Steamy Kitchen Recipes | RSS Feed http://steamykitchen.com Steamy Kitchen Food Blog: fast recipes, simple recipes, with fresh ingredients to create delicious meals. Fri, 01 May 2015 15:39:44 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.1 Chinese New Year Recipes – Party Like It’s 4707! http://steamykitchen.com/2189-chinese-new-year-recipes-party-like-its-4707.html http://steamykitchen.com/2189-chinese-new-year-recipes-party-like-its-4707.html#comments Sun, 25 Jan 2009 17:35:24 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/?p=2189 Don’t put away your party shoes just yet! I know you think that the new year celebrations are over, but for many Asians all over the world, the biggest holiday is yet to come! January 26th is the beginning of Chinese New Year, a 15-day long celebration and the start of year 4707 according to the Chinese calendar. Each year ...

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Chinese New Year Recipes

Don’t put away your party shoes just yet! I know you think that the new year celebrations are over, but for many Asians all over the world, the biggest holiday is yet to come! January 26th is the beginning of Chinese New Year, a 15-day long celebration and the start of year 4707 according to the Chinese calendar.

Each year of the Chinese calendar is symbolized by one of twelve zodiac animals, and this year, it’s the Year of the Ox. According to the wise, old sage who created the system thousands of years ago, the ox symbolizes a hardworking, honest animal. What does that mean to us? Hopefully, 2009 will be a year of strength, stability and hard work. Which quite frankly, after the tumulus and erratic Year of the Rat, this is just what we need.

And guess who was born the Year of the Ox? President Obama. Boy, oh boy, I hope the Chinese are right about this strength and stability stuff!

No matter what your ethnicity, I invite you to partake in a few of the food traditions that symbolize abundance, good fortune and prosperity for the coming year. I’m sure we could all use a little more luck, eh?

First things first, though…let’s talk about lucky money before we even get to the food. Red lucky money envelopes (“hong bao” in Chinese) are given by family and close friends to the unmarried younger generation. The amount of money you give really doesn’t matter much, but it’s nice make sure that the money is new and free of wrinkles or stains. Usually, I will visit the bank and ask for new dollar bills to insert into the envelopes. For my children’s classmates, as a fun way to wish them and their families good luck, I will put a two crisp one dollar bills in each envelope and hand them out to the class. By the way, money should always be given in EVEN numbers, except for number that is between 3 and 5.  Yes, I’m playing it safe and being totally superstitious, so I do not want to utter that number that comes after 3 but before 5, because that particular number is very, very bad luck. Sigh, silly Chinese! I know, but HEY, do you blame me? I need all the luck and prosperity I can get this Chinese New Year! Anyways, even numbers are good, odd numbers are for funerals.

When my brother and I were little, we wouldn’t be able to sleep the night before Chinese New Year, as we would huddle together on the bed with the monster Sears catalog propped on our laps, daydreaming of all the fabulous toys to buy with our lucky money! Jay and I used to love visiting our relatives on Chinese New Year, because the wealthy ones would stuff our envelopes with a coupla hundies. $CORE. You can buy packages of red envelopes at any Asian market, the more modern ones have cutesy artwork on them, like Disney characters, Hello Kitty and Pokemon.

To help you celebrate, I’ve compiled my list of favorite Chinese New Year Recipes from around the blogs and on SteamyKitchen.com. I hope you enjoy!

Continue reading RECIPES FOR CHINESE NEW YEAR…

Chinese New Year Recipes Chinese New Year would not start off right if you didn’t have a stack of Chinese Egg Rolls that represent golden bars. Bring on the prosperity, baby! This is my Mom’s Famous Chinese Egg Rolls recipe – complete with step by step rolling instructions or Vegetable Spring Rolls with video (egg rolls look like gold bars, which symbolize wealth) 
Chinese Potstickers represent prosperity too – the folded dumpling resemble golden ingots. These are really fun to make with your kids or with a couple of friends. I’ve got step-by-step photo instructions on how to make these Chinese Potstickers!These potstickers will surely be served for Chinese New Year at our home. Chinese Potstickers
Fish in Chinese is “yu” and this dish represents abundance or “always having more than enough” in the coming new year. Most Chinese families will serve a whole fish, head and all, but don’t worry, you don’t have to. Fillets are just fine.My Mom’s recipe for Chinese Steamed Fish will show you how to make Chinese restaurant style steamed fish.
Chinese Marbled Tea Eggs are incredibly easy to make, they just require q few hours of soaking time in the soy/tea mixture.These are eaten for Chinese New Year to also represent prosperity.

I love to eat them as a snack!

Chinese Tea Egg Recipe
happy_shrimp_stirfry_recipe Mom calls this dish “Hee Hee Ha Ha” as these red shrimp symbolize happiness for Chinese New Year.Shrimp in Chinese is pronounced “haa” which of course sounds like laughter!

Mom’s recipe for Happy Shrimp Stir Fry is over at my column at Simply Recipes.

RasaMalaysia has a recipe for honeywalnutshrimpwalnutprawns Honey Walnut Shrimp which I think you’ll love – it’s sweet, crunchy and the creamy sauce luxurious. You can never go wrong with her rasamalaysia_bok_choy Baby Bok Choy with Shrimp Stir Fry for Chinese New Year either.

Sunday Nite Dinner has a recipe for Chinese Sticky Rice For Chinese New Year Chinese Sticky Rice that I think I’ll make for my family.

For dessert, these Sesame Balls for Chinese New Year Chocolate Filled Sesame Balls symbolize growing prosperity. Or for a fun cookie, how about making your own chinese_fortune_cookie_chinese_new_year Chinese Fortune Cookies stuffing them with auspicious wishes for the Year of the Ox!

But whatever you do, DO NOT serve chinese_squid not for chinese new year squid for Chinese New Year – called “Yow Yu.” In the olden days, workers would have to travel far from home to work, often bringing personal belongings rolled up in a blanket. When a worker was fired, he was ordered to “yow,” or roll up his blanket, packing his stuff to go home. Serving squid symbolizes being fired in the coming year. If your co-workers or subordinates pleasantly surprises you with a dish of succulent squid on January 26th, be very, very suspicious.
Infographic: What to eat for Chinese New Year!

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Pan Fried Pork and Shrimp Potstickers Recipe http://steamykitchen.com/718-potstickers.html http://steamykitchen.com/718-potstickers.html#comments Sun, 27 Jul 2008 14:12:20 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/?p=718 What you’ll learn: How to properly pleat potsticker dumplings How to fry potstickers in batches How to squeeze out water from cabbage (if you’d like to include them in your recipe) so you wouldn’t have soggy dumplings In college, my friends and I used to get together once a month and have “Chinese Potsticker” parties. The kitchen would be prepped ...

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Pan Fried Pork and Shrimp Potstickers Recipe

What you’ll learn:

  • How to properly pleat potsticker dumplings
  • How to fry potstickers in batches
  • How to squeeze out water from cabbage (if you’d like to include them in your recipe) so you wouldn’t have soggy dumplings

In college, my friends and I used to get together once a month and have “Chinese Potsticker” parties. The kitchen would be prepped to create 3 big batches of Chinese potsticker filling and the dining table would be converted to our potsticker wrapping session.

We’d make hundreds of Chinese Potstickers. A small batch to enjoy that evening and the rest of the potstickers go straight to the freezer for my friends to take home. They were soooo fabulous and it was our girly-bonding time.

These days, it’s not my girlfriends who come over to pleat dumplings, but my little kids sit at the table wrapping the potstickers with Mommy. Love it!

Chinese Potstickers are really simple to make, and there are a few secrets that I’ll share with you.

How to pleat potsticker dumplings

I’m piecing together several photos of dumpling making from different cooking sessions, so you’ll have to excuse the inconsistent photo quality. Not to mention, these photos were from last year, before I learned how to use my camera’s basic function, like FOCUS. 😉

These photos were taken when I handmade the dumpling wrapper – a feat that while delicious – to me is not worth the trouble, which is why I’ve not posted this before! The handmade wrappers are thicker than what you’d buy at the store.

Pan Fried Pork and Shrimp Potstickers Recipe - pleating

Spoon about 1 teaspsoon of filling in the middle of the wrapper. Use your finger to brush the cornstarch slurry all around the outer edge of the dumpling to act as your “glue” to hold the potsticker together.

Pan Fried Pork and Shrimp Potstickers Recipe - pleating

Bring up opposite sides and pinch the dumpling wrapper in the middle.

Pan Fried Pork and Shrimp Potstickers Recipe - pleating

You’ll only be pleating the upper half of the potsticker. In this photo, all my pleats will be made on the upper half of the potsticker.

Start with your right side. Hold the potsticker in your hand. Fold and pleat as shown above. Pinch tight. You’ll do 3 pleats just like this on the right side. Then repeat on the other side, but in the opposite direction, so that all your pleats are pointing towards the center. See how my pleat points towards the center? This creates a crescent effect. The next time I make potstickers, I’ll have to take a few more photos, because it’s easier to learn by photos than in words.

Pan Fried Pork and Shrimp Potstickers Recipe - pleating

Pinch all pleats tight – there should be no open spaces, otherwise your filling will fall out.

Pan Fried Pork and Shrimp Potstickers Recipe - pleating

Now fry the potstickers in batches (read my instructions below in the recipe)

Sidenote:

While my Pan Fried Pork and Shrimp Potstickers Recipe below does not call for cabbage, if you do want to include cabbage in your dumpling, make sure you salt the cabbage, let it sit for 15 minutes and squeeze all the water out of the cabbage. Watery cabbage = soggy dumplings. Look how much water comes out after 15 minutes of salting:

Pan Fried Pork and Shrimp Potstickers Recipe - squeeze out water

The salt draws out the water. For every handful of shredded cabbage, use about 1 teaspoon of kosher salt (1/2 tsp table salt), mix well, let sit for 15 minutes at room temp. Place salted cabbage in cheesecloth and squeeze water out. You could also just do this in your hands too, if you don’t have cheesecloth.

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Pan Fried Pork and Shrimp Potstickers Recipe

Servings: Serves 6-8 Prep Time: Cook Time:
chinese_potsticker_dumpling_recipe

Ingredients:

FOR THE POTSTICKERS
1 package of frozen dumpling skins, defrosted overnight in refrigerator or 40 minutes room temp (do not microwave or set in water)
3/4 pound raw shrimp, shelled and deveined
3 stalks green onions, cut into 2 inch sections
1/2 cup canned bamboo shoots
1/2 pound ground pork
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
2 tablespoons cornstarch
1 teaspoon freshly grated ginger
1 tablespoon rice wine (or dry sherry)
for the slurry: 1 tablespoon cornstarch mixed with 1/4 cup water in a small bowl
water
cooking oil
FOR THE DIPPING SAUCE
1 teaspoon Asian chili sauce
1/4 cup soy sauce
2 teaspoon sesame oil
1/2 teaspoon sugar
1/2 teaspoon rice wine vinegar

Directions:

Wash the shrimp and pat very dry. In a food processor, add the shrimp, green onions, bamboo shoots and pulse several times until the shrimp is chopped to about 1/4 inch. In a large bowl, combine the shrimp mixture with ground pork, soy sauce, salt, cornstarch, ginger, rice wine. Mix well.

Spoon 1 teaspoon of the filling onto dumpling skin. Brush a bit of the cornstarch slurry
all around the edge of the dumpling skin. Fold over and press to secure edges. Make sure edges are sealed tightly. Shape the dumpling so that it has a flat bottom. Cover loosely with plastic wrap so that it doesn't dry out.

When you are ready to cook, heat a large nonstick pan with 1 tablespoon of cooking oil over medium-high heat. When the oil is hot but not smoking, add the dumplings, flat side down, not touching, to the pan. Let fry for 1 minute until the bottoms are light golden brown. Pour 1/4 cup of water into the pan and immediately cover with a tight fitting lid. Turn heat to medium and let the dumplings steam for 3minutes. Open lid and let the remaining liquid cook off about 1 minute. Cut into a dumpling to make sure that the filling is cooked through. Remove to plate, wipe the pan clean with paper towels (or wash) and repeat with remaining dumplings. Serve with dipping sauce.

More Chinese Recipes to Explore:

Chinese Pastries with Hoisin Chicken

Con Your Kids to Eat Vegetables, Steamy-Style

Ground Beef with Beijing Sauce Over Noodles

Stir Fried Shrimp, Eggs and Peas + Stir Fry Secrets

 

Xiao Long Bao – Steamed Shanghai Soup Dumplings

Wonton Noodle Soup

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