Steamy Kitchen Recipes | RSS Feed http://steamykitchen.com Steamy Kitchen Food Blog: fast recipes, simple recipes, with fresh ingredients to create delicious meals. Fri, 26 Jun 2015 12:53:12 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.2 Slow Cooker Bone Broth – Asian Style http://steamykitchen.com/39418-slow-cooker-bone-broth-asian-style.html http://steamykitchen.com/39418-slow-cooker-bone-broth-asian-style.html#comments Wed, 28 Jan 2015 22:23:46 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=39418 In Asian culture, soups and broths are part of everyday meals. A traditional Japanese breakfast would include a bowl of Miso Soup to warm the body. Chinese restaurants feature a long list of house soups, from an appetite stimulating Hot and Sour Soup to even a light broth served after dinner to cleanse the palate and complete the meal. Growing up, Mom ...

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Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian

In Asian culture, soups and broths are part of everyday meals. A traditional Japanese breakfast would include a bowl of Miso Soup to warm the body. Chinese restaurants feature a long list of house soups, from an appetite stimulating Hot and Sour Soup to even a light broth served after dinner to cleanse the palate and complete the meal.

Growing up, Mom always had soup simmering on the stove. Every night, without doubt, there was a Chinese style soup on the table. I remember saving the soup for last, as a ritual to conclude a delightful home-cooked meal.

I’ve tried to emulate Mom, but we’ve got such an active lifestyle that a pot simmering for hours on the stove isn’t feasible. Instead, we use a large 6-quart slow cooker to make an Asian-style bone broth that will last the entire week for our family.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian

What is bone broth?

Bone broth is often gently simmered for 24 hours (or more!) to extract as much nutrients from the bones of an animal, whether it be fish, chicken, pork or beef. The long cooking time breaks down bone to release vitamins, collagen and calcium phosphate — nutrients that are good for us.

Sure, it’s a trendy thing right now, with restaurants offering drive-through bone broth served in a coffee cup for $9, cookbooks dedicated to the art of bone broths (I highly recommend The Nourished Kitchen Cookbook which features bone broth) and even an entire line of bone broth concentrates that you can buy.

What’s the difference between broth, bone broth and soups?

Generally, soups are made with meats, bones, vegetables, herbs, added grains, sometimes thickened with starches – and simmered for a couple of hours.

Broths are mostly made from meats or vegetables and left clear without very much else added. Broths are also simmered for a couple of hours, resulting in a light colored, light flavored broth.

Bone broths are cooked for a day or even longer. Your favorite Vietnamese restaurant most likely simmer their pho broth overnight, which is why the broth is so rich and flavorful.

The long cooking time extracts so many nutrients and flavor! How do you know when you’ve extracted maximum nutrients and flavor? When the bones literally disintegrate just by giving a little pressure with your fingers.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe Asian Style

Like Nourished Kitchen, we make our bone broth in the slow cooker, and it will last us all week long. The process starts on Sunday night, and the slow cooker will do its magic all night long.

In the morning, we’ll enjoy bone broth as part of our breakfast. Every day, I’ll top off the pot with more water and keep the slow cooker humming along.

Each day, I’ll add a vegetable, switch out for fresh herbs, throw in a couple of umami-boosting Asian ingredients.

As the days progress, the bone broth develops new flavor, gets richer, smoother, fuller. We get the benefit of the valuable nutrition that’s normally locked inside the bones.

Some days, we’ll top off the bone broth with chopped herbs, or shredded seaweed just before serving. Or a spoonful of leftover rice in the bone broth is great too.

Secrets to Clear, Clean Bone Broth

Key to bone broth – be gentle. The cooking process is slow and gentle, coaxing out flavor with very little bubbles (no violent boiling!)

Don’t stir. Especially after the first 2 days. The bones will be come very soft and will crumble if you stir the pot too vigorously, resulting in a gritty broth.

Use cheesecloth or herb/tea bags to contain any herbs, aromatics or spices that are very small (see below.) This avoids having you dig around, stir around to fish these items out.

Use a very fine mesh skimmer to skim the surface of the broth every day, especially during the first 6-8 hours. The “scum” will cloud your broth during these first few hours of cooking. What’s the scum made out of? Proteins, fats, microscopic bone fragments (especially if the bones were cut), oils, impurities. Get rid of it!

Ready for the next batch? Jumpstart your next batch with a little of the last batch of concentrated “liquid gold!” We call this “Infinite Bone Broth.” Restaurants do the same with broths, sauces and sourdough bread too. Seed the next batch with rich flavor you’ve already built.

Bone Broth, Chinese Style

The “holy trinity” of Chinese cooking is garlic, ginger and green onion.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Garlic, Ginger & Green Onion

I’m not a fan of fishing out little pieces of ingredients, so I try to cut herbs so that they are easy to find and spoon out. The garlic head is cut in half. Sometimes, the cloves will separate (like above) but I’ll use a bag made for for DIY teabags or as an herb pouch (100 bags for $5.67)

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian DIY Herb Pouch

Fill it up with the garlic cloves that are loose. Fold the top over and the cloves or anything you put inside will stay put. You can also make your own with cheesecloth. I like to use these teabags for other spices too, like whole peppercorns or star anise – anything that would be hard to find and fish out.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Fill Herb Pouch with loose garlic cloves

The green onions are tied with twine, again for easy removal. The ginger is a big hunk, just sliced in half.  I reserve the other half of the ginger + the garlic cloves in the bag + more green onion  – to add to the bone broth a couple of days later (I’ll discard the spent herbs/aromatics, replace with fresh.)

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Tie green onions with twine and slice ginger in half

This week, I’m making bone broth with spareribs (it was on sale). Pork broth is very popular in Chinese cuisine. It’s just as popular as chicken broth is here in the U.S. Most of the Chinese soups that I make start with pork – for a lighter, more neutral flavor than beef or chicken.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Spareribs for bone broth

Some people like to cut off the excess fat, but I just leave it on. I’ll skim out the fats and oils later with a skimmer.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Everything goes into the slow cooker

Everything goes into the slow cooker, set it on low and let it go. If you plan on making slow cooker bone broth often, I suggest getting the largest slow cooker you can find. This one is a Cuisinart 6 1/2 Quart Slow Cooker ($99) that works really well. It’s never failed us.

After a few hours, I’ll skim the scuzz with a very fine mesh skimmer. This skimmer mesh is so fine that it catches all particles AND surface oils and fats.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian skim skuzz with very fine mesh skimmer

Look how rich this bone broth is the next day! Season with salt, or fish sauce. Season to taste.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian

I’ll discard the spent green onion, garlic and ginger, and add fresh to replace. This time, I’m adding garlic chives and cilantro from the garden – again, tied  up to make it easier to remove.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian discard spent herbs and add garlic chives and cilantro

Top it off with fresh water. The slow cooker stays on all week, on low.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian top off with fresh water

Chinese Bone Broth

After a couple of days, I might throw in some Chinese dried ingredients for a massive flavor and umami-boost:

Dried scallops, dried shrimp or dried black mushrooms (shitake).

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian dried scallops, dried shrimp and black mushrooms

You can also add in sliced daikon and carrots for one of my very favorite home-style soups! Every trip back to my Mom’s house, I request her Daikon Carrot soup.

If you like cilantro, you can also add in a bunch of cilantro stems, which have just as much flavor as the leaves. I often use the stems for soups.

Japanese Bone Broth

If you’d like Japanese flavor for a bone broth, add a small 6-inch piece of dried kombu and a handful of bonito flakes (place these in the tea bag.) By the way, kombu can be used over, and over again. Just rinse, wipe, and let dry completely before storing for next use.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian dried kombu and bonito flakes

My favorite breakfast? Bone broth with a spoonful of leftover rice or grains, top with roasted seaweed. This type of seaweed is called Kizame Nori – or sliced, roasted seaweed.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian with a spoonful of leftover rice or grains and roasted seaweed

By the way, have you ever tried Ochazuke?

Also, if you’d like to fortify the Japanese bone broth with miso paste – do this separately. Miso paste cooked at high heat or for too long will break apart and become gritty. Ladle some bone broth into a separate saucepan. Bring to simmer if you need to, but if it’s coming straight from the slow cooker, there’s no need to heat it up. Turn off heat. Whisk just a couple tablespoons of miso paste into the soup. Be careful of how much miso you add, especially if you’ve already added salt to the bone broth. I prefer shiro miso (white miso paste) as it’s lighter and less salty than the others. Miso paste is always added off heat.

Vietnamese Bone Broth

Add Vietnamese pho spices to a mesh bag or the tea bag (Here’s a recipe for Slow Cooker Vietnamese Pho.)

If you visit an Asian market, you can often find all these spices packaged, ready to go. Look for “Pho Spice Pack.” Instead of seasoning the broth with salt, season the bone broth with fish sauce. Start with 1 tablespoon, taste, and then add 1 teaspoon at a time until perfect.

What’s my favorite fish sauce? Right there in the sidebar is a free “Asian Masters of Flavor” ebook I wrote that includes my favorite brand! There’s a big difference between good quality fish sauce and crap, chemical-laden fish sauce.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Vietnamese Bone Broth Spices

More notes

If you’re concerned with the cost of running a slow cooker throughout the week, it costs pennies per day!

We grow all of our own herbs and most of our own vegetables in our aquaponics garden and greenhouse. Here’s a tip for green onion.

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Our aquaphonics garden

You can even start with store-bought green onion. Make sure you buy ones that have nice, wet, strong roots (no dry or wilted!) Just stick’em in soil. The green onions will continue to grow their roots and sprout more leaves. I just snip off what I need (leafy part only) and new ones will continue to grow throughout the entire growing season!

Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian grow your own green onion

Recommended Cooking Equipment

More recipes to explore

Vietnamese Pho Pressure Cooker – Paleo Friendly  (Steam Kitchen)

Mom’s Chinese Chicken Soup  (Steam Kitchen)

Vegetable Thai Curry Noodle Soup  (Steam Kitchen)

Tofu and Mushroom Miso Soup  (Steam Kitchen)

Chinese Daikon and Carrot Soup  (Steam Kitchen)

15 Minute Udon Miso Noodle Soup  (Steam Kitchen)

Thai Fish Soup  (Steam Kitchen)

Soba Noodles in Shiitake-Shoyu Broth with Spring Vegetables (Serious Eats)

Spicy Korean Seafood Soup (Serious Eats)

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Slow Cooker Bone Broth Recipe - Asian Style

Servings: Prep Time: 5 minutes Cook Time:
slow-cooker-bone-broth-recipe-asian-3832

I prefer using pork or chicken for Chinese or Japanese style bone broth. If you'd like to use beef bones (great for Vietnamese bone broth), I suggest roasting the bones (350F for 30 minutes) first before adding them to your slow cooker. Not necessary, but it will give a richer bone broth. I don't normally roast pork or chicken bones - I just add them to the pot. Grassfed, organic is best.

PORK: spareribs, neck, hock, really anything.


CHICKEN: whole, raw chicken, or just the frame of a rotisserie chicken you've already enjoyed. You can also use chicken wings or chicken feet. Turkey works great too.


BEEF: oxtail, knuckle, neck, short ribs. I also use beef bone marrow as well - but after roasting, I"ll spoon out the marrow, spread it on bread and sprinkle with sea salt for a little treat. Basically, too much marrow in the bone broth will make the broth greasy tasting. Short ribs have amazing flavor - I like to add them to any beef bone broth that I make.


FISH: Fish bones and head. I like to do this traditional Chinese style with garlic, lots of ginger and green onion. Remove the fish skin and the thin, silvery lining in the gut area (very fishy taste). If the fish is raw, I prefer to roast the fish bones (350F for 20 minutes) - as this tames the fishiness smell and flavor of the bone broth. Most fish will work except for oily fish like mackerel.

Ingredients:

4 pounds spareribs
1 head garlic, halved
big knob of fresh ginger (about the size of 2 fingers), halved
3-4 stalks green onions, cut in half

Directions:

1. Reserve half of the garlic, ginger and green onion for later in the week. Tie the green onion bundles with twine.

2. In a slow-cooker, add green onion, garlic and ginger. Fill slow cooker with water, up to 1-inch below rim. Set to cook on high heat at first. When the bone broth comes to a simmer after an hour or so, you'll see lots of scum. Skim and discard. Set slow cooker on low and let the bone broth cook for at least 6 hours.

3. Use a skimmer to skim the surface of any particles and oil. Season with salt, to taste.

4. After drinking some of the bone broth, top off the slow cooker with additional fresh water. You can also discard the spent herbs and add the reserved garlic, onion and green onion. Continue to add additional vegetables, aromatics, dried ingredients (see post above for details) as you wish. Keep the setting on low.

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Chinese Daikon and Carrot Soup http://steamykitchen.com/26933-chinese-daikon-and-carrot-soup-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/26933-chinese-daikon-and-carrot-soup-recipe-video.html#comments Tue, 14 May 2013 15:38:21 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=26933 I’ve been making a lot of Chinese home-style soups lately – Nathan has been going through some health challenges lately and all he wants to eat is clear soup. My house smells like Mom’s house when I simmer a pot of soup. One most frequently asked questions I get is, “what’s your favorite recipe from your Mom?” It’s tough to ...

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Chinese Daikon and Carrot Soup Recipe

I’ve been making a lot of Chinese home-style soups lately – Nathan has been going through some health challenges lately and all he wants to eat is clear soup. My house smells like Mom’s house when I simmer a pot of soup.

One most frequently asked questions I get is, “what’s your favorite recipe from your Mom?” It’s tough to just pick ONE single recipe so I’ll pick my top 3 categories – Fried Rice, Crispy Spring Rolls and Soup – any Chinese soup.

Soup is easy to make, but tough to master. Simply boiling ingredients and adding enough salt will make anything from flavored water to somewhat decent soup. I’m talking about making a broth that’s rich and concentrated but also clear and clean.

What is clear and clean soup? Well the French technique to making clear soup, or consommé, is to stir in egg whites. The proteins of the egg whites will collect and trap all of the sediment and fat from the soup, which then gets discarded.

The Asian way is different:

  • Par-boil the meats and/or bones to get rid of the fats and other “muckity muck” that would otherwise cloud and taint your soup. (i.e. skin, blood, bone fragments, dirt – the stuff that makes for cloudy soup)
  • Use umami-boosting dried or preserved ingredients to create nutritional benefits, richness and savoryness – dried Chinese mushroom, dried shrimp, dried scallops, dried abalone, preserved turnip, dried dates, dried lily buds, dried figs….well, you get the picture. If it can be preserved/dried, it will….and the Chinese will use it for soup!

In this recipe for Chinese Diakon and Carrot soup – you can use one or both techniques. I bring a big pot full of water to a rapid boil, then add in my meat/bones. I let it boil like crazy. This violent boiling action “scrubs” the meat and bones, forcing the impurities to be released. Let this happen for 10 minutes and then discard the water and fill the pot with new, clean water to create the broth.

I know your next question….”Doesn’t the par-boiling take away a lot of the flavor?”

The answer is no. Unless you count that scuzzy stuff as flavor. You don’t want that crap in your soup anyways. The real flavor of soup comes from a long, slow, gentle simmer of the meat and bones. Unless you use a pressure cooker, which I sometimes do too. But that’s a different sort of cooking technique.

This recipe, like all of my recipes, is flexible. Don’t eat pork? Use chicken instead. No daikon? Try potato. No dried shrimp/scallops? It’s optional.


Chinese Daikon and Carrot Soup Recipe

Chinese Daikon and Carrot Soup Recipe Video

 

 

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Chinese Daikon and Carrot Soup

Servings: 8-10 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 30 minutes
Chinese Daikon and Carrot Soup

Use whatever pork is on sale. If it comes with a bone - even better. In place of salt, you can use a few dashes of fish sauce. The dried scallops and shrimp can be found in an Asian market -- but if you can't find these ingredients, feel free to leave them out. The dried scallops/shrimp add incredible savory and ocean-salty flavor (you'll use less salt to season the soup).

Ingredients:

1 pound pork, cut into large chunks
6-8 dried shrimp
2-3 dried scallops
One 2-inch piece of ginger, cut into chunks
2 whole cloves garlic
1 large Daikon radish, peeled and cut into chunks
3 large carrots, peeled and cut into chunks
2-3 tomatoes, cut into quarters
Salt to taste

Directions:

Bring a large soup pot filled with water to a rolling boil. Add pork and bones and let boil rapidly for 10 minutes. Remove pork and set aside. Drain and discard the water, clean the pot if needed. Fill the pot with new water to make the broth (approximately 4 quarts) and add in the pork, bones, shrimp, scallops, ginger, garlic. Bring to a simmer and then turn the heat to medium-low, or hot enough to just produce a gentle simmer for 30-40 minutes.

Occassionally, skim the soup of any fats or particles and discard. Add radish, carrots and tomatoes to the soup and simmer for another 15-20 minutes. Season with salt (or fish sauce) to taste.

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Pork and Spinach Wonton http://steamykitchen.com/23790-pork-and-spinach-wontons-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/23790-pork-and-spinach-wontons-recipe-video.html#comments Mon, 10 Dec 2012 16:14:00 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=23790 Learn how to make and fold wonton! Pork and Spinach Wonton recipe & video.

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Pork and Spinach Wontons Recipe

I think the ultimate Chinese comfort food is handmade wonton in soup. Warm, soothing, gingery broth…..delicate, floating “clouds.” In Cantonese, wonton is pronounced wun tun 雲吞, which means “swallowing clouds.”  The wonton wrapper is so delicate and thin. the wonton appear to be floating in the soup.

Pork and Spinach Wontons Recipe

When I was in college, my girlfriends and I would get together and make hundreds of these and freeze them. It was cheap, easy to make and we had quite a bit of fun as we turned it into a “dumpling party.” It’s the best quick meal, as wonton can be cooked directly from the freezer into simmering broth.

Pork and Spinach Wontons Recipe

There’s all sorts of ingredients that you can use to fill wonton. Shrimp, ground beef, ground pork, cabbage, spinach, bamboo shoots, scallops, mushrooms….really, anything that you want. When snow crab or king crab legs are on sale, I’ll make crab and napa cabbage wonton.

Pork and Spinach Wontons Recipe

I normally eat wonton with a small dipping bowl of red vinegar and slivers of fresh ginger. That’s the Cantonese way! Add in some noodles to make wonton noodle soup and I’m in heaven.

Pork and Spinach Wontons Recipe

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Pork and Spinach Wonton Recipe Video

 

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Pork and Spinach Wonton Recipe

Servings: 50 dumplings Prep Time: 40 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes
pswontons

Don't worry about the amount of salt used for the cabbage and spinach. The majority of the salt stays in the water and is discarded. The salt is used to release water from the vegetables (hey, remember osmosis from high school!?)

You can add cooked noodles to this dish to make wonton noodle soup - but just remember to cook the noodles in a separate pot of water (and not the broth) to prevent excess starch from the noodles from clouding up the good broth.

If you want, serve wonton with a dipping bowl of red wine vinegar and slivers of fresh ginger. Peel ginger, then use a vegetable peeler to peel paper-thin slices of ginger. Use knife to further chop into fine slivers. Combine with the red vinegar. To eat, place a wonton on your spoon. With chopsticks, pick up a few slivers of ginger and place on top of wonton. Eat!

Ingredients:

10-ounce package frozen spinach, defrosted
1/4 cabbage, grated on large holes of box grater
2 teaspoons salt
1 pound ground pork
2 teaspoons grated fresh ginger
2 cloves garlic, finely minced
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1 tablespoon Chinese rice wine (or dry sherry)
2 teaspoons roasted sesame oil
1 tablespoon cornstarch
16-ounce package of wonton wrappers (about 50 wrappers), defrosted (see note)
For the slurry: 1/4 cup cool water + 1 tablespoon cornstarch

FOR THE GINGER BROTH
2 quarts vegetable or chicken broth
2 thumb-sized pieces of ginger, sliced
sprigs of cilantro, optional

Directions:

1. Squeeze as much water out of the spinach and discard the water (or water your plants!). Place the spinach and cabbage in a large bowl. Sprinkle with salt and mix well. Let sit for 10 minutes. In large handfuls (or a cheesecloth), squeeze the water out of the cabbage/spinach and discard the water.

2. Add in the ground pork, ginger, garlic, soy sauce, wine, sesame oil and cornstarch. Mix well.

OPTIONAL: Heat up a small frying pan over medium heat, add in a touch of cooking oil. Cook a spoonful of the dumpling filling and taste. Adjust seasonings to the dumpling filling if you wish.

3. In a small bowl, mix together the water and cornstarch for the slurry.

4. Take one wonton wrapper, place 1 scant teaspoon of the dumpling mixture in the middle. Paint the outer edge of the wonton wrapper with the slurry. Fold wrapper over like in a triangle shape and seal tightly all around. Make sure there are no air pockets or holes in the wonton. Fold the two triangle points together and seal to make the wonton shape. Place folded wonton on a clean, dry plate and cover with plastic wrap or barely damp towel to avoid drying out.

5. When wonton are all folded, you can store or freeze.

6. For the broth: Set aside 2 cups of the broth. Bring the remaining broth and ginger to a simmer in a large stock pot and turn the heat to medium-high. Add in a batch of wonton. When the broth returns to a simmer again, pour in 1 cup of the reserved broth. Again, let the broth return to a simmer and then pour in the last 1 cup of reserved broth. Once the broth comes back to a simmer, the wonton should be done. Discard the ginger slices. Serve wonton and broth with few cilantro leaves if desired!

TO STORE:

- If you want to freeze the wonton, place all the UNCOOKED wonton flat on a plate. Do not crowd. Cover with plastic wrap and freeze. Once the wonton are frozen, you can gather them up and store in freezer bag. This ensures that the wonton freeze individually (otherwise if the wonton froze and stuck together, it would be nearly impossible to cook.

- When ready to cook wonton, they can go from freezer to simmering broth. Follow exact same cooking instructions. Since the wonton is frozen, it will take longer time for the broth to return to a simmer -- so it's self timing!.

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Hungarian Pork Stew Recipe, Guest Post by The Watering Mouth http://steamykitchen.com/23936-hungarian-pork-stew-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/23936-hungarian-pork-stew-recipe-video.html#comments Tue, 20 Nov 2012 16:23:00 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=23936 Jaden Introduces Cheri from The Watering Mouth: Hello, all you Steamy Kitchen readers! A gazillion thanks to Jaden for letting me share this amazing recipe with you all! I know you’re going to LOVE it. My husband Tamas (taw-MAHSH) was born and raised in a small village in Hungary named Tengelic [ten-gell-EETZ]. If you’re unfamiliar with Hungary, there is a ...

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Jaden Introduces Cheri from The Watering Mouth:

Hello, all you Steamy Kitchen readers! A gazillion thanks to Jaden for letting me share this amazing recipe with you all! I know you’re going to LOVE it.

Hungarian Pork Stew Recipe

My husband Tamas (taw-MAHSH) was born and raised in a small village in Hungary named Tengelic [ten-gell-EETZ]. If you’re unfamiliar with Hungary, there is a distinctive type of cuisine that Hungarians cook and it can most often be categorized as “peasant food”. Think: comfort food! My favorite! There are typical dishes that many of us know about like paprikashes and goulashes…and the distinctions between those dishes are slim. And this dish that I’m sharing with you is very similar: I describe it as thick, rich, flavorful, hearty type of stew. It’s the type of food that you absolutely crave at this time of year that will warm you up and keep you going!

Hungarian Pork Stew Recipe

In order to make this dish complete, you’ve got to make the homemade pasta to go along with it – it’s just not the same without it! (I know, I’ve tried). Only problem is, the pasta is so simple, you’ll be wanting to make that by itself and then you’ll have a carb problem on your hands. Don’t say I didn’t warn you…. (and absolutely NEVER fry up the pasta by itself in butter with a little salt on top…then you’ve got a REAL problem…)

Every time we get together with friends and it’s our turn to cook, Tamas and I make this exact dish. And we have never heard one complaint by anybody — not even from kids!! This is a dish everyone can agree on. And if you and your loved ones like to cook together, it’s a great dish where everyone can lend a hand. (Hint: The kids will love to smash the meat!)

Hungarian Pork Stew Recipe

So, without further ado, you can watch the videos I’ve created to quickly show how both parts are done, or you can skip straight to the recipe! Either way – enjoy and make sure to comment to tell me how you liked it!

xoxo,

Cheri from The Watering Mouth

How to Make Hungarian Pork Stew Video

How to Make Hungarian Nokedli (pasta) video

 

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Hungarian Pork Stew Recipe

Servings: 8 to 10 Prep Time: 1 hour Cook Time: 1 hour
Hungarian Pork Stew Recipe

Serves: about a million people. Okay, definitely enough for 8, maybe with leftovers! So cut this recipe in half for less and you can save time on the preparation too, because making this much does take us quite a bit of time. But we LOVE the leftovers!

Ingredients:

8 medium yellow onions, chopped to medium dice
1/3 cup canola/vegetable oil, plus more for frying
9 3/4-inch thick boneless center cut loin pork chops, trimmed of fat, sliced in half length-wise, pounded 1/4 inch thin (if you’re lucky enough to find the thin loin chops, you’ll only have to pound them thin)
1 tablespoon salt
1 tablespoon pepper
flour for dredging
3 tablespoons sweet Hungarian paprika
6-8 cups water, or enough to fully immerse all ingredients in the pot
Vegeta to taste, approximately 1 tablespoon (but if you can’t find it, just use vegetable/chicken soup seasoning packets)
1 cup sour cream

Directions:

1. In a large pot (6 qt) over medium to medium-high heat, add onions and canola oil. Saute onions until they are translucent, but not browned. Add more oil when necessary to keep them slick in the process. When the onions have finished cooking, turn down heat to low, add paprika to mixture and stir to mix well.

2. Season each side of the pork slices generously with salt and pepper. Dredge the slices in flour on each side.

3. In a frying pan over medium-high to high heat, heat about an inch of canola or vegetable oil. Fry each slice of pork until just barely golden brown around the edges, about 1-2 minutes, flipping halfway through. If they are thin enough, this will be enough to cook them fully. Lay them between sheets of paper towel on a plate to catch excess oil.

4. Cut each of the pork slices in half and place them back in the pot with the onions. Add enough water to the pot to cover the pork and onions. Cover pot and simmer on medium heat for 45 minutes to 1 hour. Stir occasionally.

5. When the stew is thickened up a bit from the flour and the onions are starting to disappear, it is ready for the final seasoning. Add salt, pepper and Vegeta seasoning to taste. Add sour cream and stir until the stew is a rich, thick consistency.

 

Click here to Like The Watering Mouth on Facebook where I share lots of other great recipes!

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Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork http://steamykitchen.com/23642-vietnamese-spring-rolls-slow-cooker-pork-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/23642-vietnamese-spring-rolls-slow-cooker-pork-recipe.html#comments Wed, 10 Oct 2012 19:41:35 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=23642 (Video) Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Orange Coriander Pork. Simple slow cooker recipe! Watch step by step video on how to roll Vietnamese Spring Rolls.

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Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork Recipe

I’ve been waiting MONTHS to share this video with you! We shot a series of cooking videos in Seattle back in June, when I was in town speaking at the BlogHer Food conference and tickling oysters.  The videos were produced by the National Pork Board and Costco, featuring pork and a few of my blogger friends – Sandy & Paul (Reluctant Entertainer), Diana (Eating Richly), Jenny (Picky Palate), Jessica (The Novice Chef), Lauren (Lauren’s Latest), Amanda (Kevin & Amanda).

I wanted to create a magical day for the gals, so we arranged to have a B-I-G stretch limo pick up all of us.

The limo was complete with sparkling disco lights, rockin’ music, lava lamps (all we were missing was a stripper pole in the middle).

Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork Recipe

Prior to shooting the video, each of us went through hair, makeup, food styling and video talent coaching. Some of the gals had never been on camera before, so it was important to get some tips and guidance from an industry pro.

Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork Recipe

So um, what does a video coach teach you? Well, uh….

Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork Recipe

You don’t realize how much you use these filler words until you tape yourself. I tend to use these fillers when I’m transitioning between finishing one sentence and not knowing what my next sentence would be quite yet.

Coach’s advice to me?

Now.

Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork Recipe

Honestly, I don’t remember what he said. Something about NOW.

Next up, hair and makeup. This is what it takes to make me “camera-ready.”

Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork Recipe

HOLD STILL, JADEN! | That’s the lovely Diana, who’s expecting a BOY!

Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork RecipeVietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork Recipe

Since we were shooting 5 different recipes with multiple bloggers, we also had a couple of food stylists help us cook, prep and pretty up the food. Each dish had to be planned out, including colors of napkins, the type of platter and what ingredient goes where.

Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork Recipe

And…..ACTION! (look closely! It’s an iPad!)

Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork Recipe

The cameras and lights can be a little intimidating if you’re not used to them. There were 3 cameramen, a sound guy, a lighting guy, a producer, food stylists, PR reps, the Pork team and then all of us.

Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork Recipe

In between takes, hair and makeup sneak in to touch up.

Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork Recipe

Put 8 food bloggers in a room, turn on a video camera, and you’re sure to get some bloopers! See end of post for the blooper reel!

Big thanks to Pork Board and to Costco for producing these videos! My dish that I made with pork was Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork. I used Sirloin Tip Roast – a very lean and flavorful cut perfect for roasting and slow cooking. It feeds a big crowd on a small budget! Enjoy the recipe!

Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork Recipe

How to roll Vietnamese Spring Rolls

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Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Slow Cooker Pork Recipe

Servings: 8 to 10 Prep Time: 10 minutes for the pork + 25 minutes for assembly Cook Time: 3 3/4 hours
Vietnamese-Spring-Roll-Pork-Recipe-feature-16

Please watch the video for detailed wrapping instructions. For the dipping sauce, purchase Sweet Chili Sauce, usually found in regular supermarkets, in the Asian section. It's sold in glass bottles and is bright orange/red in color. The Sweet Chili Sauce is sweet, and not too spicy. Alternatively, you could use other sweet sauces like "Duck Sauce" or "Sweet Plum Sauce".

If you don't have a slow cooker - roast the pork in the oven, 275F for 4 hours.

Ingredients:

FOR THE ORANGE CORIANDER PORK
2 pound boneless pork sirloin tip roast
1 teaspoon ground coriander
3/4 teaspoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 onion, cut into thick slices
1 orange, cut into 1/4-inch-thick rounds (do not peel)
1 cup orange juice
1 cup canned chicken broth
2 tablespoons fish sauce or soy sauce
2 teaspoons finely chopped fresh ginger
6 garlic cloves, smashed under a knife & peeled

FOR THE ROLL ASSEMBLY
one 8-oz. package (8-inch-diameter) rice spring roll wrappers (22 wrappers)
2 cups matchstick cut carrots
1 cucumber, cut into matchstick (English or Japanese cucumber preferred)
1 medium red bell pepper, cut into matchsticks
2 cups packed baby spinach leaves
sprigs of fresh mint and basil leaves
1 cup prepared Sweet Chili Sauce

Directions:

FOR THE SLOW COOKER PORK
Season pork roast with coriander, salt and pepper. To the slow cooker, add orange juice, broth, fish sauce, garlic and ginger. Scatter half the onion and orange in the slow cooker, top with pork, then add remaining onion and orange on top of the pork. Cover and cook on low until an instant-read thermometer inserted in the center of the pork registers 160F, about 3-4 hours. Transfer the pork to a carving board. Rest for at least 15 minutes.

FOR THE ASSEMBLY:
Slice pork across the grain into very thin slices. Divide into 22 portions. Half-fill a wide bowl with warm water. For each roll, dip 1 wrapper for 5 seconds. Shake
off the excess water from the wrapper and place on clean and dry surface. The rice paper will still be a little stiff, but don't worry, it will soften up. Fold the rice paper in half to make half-moon shape. Place 1 portion of pork at the bottom of the wrapper and top with carrot, cucumber, bell pepper, spinach leaves and herbs. Roll up the wrapper tightly. Place roll on a platter and cover with a barely damp towel to keep moist. The rolls can be made and refrigerated up to 2 hours ahead. Serve chilled with the Sweet Chili Sauce for dipping.

Our Blooper Reel!

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Whiskey Miso Pork Chops http://steamykitchen.com/23386-whiskey-miso-pork-chops-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/23386-whiskey-miso-pork-chops-recipe.html#comments Wed, 26 Sep 2012 16:19:17 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=23386 Pork chops marinated in a savory whiskey-miso sauce.

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We’re back from a little family getaway to the Bahamas with our best friends, Shawn and Wendy. As a travel-bug and a bargain hunter, I felt it was my duty to allow the kids to ditch school in order to take advantage of an unbelievable Bahamas deal with daily access to Atlantis water park, without the Atlantis moneybags pricetag.

Our hotel was right next door, 5 minute walking distance to Atlantis (if you are curious, here’s where we found the deal – no affiliation or anything with them, but I see that the deal we bought is now over) and our room included access to the water park for free. FREE! Which meant we’re now pros at the art of going down steep waterslides without getting a painful wedgie. Each of us now sport a nice, bronzy tan, too.

Speaking of nice, bronzy tan, check out these pork chops (nice transition back to food, eh?). The chops are marinated in a whiskey-miso sauce overnight (or even just 15 minutes if you’re in a hurry).

This is a recipe that I’ve created for client, Miso & Easy – here’s the entire collection of miso recipes. You can either use their easy-to-use miso or any regular miso paste that you find at the store.

Both the miso and the apple cider vinegar in the marinade tenderizes the pork chop. The salt/sugar in the miso acts like a brine; And the apple cider vinegar helps break down the toughness. The same marinade is cooked with the pork chop and makes a lovely sauce as well.

The ingredients are simple:

Whiskey Miso Pork Chops Ingredients

And the results are amazing:

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Whiskey Miso Pork Chop Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 20 minutes (or optional overnight marinade) Cook Time: 10 minutes
whiskey-miso-pork-chop-recipe-feature-9367

Chicken breasts would work beautifully in this recipe as well.

Ingredients:

1/2 cup whiskey
1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
1 1/2 tablespoons miso paste (or 3 tablespoons Miso & Easy)
1 tablespoon brown sugar
1 tablespoon grainy mustard
4 pork chops, about 1-inch thick
1 tablespoon cooking oil
1 tablespoon minced fresh parsley

Directions:

1. In a sealable bag, combine the whiskey, apple cider, miso, brown sugar and mustard. Add the pork chops, seal the bag and squeeze out as much air as possible. Refrigerate for 15 minutes or up to overnight.

2. When ready to cook, remove the pork chops from the bag. Wipe off marinade from pork chop, reserving as much of the marinade as possible in the bag.

3. Heat a large frying pan over medium-high heat. Swirl in the cooking oil. Add in the pork chops and cook for 2 minutes. Flip the pork chops then pour in the reserved remaining marinade from the bag into the pan. Turn the heat to medium-low and cover the pan. Cook for 5 minutes (if your pork chops are thinner than 1" please cut time to 3-4 minutes) or until the pork chops are 145F in the middle, or just barely pink. Let rest for 3 minutes on counter.

4. Top with parsley. Serve with the whiskey miso sauce from the pan.

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Chinese Stir Fried Sticky Rice Cakes (Nian Gao) http://steamykitchen.com/15288-chinese-stirfried-sticky-rice-cakes-nian-gao.html http://steamykitchen.com/15288-chinese-stirfried-sticky-rice-cakes-nian-gao.html#comments Thu, 28 Apr 2011 17:49:45 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=15288 Step by step photos for authentic Shanghainese Chinese Fried Sticky Rice Cake (Nian Gao) Recipe.

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Last week, on a surprise visit to see family, Mom made a couple of dishes that I normally don’t cook myself. One of them is this Chinese Fried Sticky Rice Cake Noodle dish (long name!) In Chinese, it’s called 炒年糕 Chǎo Nián Gāo.

The recipe is from my Dad’s hometown of NingBo in China.

What are Sticky Rice Cake Noodles (Nian Gao)

Nian Gao is normally eaten for Chinese New Year, as it signifies good fortune for the coming year. “Nian” means year and “gao” means high — translating loosely to “every year, may you reach higher and higher.”

Nian Gao can also mean sticky rice cakes that are fried in egg (savory) or fried with sugar (sweet). The Shanghainese and Korean version (TteokGuk photo) of nian gao is this recipe, where they take the glutinous rice cakes, cut them into ovals 2 inches long, 1 inch wide, and stir fry them like noodles.

You can find these rice cake noodles at Asian markets, either dried form (in the dried noodle section), frozen or in the refrigerated noodle section. Mom likes to buy frozen rice cake noodles, as they keep well in the freezer. They have to be soaked for 2 hours up to overnight in water. Purchase either the Korean or Chinese version, they are the same.

The rice cakes have to be soaked for 2 hours (up to overnight)

Dried or fresh Chinese mushrooms (or shiitake), canned bamboo shoots

Mom used mustard greens that she had salted overnight, but I’ve given easier instructions in the recipe to use Napa Cabbage.

and Pork marinated in soy, rice wine, pepper, cornstarch and a pinch of sugar.

The pork is first stir-fried until almost cooked through.

Then add the Chinese mushrooms.

Add in the bamboo shoots.

Then the vegetables.

Toss well.

Season with a bit of soy sauce. Taste first and add more if needed.

Add in the drained rice cakes.

Toss! Toss! Toss!

Pour in 1/4 cup of chicken broth or vegetable broth, cover, turn heat to low and let cook for 2-3 minutes until the rice cakes are softened.

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Stir Fried Chinese Sticky Rice Cakes (Nian Gao) Recipe (炒年糕 chǎo nián gāo)

Servings: 6 Prep Time: 15 minutes Cook Time: 15 minutes (with up to overnight soaking of noodles)
chinese-korean-sticky-rice-noodles-nian-goh-recipe.jpg-2840.jpg

Notes on the sticky rice cakes:
They rice cakes should be gluten-free, but please check the packaging.
If dried - soak in water at room temperature overnight or up to 2 days
If frozen - defrost then soak in water at room temperature for 2 hours up to overnight
If fresh (in refrigerated section) - soak 2 hours in water at room temperature up to overnight

Notes on mushrooms
Mom likes to use dried Chinese black mushrooms, as they have much more flavor than the fresh shiitake mushrooms you'll find in the refrigerated section. But feel free to use either.

Ingredients:

One 24-ounce package rice cake nian goh noodles (see notes above)
4 dried Chinese black mushrooms (or 8 fresh shiitake mushrooms)
2 teaspoons soy sauce
freshly ground black pepper
pinch of sugar
1 teaspoon Chinese rice wine (or dry sherry)
1 teaspoon cornstarch
8 ounces pork, cut into very thin strips
2 tablespoons cooking oil
6 ounces Chinese Napa Cabbage, shredded
One 6-ounce can julienne cut bamboo shoots, drained
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1/4 cup chicken or vegetable broth

Directions:

1. In a large bowl, soak the rice cakes according to the instructions in the headnotes. If you are using dried Chinese black mushrooms, in a small bowl, soak the dried Chinese mushrooms for 2 hours or up to overnight until softened. If you are using fresh shiitake mushrooms, skip this step.

2. In a medium bowl, combine the 2 tsp soy sauce, black pepper, sugar, rice wine, cornstarch together. Mix in the pork and marinate for 20 minutes or up to overnight in the refrigerator.

3. When you are ready to cook, have all of your ingredients ready. Drain the rice cakes. Drain the mushrooms and slice into very thin slices.

4. Heat a wok or large saute pan over high heat. When hot, swirl in the cooking oil. Add the pork and cook until browned and almost cooked through.

5. Add in the mushrooms and the bamboo shoots, stir fry for 1 minute. Add in the cabbage and stir fry for 2 minutes. Mix in the soy sauce.

6. Add in the rice cakes and toss very well. Pour in the broth, cover and lower the heat to medium-low. Cook for 2-3 minutes or until the rice cakes have browned a little and are softened. The sticky rice cakes will be just slightly chewy (but not hard to chew) similar to pasta cooked al-dente. Taste and add in additional soy sauce if needed. Serve immediately.

 

 

 

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Steamed Siu Mai Dumplings http://steamykitchen.com/11045-steamed-siu-mai-dumplings.html http://steamykitchen.com/11045-steamed-siu-mai-dumplings.html#comments Mon, 30 Aug 2010 12:19:01 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=11045 Delicious recipe for Steamed Siu Mai Dumplings on New Asian Cuisine.

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Delicious recipe for Steamed Siu Mai Dumplings on New Asian Cuisine.

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Fall off the Bone Baby Back Ribs with Sweet Chili Sauce http://steamykitchen.com/11036-baby-back-ribs-recipe-fall-off-bone.html http://steamykitchen.com/11036-baby-back-ribs-recipe-fall-off-bone.html#comments Sun, 29 Aug 2010 14:31:06 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=11036 There aren’t very many recipes that can boast “2 ingredients” and taste better than fall off the bone baby back ribs smothered in sweet, sticky Thai chili sauce, which by the way, isn’t really all that spicy despite the name. 5-minutes hands-on and two ingredients: ribs and 1/2 cup of the sweet chili sauce. Salt and pepper don’t count, but ...

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There aren’t very many recipes that can boast “2 ingredients” and taste better than fall off the bone baby back ribs smothered in sweet, sticky Thai chili sauce, which by the way, isn’t really all that spicy despite the name.

5-minutes hands-on and two ingredients: ribs and 1/2 cup of the sweet chili sauce. Salt and pepper don’t count, but even if you did count it, it’s still will be the best 4 ingredient-dish you can ever make.

Just a word on the ribs – there are 2 camps of rib-lovers:
a) meat fall off the bone camp
b) I want to gnaw and tear meat off the bone camp

I’m part of the first group, I enjoy tender, juicy, succulent meat that requires very little effort to pry from the bone. If you’re like me, you’ll love this recipe and I bet you’d never order ribs at a restaurant again.

Also, I’ve got a trick for you that will make the ribs even more tender.

How to make baby back ribs fall off the bone

This technique can be used with ANY type of barbeque sauce. If you want, you can also use a dry rub instead of the salt and pepper.

To feed 4 hungry people, start with about 5 pounds of baby back ribs. Actually, you can use the larger St. Louis or country style ribs if you want. Tender baby backs are my thing. The amount of ribs really doesn’t matter – throw in another rack if you’ve got more people.

Turn the rib over to the underside — see that layer of white membrane covering the ribs? You’ll want to remove that – it’s tough and stringy.

Take a butter knife, wedge it just underneath the membrane to loosen.

Pull the membrane up and off the bone.

Once you’ve got a section off, use your fingers to remove the rest – just peel it off.

See how thick and tough that membrane is? Removing this will make your ribs infinitely better. Sometimes this membrane is really thick (like mine) and sometimes it’s really thin and a little more difficult to remove. Try to get as much as you can.

Place all the ribs in a roasting pan, it doesn’t matter if they overlap. Season with salt on both sides.

Pepper on both sides.

If they overlap, I like to layer them like this.

Cover with double-thickness of tin foil. Bake at 275F for 4 hours or so.

After 4-ish hours, they’ll look like this:

Use a spatula to move them to a baking sheet.

Here’s sweet chili sauce. Mae Ploy is my favorite brand. Really, you can use any type of barbeque sauce, thick teriyaki sauce that you want. No need to stick to sweet chili sauce (but please, try it just once!)

Brush on the sweet chili sauce all over the ribs.

Be generous! Brush on a lot.

Now move your oven rack to the top 1/3 of the oven and broil for 5 minutes. Keep a good watch on ’em! Don’t let them burn.

And that’s it! Baby Back Ribs with Sweet Chili Sauce.

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Baby Back Ribs Fall off the Bone Recipe

Servings: 4-6 Prep Time: 5 Cook Time: 4 hours
baby-back-ribs-sweet-chili-sauce-4025.jpg

You can use the larger St. Louis or country style ribs. If you'd like to use a dry rub, just it in place of salt and pepper. My kids love barbeque sauce, and I'll use this same technique and slather on bbq sauce instead of the sweet chili sauce.

Ingredients:

5 pounds baby back ribs
salt & pepper
1/2 cup Thai sweet chili sauce

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 275F. On the underside of the rib, remove the thin membrane and discard. Season both sides with salt and pepper.

2. Place the ribs in a roasting pan, cover with double thickness of tin foil.

3. Roast for 4 hours or so. Discard foil. Use a wide, flat spatula to carefully lift the ribs onto a baking sheet. Spread the sweet chili sauce generously over the ribs.

4. Place oven rack near the top of the oven. Turn broiler on and broil the ribs for 3-5 minutes, or until the sweet chili sauce begins to caramelize. Make sure you don't burn the sauce, so keep a close eye on the ribs.

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Hawaiian Luau Burger http://steamykitchen.com/10122-hawaiian-luau-burger.html http://steamykitchen.com/10122-hawaiian-luau-burger.html#comments Wed, 23 Jun 2010 16:20:22 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=10122 Ted Reader is a man I’ve referred to as someone who tiptoes the fine line between genius and lunatic, and that’s exactly why I love this man. His cookbooks are big, bold and absolutely nuts. Ted just came out with king of all burger books – Napolean’s Everyday Gourmet Burgers. Meet Ted and the Ultimate Cheeseburger Melt. It’s as big ...

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Ted Reader is a man I’ve referred to as someone who tiptoes the fine line between genius and lunatic, and that’s exactly why I love this man.

His cookbooks are big, bold and absolutely nuts. Ted just came out with king of all burger books – Napolean’s Everyday Gourmet Burgers.

Meet Ted and the Ultimate Cheeseburger Melt. It’s as big as his head and includes 5 different cheeses and a side of heartburn.

The Schwarzenegger Burger has 2 bacon-covered sirloin/ground pork burgers on either side of a hot dog, grilled on a cedar plank. I’d make this just for giggles.

The Steak Oscar Burger is a bacon-wrapped beef tenderloin burger topped with lump crabmeat, asparagus and dijon mustard sauce.

The Halibut King Crab Burger includes wild rice, grated carrots, onions and red bell pepper on top of a broiche bun.

The over-the-top Billion Dollar Burger is made with smoked shredded beef brisket, foie gras, Kobe beef, Gentleman Jack Rare Tennessee Whisky. And that’s just the patty. Top the burger with a seared piece of foie gras, shaved truffles, caviar and surround with morel mushrooms.

So which one would you try?

I’m all over Ted’s Hawaiian Luau Burger – a pork patty topped with grilled pineapple, tomatoes, red onion and shaved smoked ham. The recipe for the Luau Burger is over at Steamy Kitchen on TLC.

Recipe for the Luau Burger is over at Steamy Kitchen on TLC.

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