinoa that's been chilled in the refrigerator. If you don't have time, cook the quinoa but using only 80% of the water that the recipe calls for on the package. Once the quinoa is cooked, spread it out on a baking tray or large bowl and place in freezer for 10 minutes. This will chill the quinoa for the recipe.

Fish sauce is the secret ingredient to this dish - if you cannot find it, substitute with additional soy sauce).

Ingredients:

1 tablespoon cooking oil
2 eggs
1 cup diced ham
1 stalk green onion, chopped
1 clove garlic, finely minced
1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger
1/2 cup frozen peas
2 cups cooked, chilled quinoa (about 1/2 cup raw)
1 1/2 teaspoon soy sauce
1 teaspoon fish sauce
freshly ground black pepper

Directions:

1. Heat a wok or large saute pan over high heat. When hot, swirl in the oil. Add in the eggs and scramble for 15 seconds. Once the eggs have just set, remove the eggs to a clean plate or bowl.

2. Return wok to stove and turn to medium-high heat. Add in the diced ham and cook for 2 minutes until warmed through and browned. Push the ham to one side of the wok to leave room to fry the next ingredients. Add a bit of cooking oil if necessary. Add in the green onion, ginger and garlic, stir fry for 30 seconds until fragrant. Mix in with the ham.

3. Add in the cooked eggs, frozen peas and quinoa. Toss and stir fry for 2 minutes, spreading everything out over the surface of the wok. Pour in the soy sauce, fish sauce and add in the black pepper. Toss again and stir fry for an additional minute. Taste and add in additional soy sauce or fish sauce if needed (remember that the ham is salty so make sure you grab a bite that includes ham.)

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Carrot, Pea and Mint Salad Recipe http://steamykitchen.com/15745-carrot-pea-mint-salad-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/15745-carrot-pea-mint-salad-recipe.html#comments Thu, 02 Jun 2011 19:51:26 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=15745 Hi everyone! I’ve been traveling quite a bit this month (okay, traveling A LOT) and I have so much to tell you about, including a offshore fishing trip with Hank Shaw, meeting wonderful bloggers at BlogHer Food and introducing you to 2 brand new members of the Steamy Kitchen team! I’m finally back home on Saturday and hopefully will be ...

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Carrot pea mint salad recipe


Hi everyone! I’ve been traveling quite a bit this month (okay, traveling A LOT) and I have so much to tell you about, including a offshore fishing trip with Hank Shaw, meeting wonderful bloggers at BlogHer Food and introducing you to 2 brand new members of the Steamy Kitchen team! I’m finally back home on Saturday and hopefully will be able to catch up on my blogging duties 😉 In the meantime, I’ve asked Susie of Return to Sunday Supper to fill in for me here today. Lots of love, Jaden

A couple of months ago, we hosted an all-day blogging seminar called Food Blog Forum in Orlando where I met some fantastic food bloggers, some of whom flew all the way from other states (and one from Canada!) to attend. Husband and wife team Jeff and Susie Kauck came all the way from Chicago to hear us talk and we just hit it off immediately. Jeff is an James Beard nomincated food photographer, having shot an array of top notch cookbooks. Susie is the author of  Return to Sunday Supper food blog featuring recipes that I know your family will love. Their daughter, Dana, just started contributing to the blog too – once a week she highlights the nutritional information of an ingredient that’s used in one of the recipes. Please welcome Susie and her clean, light and refreshing Carrot, Pea and Mint Salad. ~Jaden

carrot pea mint salad recipe

I’m Susie Kauck, and I started my blog, Return to Sunday Supper, because I want to emphasize the need for a significant, celebrated, face-to-face meal shared by family and friends at least once a week.  What better way to add value to our lives than to join together around a weekly meal that brings family and friends closer?

I think of this gathering as an antidote to “life as usual” – hectic schedules, physical and emotional distance between us, reliance on fast food and addiction to TV and computer screens.  What better way to add value to our lives than to join and inspire others around a weekly meal that brings family and friends closer?

Return to Sunday Supper also presents nutritional information for some of the foods featured and documented reasons why it is so important for families to eat together.

carrot pea mint salad recipe - mintMy blog features family favorite classics and updated recipes each tied to a personal story.  I invite you to share your Sunday supper stories and recipes so that together we can motivate others to start their own Sunday supper traditions.  If you would like to participate, please contact me, susie@returntosundaysupper.com.

This week I have been thinking about the simple pleasures of the bounty of spring and that inspired this lovely salad.  It’s simple, beautiful, and easy to prepare.

I think that I love carrots because I can vividly remember the charming illustrations of carrots in the Beatrix Potter stories from when I was a child.  My favorite way to eat them them then and now was raw….just like Peter!  Of course, if you eat them uncooked they retain all of their wonderful nutrients…just one more reason to love this salad.

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Fresh Carrot, Pea and Mint Salad Recipe

Servings: 4 servings Prep Time: 20 minutes Cook Time: 2 minutes
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Recipe by Susie Kauck, Return to Sunday Supper

Ingredients:

For the salad:
4 large carrots, washed, trimmed and peeled (about 1 pound)
½ cup of fresh (shelled) or frozen peas (defrosted)
1 tablespoon fresh mint, torn or cut with scissors into small pieces
pea shoots for garnish, if you likeFor the Vinaigrette:
¼ cup extra virgin olive oil (or grape seed oil for a lighter taste)
1 lemon
3 sprigs mint
1 teaspoon honey (optional) if you like sweeter vinaigrette
salt and pepper to taste

Directions:

For this salad you can use a mandoline slicer or a grater (manual or food processor). Slice carrots lengthwise using a mandoline slicer or grate them. Keep sliced carrots in a bowl of ice water and drain them before assembling salad. Blanch fresh peas in boiling water for 2 minutes. Drain and immediately immerse peas in ice water for two minutes to stop the cooking process, then drain. If using frozen peas, you can just defrost them. Arrange carrots on individual salad plates. Top with peas. Right before serving, sprinkle with chopped mint.

For the Vinaigrette: Crush 3 sprigs of mint and add to the olive or grape seed oil. Leave the mint in the oil for 10 minutes then remove the mint. You will now have mint infused oil. Zest the lemon first, then squeeze to render 1 teaspoon zest and 2 tablespoons juice. In bowl whisk together oil, lemon juice, zest, honey (optional), salt and pepper. Drizzle dressing over salad, garnish with pea shoots if you like, and serve immediately.

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Peas and Bacon http://steamykitchen.com/12730-peas-and-bacon.html http://steamykitchen.com/12730-peas-and-bacon.html#comments Tue, 28 Dec 2010 20:57:12 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=12730 I honestly had trouble naming this dish. Peas and Bacon? Or Bacon and Peas? In the marketing world, I guess you’d have to consider the target market. In my case, it was our family friend, Shawn, who is a true carnivore. 99.6% of his dinner plate is meat. The remaining 0.4% of his plate is the occasional herb garnish on ...

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I honestly had trouble naming this dish. Peas and Bacon? Or Bacon and Peas? In the marketing world, I guess you’d have to consider the target market. In my case, it was our family friend, Shawn, who is a true carnivore. 99.6% of his dinner plate is meat. The remaining 0.4% of his plate is the occasional herb garnish on the meat dish that he’s stuck with.

In an effort to get Shawn to eat the peas, I did call this dish Bacon with Peas. And yes, there’s a difference between the word “and” (which sort of implies equal importance of both ingredients) and the word “with” (the peas were more of an accessory to the bacon).

I’ll be completely honest and tell you that while I would have loved to celebrate success with this particular vegetable-fearing adult, it was a no-go for him.

I must say that my kids love Shawn very much, he’s taught the boys how to fish, play catch with the dogs, how to breathe underwater through a regulator, but there’s just one thing…..

….he’s also taught my boys to pick out and only eat the bacon.

3 ingredients. Bacon, frozen peas and onions.

There’s enough fat in the bacon to cook the onion, so no oil needed. In a cold pan, throw in the bacon and onion.

Bacon fat melts, cooks onion.

Dump a bag of frozen peas (no need to defrost).

Cover and when the peas are warmed through, the dish is done.

5 minutes tops.

for Bacon and Peas; Peas and Bacon; Peas with Bacon or Bacon with Peas or just BACON….depending on your target market.

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Peas and Bacon Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 1 minute Cook Time: 5 minutes
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Don't bother defrosting the peas! They'll warm through in the pan.

Ingredients:

3 slices bacon, chopped
1/2 small onion, chopped
1 bag frozen peas

Directions:

In a frying pan over medium heat, fry bacon and onion until bacon is crisp and onion softened. Add frozen peas, cover and cooked until peas warmed through.

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Pasta, Bacon and Peas http://steamykitchen.com/6598-pasta-bacon-peas.html http://steamykitchen.com/6598-pasta-bacon-peas.html#comments Tue, 17 Nov 2009 15:00:10 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=6598 I feel like that commercial for Beggin’ Strips… baconbaconbaconbacon…BACON! It’s a recipe I’ve adapted from Marcus Samuelsson’s brand new book, New American Table….recipe for Pasta, Bacon and Peas.

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pasta peas bacon recipe

I feel like that commercial for Beggin’ Strips

Bacon Peas Pasta Recipe

baconbaconbaconbacon…BACON!

It’s a recipe I’ve adapted from Marcus Samuelsson’s brand new book, New American Table….recipe for Pasta, Bacon and Peas.

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Pasta, Bacon and Peas Recipe

Servings: 4-6 servings Prep Time: Cook Time:
pasta-peas-bacon-lg-006

Ingredients:

1 pound dry pasta
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 large egg yolks
3 tablespoons freshly grated Parmesan cheese, plus more for garnish
3 tablespoons heavy cream
zest of 1/2 lemon
4 slices bacon, cut until 1/2-inch pieces
1/2 yellow onion, diced (about 1/2 cup)
3 garlic cloves, finely minced
1 1/2 cups frozen peas, rinsed under warm water to defrost
salt and freshly ground black pepper
torn fresh basil leaves

Directions:

1. Bring a large pot of generously salted water to a boil. Add the pasta and cook according to package instructions. Drain the pasta and toss with the olive oil.

2. While the pasta is cooking, in a small bowl, whisk together the egg yolks, Parmesan cheese, heavy cream and lemon zest.

3. Heat a large saute pan over medium heat. Add the bacon pieces and cook until the bacon is crisp and cooked through. Use a slotted spoon and remove the bacon, keeping as much of the bacon drippings in the pan as possible.

4. Return the pan (with the bacon drippings) to medium heat. Add the onions and saute until the onions are softened, about 2 minutes. Add the minced garlic and saute an additional 30 seconds until fragrant.

5. Turn the heat to medium-high and whisk in the egg/cream mixture. Let the sauce bubble briefly and then quickly add in the pasta, peas and the cooked bacon (you don't want too much of the egg/cream mixture to evaporate, so work quickly)

6. Toss so that the ingredients are well mixed throughout. When the pasta is heated through (about 4 minutes) season with salt and pepper to taste (go easy on the salt - remember the bacon is salty and you've salted the pasta water.) Toss well with the torn basil leaves and add additional Parmesan cheese, if desired.

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Fresh Pear and Shrimp Stir Fry Recipe http://steamykitchen.com/5594-fresh-pear-shrimp-stir-fry.html http://steamykitchen.com/5594-fresh-pear-shrimp-stir-fry.html#comments Tue, 15 Sep 2009 17:53:19 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=5594 What you’ll learn: The competitive sport of eating dim sum How to prepare T.C Choy’s Asian Bistro’s Fresh Pear and Shrimp Stir Fry Recipe Every time I’m back in Hong Kong, I head straight for a good dim sum restaurant. If you haven’t had dim sum before, it’s as close to competitive eating as I’ve ever experienced. And I’m not talking ...

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Fresh Pear and Shrimp Stir Fry Recipe

What you’ll learn:

  • The competitive sport of eating dim sum :)
  • How to prepare T.C Choy’s Asian Bistro’s Fresh Pear and Shrimp Stir Fry Recipe

Every time I’m back in Hong Kong, I head straight for a good dim sum restaurant. If you haven’t had dim sum before, it’s as close to competitive eating as I’ve ever experienced. And I’m not talking about the amount of food consumed, either. In Hong Kong, many dim sum restaurants don’t have a nice, orderly wait list, buzzing beepers or call-aheads. Instead, you start by taking a calculating, broad sweep of the entire layout, and in a split-second survey which dining guests are closest to asking for the check.

You then divide up your party, assign tables (even the kids) and plant yourself right there at the table like hungry vultures.

This signals that you are next to take that table. Not too close, because if the table considers you rude, they’d just linger at the table longer to piss you off. But not too far, because another waiting patron could come squeeze in and take claim.

The moment that the very first guest lifts his/her torso to get out of the chair, you must quickly, effectively and stealthy signal to the rest of your party to dash over and take control of the table-handoff situation. Timing is important. Because if the rest of your party doesn’t recognize your signal, too much time passes or worse yet, ANOTHER waiting party sees your signal and makes a mad dash in for a hostile takeover, you’re totally screwed. And once more than half the table is seated by hostile takeover, you have no chance in hell to get the table back, even if it was rightfully yours.

And I haven’t even gotten to the best part – since the cart-pushers are paid on commission, there’s competition for having the A+, easy-selling dishes like Shrimp Har Gow (you wouldn’t want to be stuck with Black Moss Lotus Seed Steamed Duck Tongue that only a few people would find appetizing). They even jockey for floor space with pushers teaming up to cart-block a path to a good table with hungry guests. Yes, it gets nasty.

Thank goodness we don’t have to experience that type of competitive sport here in Tampa Bay. A few weeks ago, I was shooting a television segment at Publix Greenwise and then afterwards scooted over to T.C. Choy’s Asian Bistro across the street and got to enjoy a dim-sum lunch sans vultures.

I’ve asked them for a recipe to publish, and this is a brand new one that will be part of their new menu. While it’s not a typical “dim sum” dish, it certainly is a very popular recipe from Hong Kong.

Fresh Pear and Shrimp Stir Fry Recipe

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Fresh Pear and Shrimp Stir Fry Recipe

Servings: serves 4 as side dish Prep Time: Cook Time:
pear-shrimp-stirfry-4

adapted from T.C. Choy's Asian Bistro

Ingredients:

1 whole pear, peeled, cored and cut into small wedges
4 ounces thinly sliced carrots
2 tablespoons cooking oil
4 ounces snow peas
1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger
8 ounces shrimp, peeled and deveined
1/2 teaspoon table salt
1 teaspoon sugar
2 tablespoons chicken broth
1 teaspoon cornstarch

Directions:

1. Bring a saucepan of salted water to a boil. Blanch the pear wedges and carrots for 30 seconds, then drain immediately. Pat the shrimp very dry. In a small bowl, mix together the salt, sugar, chicken broth and cornstarch. Set aside.

2. Heat a wok or large saute pan over medium-high heat. Add in the cooking oil and swirl to coat. When the oil is shimmering, add the shrimp and stir fry for 1 minute. Add the grated ginger and continue stir frying for 30 seconds. Add the peas, carrots and pears and toss well. Stir fry for 1 minute. The shrimp should be just barely cooked through.

3. Pour in the chicken broth mixture, stir and let cook for an additional minute, until shrimp is cooked through. Serve immediately.

More recipes to explore:

Garlic Ginger Shrimp Stir Fry (Steamy Kitchen)

Green Beans with Chinese Preserved Radish Stir Fry (Steamy Kitchen)

Chinese Broccoli Beef Noodle Stir Fry (Steamy Kitchen)

Stir Fried Beef and Nectarines (Steamy Kitchen)

Green Bean and Shiitake Mushroom Stir Fry (Steamy Kitchen)

Stir Fried Shrimp, Eggs and Peas + Stir Fry Secrets (Steamy Kitchen)

Stir Fry Chicken and Vegetables (All Recipes)

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Peanut Pesto and Peas Pasta Salad http://steamykitchen.com/4704-peanut-pesto-and-peas-pasta-salad.html http://steamykitchen.com/4704-peanut-pesto-and-peas-pasta-salad.html#comments Tue, 28 Jul 2009 12:16:49 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=4704 In the Tampa, Florida, Summer began sometime like in March. No kidding. The season RIGHT NOW is called too “*!%!$@*$ HOT.” The moment you step outside into 99.9% humidity coupled with 98F temps, you wonder why you even bothered to dry yourself after a shower. But never mind, because while Summer Fest is almost unbearable in my backyard, it’s in ...

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summerfest-badge

In the Tampa, Florida, Summer began sometime like in March. No kidding. The season RIGHT NOW is called too “*!%!$@*$ HOT.” The moment you step outside into 99.9% humidity coupled with 98F temps, you wonder why you even bothered to dry yourself after a shower.

But never mind, because while Summer Fest is almost unbearable in my backyard, it’s in full-swing over at friends White On Rice and Matt Bites. Also, the rain didn’t flood out Margaret Roach’s Away to Garden in New York (though for a few weeks I almost was expecting Margaret to rename the blog Away Washed the Garden due to the non. stop. rainfall.

The four of us (actually five because Todd and Diane are separate people, not Toddiane, though they are so well fit that sometimes it’s just easier to say it like that in one lovely breath) teamed up to bring you Summer Fest 2009, a four-week celebration of fresh-from-the-garden food: recipes, growing tips, even tricks for storing and preserving summer’s best. Each week we’ll have a different theme, this week is herbs.

The Summer Fest is all about blog cross-pollination…meaning we want to hear from you! The secret to this recipe is for you to play along…I’ll give you details at the end.

To kick of Week 1 of Summer Fest: Herbs, I’ve made a Peanut Pesto and Peas Pasta Salad.

It’s pabulously peasy and pealicious.

and easy, too.

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Fortunately for me, basil is thriving right now in my garden, one of the few things that actually are doing well in this extreme Florida summer heat. Instead of the boring pine-nut pesto, I make variations by substituting different nuts – like peanuts today.

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Pesto comes together really easy in a food processor – here I’ve added basil, peanuts, garlic, salt and a bit of olive oil (to lubricate and get things moving)

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Let the baby whirrrrrrrrr!! Dang it, pesky leaf didn’t want to get chopped up. You can also spice things up by adding some red pepper flakes. Drizzle in the remaining olive oil slowly.

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Stir in the Parmesan (hey! another P word!!)

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and here you go – a beautiful Peanut Pesto.

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To Store: You can take this Peanut Pesto and freeze them in little freezer baggies – seal tight and lay flat in your freezer so that they freeze flat. I know some of you freeze them in ice cube trays too – but I find that it’s more convenient to use quart freezer bags, as it’s the perfect amount to toss with pasta.

To make the Peanut Pesto and Peas Pasta Salad – boil some pasta, chop up some tomato, add some frozen peas, corn. Then toss with some of the peanut pesto. Really, that’s it! You can sub with ANY other pasta shape, vegetables etc. I’m easy like that.

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Voila! You’ll end up with a big bowl.

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This is summery, fresh and colorful…it’s a great way to use up all your basil too!

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Don’t forget, you can use any type of nut that you want….macadamia nut would be too fabulous for words.

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Peanut Pesto and Peas Pasta Salad Recipe

1 pound dried pasta (any shape)
1 cup frozen peas
1 cup frozen corn
1 pint grape tomatoes, cut into quarters
1/2 cup (or more) of the Peanut Pesto Recipe (below)

Combine all ingredients together.

Peanut Pesto Recipe

You’ll have some pesto left over – freeze the remaining pesto

3 ounce block of parmesan or romano cheese (1/2 cup finely grated)
2 cups loosely packed fresh basil leaves, thick stems discarded
1 teaspoon kosher or sea salt (1/2 tsp table salt)
2 cloves garlic, peeled
2 tablespoons unsalted dry-roasted peanuts (if using salted, cut amount of salt measurement in half)
1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
juice of 1/2 lemon

1. If using pre-grated cheese, skip this step. Cut the parmesan or romano cheese into 1/2-inch chunks and put into a food processor. Process until the cheese is very fine. Remove to a bowl and set aside.

2. To the food processor bowl, add the basil leaves, salt, garlic, peanuts and only 1/4 of the olive oil. Process, stopping to scrape down the sides of the container halfway. Stir in the remaining 1/4 cup of oil, the cheese and the lemon juice.

summerfest-badge

How you can join Summer Fest

Summer Fest 2009 is a four-week, cross-blog celebration co-created (alphabetically listed) by A Way to Garden, Matt Armendariz of Mattbites, Jaden Hair of Steamy Kitchen, and Todd and Diane of White on Rice Couple, with guest appearances from Shauna and Daniel Ahern of Gluten-Free Girl, Simmer Till Done’s Marilyn Pollack Naron, and Paige Smith Orloff of The Sister Project. And from you, that’s critical. Your contributions are desired, and needed.

Will you play along? Have a recipe or tip that fits any of our weekly themes? Starting today, with the subject of herbs, you can contribute in various ways, big or small. Contribute a whole post, or a comment – whatever you wish. It’s meant to be fun, viral, fluid. No pressure, just delicious. The possibilities:

Simply leave your tip or recipe or favorite links in the comments below a Summer Fest post on my blog, and then go visit my collaborators and do the same.

The cross-blog event idea works best when you leave your recipe or favorite links (whether to your own blog or someone else’s) at all the host blogs. That way, they are likely to be seen by the widest audience. Everyone benefits, and some pretty great dialog starts simmering.

Or think bigger: Publish entire entire posts of your own, if you wish, and grab the juicy Summer Fest 2009 tomato badge (illustrated by Matt of Mattbites).

Summer Fest 2009 Schedule:

  • Tuesday, July 28: HERBS. Any and all.
  • Tuesday, August 4: FRUITS FROM TREES (also known as stone fruits, but we won’t scream if you toss in a berry or another fruit, promise).
  • Tuesday, August 11: BEANS-AND-GREENS WEEK (either or both, your choice).
  • Tuesday, August 18: TOMATO WEEK. How do you like them love apples?

What did my co-conspirators make this week of Herbs?

Away to Garden: Roll your herbs! (no, not THOSE kind of herbs!) parsley-roll-done Growing and Storing a Year of Parsley

White On Rice: vegetable-spring-rice-paper-rolls-425x641 Vietnamese Vegetable Summer Rolls!! You must see their lovely garden.

Matt Bites:rosemary-salty-dog-cocktail Rosemary Salty Dog Cocktail GORGEOUS!

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Shrimp Fried Rice Recipe http://steamykitchen.com/1331-shrimp-fried-rice.html http://steamykitchen.com/1331-shrimp-fried-rice.html#comments Wed, 20 Aug 2008 11:53:57 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/?p=1331 Beautiful Shrimp Fried Rice photo! What you’ll learn: About the best kind of rice to use for fried rice The right amount of heat that is essential for the perfect fried rice Why it’s important to fry all the ingredients separately The right way to fry rice and why constantly poking, prodding, turning and flipping at every second isn’t ideal The ...

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Shrimp Fried Rice

Beautiful Shrimp Fried Rice photo!

What you’ll learn:

  • About the best kind of rice to use for fried rice
  • The right amount of heat that is essential for the perfect fried rice
  • Why it’s important to fry all the ingredients separately
  • The right way to fry rice and why constantly poking, prodding, turning and flipping at every second isn’t ideal

The first time I attempted to cook fried rice on my own, I was a teenager and my parents and little brother were on vacation. I stayed home to attend summer school and to enjoy a little freedom living on my own for a couple of weeks.

Since my Mom was the queen in the kitchen, I didn’t really cook too much back then. My job was just to eat and enjoy her wonderful home cooked meals. But that week, after 3 days of instant ramen, I was longing for something a little more substantial. Too lazy to bike to the market, I decided on fried rice. I steamed a batch of rice and found enough bits of vegetables to make the dish.

It was a total disaster. Mushy, soggy and goopy. Back to Top Ramen for another 10 days.

When the family returned, I told Mom about my fried rice misfortune and she laughed, “You better start learning from me before you go off to college or you’ll starve!” And a crash course in fried rice followed the next day.

So here I am to teach you what I learned from my Mom and share with you an authentic Shrimp Fried Rice Recipe. These are her secrets to light, fluffy and flavorful fried rice, no matter what ingredients you use.

Rules for Best Shrimp Fried Rice Recipe

Use previously chilled leftover rice

Here’s rule #1. You have to use yesterday’s (or earlier) cooked rice as it’s had a chance to dry out a bit in the refrigerator. The heat of the pan and the soy sauce will re-steam and hydrate the leftover rice. If you try to use freshly cooked, hot rice (like I did years ago,) you’ll end up with too much moisture in the rice and will make a heavy mess in the pan.

High heat is essential in cooking fried rice

But high heat doesn’t mean that you need super high BTU’s or a gas stove. All it takes is a bit of patience to let your pan or wok heat up. The high heat ensures that whatever ingredients that you put into the pan gets fried quickly and that each grain of rice gets hot to the core.

Fry ingredients separately

Fried rice has many different ingredients, and in my home it’s usually just a mixture of whatever vegetables, meats or seafood I can scrounge up from the refrigerator or freezer. But whatever the ingredients, you want to make sure that you can taste each individual one. To do this, you’ve got to fry your meat or seafood first, remove from the wok or pan when 80% cooked through and then toss it back in towards the end of the stir fry to finish cooking. Because if you try to fry all of the ingredients at the same time in the same pan, they’ll all compete for “wok time” and everything will end up tasting exactly the same!

No no touching!

A common mistake of stir frying is to constantly poke, prod, turn and flip every second. In a restaurant kitchen where flames are so powerful they can singe your brows, chefs have to keep things moving. But in home kitchens, our stovetops need a little more time to do their work to heat up and cook our food. If you keep poking at the rice, the grains will break, release more starch and turn the entire thing goopy. It will never have a chance to fry correctly…not enough “wok time” as my Mom likes to say. The best thing is to do is to spread out the rice, use the entire cooking surface of the pan and just leave it alone. Put your spatula down and back away from the stove for a minute. Give the rice a chance to heat up. Then flip, toss and redistribute the rice, again spreading it out and leaving it alone to cook another side.

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Shrimp Fried Rice Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes
shrimp-fried-rice

Ingredients:

8 ounces small uncooked shrimp, shelled and deveined
1/4 teaspoon salt (or 1/2 tsp kosher salt)
freshly ground black pepper
1/2 teaspoon cornstarch
2 tablespoons cooking oil (divided)
3 eggs, beaten in a small bowl
2 stalks scallion or green onion, minced
4 cups previously cooked leftover rice, grains separated well
3/4 cup frozen carrots and peas, defrosted
1 tablespoon soy sauce (use gluten-free soy sauce if you are making a gluten-free version)
1 teaspoon sesame oil

Directions:

In a bowl, toss the shrimp with the salt, pepper and cornstarch. Let the shrimp marinate for 10 minutes at room temperature. Heat a wok or large sauté pan on high heat. When the pan is hot enough for a bead of water to instantly sizzle and evaporate, add only 1 tablespoon of the cooking oil and swirl to coat pan.

Now add the shrimp, quickly spreading out around the pan so that they are not overlapping. Let the shrimp fry, untouched for 30 seconds. Flip over and let the other side fry for 30 seconds, or until about 80% cooked through. Remove the shrimp from the pan onto a plate, leaving as much oil in the pan as possible.

Turn the heat to medium and let the pan heat up again. Pour in the eggs, stirring in a quick motion to break up and scramble the eggs. When the eggs are almost cooked through (they should still be slightly runny in the middle), dish out of the frying pan onto the same plate as the cooked shrimp.

Use a paper towel to wipe the same wok or sauté pan clean (no need to wash) and return to high heat with the remaining 1 tablespoon of cooking oil, swirling to coat. When the oil is very hot, add the green onions and stir fry until fragrant, about 15 seconds. Add in the rice and stir well to mix in the green onions throughout. Spread the rice all around the wok surface area and let the rice heat up, untouched until you hear the bottoms of the grains sizzle, about 1-2 minutes. Use the spatula to toss the rice, again spreading the rice out over the surface of wok or pan

Drizzle the soy sauce all around the rice and toss. Add the peas and carrots, the cooked eggs, shrimp and sesame oil, tossing to mix the rice evenly with all of the ingredients. Let everything heat back up again, until the rice grains are so hot they practically dance! Taste and add an additional 1 teaspoon of soy sauce if needed.

More recipes to explore:

Cauliflower Fried Rice with Bacon (Steamy Kitchen)

Chinese Sausage and Rice Recipe (Steamy Kitchen)

Quinoa Fried Rice Recipe (Steamy Kitchen)

Chinese Fried Rice (Food.com)

Korean Beef Rice Bowl (Steamy Kitchen)

 

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Stir Fried Shrimp, Eggs and Peas + Stir Fry Secrets http://steamykitchen.com/631-stir-fried-shrimp-eggs-and-peas-stir-fry-secrets.html http://steamykitchen.com/631-stir-fried-shrimp-eggs-and-peas-stir-fry-secrets.html#comments Thu, 24 Jul 2008 04:08:03 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/?p=631 Cooking Chinese for the Olympics! This is the 2nd recipe in the series…see the end for links Oh…and there’s a contest in the middle of this post!!! *** Last fall, my parents treated Scott and I to a 10 day group tour around China. Our first stop was Beijing, and first thing I noticed was how clean the city was. ...

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Stir Fried Shrimp, Eggs and Peas

Cooking Chinese for the Olympics! This is the 2nd recipe in the series…see the end for links

Oh…and there’s a contest in the middle of this post!!!

***

Last fall, my parents treated Scott and I to a 10 day group tour around China. Our first stop was Beijing, and first thing I noticed was how clean the city was. I literally could eat off the streets, as there was an entire team of sanitation engineers whose sole job was to scrape gum off the streets and sidewalk. I’m so not kidding – they wore white gloves and could scrape even crusty, 2 week old Bubbalicious in one quick motion.

You could see the entire city was gearing for its big Olympic moment: sleek buildings, sporting stadiums and even beautiful parks were being quickly erected and created almost overnight. There was hardly any traffic for a city of over 17 million and in addition to the gum scrapers, workers were polishing the guard rails that lined the interstate.

But no tricking this smart rat! I knew our tour’s itinerary, including restaurants, shopping, sightseeing and even driving path was carefully planned and regulated by the government. I was half afraid to turn my head around and look out the back window of the tour bus, for fear that the set façade would be replaced by the daily regular.

Well, no matter…I mean, how can I blame Beijing? For if you come to my house for dinner, you’d find last night’s crumbs swept under my rug and mounds of dirty laundry shoved into closets too.

In the next couple of weeks, I’ll be sharing many of my favorite Chinese dishes, so that you’re not stuck just ordering take out from your local Chinese restaurant. But today, I want to teach you the secrets of a light, flavorful Chinese stir fry.

Ancient Chinese Stir Fry Secrets (at home)

Restaurant kitchens have extremely high powered stoves, flames that jump so high that your eyebrows will singe just standing in the doorway. At home, especially with electric stovetops, we just can’t get that kind of heat. To compensate, you’ve got take the time to let your wok or pan get super hot and the best way to judge whether it’s hot enough is to hold your hand 6 inches over your wok. The moment you start feeling some serious heat, it’s ready. Seriously, though, don’t try to be all macho and stuff, if it’s hot enough for you to say, “hot!” just pull away.

The second trick is to sear your meat or seafood first, remove from the wok, then cook the vegetables, and then returning the meat or seafood back to the wok towards the end of the stir fry. If you don’t, you’ll end up steaming your meat in the vegetable juices instead of frying it. You want each individual ingredient of a stir fry to sing on its own, instead of becoming a soggy, heavy, mish-mash.

The last trick is a tough one. I know it’s a gut reaction to constantly keep poking, prodding and stirring during a stir fry (which is essential in a massively hot restaurant wok), but resist the urge when you’re frying meat or seafood. When you first put your meat in the wok, spread it out so that the pieces are not touching and use all available surface area. Now, step away! Let the meat have a chance to sear. If you keep messing with it, the protein never has a chance to develop that wonderful carmelization and you’ll end up with mushy meat.

In this Stir Fried Shrimp, Eggs and Peas dish, you’ll practice all three of these secrets. You’ll let the oil heat up before adding the shrimp, spread out the shrimp so that they don’t touch and just let it sear. Once cooked, you’ll remove the shrimp and add it back in when the eggs are almost set. This will give you a light/firm/crisp/crunch/springy shrimp – a sure sign that you’ve cooked the shrimp properly.

STOP! I need a word or two that elegantly describes the texture of perfectly cooked, fresh shrimp. It’s the feeling in your mouth when you bite into the shrimp – “light/firm/crisp/crunch/springy” just doesn’t capture it quite right. There is a Chinese word for it (to not give Chinese speaking advantage on this contest, I’m not going to tell what that word is) – but I can’t find the right English words to match. The first person to come up with the best word or phrase wins a $25 gift certificate to Amazon.com!!

I always have a bag of frozen peas/carrots (and in this case just peas), some frozen shrimp and eggs on hand. When I’m cooking Chinese food and need just one more dish to make the meal complete, this is one of my go-to dishes.

In this recipe for Stir Fried Shrimp, Eggs and Peas, I’ve chosen to fry the chilies and garlic separate from the eggs and shrimp, using it as a topping. This is because my kids are eating this dish too – and they can pick the parts where the chilies are not touching.

I know you’ve been taught not to burn garlic, as it can be bitter and ruin the entire dish. But in this case, the garlic is fried to a crisp – it provides a wonderful texture. Since it’s a TOPPING – and not the base of the dish (i.e. I’m not cooking the garlic first and layering ingredients/flavors on top of the garlic) – the very slight bitterness is a welcome, especially nestled against the chili pepper’s sweet heat.

Stir Fried Shrimp, Eggs and Peas

1/2 pound raw shrimp, shelled and deveined and patted very, very dry
1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
freshly ground black pepper
1/2 teaspoon cornstarch
1/2 teaspoon sesame oil
1 teaspoon finely minced garlic
1 large mild chili (anaheim, Hungarian wax), thinly sliced
1/4 cup frozen peas, thawed
4 eggs, beaten
3/4 teaspoon kosher salt
cooking oil

in a bowl, combine shrimp, salt, pepper, cornstarch and sesame oil, let sit at room temperature for 10 minutes to marinate.

In a wok or large saute pan over high heat, add 1 tablespoon cooking oil, swirling to coat the wok. When the oil is very hot (hold your hand 6″ above the wok surface), add the shrimp (the shrimp should sizzle loudly upon contact) and spread out around the cooking surface. Let fry, untouched for 1 minute.

Flip shrimp and fry for an additional minute, or until cooked through. Remove the shrimp from wok to a plate, leaving as much cooking oil in the wok as possible.

Keep the heat on high, add the garlic and sliced chilies and fry until fragrant and the garlic is crispy, about 30 seconds. Remove from wok to a small dish and wipe the wok clean with paper towels. Return the wok to high heat and add 1 tablespoon of cooking oil. When the oil is hot (a drop of egg should sizzle immediately), pour in the eggs and gently stir for 1 minute, until almost set but still a little runny in the middle. Season the egg with salt and add the shrimp and the peas to the wok and stir to mix well until the eggs are completely cooked through. Dish to serving plate and top with the fried garlic and chilies.

***

Other great Chinese dishes

Sesame Shrimp Sesame Shrimp with Honey Mustard Sauce
Firecracker Shrimp Shrimp and Mango Firecrackers

Beijing Noodles Ground Beef with Beijing Sauce Over Noodles

Pan Fried Shrimp and Pork Postickers Pan Fried Shrimp and Pork Potstickers

Xiao Long Bao Xiao Long Bao – Steamed Shanghai Soup Dumplings

Wonton Noodle Soup Wonton Noodle Soup

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