Steamy Kitchen Recipes | RSS Feed http://steamykitchen.com Steamy Kitchen Food Blog: fast recipes, simple recipes, with fresh ingredients to create delicious meals. Fri, 24 Jul 2015 17:57:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.3 Satay Noodles and Greens http://steamykitchen.com/28957-satay-noodles-and-greens-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/28957-satay-noodles-and-greens-recipe-video.html#comments Fri, 06 Dec 2013 18:33:47 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=28957 What you’ll learn: Vegetarian noodle dish with Peanut Satay Sauce Recipe from Chef Dale Pinnock of The Medicinal Chef Cookbook 20 minute recipe, start to finish Satay is generally grilled meat on a skewer, served with a peanut-y dipping sauce on the side.  You know, something like this: or this: or this: Asian shish-kabob, right? Well, not this recipe! We’ve ...

The post Satay Noodles and Greens appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
Satay Noodles and Greens Recipe

What you’ll learn:

  • Vegetarian noodle dish with Peanut Satay Sauce
  • Recipe from Chef Dale Pinnock of The Medicinal Chef Cookbook
  • 20 minute recipe, start to finish

Satay is generally grilled meat on a skewer, served with a peanut-y dipping sauce on the side.  You know, something like this:

or this:

or this:

Asian shish-kabob, right? Well, not this recipe! We’ve taken all the savory, nutty flavors of meat satay and made it a vegetarian noodle dish, with the help of my favorite cookbook of the year, The Medicinal Chef by Dale Pinnock.

Satay Noodles and Greens Recipe

Screen Shot 2013-11-14 at 1.07.32 PM

If there’s one book to add to your wishlist, this is it. Dale’s philosophy about food is that it should not only nourish your stomach, but should also heal your body.

Satay Noodles and Greens Recipe

Each recipe is accompanied by a little chart to highlight ailments the ingredients can help.

Satay Noodles and Greens Recipe

In this instance, Satay Noodles and Greens Recipe with the peanut-y sauce is great for:

Screen Shot 2013-12-02 at 4.13.02 PM

With fresh greens that we picked from our garden, Asian dried rice noodles and a simply stir-together sauce, it’s an easy, filling and healthy meal.

Satay Noodles and Greens Recipe

***

Satay Noodles and Greens Recipe Video

 ***

Yum
Print

Satay Noodles and Greens Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes
satay noodles and greens recipe-0146

Recipe adapted from The Medicinal Chef: Eat Your Way to Better Health by Dale Pinnock.

Ingredients:

8 ounces dry rice noodles
1 tablespoon cooking oil
1 large leek
2 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
1 small green or red chili pepper, minced
4 handfuls shredded greens, such as cabbage, napa cabbage, bok choy and tatsoi
2 tablespoons hot water
4 tablespoons chunky peanut butter
2 tablespoons dark soy sauce (or 2 tablespoons regular soy sauce + 1 tablespoon brown sugar)
1 tablespoon honey
1 teaspoon Chinese five-spice powder
1/2 teaspoon sea or kosher salt

Directions:

Soak the dry rice noodles in warm water for 5-8 minutes. In a bowl, whisk together the hot water, peanut butter, dark soy sauce, honey, five-spice powder, salt and set aside. We'll be only using the white part of the leek (compost or use the green part to make broth). Wash the leek very well, separating the layers a bit to rinse out any dirt. Very thinly slice the leek.

Heat the cooking oil in a large saute pan or wok over medium heat until just shimmering. Add the leek, garlic and chili pepper. Cook for 2 minutes (take care to not burn the garlic).

Add the shredded greens and continue to cook until they have softened slightly, about 1 minute. Turn heat to medium-high and add in the soy sauce mixture

Drain the rice noodles. When sauce begins to bubble a bit, add in the rice noodles and cook for 1-2 minutes or until the rice noodles are cooked.

Legend image reprinted with permission from The Medicinal Chef © 2013 Dale Pinnock, Sterling Publishing Inc. Co. Photography by Martin Poole.

 

The post Satay Noodles and Greens appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/28957-satay-noodles-and-greens-recipe-video.html/feed 7
Vegetable Thai Curry Noodle Soup http://steamykitchen.com/26966-vegetable-thai-curry-noodle-soup-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/26966-vegetable-thai-curry-noodle-soup-recipe-video.html#comments Fri, 03 May 2013 15:05:55 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=26966 We’ve been a little distracted for the past week, new babies, another new baby that is just learning how to waddle and getting quotes to build a new fence for animals (sheep! alpaca! bunnies!) Pretty soon, I’ll have to rebrand this site to be “Steamy Farmer” right?! So, dinners recently have been super quick-cooking meals and raiding my pantry/refrigerator for something ...

The post Vegetable Thai Curry Noodle Soup appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>

Vegetable Curry Noodle Soup Recipe

We’ve been a little distracted for the past week, new babies, another new baby that is just learning how to waddle and getting quotes to build a new fence for animals (sheep! alpaca! bunnies!) Pretty soon, I’ll have to rebrand this site to be “Steamy Farmer” right?!

Vegetable Curry Noodle Soup Recipe

So, dinners recently have been super quick-cooking meals and raiding my pantry/refrigerator for something to cobble together. This is one of them. In fact, I think Thai Curry is the queen of emergency quick-cooking.

Vegetable Curry Noodle Soup Recipe

This version of Vegetable Thai Curry Noodle Soup consists of:

Pantry – Thai curry paste, coconut milk, carton of vegetable broth, rice noodles, bamboo shoots, baby corn.
Refrigerator – bell pepper, mushroom, tofu, basil

All of the refrigerator items are long-lasting type of ingredients that stay fresh for about a week.

15 minutes tops, from pantry/refrigerator to table.

Vegetable Curry Noodle Soup Recipe

Vegetable Thai Curry Noodle Soup Recipe Video

 


Yum
Print

Vegetable Curry Noodle Soup

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 5 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes
vegetable-curry-noodle-soup-recipe-featured-1708

Use whatever vegetables suit you! Other ideas: zucchini slices, very thinly sliced carrots (use a vegetable peeler), onion slivers, broccoli florets, bok choy, spinach leaves, kale leaves, cabbage.

Ingredients:

10 ounces dried rice noodles
1 tablespoon cooking oil
2 tablespoons Thai curry paste (or to taste)
1 cup coconut milk
4 cups vegetable broth
1 tablespoon fish sauce
8 ounces baby corn, halved
4 ounces bamboo shoots
1/2 red bell pepper, sliced
8 whole shiitake mushrooms, sliced
8 ounces medium or firm tofu, cubed
handful fresh basil, leaves torn

Directions:

If you are using rice noodles, soak the noodles in hot tap water (not boiling water, just use hottest water from tap) for 10 minutes. Drain. If you're not using rice noodles, cook noodles according to package directions.

In a wok or a soup pot, heat oil over medium heat, add in curry paste and fry for a few seconds until very fragrant. Be careful not to burn the curry paste. Pour in 2 tablespoons coconut milk and whisk with the curry paste until combined. Add the remaining coconut milk and the vegetable broth and bring to a simmer. Optional- stir in the fish sauce or soy sauce. Give the soup a taste and add more curry paste if you'd like it spicier.

Add in the vegetables and tofu. Cook for 3 minutes or until the vegetables are cooked to your liking. (If you're not using rice noodles, see below.) Add in the drained rice noodles and boil until the rice noodles are cooked through, about 60 seconds to 2 minutes depending on the thickness of the rice noodles. Stir in fresh basil and serve immediately.

* If you are NOT using rice noodles and have cooked the noodles according to instructions on the package, divide the cooked noodles evenly into 4 serving bowls. Stir in fresh basil in the vegetable curry soup and pour over the noodles.

 

The post Vegetable Thai Curry Noodle Soup appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/26966-vegetable-thai-curry-noodle-soup-recipe-video.html/feed 20
Chinese Stir Fried Sticky Rice Cakes (Nian Gao) http://steamykitchen.com/15288-chinese-stirfried-sticky-rice-cakes-nian-gao.html http://steamykitchen.com/15288-chinese-stirfried-sticky-rice-cakes-nian-gao.html#comments Thu, 28 Apr 2011 17:49:45 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=15288 Step by step photos for authentic Shanghainese Chinese Fried Sticky Rice Cake (Nian Gao) Recipe.

The post Chinese Stir Fried Sticky Rice Cakes (Nian Gao) appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>

Last week, on a surprise visit to see family, Mom made a couple of dishes that I normally don’t cook myself. One of them is this Chinese Fried Sticky Rice Cake Noodle dish (long name!) In Chinese, it’s called 炒年糕 Chǎo Nián Gāo.

The recipe is from my Dad’s hometown of NingBo in China.

What are Sticky Rice Cake Noodles (Nian Gao)

Nian Gao is normally eaten for Chinese New Year, as it signifies good fortune for the coming year. “Nian” means year and “gao” means high — translating loosely to “every year, may you reach higher and higher.”

Nian Gao can also mean sticky rice cakes that are fried in egg (savory) or fried with sugar (sweet). The Shanghainese and Korean version (TteokGuk photo) of nian gao is this recipe, where they take the glutinous rice cakes, cut them into ovals 2 inches long, 1 inch wide, and stir fry them like noodles.

You can find these rice cake noodles at Asian markets, either dried form (in the dried noodle section), frozen or in the refrigerated noodle section. Mom likes to buy frozen rice cake noodles, as they keep well in the freezer. They have to be soaked for 2 hours up to overnight in water. Purchase either the Korean or Chinese version, they are the same.

The rice cakes have to be soaked for 2 hours (up to overnight)

Dried or fresh Chinese mushrooms (or shiitake), canned bamboo shoots

Mom used mustard greens that she had salted overnight, but I’ve given easier instructions in the recipe to use Napa Cabbage.

and Pork marinated in soy, rice wine, pepper, cornstarch and a pinch of sugar.

The pork is first stir-fried until almost cooked through.

Then add the Chinese mushrooms.

Add in the bamboo shoots.

Then the vegetables.

Toss well.

Season with a bit of soy sauce. Taste first and add more if needed.

Add in the drained rice cakes.

Toss! Toss! Toss!

Pour in 1/4 cup of chicken broth or vegetable broth, cover, turn heat to low and let cook for 2-3 minutes until the rice cakes are softened.

Yum
Print

Stir Fried Chinese Sticky Rice Cakes (Nian Gao) Recipe (炒年糕 chǎo nián gāo)

Servings: 6 Prep Time: 15 minutes Cook Time: 15 minutes (with up to overnight soaking of noodles)
chinese-korean-sticky-rice-noodles-nian-goh-recipe.jpg-2840.jpg

Notes on the sticky rice cakes:
They rice cakes should be gluten-free, but please check the packaging.
If dried - soak in water at room temperature overnight or up to 2 days
If frozen - defrost then soak in water at room temperature for 2 hours up to overnight
If fresh (in refrigerated section) - soak 2 hours in water at room temperature up to overnight

Notes on mushrooms
Mom likes to use dried Chinese black mushrooms, as they have much more flavor than the fresh shiitake mushrooms you'll find in the refrigerated section. But feel free to use either.

Ingredients:

One 24-ounce package rice cake nian goh noodles (see notes above)
4 dried Chinese black mushrooms (or 8 fresh shiitake mushrooms)
2 teaspoons soy sauce
freshly ground black pepper
pinch of sugar
1 teaspoon Chinese rice wine (or dry sherry)
1 teaspoon cornstarch
8 ounces pork, cut into very thin strips
2 tablespoons cooking oil
6 ounces Chinese Napa Cabbage, shredded
One 6-ounce can julienne cut bamboo shoots, drained
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1/4 cup chicken or vegetable broth

Directions:

1. In a large bowl, soak the rice cakes according to the instructions in the headnotes. If you are using dried Chinese black mushrooms, in a small bowl, soak the dried Chinese mushrooms for 2 hours or up to overnight until softened. If you are using fresh shiitake mushrooms, skip this step.

2. In a medium bowl, combine the 2 tsp soy sauce, black pepper, sugar, rice wine, cornstarch together. Mix in the pork and marinate for 20 minutes or up to overnight in the refrigerator.

3. When you are ready to cook, have all of your ingredients ready. Drain the rice cakes. Drain the mushrooms and slice into very thin slices.

4. Heat a wok or large saute pan over high heat. When hot, swirl in the cooking oil. Add the pork and cook until browned and almost cooked through.

5. Add in the mushrooms and the bamboo shoots, stir fry for 1 minute. Add in the cabbage and stir fry for 2 minutes. Mix in the soy sauce.

6. Add in the rice cakes and toss very well. Pour in the broth, cover and lower the heat to medium-low. Cook for 2-3 minutes or until the rice cakes have browned a little and are softened. The sticky rice cakes will be just slightly chewy (but not hard to chew) similar to pasta cooked al-dente. Taste and add in additional soy sauce if needed. Serve immediately.

 

 

 

The post Chinese Stir Fried Sticky Rice Cakes (Nian Gao) appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/15288-chinese-stirfried-sticky-rice-cakes-nian-gao.html/feed 55
Slow Cooker Vietnamese Chicken Pho Ga http://steamykitchen.com/13332-slow-cooker-vietnamese-chicken-pho-ga.html http://steamykitchen.com/13332-slow-cooker-vietnamese-chicken-pho-ga.html#comments Fri, 21 Jan 2011 22:53:54 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=13332 Cook Vietnamese chicken pho in a slow cooker! From cookbook author Jaden Hair.

The post Slow Cooker Vietnamese Chicken Pho Ga appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>

Bon Appétit and I are celebrating slow cookers this month — I’ve created three incredible slow cooker recipes for them, Slow Cooker Vietnamese Pho Ga Noodle Soup; Slow Cooker Cedar Planked Salmon and Slow Cooker Moroccan Lamb Stew. Oh, and if you don’t have a slow cooker, guess what? Bon Appétit is giving away a $150 KitchenAid Slow Cooker to one lucky duck.

For the full recipe for Slow Cooker Vietnamese Chicken Pho Ga Noodle Soup, head over to Bon Appetit. I’ll go into more detail about 3 of the secrets to the recipe.

Slow Cooker Vietnamese Chicken Pho Ga Noodle Soup

Vietnamese Slow Cooker Chicken Pho Ga Recipe

Secret #1: The Moist Chicken

See how moist and tender that chicken is? The secret is to separate your chicken. Chicken bones and parts for the broth; and 1 chicken breast reserved for slicing and eating with your Pho Ga.

The chicken bones and parts go into the slow cooker to make the soup.

The chicken breast is thinly sliced and poached just before serving – cooks in 3-4 minutes. If I had cooked the chicken-for-eating in the slow cooker, it would be flavorless and tough. All of the flavor would have transferred into the broth….and chicken cooked for hours on end in a slow cooker ends up chewy and tough.

Secret #2: Size Matters

Let’s talk about the Pho Ga soup for a bit. I add 2 pounds of chicken parts, whole coriander seeds, half an onion, ginger slices, whole cloves, star anise, and a bundle of cilantro.

Of the 2 pounds of chicken, 1/2 pound of that should be wing tips. Most slow cooker have capacity of 7 quarts. The chunkier the chicken, the less room you have left for broth.

Chicken wing TIPS (the section that really has no meat anyways) have maximum flavor, minimum size. That’s why I love using wing tips. Or chicken feet, if you can find them (did I hear someone squeal?! chicken feet is great for soup!) So remember, size matters. A 7-quart slow cooker will make enough Pho Ga soup for 4 big bowls.

After taking out the big chicken parts, I’ll strain through cheesecloth just to ensure that the broth is clean and clear. For cooking noobs, here’s something to remember. Anytime you are cooking raw chicken in simmering water, you’ll get quite a bit of “white stuff” in the water. Don’t be afraid of it, it’s just chicken protein. If you have time on your hands, you could parboil the bones first in a stock pot, discard water (and “white stuff”) and then proceed with the recipe. But if you have time on your hands, you could just make Pho Ga without the slow cooker.

Straining the broth gives you golden, richly colored, clean soup.

Secret # 3: The Noodles

Soak the dried noodles in COOL water first then DRAIN. This helps makes them pliable, soft and cook better.

To cook the noodles, bring a pot of water to boil and then put the cool drained noodles into the hot water and simmer for 1 minute. After 1 minute — the noodles are DONE!!! That’s it. Don’t overcook the rice noodles, they’ll get too soft and soggy.

Oh and a note on why I boil my noodles in water instead of the pho ga broth we made? Well, I always boil my noodles and pasta separately from my precious soup. That’s because dried noodles/pasta tend to have excess starch that boils out into the water (that’s why boiled pasta water is murky) and many times the dried noodles might have itty bitty weevils or dirt particles that I just don’t want in my soup.

Not so secret secret:

I love garnishing with shaved onions, fresh bean sprouts, cilantro and a squeeze of lime. No Sriracha or Hoisin for me, though many people do enjoy those condiments in their Pho Ga, I think it totally overpowers the beautiful broth.

For the full recipe for Slow Cooker Vietnamese Chicken Pho Ga Noodle Soup, head over to Bon Appetit.

The post Slow Cooker Vietnamese Chicken Pho Ga appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/13332-slow-cooker-vietnamese-chicken-pho-ga.html/feed 24
Malaysian Chicken Noodle Soup with Asian Greens and Chili-Soy Sauce http://steamykitchen.com/4128-malaysian-chicken-noodle-soup-ipoh-sar-hor-fun.html http://steamykitchen.com/4128-malaysian-chicken-noodle-soup-ipoh-sar-hor-fun.html#comments Thu, 18 Jun 2009 06:37:08 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=4128 [imagebrowser id=18] Malaysian Chicken Noodle Soup is called Ipoh Sar Hor Fun in Malaysia. “Ipoh” is the town that this dish originates from. I’m a bad, bad blogger. One who eats crumbly chocolate chip cookies while editing photos on a very expensive laptop with nose 2 inches from screen, thinking out loud “is this shade of green more greener than ...

The post Malaysian Chicken Noodle Soup with Asian Greens and Chili-Soy Sauce appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>

Malaysian Chicken Noodle Soup is called Ipoh Sar Hor Fun in Malaysia. “Ipoh” is the town that this dish originates from.

I’m a bad, bad blogger. One who eats crumbly chocolate chip cookies while editing photos on a very expensive laptop with nose 2 inches from screen, thinking out loud “is this shade of green more greener than that shade of green?” I never take the time to back up even now I’m a subscriber of multiple backup websites. And I read your very funny blog posts while drinking wine which sometimes results in a spontaneous spew of red, staining liquid that lands on my keyboard.

I’m a bad blogger because Chef Robert Danhi it took the time to chat with me on the phone a couple of weeks ago and I have yet to post the podcast. In fact, I don’t even know where the damn audio file is. It could be because of my upload-then-delete-on-harddrive-without-checking-upload habit that I accidentally slingshot (slingshotted? slingshoot? slungshot?) our recorded phone convo into a gazillion cyber-bytes, each zipping in separate directions.

I’m praying that Google will somehow come across the files, scoop it up and just stick it in his shirt pocket, at least just until I can figure a way to harness that “beam me up” technology to come claim my podcast.

-Jaden

p.s. I have some winners to announce! The winners of the Club Med vacation and the $50 Sur La Table Gift Card will be announced as soon as my jet lag decides it’s had enough (hopefully tomorrow)

But I still have one more giveaway going on – big-green-egg-baby-back-ribs-2475 Dr. BBQ Cookbook Giveaway (ends June 21st 12pm EST)

==

Southeast Asian Flavors Cookbook

This morning we returned from a week in California, and all I wanted to eat was Chef Danhi’s Malaysian Chicken Noodle Soup. Warm, rich broth with silky-juicy chicken. Slippery fresh rice noodles and snappy shrimp. So I thought I might as well post this recipe without the podcast, before I lose this recipe and the photos too.

While the recipe is from Robert’s new book southeast-asian-flavors-cookbook Southeast Asian Flavors Cookbook, the photos above are mine when I had made his recipe two weeks prior. It’s a stellar recipe that I know you will absolutely enjoy. The James Beard Foundation nominated Southeast Asian Flavors among the finalists for a 2009 Book Award in the international category and it contains over 100 authentic recipes from Southeast Asia and over 700 color photographs that Robert Danhi took himself.

Southeast Asian Flavors Cookbook is a must-have in your Asian cookbook collection, because not only are the recipes authentic (Danhi has been traveling and studying Southeast Asian cooking for over 20 years) but the book also incudes anecdotes about the culture and history of Thailand, Vietnam, Malaysia and Singapore. Also make sure to visit Danhi’s website for this book – tons more photos.

This particular recipe for Malaysian Chicken Noodle Soup is virtually fool proof and one of the best recipes I’ve seen for an Asian noodle soup. The reason is because the chicken is slowly poached, resulting in meat that is tender and never overcooked. This is also the same technique that I use for Hainanese Chicken (recipe is in my upcoming cookbook)

==

A few notes for Malaysian Chicken Noodle Soup Recipe

A few notes on the ingredients and techniques:

  • This method of poaching involves bringing the pot to a boil and then turning off the heat (keep the lid on!) and let the chicken slowly, gently poach in the very hot water until cooked through. It’s almost impossible to overcook the chicken this way, and you’ll get a very silky texture. Once the chicken is cooked through, immediately plunge it in ice-water to stop the cooking process and firm up the skin. Once the chicken is cool enough to handle, you’ll use your hands to shred/pull the meat. Whether you keep or discard the skin is up to you (I personally love the skin.) You won’t be using the entire chicken for this Malaysian Chicken Noodle Soup Recipe – reserve the rest for another meal.
  • Try to get a small chicken, if your chicken is larger than 3.5 pounds, you will have to increase your poaching time. If your chicken is over 4 pounds – once you’ve finished your 45 gentle poach, return the pot to a boil and immediately turn off the heat. Let the pot sit for another 5 minutes, then check for doneness.
  • If you don’t have white peppercorns, just use whole black peppercorns
  • I love using fresh rice noodles that you can find in the Asian markets (refrigerated section). If they are super-fresh they don’t need to be boiled…just soak them in warm water until softened. If they are still a bit hard, try soaking them in hot water for a few seconds. If you don’t have access to fresh rice noodles, then use dried, wide rice noodles and follow the instructions on the package for soaking/cooking times.

==

Malaysian Chicken Noodle Soup (Ipoh Sar Hor Fun) Recipe

Recipe from southeast-asian-flavors-cookbook Southeast Asian Flavors Cookbook by Robert Danhi

Makes 4-6 bowls as a one-dish meal

1 whole chicken (3 to 3.5 lbs/ 1.4 to 1.8 kg.)
2-inch (5 cm.) piece ginger, cut into 1/2 inch slices and lightly smashed
1 large onion, cut in quarters
6 cloves garlic, smashed
12 white peppercorns, crushed with mortar/pestle or side of knife
2 teaspoons kosher salt

1. Make Chicken Broth: Place rinsed chicken in 2-gallon pot (8 L.), with just enough water to cover. Bring to a vigorous boil; lower to simmer. Skim off foam and impurities; simmer 15 minutes. Remove pot from heat, cover tightly, and leave undisturbed at room temperature for 45 minutes (an instant-read thermometer should read 165F / 74 C at the thickest part of the chicken).

2. Carefully lift chicken from poaching liquid and plunge into a large container/pot/bowl of ice water. Leave in water for 15 minutes to stop cooking and firm up meat. Using your hands, pull off skin and discard.

3. Pull meat off breast and thighs into 1/4to 1/2-inch (.6 to 1.3 cm.) thick strips, transfer to covered container and reserve at room temperature (you will have more than needed for the recipe).

4. Combine bones, thighs and poaching liquid back in the pot. Add ginger, onion, garlic, peppercorns and salt; simmer one hour to make a broth. Strain through fine wire mesh sieve. Taste and season well with salt.

SOUP GARNISHES
1 pound (454 g.) fresh rice noodles, about 1/4 inch (0.6 cm.) (1.3 cm.) wide
1/2 pound. (227 g.) small shrimp
1/2 pound. (227 g.) Chinese greens such as choy sum, bok choy, yu choy or gai-lan
2 scallions, chopped
Soak noodles in lukewarm water 10 minutes, drain; peel apart into individual strands. Poach shrimp in chicken broth until just cooked; peel, devein and halve lengthwise. Blanch whole bunches of choy sum in boiling water; transfer to a bowl of ice water for 30 seconds, squeeze dry, and cut into 2 to 3-inch pieces (5 to 7 cm.).

FOR THE CHILI-SOY SAUCE
4 to 6 each Thai bird chilies, or other small hot chilies, sliced thinly, about 1/8inch (0.3 cm.) thick
1/4 cup soy sauce
1/4 teaspoon dark/toasted sesame oil

Combine soy sauce, sesame oil and chilies, spoon mixture into individual bowls for each person.

ASSEMBLY OF MALAYSIAN CHICKEN NOODLE SOUP BOWLS
1. Bring seasoned broth up to a near boil. Have all ingredients ready, and have a pot of water boiling to reheat the noodles.

2. Reheat noodles in boiling water for 15 seconds. Drain, and distribute into 4 to 6 Asian soup bowls. Top noodles with chicken meat, shrimp, and choy sum. Ladle about 1 1/2 to 2 cups of broth into each bowl.

3. Sprinkle with scallions; serve with small dishes of chili-soy sauce. This sauce is used for dipping the subtly-flavored chicken, but can also be added to the soup.

The post Malaysian Chicken Noodle Soup with Asian Greens and Chili-Soy Sauce appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/4128-malaysian-chicken-noodle-soup-ipoh-sar-hor-fun.html/feed 32