Steamy Kitchen Recipes | RSS Feed http://steamykitchen.com Steamy Kitchen Food Blog: fast recipes, simple recipes, with fresh ingredients to create delicious meals. Mon, 29 Jun 2015 20:33:14 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.2 Chinese Salted Kumquat Recipe http://steamykitchen.com/30693-chinese-salted-kumquat-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/30693-chinese-salted-kumquat-recipe.html#comments Wed, 26 Feb 2014 18:35:40 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=30693 Many people candy the kumquat — or if you’re Chinese, you may have had it dried or salted. One of my Mom’s favorite remedies for sore throat is salted, preserved kumquat mixed in hot water and a little honey. Basically, it’s just like making Moroccan preserved lemons, but with kumquat. The kumquat is kept whole, but squashed or cut slightly ...

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Many people candy the kumquat — or if you’re Chinese, you may have had it dried or salted.

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One of my Mom’s favorite remedies for sore throat is salted, preserved kumquat mixed in hot water and a little honey. Basically, it’s just like making Moroccan preserved lemons, but with kumquat. The kumquat is kept whole, but squashed or cut slightly to expose the insides (so that salt can seep in). In a large mason jar, add alternate layers of kumquat and salt until you’ve filled the jar. Cover and let sit for a few days to a month. Refrigerate.

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You can keep this Chinese sore throat remedy for the next time you are sick – just add a couple of kumquats to your mug, mash them with a fork and fill with hot water. Swirl in a bit of honey.

So why does this work? Find out in the video where I talk with my parents!

Chinese Salted Kumquat Recipe Video

 

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Chinese Salted Kumquat

Servings: 10 or more Prep Time: 5 minutes Cook Time:
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Ingredients:

Mason Jar
Kumquats, enough to fully smush into the jar
Kosher Salt, enough to fill in all the cracksFor the Salted Kumquat Tea

Directions:

STEP 1: In a mason jar, add alternating layers of kumquat and salt until the jar is completely filled and the kumquats are somewhat smushed tightly inside. Cover and refrigerate indefinitely, but at least for 2 weeks.

STEP 2: Make tea from the kumquats mixture to help heal a sore throat. In a glass, add 2-3 salted kumquats, some of the salt mixture, hot water and honey until it is drinkable. Choke it down. Feel better.

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20 Minute Sriracha Sauce http://steamykitchen.com/31539-20-minute-sriracha-sauce-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/31539-20-minute-sriracha-sauce-recipe-video.html#comments Fri, 07 Feb 2014 16:38:08 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=31539 Like my label!? LOL Back before Sriracha was a “thing” – we just called it “red sauce” and squirted it on just about everything, including scrambled eggs. The original “rooster brand” Huy Fong recipe was so perfect that they had a virtual monopoly at Vietnamese restaurants and competitors didn’t even try to imitate their formula. Fun fact from Forbes: Huy Fong ...

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20 Minute Sriracha Sauce RecipeLike my label!? LOL

Back before Sriracha was a “thing” – we just called it “red sauce” and squirted it on just about everything, including scrambled eggs.

The original “rooster brand” Huy Fong recipe was so perfect that they had a virtual monopoly at Vietnamese restaurants and competitors didn’t even try to imitate their formula. Fun fact from Forbes: Huy Fong Foods has seen a 20% increase in revenue nearly every year since its founding in 1980.

After the news of the temporary shutdown of Huy Fong operations in Irwindale, California, the people of the Internets went crazy. Apparently, the fumes from cooking thousands of pounds of chiles were becoming unbearable for Huy Fong’s residential neighbors. (We hear they’ve resumed shipping, but I haven’t been able to confirm this.)

It’s actually easier than you think to make your own Sriracha – a food processor and medium pot is all you need. If you’re used to just squeezing the rooster bottle (heehee) for your hot sauce fix, you’ll be shocked at how many more flavor profiles you can get from homemade.

20 Minute Sriracha Sauce Recipe
You can make your sauce thinner if you like – run the sauce through a blender to get it less chunky. But I likey mine chunky :-)

While I love the original Huy Fong sauce, it’s missing balance and depth.

Here’s what good  flavor translates to – a balance of the 5 S’s:

  • Salty
  • Savory
  • Sour
  • Spicy
  • Sweet

I’d also add in a B – bitterness – but people don’t like that “B” word (plus it doesn’t start with an “S” ruining my awesome convenient and catchy teaching moment (eye roll and head shake).

The perfect condiment should have all of these flavor elements. Here’s why this 20-Minute Sriracha recipe that I’ve modified from Nom Nom Paleo Cookbook is perfect:

  • Salty and Savory: choice of fish sauce, coconut amino or Bragg’s. Not only do these sauces provide a salty flavor, but they all have “umami” which adds savory notes.*
  • Sour – vinegar
  • Spicy – chiles. But not too spicy. I like using s combo of hot peppers and mild peppers. If a sauce is too spicy, you can’t taste anything else on your plate.
  • Sweet – honey, and sweetness of peppers

Plus, the bonus of homemade is that your sauce is so much more vibrant, bright and full flavored. You’ll want this sauce on your eggs in the morning. in your noodle soup, on your meatloaf, in your stir-fries.

*Bragg’s Liquid Aminos is found in health food stores, Whole Foods and most major supermarkets have this too. Look near the BBQ sauces and Worcestershire sauce. Love this stuff. I’ve been using this in place of soy sauce and fish sauce on everything. It’s healthier, non-GMO, gluten-free, non-fermented. Every homemade salad dressing I’ve been making lately has a Bragg’s in it! Good stuff.

*Coconut Aminos is a new ingredient for me. I found it at my local health food store. It’s raw, gluten-free, 100% organic, dairy-free, vegan, soy-free and contains 17 naturally occurring aminos. I like this just as much as Bragg’s. Give it a try!

20 Minute Sriracha Sauce Recipe

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Big thanks to Nom Nom Paleo Food for Humans Cookbook by my friends Michelle Tam and Henry Fong for another stellar recipe. LOVE this cookbook, I can’t recommend it enough and have purchased copies for my friends.

None of us are Paleo dieters, but the recipes are so versatile and delicious that anyone can benefit from this book! Every recipe has a photo, most with vibrant step by step photos.

If you haven’t already, check out the Cauliflower Bacon Fried Rice that I’ve made from the Nom Nom Paleo.

——-

Watch how easy it is to make this homemade Sriracha sauce!

20 Minute Sriracha Sauce Recipe Video

 

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20 Minute Sriracha Sauce Recipe

Servings: 3 cups Prep Time: 5 minutes Cook Time: 15 minutes
20 minute sriracha sauce recipe featured-0858

Use any type of peppers you want! If you want your sauce red colored - stick to red peppers. My favorite is a combo of red jalapeno or red serrano and mini sweet peppers (the kind you find on veggie trays to eat raw) - smaller and sweeter than bell peppers.

In fact, if you want to use bell peppers, go ahead!

Ingredients:

1/2 pound fresh red jalapeno peppers
1/2 pound fresh mini sweet snacking peppers
7 garlic cloves, smashed and peeled
1/3 cup apple cider vinegar (or white or unsweetened rice vinegar)
3 tablespoons tomato paste
4 tablespoons honey
2 tablespoons fish sauce, Braggs Liquid Aminos or Coconut Aminos

Directions:

STEP 1: In a food processor or high speed blender, add all ingredients and blend until smooth.

STEP 2: In a medium saucepan over high heat, pour the sauce in and cook on high until it begins to boil. Reduce to a simmer and cook for 10-15 minutes. Taste and adjust with additional honey, vinegar or Bragg's (or whatever you're using) if needed. You're looking for a nice balance of flavor. Fry an egg and try a spoonful on it. Tastes wonderful? Turn off heat and allow sauce to cool completely.

STEP 3: Transfer the sriracha sauce to jars. Sriracha will keep for 2 weeks in the refrigerator. Better yet, can them and store in pantry!

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Healthy Garlicky Spinach Artichoke Dip with Baked Tofu Fries http://steamykitchen.com/30480-garlicky-spinach-artichoke-dip-with-tofu-fries.html http://steamykitchen.com/30480-garlicky-spinach-artichoke-dip-with-tofu-fries.html#comments Thu, 19 Dec 2013 18:02:14 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=30480   Here’s another way to incorporate more tofu in your life! I developed a series of recipes for Mori-Nu tofu, made Tualatin, Oregon, USA. You’ll love this one! ~Jaden   If you’re looking for a dip for your holiday party – here it is! I was so incredibly surprised testing this recipe – the Garlicky Spinach Artichoke Dip was made with ...

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Garlicky Spinach Artichoke Dip with Tofu Fries Recipe

 

Here’s another way to incorporate more tofu in your life! :-) I developed a series of recipes for Mori-Nu tofu, made Tualatin, Oregon, USA. You’ll love this one! ~Jaden

 

Garlicky Spinach Artichoke Dip with Tofu Fries Recipe

If you’re looking for a dip for your holiday party – here it is! I was so incredibly surprised testing this recipe – the Garlicky Spinach Artichoke Dip was made with a base of silken tofu and light mayonnaise, cutting the amount of fat and calories. In return for opting for a healthier dip, you’ll be rewarded with a light, creamy, full-flavored dip that’s got a nice zing with the addition of garlic and lemon juice!

Garlicky Spinach Artichoke Dip with Tofu Fries Recipe

For something a little different, we made baked tofu fries too. They take less than 20 minutes to make in the oven.

Watch the video for all the details!

Garlicky Spinach Artichoke Dip with Baked Tofu Fries Recipe Video

 

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Garlicky Spinach Artichoke Dip with Baked Tofu Fries

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 20 minutes
garlic spinach artichoke dip featured-0525

Nobody will believe you when you tell them the dip is made from tofu! In fact, I prefer this version over the full-fat original version. This tofu version is light, zippy and garlicky! The tofu fries are so fun to make and eat - they look just like french fries! Use them to dip too!

Ingredients:

FOR THE TOFU FRIES

1 box firm tofu (I prefer Mori-Nu silken extra-firm brand), drained

cooking sprayFOR THE GARLICKY SPINACH ARTICHOKE DIP


3/4 cup light mayonnaise of your choice
3/4 cup parmesan cheese

1/2 cup silken tofu (I prefer Mori-Nu silken), drained

1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
2 cloves garlic

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 (10-oz) package frozen spinach, defrosted

1 tablespoon fresh dill

1 (8 oz) can marinated artichoke hearts, drained

Directions:

FOR THE TOFU FRIES

Set your oven to broil, place rack near top (about 6" below heating element). Pat the tofu dry with a paper towel. Slice the block of tofu into 1/2-inch thick strips. Coat the baking sheet with the cooking oil spray. Add the tofu to the baking sheet. Coat the top of the tofu with more cooking oil spray. Broil tofu in the oven for 7-10 minutes, or until the bottoms are browned. Carefully flip and broil the other side for 7 minutes or until all sides are browned. Season while hot with salt and pepper if you'd like. I also enjoy a little smoked paprika or a Cajun spice on them too.

FOR THE GARLICKY SPINACH ARTICHOKE DIP
Drain the defrosted spinach and use your hands to squeeze as much water as possible out. Save the spinach water for another use if you want.
In a food processor, add the mayonnaise, cheese, tofu, garlic, lemon juice, and salt. Blend until well combined. Add the spinach and dill and pulse a few times. Add the artichoke hearts and pulse 3-4 times until the artichokes are just coarsely chopped. Serve as a dip with the tofu fries and other vegetables such as carrots, celery and radishes.

 

 

 

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Prime Rib Roast with Miso Jus http://steamykitchen.com/24985-prime-rib-roast-recipe-miso-jus.html http://steamykitchen.com/24985-prime-rib-roast-recipe-miso-jus.html#comments Wed, 19 Dec 2012 16:53:00 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=24985 Prime Rib seems so intimidating to cook, but in all honesty, it’s easier than roasting a turkey. There’s no brining, stuffing a cavity, flipping halfway or injecting with marinade. Cooking the most tender Prime Rib only uses one cooking rule – slow ‘n low. All you need is time.   If you’re looking for a more traditional recipe, check out my ...

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Prime Rib Roast with Miso Jus Recipe

Prime Rib seems so intimidating to cook, but in all honesty, it’s easier than roasting a turkey. There’s no brining, stuffing a cavity, flipping halfway or injecting with marinade. Cooking the most tender Prime Rib only uses one cooking rule – slow ‘n low. All you need is time.

Perfect Prime Rib Recipe with Red Wine Jus

 

If you’re looking for a more traditional recipe, check out my other post for the Perfect Prime Rib Roast with Red Wine Jus.

Prime Rib Roast with Miso Jus Recipe

This is by far the most simple way to cook a Prime Rib Roast – my trick is to start with a savory-sweet-umami-rich ingredient, Miso Paste. Rubbing the Prime Rib Roast with miso, salt and pepper will season the roast nicely. If you’re concerned that the Prime Rib Roast will taste like miso soup – let me give you a guarantee that it certainly won’t. When miso is combined with meat and heat, the flavor profile helps deepen the flavor of the meat itself, much better than just plain salt. It’s like the difference between sprinkling salt on your bread vs. spreading a rich butter.

Prime Rib Roast with Miso Jus Recipe

In my recipe, you can either use low-sodium miso paste (my favorite is shiro miso, which is white miso) or Miso & Easy, a super easy to use miso product, from the makers of one of Japan’s #1 brand of miso, Marukome. I’ve developed quite a few recipes for them over the past year – come take a look.

Prime Rib Roast with Miso Jus Recipe

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Prime Rib Roast with Miso Au Jus Recipe

Servings: 6-10 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 20 minutes per pound
Prime Rib Roast with Miso Rub

Ingredients:

1 (6-10 pound) standing rib roast
salt and freshly ground black pepper
1/3 cup miso paste (or 1/2 cup Miso & Easy), divided
5 large carrots, halved
8 stalks celery, halved
2 onions, halved
1 cup red wine
2 cups good quality beef stock

Directions:

Heat the oven to 250F. Season the rib roast on all sides with salt and pepper. Rub just 2-3 tablespoons of the miso (keep the rest of the miso for the Au Jus) on all sides of the rib roast. Place rib roast in a large roasting pan. Scatter the vegetables all around the roast.

Roast for 17-20 minutes PER POUND or until temperature of the middle of the roast is 130F (medium-rare to medium). Turn the broiler to high and let the roast brown a bit on the outside, for about 5 minutes. Transfer roast to cutting board, carefully untie the bones from roast. Cover loosely with tin foil. Rest for 20 minutes.

While roast is resting, make the Miso Jus. Keep the vegetables in the roasting pan but discard all but 1 teaspoon of the fat. Place the roasting pan 2 burners set on high heat.

Pour in the red wine and cook until wine is reduced by half. Use a wooden spoon to scrape up the bits. Whisk in the beef broth and 2 tablespoons of miso paste (or 3 tablespoons Miso & Easy). Turn heat to medium-low and simmer for 15 minutes. Add any juices accumulated from the rib roast on the cutting board. Turn off heat.

Strain the jus with mesh strainer, pressing down with wooden spoon to extract out all the juice from the vegetables. Carve the roast, serve with the jus.

 

Perfect Prime Rib Recipe with Red Wine Jus

 

If you’re looking for a more basic recipe, check out my other post for the Perfect Prime Rib Roast with Red Wine Jus.

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Split Pea and Ham Soup http://steamykitchen.com/21252-split-pea-and-ham-soup.html http://steamykitchen.com/21252-split-pea-and-ham-soup.html#comments Tue, 10 Apr 2012 15:27:26 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=21252 Usually sometime during the holiday, we’ll bake an entire bone-in ham. Split pea and ham soup is so surprisingly easy, especially in a pressure cooker. It takes about 3 minutes of chopping, 4 minutes of pressure cooking time and then 20 minutes to just let it sit. My friend, Wendy taught me her version, which actually comes from the back ...

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Usually sometime during the holiday, we’ll bake an entire bone-in ham.

Split pea and ham soup is so surprisingly easy, especially in a pressure cooker. It takes about 3 minutes of chopping, 4 minutes of pressure cooking time and then 20 minutes to just let it sit. My friend, Wendy taught me her version, which actually comes from the back of the package of split peas!

No soaking necessary (which makes the recipe even simpler!)

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Split Pea and Ham Soup Recipe

Servings: serves 4 Prep Time: 5 mins Cook Time: 25 mins
pressure-cooker-split-pea-ham-soup-recipe-5649

Split pea and ham soup is so surprisingly easy. It takes about 3 minutes of chopping, 4 minutes of pressure cooking time and then 20 minutes to just let it sit.

Ingredients:

1 pound split peas
3 cups diced ham
bone from ham or smoked ham hock (optional)
3 carrots, diced
3 stalks celery, diced
1/2 onion, diced
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 bay leaf
3 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley (or 1 teaspoon dried parsley)
2 teaspoons kosher salt (or 1 teaspoon table salt)
freshly ground black pepper
1 1/2 quarts water

Directions:

Rinse peas and drain. Pick out anything that's "not-pea" :-)

Place all ingredients into pressure cooker, set on high for 4 minutes. When cooking is done, leave the pressure cooker to sit for an additional 15-20 minutes to let pressure and steam escape.

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Steak with Orange Miso Sauce http://steamykitchen.com/20046-orange-miso-steak-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/20046-orange-miso-steak-recipe.html#comments Mon, 06 Feb 2012 17:05:22 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=20046 Pan seared steak with a simple pan sauce made with fresh orange juice and miso.

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We’ll be posting miso recipes regularly for the next few months, I’m working with Marukome to develop recipes for their brand new Miso & Easy product with substitutions using regular miso paste. So, Miso & Easy is like instant miso in a squeezable bottle. You can make miso soup in seconds, there’s no need for kombu or bonito flakes or dashi – it’s all in the bottle!

This recipe can be made with Miso & Easy or regular Miso Paste (I love the all-natural low sodium miso paste from Marukome)

 

How to make Steak with Orange Miso Sauce

Rub both sides of the steak with cooking oil and season with salt.

Heat a heavy-bottomed skillet, such as a cast iron pan, over high heat. When hot, add the steak to the pan. Sear both sides until browned, about 3-5 minutes on each side.

Transfer the steak to a clean plate then make the orange miso sauce. Turn the heat to medium-low and add about 3/4 of a cup of beef stock to the pan.

Next, add miso, mirin (a Japanese sweet rice wine) and Asian sesame oil to the pan. Cook the sauce for one minute.

Now, squeeze the juice from half an orange into the sauce.

Add the steak back into the pan and cook until your desired doneness.

…and, you’re done!

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Orange Miso Steak Recipe

Servings: serves 4 Prep Time: 15 minutes Cook Time: 20 minutes
Orange Miso Steak Recipe

Pan seared steak with a simple pan sauce made with fresh orange juice and miso.

Ingredients:

FOR THE STEAK
2 ribeye steaks, bone-in, 1-inch thick
2 teaspoons cooking oil
1 teaspoon saltFOR THE SAUCE
¾ cup beef stock
2 tablespoons Miso and Easy (substitute 1 tablespoon red miso paste)
1 tablespoon mirin (Japanese sweet rice wine)
1 teaspoon Asian sesame oil
juice of half an orange

Directions:

1) Let steak rest at room temperature for 15 minutes. Rub both sides of each steak with cooking oil and season with salt.
2) Heat an oven-safe pan (cast iron preferred) over high heat. When very hot, add steaks to the pan and let cook until browned, 3-5 minutes. Flip steaks and cook an additional 3-5 minutes. Transfer to a clean plate.
3) Reduce heat to medium-low then add beef stock, Miso and Easy, mirin and sesame oil, cook 1 minute. Add orange juice then add the steaks back to the pan and cook until desired doneness. Test doneness with a meat thermometer:
135F = rare
145F = medium rare
160F = medium
170F = well-done
4) Serve steak with pan sauce drizzled on top.

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Apple Cinnamon Bourekas http://steamykitchen.com/19860-apple-bourekas-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/19860-apple-bourekas-recipe.html#comments Mon, 26 Dec 2011 18:47:13 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=19860 Try serving these Apple Cinnamon Bourekas fresh from the oven with a scoop of vanilla ice cream.

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Every couple of months I get an email from Janis Donnaud asking if I’d chat with one of her potential clients and give a bit of advice or direction.

Janis is my literary agent, she’s one of the very best out there, also repping the Neeley’s, Paula Deen, as well as friends Melissa Clark and Sara Kate from The Kitchn. I recently intro’d dynamic duo Stephanie Stiavetti (hey check out her shiny new blog design!) and Garrett of Vanilla Garlic to Janis — who sold their upcoming book proposal what seemed like just a few days!

(Read Garrett’s interview with Janis on Epicurious)

Earlier this year, Janis asked if I’d have some time at the BlogHer conference in San Diego to meet Tori Avey, The Shiksa in the Kitchen.

First, I had to look up what shiksa meant — then, “oh heck yeah!” when I found out she was a culinary anthropologist and a convert to Judaism through her marriage.

Tori and I met over wine and talked non-stop about food blogging, cooking, photography and book writing. She’s gorgeous. Inside and out.

I can’t wait for the world to discover her! I’ve asked her to come on by and introduce herself and a recipe for super-simple Apple Boureka using pre-made filo dough. Enjoy! ~Jaden

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I am so thrilled to be guest posting for Jaden here at Steamy Kitchen! I met Jaden at the BlogHer conference in San Diego this past summer and we became fast friends. Jaden and her website are an inspiration to many of us in the food blogging community. It’s a treat to be able to share one of my recipes with you!

I realize some of you may not be familiar with my website, so here’s a little background for you. My blog The Shiksa in the Kitchen explores the history of Jewish cuisine as well as other historical culinary topics. I am fascinated by the story behind the food– why we eat what we eat, how cultural foods have evolved, and how yesterday’s food can inspire us in the kitchen today.

I’d like to introduce you to the boureka—a delicious Middle Eastern hand pie. These baked, stuffed pastries are popular in Israel and throughout the Middle East. They originated in Asia as a deep-fried filled dumpling known as a burga. When the Turks of central Asia moved to what is now the country of Turkey, they brought their stuffed burga dumplings with them. Over time, the dumpling evolved into a variety of stuffed, layered pastries known as börek. Sephardic Jews who settled in Turkey adopted the pastry, merging it with their version of the same dish (empanada) and adapting it to make it kosher. Börek + empanada = boureka. The boureka was born!

Today bourekas are usually made savory, with fillings like meat or cheese. Recently, I wondered what it might be like to stuff them with sweet pie-like fillings. The experiment paid off; I ended up with Apple Cinnamon Bourekas, a delicate, flaky dessert just perfect for winter. With the holidays approaching, these sweet little baked bourekas are a seasonal treat. They’d make a great addition to a holiday buffet. Now that you know the history behind the dish, perhaps you’ll enjoy them even more!

How to make Apple Cinnamon Bourekas

2 hours before you begin, take your filo dough out of the freezer and let it defrost. You can also let it defrost overnight in the refrigerator, if you prefer.

Preheat your oven to 325 degrees F. Cut the cored, peeled apples into very thin slices.

Place the slices in a mixing bowl along with the brown sugar, vanilla, ½ tsp of cinnamon, and salt. Toss all ingredients with a spoon till the apple slices are evenly coated. Let them macerate for a few minutes so the apples become juicy and the sugar begins to dissolve.

Lightly dampen a kitchen towel (don’t soak it!), and keep it with you as you work with the filo dough. Unroll your dough. Filo sheets come in different sizes, so you may need to cut your sheets to size get the size you need. For each boureka, you want to create a double layer of filo dough that is about 4 inches wide and 14 inches long.

Folding a smaller filo sheet (8×14) in half lengthwise is the easiest way to form this double layer.

If your filo sheets are larger, use scissors to cut the sheet in half lengthwise to make two rectangular pieces.

Then, fold each piece in half lengthwise to create the double layer of filo you need.

Keep the unused filo sheets under the damp towel as you work to keep them from drying out. Filo is very delicate and prone to ripping, so if you’ve never worked with it before, be patient… rips will happen. It takes some time to get a feel for it.

Use a pastry brush to pain a thin layer of melted butter onto the surface of the double layer filo rectangle.

Place a few slices of the apple filling in the lower left corner of the filo rectangle, following the left edge of the filo and fanning downward in a triangular shape.

Fold the lower left corner of the rectangle up and over the apple filling to form a triangle of dough.

Take the upper left and corner and fold it up and over, maintaining the triangular shape.

Continue folding the filo in the same way you would fold a flag, till the entire strip is used up and a neat triangle pastry is formed.

Place the folded boureka on an ungreased baking sheet.

Repeat process until all the filling is used up. You should end up with around 14-15 bourekas. You may need two baking sheets to fit all of the bourekas.

Brush each boureka with another thin layer of melted butter. Don’t brush it on too heavy, or the bourekas will become very greasy. Just a light layer will do it.

In a small bowl, mix together 2 tbsp of sugar and ½ tsp of cinnamon. Sprinkle the cinnamon sugar over the top of the buttered bourekas.

Place the bourekas on the middle rack of your preheated oven. Let them bake for 20-25 minutes till filo turns golden brown and the filling begins to bubble out in places. Serve warm.

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Apple Cinnamon Bourekas

Servings: Makes 14-15 bourekas Prep Time: 2 hours 15 minutes Cook Time: 7 minutes
Apple Cinnamon Bourekas Recipe

Try serving these Apple Cinnamon Bourekas, from Tori Avey, fresh from the oven with a scoop of vanilla ice cream. The light, crispy filo shell and tender, piping hot apple filling pair perfectly with ice cream. They’ll keep at room temperature for 2-3 days; before serving, reheat them in the oven at 325 degrees for 5-7 minutes till warmed through.

Kosher Key: Dairy

Ingredients:

1 lb. baking apples (Golden Delicious, Gravenstein or Fuji), cored and peeled
¼ cup brown sugar
1 tsp vanilla
1 tsp cinnamon, divided
1/8 tsp salt
1 package filo dough
½ cup unsalted butter, melted
2 tbsp sugar

Directions:

1) 2 hours before you begin, take your filo dough out of the freezer and let it defrost. You can also let it defrost overnight in the refrigerator, if you prefer.
2) Preheat your oven to 325F. Cut the cored, peeled apples into very thin slices.
3) Place the slices in a mixing bowl along with the brown sugar, vanilla, ½ tsp of cinnamon, and salt. Toss all ingredients with a spoon till the apple slices are evenly coated. Let them macerate for a few minutes so the apples become juicy and the sugar begins to dissolve.
4) Lightly dampen a kitchen towel (don’t soak it!), and keep it with you as you work with the filo dough. Unroll your dough. Filo sheets come in different sizes, so you may need to cut your sheets to size get the size you need. For each boureka, you want to create a double layer of filo dough that is about 4 inches wide and 14 inches long.
5) Folding a smaller filo sheet (8x14) in half lengthwise is the easiest way to form this double layer.
If your filo sheets are larger, use scissors to cut the sheet in half lengthwise to make two rectangular pieces.
6) Then, fold each piece in half lengthwise to create the double layer of filo you need.
7) Keep the unused filo sheets under the damp towel as you work to keep them from drying out. Filo is very delicate and prone to ripping, so if you’ve never worked with it before, be patient… rips will happen. It takes some time to get a feel for it.
8) Use a pastry brush to pain a thin layer of melted butter onto the surface of the double layer filo rectangle.
9) Place a few slices of the apple filling in the lower left corner of the filo rectangle, following the left edge of the filo and fanning downward in a triangular shape.
10) Fold the lower left corner of the rectangle up and over the apple filling to form a triangle of dough.
11) Take the upper left and corner and fold it up and over, maintaining the triangular shape.
12) Continue folding the filo in the same way you would fold a flag, till the entire strip is used up and a neat triangle pastry is formed.
13) Place the folded boureka on an ungreased baking sheet.
14) Repeat process until all the filling is used up. You should end up with around 14-15 bourekas. You may need two baking sheets to fit all of the bourekas.
15) Brush each boureka with another thin layer of melted butter. Don’t brush it on too heavy, or the bourekas will become very greasy. Just a light layer will do it.
16) In a small bowl, mix together 2 tbsp of sugar and ½ tsp of cinnamon. Sprinkle the cinnamon sugar over the top of the buttered bourekas.
17) Place the bourekas on the middle rack of your preheated oven. Let them bake for 20-25 minutes till filo turns golden brown and the filling begins to bubble out in places. Serve warm.

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Making Your Own Flavored Salts http://steamykitchen.com/125-making-your-own-flavored-salts.html http://steamykitchen.com/125-making-your-own-flavored-salts.html#comments Sun, 24 Jun 2007 06:35:43 +0000 http://s198136598.onlinehome.us/blog/2007/06/24/making-your-own-flavored-salts/ One of the easiest ways to elevate your cooking to another level is to use flavored salts, or finishing salts. No recipe needed, really. Flavor + Salt = Flavored Salt. REALLY!!! I know you just had...

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Flavored Salts

One of the easiest ways to elevate your cooking to another level is to use flavored salts, or finishing salts. No recipe needed, really. Flavor + Salt = Flavored Salt. REALLY!!! I know you just had a V-8 moment just now (wow. that sure dates me. does anyone know what i’m talking about?!) My latest crush, Eric Gower the Breakaway Cook, writes extensively about finishing salts on his website and even gives you several flavors to try. I like to use these salts in place of regular salt – the flavor I use is dependent on either the type of dish I’m cooking, the ethnic cuisine or a flavor I would like to infuse in the dish. I call these Finishing Salts because most of the time, its exactly what I use them for.

Sometimes a dish just needs a little color after plating and a finishing salt is the perfect compliment flavor-wise and eye-candy-deliciousness-wise. Learn from professional cooks – who often serve food on white dinnerware – and sprinkle a little of your Finishing Salt directly on the food AND the plate. The vibrant colors are shown off against the white and your dinner guests can dab as much as or as little of the salt as they wish. You can make a batch for less than $1….or you could go to a gourmet shop and spend $12 for an itty bitty jar.

Szechuan Peppercorn Salt

Peppercorn Salts

Dry-roasted Szechuan or Sichuan Peppercorn + food processor to grind the peppercorn + sea salt. It’s spelled Sichuan nowadays, but for some reason I’ve always spelled it Szechuan. Anyways, spell how you like.

>>Edit: more detailed instructions: I roasted SZP in a hot, dry skillet until smoking but not burnt. Let that cool a little bit. Dump in food processor to grind to same size as your salt. Then you add your salt and pulse a just couple of times to fully incorporate the flavors together. I like my S&P a little chunky and not like a fine powder. I used equal amts of SZP and sea salt. You can adjust based on your tastes. If you are using a very fine sea salt or just regular table salt, decrease the amt of salt.

Peppercorn Salts

Szechuan Peppercorn is really not a peppercorn at all – its a berry from a bush that will make your tongue and lips tingle and numb when you eat them. Yes, its legal. No, you can’t snort it. When you dry-roast the peppercorns, your entire house will smell heavenly…woodsy, citrusy, earthy…so incredibly aromatic that Chef Kylie Kwong perfumes her restaurant daily with a hot, smoking, dry wok of roasted peppercorns. Add to any dish that needs a little kick in the pants. Cooking Chinese? Sprinkle some Szechuan Peppercorn Salt to finish any dish. I also love seasoning my steaks with this instead of the standard salt & pepper prior to grilling. This can also serve as a dipping salt for fried shrimp.

Fushia Dunlop even recommends using this combination on potato chips! Make them yourself (its very simple with a mandoline) and flavor with SZP Salt while they are hot. Or, dump a bag of your favorite plain chips onto a baking sheet + 375 F for 5 minutes, remove and sprinkle with SZP Salt. Ohhh…how about french fries with SZP Salt at your next dinner party? Nothing like watching the reaction of your guests as their lips tingle and they discover a new taste. You can buy Szechuan peppercorn at your local Chinese market or at Whole Spice, iGourmet, GetSpice (UK), Spice Barn and Spicehouse

When you get your SZP, take a couple of pods and chew – the tip of your tongue will go tingly! Cooking the SZP tames the pepperyness and the numbing quality.

Szechuan Peppercorn Salt

Citrus Salt

Citrus Salt

Grated orange peel + grated lemon peel + let the citrus peels dry a little bit on a paper towel + sea salt Think bright, cheery and light. Finish your shrimp skewers, any vegetables, grilled chicken breasts, grilled salmon with Citrus Salt. Lighten your risotto or steamed rice with Citrus Salt. I’ll be posting soon on a recipe I created, Panko-Crusted Grouper Cheeks with Japanese-Style Risotto and Citrus Salt. Long, fancy name for fish ‘n rice, I know. I need to shorten the name…just sounds too restaurant-y.

Matcha Salt

Matcha Salt

Matcha is Japanese green tea powder made from the highest quality of green tea leaves. Its a stunning and lovely mossy color which makes such a pretty finishing salt, especially if you use a white plate and also sprinkle some directly on the plate. Matcha powder + sea salt + couple pulses in food processor if you are using course sea salt You know what is so totally divine? Your favorite chocolate truffle or chocolate bar + dip in Matcha Salt. So very different! Eric Gower pairs it with eggs and tofu. Use with dishes that are light in texture and flavor, since this salt’s flavor is more delicate and subtle. It gives a beautiful floral, grassy, sweet and soothing aroma. You can buy Matcha powder at your local Asian market. Sometimes coffee/tea shops will carry as well. This is not the same as green tea leaves. Ask specifically for Matcha powder. Its a little expensive. I paid $7.50 for 1.4 oz jar at a Japanese market in Los Angeles (which will last me a long time as I only used about� 1 teaspoon in my mixture). Don’t get the super-premium stuff, it would be a waste to use the expensive powder for the salts. Buy online at Amazon (this is the brand I got). Use your leftover powder to make green tea ice cream. I have all three sitting patiently waiting for my next cooking adventure….you guys have any ideas for other flavors? What would you do with Chocolate Salt?

Flavored Salt

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