Steamy Kitchen Recipes | RSS Feed http://steamykitchen.com Steamy Kitchen Food Blog: fast recipes, simple recipes, with fresh ingredients to create delicious meals. Fri, 01 May 2015 15:39:44 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.1 Kalbi Ribs with Macadamia Nut Rice http://steamykitchen.com/18881-kalbi-ribs-with-macadamia-nut-rice-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/18881-kalbi-ribs-with-macadamia-nut-rice-recipe.html#comments Tue, 11 Oct 2011 15:09:29 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=18881 Lucy Lean shares a Peter Merriman recipe for Kalbi Ribs with Macadamia Nut Rice from her cookbook, Made in America.

The post Kalbi Ribs with Macadamia Nut Rice appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>

I met my friend Lucy Lean through Diane & Todd a couple of years ago in Los Angeles. At that time, she was the Editor of Edible Los Angeles and we chatted for hours over bottles of red wine and plates of cheese and charcuterie. It turns out, Lucy has 2 kids around the same age as mine and on our next trip out to L.A., we brought the kiddies out to a massive children’s park near Griffith Park.

As the kids went all crazy on the playground, Lucy and I sat on a nearby bench, straining our eyes to catch up with each of our kids, as they were darting from here to there to who knows where. Imagine 8 different play structures, 50 little kids, and probably 29 pounds of sugar running through their veins.

It’s pretty tough to hold decent conversation whilst trying to make sure your children don’t beat up on another kid, try to take cutsies or wander off. But Lucy and I did manage to have one very important conversation that afternoon:

Lucy: I think I want to start a blog, what do you think?

Me: Sure! That’s a great idea! Do you have a name for it? What do you want to write about?

Lucy: I have the perfect name – Ladles & Jellyspoons, you know, like Ladies & Gentleman, but cuter. Oh, and food related. But I don’t know…..I don’t know if I could do it.

Me: Lucy! That’s a fab name for a blog! Did you get the URL for it already? 

Lucy: No, not yet. I don’t even know how to use WordPress or anything. Well, maybe I’ll ask Didier (her husband) to help me when I get home. Maybe.

Me: Sweetheart, listen to me. That URL could be taken If you don’t buy the name like *right now* I’m going buy it and then sell it back to you for 10x the price! (as I’m logging into my GoDaddy account on my phone). It’s now or never, baby!

So *of course* she bought it. I’m can be pushy like that LOL! Lucy launched Ladles & Jellyspoons, cooking with chefs past, present and future blog and a little while later snagged a book deal to write a book called Made in America: Our Best Chefs Reinvent Comfort Food and is now a casting judge for Master Chef television show.

Wow, right!? She’s amazing. Here’s a recipe we chose to share with you from the brand new book! ~Jaden

***

Merriman’s has been the destination restaurant in Waimea on the Big Island since it opened in 1988. The Los Angeles Times named chef and owner Peter Merriman “The Pied Piper of Hawaii regional cuisine,” and he’s proud of showcasing local ingredients on his menu.
There are toasted Hawaiian macadamia nuts in the jasmine rice for extra texture and flavor, a good example of how he integrates ingredients to present them at their best. Originally, he sourced local produce simply because it tasted better, encouraging farmers to cultivate varieties never before grown on the island.
With the creation of Hawaii regional cuisine, many local farmers and ranchers are now providing Merriman with a vast array of ingredients—from fresh organic mushrooms and greens to award-winning goat cheese and free-range, hormone-free lamb and beef. All find their way onto Merriman’s extensive menu with 90 percent of the ingredients from Hawaii.
Merriman also grows a lot of his own herbs, fruits, and vegetables for the restaurant in a little kitchen garden that the dining room overlooks. A couple of tomatoes cling to a drying vine from a season long since over in the rest of America; a large bunch of bananas are about to ripen; black sugarcane stands tall; and tiny, bright, super hot red peppers dot a low bush.
Merriman shows off the abundance, bending to smell an herb and happy to share his stories. “These are all canoe crops,” he tells me. “Brought to Hawaii hundreds of years ago. The only indigenous species are coconuts and kukui nuts [their oil is used as the fuel in tiki lamps].” ~Lucy Lean
Her book is available on Amazon here, Made in America: Our Best Chefs Reinvent Comfort Food!

Yum
Print

Kalbi Ribs with Macadamia Nut Rice

Servings: 4 - 6 servings Prep Time: 8 hours Cook Time: 15 minutes
Kalbi Ribs with Macadamia Nut Rice Recipe1

This Korean twist on the American classic comfort food, short ribs, is supereasy and quick,” says Merriman. “It’s also a guys’ recipe. It should be cooked outside on the grill. It goes great with a beer.

Recipe copyright Peter Merriman

Ingredients:

1 jumbo onion
6 cloves garlic
1/4 cup finely chopped fresh ginger
2 cups low-sodium soy sauce
1/4 cup brown sugar
5 pounds 1/2-inch-cut beef short ribs, use prime or choice corn-fed beef (you need the fat)
12 ounces jasmine rice
2 tablespoons garlic butter
1/2 cup chopped toasted macadamia nuts
1/2 cup chopped scallions

Directions:

1. Purée the onion, garlic, ginger, soy sauce, and brown sugar in a food processor. Pour over ribs and marinate for 8 hours.
2. rinse the rice in a sieve under cold water, place in a small saucepan, and pour in enough water to cover rice and come to 1 inch above it. Bring to a boil and then reduce the heat and simmer for 15 minutes. turn off the heat and let the rice rest for 15 minutes without opening the lid.
3. Grill the ribs over charcoal until medium rare.
4. Serve on jasmine rice tossed with garlic butter, toasted macadamia nuts, and chopped scallions.

Chef Merriman’s Tip
“Half-inch pieces of beef absorb the marinade better, stay more tender, and cook more evenly—so have your butcher cut them down.”

The post Kalbi Ribs with Macadamia Nut Rice appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/18881-kalbi-ribs-with-macadamia-nut-rice-recipe.html/feed 25
Steamed Siu Mai Dumplings http://steamykitchen.com/11045-steamed-siu-mai-dumplings.html http://steamykitchen.com/11045-steamed-siu-mai-dumplings.html#comments Mon, 30 Aug 2010 12:19:01 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=11045 Delicious recipe for Steamed Siu Mai Dumplings on New Asian Cuisine.

The post Steamed Siu Mai Dumplings appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>

Delicious recipe for Steamed Siu Mai Dumplings on New Asian Cuisine.

The post Steamed Siu Mai Dumplings appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/11045-steamed-siu-mai-dumplings.html/feed 4
Seared Ahi with Lilikoi-Shrimp Salsa http://steamykitchen.com/10314-seared-ahi-with-lilikoi-shrimp-salsa.html http://steamykitchen.com/10314-seared-ahi-with-lilikoi-shrimp-salsa.html#comments Thu, 08 Jul 2010 16:39:14 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=10314 Seared Ahi with Lilikoi-Shrimp Salsa at New Asian Cuisine  

The post Seared Ahi with Lilikoi-Shrimp Salsa appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>

Seared Ahi with Lilikoi-Shrimp Salsa at New Asian Cuisine

 

The post Seared Ahi with Lilikoi-Shrimp Salsa appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/10314-seared-ahi-with-lilikoi-shrimp-salsa.html/feed 0
Wonton Noodle Soup http://steamykitchen.com/1194-wonton-noodle-soup.html http://steamykitchen.com/1194-wonton-noodle-soup.html#comments Mon, 04 Aug 2008 14:00:45 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/?p=1194 Watch me make Chinese Wonton Noodle Soup in a video and I'll give you the secrets to folding, freezing and cooking wonton noodle soup...

The post Wonton Noodle Soup appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
Wonton Noodle Soup

It’s Chinese Wonton Noodle Soup time! A great dish to make for the Beijing 2008 Olympics! This is recipe 5 in the series (see links at the end for the other recipes)

***

Wrapping Wontons Videos

I’ve got two for you – I was on CBS on Tuesday – this was a BLAST! A 4 minute cooking segment cooking wonton noodle soup…but in not in a kitchen…here’s the video:
(link is right above photo when you get to CBS site)

And my regular segment on ABC7 Chinese Wonton Noodle Soup  just click on the “featured video” right below the recipe name. And yes, I flubbed saying the number eight in Mandarin! It’s “baa” not “baat” (which is how I say it in Cantonese).

***

Wonton Noodle Soup Recipe

I love making wonton noodle soup with my kids! Gather your guests in the kitchen and have them help you fold the wonton. The key to making wonton is to not overfill the dumpling and to make sure that the wonton is sealed tight.

Wonton Wrapper

The wrappers come frozen – just defrost in refrigerator overnight or on the counter for 40 minutes. Do not soak in water or defrost in microwave. Once the package is opened, it’s important to always keep them covered under a damp towel, as the edges will dry out, making it very difficult to work with.

Freezing Wonton

If you’d like to freeze wonton (great idea for super easy quick meal) – lay the wrapped wonton in a single layer. Freeze and when frozen, gather them up and place them in a freezer bag. If you don’t freeze them in single layer, you’ll end up with a big, massive clump of wonton and you’ll have trouble prying them apart.

To cook frozen wonton, the instructions are exactly the same. Put them in the boiling broth FROZEN. Do not defrost. Cooking time will be longer BUT – that’s the beauty of my cooking method.

Boiling Wonton

Put away your timer! Let me explain. I’m sure you’re used to watching the clock when boiling pasta. Instead of watching the clock, I’m having you do this Chinese style. Boil your pot of soup. Add dumplings. When it comes to a boil, add 1 cup of room temp broth. When that comes to a boil, add another cup. When boiling again, it’s done. So if you’re adding FROZEN wonton, 10 wonton or 50…the water will come to a boil as it’s ready – thus it’s sort of self-timing.

Adding broth a little at a time like this prevents your delicate dumplings from breaking and bursting in rapid, hard boiling water. So how many wonton to cook at a time? Well – that depends on how big your pot is, how much soup you have.

For the Wonton Noodle Soup recipe below, I’d cook them in 3 separate batches – so that you don’t crowd the wonton.

Wonton Noodle Soup Recipe

Serves 4

1/2 pound ground pork
2 stalks scallion, finely minced
1 tablespoons soy sauce
1 teaspoons rice vinegar
1 teaspoons cornstarch
1/4 teaspoon sugar
1/2 teaspoon sesame oil
1/2 pound wonton wrappers, at room temperature, covered with a damp towel
1 tablespoon cornstarch + 1/4 cup cool water (cornstarch slurry)
2 quarts chicken broth
8 ounces dried wonton noodles (or thin, egg noodles)
1/2 pound bok choy, leaves separated and washed well
1 teaspoon sesame oil
chili garlic sauce (optional)

In a large bowl, combine the pork, scallion, soy sauce, rice vinegar, cornstarch, sugar and sesame oil. Mix well. Put a scant teaspoon of filling in the middle of a wonton wrapper, brush cornstarch slurry on all edges. Fold over to form a triangle, press to secure edges, encasing the filling. Brush cornstarch slurry on one tip of the triangle. Bring two corners together and press to secure (though my kids often just leave them as triangles.) Place on clean, dry plate in one layer and cover loosely with plastic wrap to prevent drying. Repeat with remaining.

In a large stockpot, add all but 2 cups of the broth and bring to a boil. The 2 cups of reserved broth should be room temperature or just slightly chilled. Turn the heat to medium-high and add the wontons. Bring pot back to a gentle boil. When it reaches a boil, add 1 cup of the reserved broth. Bring back to a boil and again, add the remaining 1 cup of reserved broth.

Keep the heat on the pot on (you still need to cook the noodles and bok choy) while using a spider or sieve to scoop up the wontons and distribute amongst the bowls. Cook the noodles in the pot according to the package instructions. Add the bok choy to the pot during last minute of cooking noodles and let simmer, until cooked through. Ladle broth, noodles and bok choy to bowls. Drizzle just a few drops of sesame oil in each bowl.

Serve with chili garlic sauce if desired.

***
Other great recipes!

Ground Beef with Beijing Sauce Over Noodles

Stir Fried Shrimp, Eggs and Peas + Stir Fry Secrets

Pan Fried Shrimp and Pork Potstickers

Xiao Long Bao – Steamed Shanghai Soup Dumplings

The post Wonton Noodle Soup appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/1194-wonton-noodle-soup.html/feed 49
“Meat” Fried Rice – Four Ways http://steamykitchen.com/613-meat-fried-rice-four-ways.html http://steamykitchen.com/613-meat-fried-rice-four-ways.html#comments Tue, 08 Jul 2008 05:59:10 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/?p=613 My editor, Jeff Houck, sent over a picture of pan-fried Scrapple slice and my heart fluttered like crazy. “Scrapple? Scrapple! What’s Scrapple? I asked him,” and within 30 minutes was off to the supermarket to find Scrapple, a distant cousin to Spam. Yes, I have an odd fascination with meat that comes in it’s own coffin. “hmmm…I wonder if I ...

The post “Meat” Fried Rice – Four Ways appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
Meat Fried Rice - Four Ways

My editor, Jeff Houck, sent over a picture of pan-fried Scrapple slice and my heart fluttered like crazy. “Scrapple? Scrapple! What’s Scrapple? I asked him,” and within 30 minutes was off to the supermarket to find Scrapple, a distant cousin to Spam.

Yes, I have an odd fascination with meat that comes in it’s own coffin.

“hmmm…I wonder if I could showcase the otherwise disgusting “meat” in a edgy, fashion-y, Bon Appetit-esque yet appetizinng way. I mean, when was the last time you saw a photo of canned ham and said, “DAMN…that’s a mighty fine piece of ass?!”

While I was there, I went bezerk and ended up with a basketful of “meat” products along with a variety of ingredients to concoct four different recipes. And really. That’s how my “meat” adventure began.

***

Scrapple Fried Rice with Fresh Chilies and Garlic

Scrapple

Hello world, meet Scrapple, a product that when fried with nothing else, tastes just like the name sounds, scrappy offal. If you must know what scrapple is made of, Wikipedia paints a pretty picture:

Scrapple is typically made of hog offal, such as the head, heart, liver, and other scraps, which are boiled with any bones attached (often the entire head), to make a broth. Once cooked, bones and fat are discarded, the meat is reserved, and (dry) cornmeal is boiled in the broth to make a mush. The meat, finely minced, is returned, and seasonings, typically sage, thyme, savory, and others are added. The mush is cast into loaves and allowed to cool thoroughly until gelled.

I don’t know about you, but thank goodness for sage, thyme and savory. The thought of jellied pig snout without those herbs just sends shivers throughout my frail, virgin body.

My main strategy when developing this recipe, was really, “how the hell do I transform something so utterly disgusting into a flavorful fried rice that even the pickiest eater would enjoy (as long as I didn’t let on what scrapple was.)

I chose 3 of the most pungent Asian ingredients that I had on hand: fresh chilies, fish sauce and garlic. Now, I know some of you would say that fish sauce sounds just as disgusting as scrapple, since basically a vat of stinky, fermented fish. But it’s a Southeast Asian staple and I’m being SO hypocritical right now. But did you know that your beloved Worcestershire sauce also contains a version of fish sauce? Dude. I KNOW! If only the makers of scrapple had marketing smarts too – and named their product something a little appealing than horse shit.

Scrapple Fried Rice

Because scrapple contains cornmeal, it crumbles pretty easily when fried, so I treated it like ground beef. First, I cut the scrapple into small cubes and stir fried it, using my spatula to break it up even further.

Scrapple Fried Rice with Fresh Chilies and Garlic

serves 2

1 1/2 tablespoons cooking oil, divided
1 teaspoon finely minced garlic
1 stalk scallion, minced
1 thinly sliced fresh chili (like Thai bird’s eye or jalepeno)
1/2 cup chopped scrapple
2 cups cooked, leftover rice (grains separated with a fork)
3/4 teaspoon fish sauce (substitute with 1 to 2 tsp soy sauce)
freshly ground black pepper

In a wok or large saute pan, heat just 1 tablespoon of the cooking oil over high heat. When the oil is very hot, add the scrapple and fry until browned, about 1 minute. Push the scrapple towards the outer edges of the wok, clearing a space in the middle to fry the aromatics. Turn the heat to medium, add the remaining 1/2 tablespoon of cooking oil and immediately add the garlic, scallion and fresh chilies. Stir fry for 15 seconds, until you can smell the fragrance of the aromatics. Turn your heat to high and add the rice. Use your spatula to mix all the ingredients thoroughly and at the same time spreading the rice and ingredients to use as much of the cooking surface of the wok as possible.

Now just leave it alone for 30 seconds. Don’t stir, poke or prod. Let the rice grains heat up, which basically will re-steam the rice. Once the rice has heated up, use your spatula to stir and flip the mixture. Pour the fish sauce slowly around the outer edges of the wok – the heat of the wok will help evaporate the fish sauce as it moves down the sides. Stir and flip the rice well again, to mix the fish sauce throughout. Season with black pepper. Let rice continue to cook until each of rice grain is hot.

***

Spam Fried Rice with Pineapple

Spam Fried Rice with Pineapple

Wow, what a voluptuous fan of Spam! Spread it all out, hot stuff!

spam fried rice

This was a no-brainer…I’ve previously have professed my love for Spam, in the Ode to Spam in the Style of Seuss, and I wanted to create a simpler, more refreshing version of Spam Fried Rice. My recipe calls for canned pineapple – but of course, you can use fresh pineapple, but hey…we’re going with the whole canned and processed theme here.

Spam Fried Rice with Pineapple

serves 2

2 teaspoons cooking oil
1/2 cup diced spam
1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger
1 stalk scallion, minced
1/4 cup crushed or 1/8 inch diced pineapple (canned or fresh)
2 cups cooked, leftover rice (grains separated)
1 to 2 teaspoons soy sauce
1/2 teaspoon sesame oil

In a wok or large saute pan, heat the cooking oil over medium-high heat. When the oil is hot but not smoking, add the diced spam and fry until browned on all sides, about 1 minute. Push the spam towards the outer edges of the wok, clearing a space in the middle to fry. You should still have a bit of oil left that is pooled in the middle of the wok. Turn the heat to low, add the  add the ginger, scallions and pineapple. Stir fry for 15 seconds, until fragrant. Turn your heat to high and immediately add the rice. Use your spatula to mix all the ingredients thoroughly and at the same time spreading the rice and ingredients to use as much of the cooking surface of the wok as possible.

Now just leave it alone for 30 seconds. Don’t stir, poke or prod. Let the rice grains heat up, which basically will re-steam the rice. Once the rice has heated up, use your spatula to stir and flip the mixture. Pour the soy sauce sauce slowly around the outer edges of the wok – the heat of the wok will help evaporate the soy sauce as it moves down the sides. Stir and flip the rice well again, to mix the ingredients throughout. Finish with sesame oil and stir well. Let rice continue to cook until each of rice grain is hot.

***

Pork Roll Fried Rice with Shitake Mushrooms and Red Bell Pepper

Pork Roll Fried Rice
“Come ‘on, baby, look sexy for the camera….WORK IT!….Twirl and look over your shoulder now!…..YEAH BABY”

I had no idea there was such a thing as Pork Roll until I went shopping for Scrapple! The meat manager actually went around the store with me, helping find the scrapple (frozen section) and then also brought me to the refrigerated bacon and sausage section to hand me a package of Pork Roll. Four slices come per package, and it’s used in a regional specialty called “The Jersey Breakfast” – fried pork roll, egg and cheese sandwich. If you’re not lucky enough to find Pork Roll at your market, substitute with that strange oval-ish shaped canned ham. But then you’d have to buy that big can and only use a half cup diced. I have no idea how to eat that stuff outside of fried rice. I guess you could make the Jersey Breakfast sandwiches the next day from leftover canned ham.

Pork roll is basically coursely ground pork shoulder, and to me, is a Gucci-er version of spam. So I had to up the ante and use some fancy ingredients like fresh shitake mushrooms and fresh red bell peppers. Instead of plain ‘ol soy, I used Maggi sauce, a very popular condiment in Asia (even though its origins are Swiss). I’ve seen this seasoning at most major supermarkets and of course Asian markets too. I believe Maggi sauce even has a big cult following including myself!…. 😉

Pork Roll Fried Rice

We were going for the casually tossed, grunge look for this photoshoot.

Pork Roll Fried Rice with Shitake Mushrooms and Red Bell Pepper

Pork Roll Fried Rice with Shitake and Bell Peppers

serves 2

2 teaspoons cooking oil
1/2 cup sliced pork roll
4 fresh shitake mushrooms, thinly sliced
1/2 red bell pepper, thinly sliced
2 cups cooked, leftover rice (grains separated)
1 teaspoon Chinese rice wine
1 teaspoon Maggi sauce (substitute with 1 to 2 teaspoons soy sauce)

In a wok or large saute pan, heat the cooking oil over medium-high heat. When the oil is hot but not smoking, add the pork roll and fry until browned, about 1 minute. Push the pork roll towards the outer edges of the wok, clearing a space in the middle to fry. You should still have a bit of oil left that is pooled in the middle of the wok. Turn the heat to low, add the shitake and bell pepper. Stir fry for 30 seconds, until softened. Turn your heat to high and immediately add the rice. Use your spatula to mix all the ingredients thoroughly and at the same time spreading the rice and ingredients to use as much of the cooking surface of the wok as possible.

Now just leave it alone for 30 seconds. Don’t stir, poke or prod. Let the rice grains heat up, which basically will re-steam the rice. Once the rice has heated up, use your spatula to stir and flip the mixture. Pour the Maggi sauce and the rice wine sauce slowly around the outer edges of the wok – the heat of the wok will help evaporate the sauce as it moves down the sides. Immediately, stir and flip the rice well again, to mix the ingredients throughout. Let rice continue to cook until each of rice grain is hot.

***

Vienna Sausage Fried Rice with Kaffir and Lemongrass

Vienna Sausage

Went for minimalistic architecture – symmetrical, clean, lines. Very sleek and slimming!

I admit to eating an entire can of Vienna Sausages – straight out the can at room temperature. LOVE IT. We used to eat these little turds fried for breakfast in Hong Kong. I thought it would be great to put a Southeast Asian twist to this fried rice – and use thin slivers of lemongrass and torn kaffir lime leaves – both from my garden, but you can find at most Asian markets. If they don’t have fresh lemongrass or kaffir, ask for either in frozen form.

To prepare lemongrass, measure about 4-6 inches from the bottom and cut. Discard the scratchy, long leaves and keep the bottom, white bulb part. Peel off the outermost leaves and use a very sharp chef’s knife to cut paper-thin slivers. If you’re not capable of doing this, grab a microplane grater and just grate the bottom 4 inches of the bulb. It’s a pretty fibrous grass, and if you cut into huge chunks, you’ll end up chewing like a cow. Not so lady-like.

For the Kaffir, take a single leaf and tear in several spaces, stopping at the spine to keep the leaf intact. You won’t actually eat this leaf, but exposing the inner part of the leaf will fragrance your entire dish.

Vienna Sausage Fried Rice with Kaffir and Lemongrass

Even the bowl is sleek and slimming!

Vienna Sausage Fried Rice with Kaffir and Lemongrass

Vienna Sausage Fried Rice with Kaffir and Lemongrass

3 teaspoons cooking oil, divided
1/2 cup Vienna sausage, each link cut into 4 pieces
1 tablespoon fine rings of lemongrass (see note)
3 kaffir lime leaves, torn in several places to spine
1 tablespoon sliced chilies
2 eggs, beaten
2 cups cooked, leftover rice (grains separated)
1 1/2 teaspoons fish sauce (substitute with 1-2 teaspoons soy sauce)

In a wok or large saute pan, heat just 2 teaspoons of cooking oil over medium-high heat. When the oil is hot but not smoking, add the Vienna sausage and fry until browned, about 1 minute. Push the sausage towards the outer edges of the wok, clearing a space in the middle to fry. You should still have a bit of oil left that is pooled in the middle of the wok. Turn the heat to low, add the lemongrass, kaffir leaves and chilies. . Stir fry for 30 seconds, until fragrant.

Now push those aromatics up to the sides of the wok to clear space again in the middle. Turn the heat to high and add the remaining 1 teaspoon of cooking oil and let that heat up to hot but not smoking. Add the egg and fry the egg, swirling gently to break up the egg. Cook the egg until firm, about 1 minute.

Add the rice. Use your spatula to mix all the ingredients thoroughly and at the same time spreading the rice and ingredients to use as much of the cooking surface of the wok as possible.

Now just leave it alone for 30 seconds. Don’t stir, poke or prod. Let the rice grains heat up, which basically will re-steam the rice. Once the rice has heated up, use your spatula to stir and flip the mixture. Pour the fish sauce slowly around the outer edges of the wok – the heat of the wok will help evaporate the sauce as it moves down the sides. Immediately, stir and flip the rice well again, to mix the ingredients throughout. Let rice continue to cook until each of rice grain is hot.

***
If you enjoyed this post, will you please click on “Stumble This” or “Digg” for me? The icons are right below this area here. Thank you!

The post “Meat” Fried Rice – Four Ways appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/613-meat-fried-rice-four-ways.html/feed 75
15 Minute Asian Noodles http://steamykitchen.com/164-15-minute-asian-noodles.html http://steamykitchen.com/164-15-minute-asian-noodles.html#comments Mon, 01 Oct 2007 16:10:35 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/2007/10/01/15-minute-asian-noodles/ During freshman year of college, I lived off of Kraft mac 'n cheese and Cocoa Puffs. Not because I couldn't cook-but because Mother never let us have awful artificially flavored junk food in our household since it would "OH MY GOD, ROT OUR TEETH." Never mind that our home had chipped lead paint, asbestos in the attic and ...

The post 15 Minute Asian Noodles appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
15 Minute Asian Noodles

 

During freshman year of college, I lived off of Kraft mac ‘n cheese and Cocoa Puffs. Not because I couldn’t cook-but because Mother never let us have awful artificially flavored junk food in our household since it would “OH MY GOD, ROT OUR TEETH.” Never mind that our home had chipped lead paint, asbestos in the attic and that I’d wrestle with Brother on the lawn 10 seconds after Dad sprayed DDT.

 

I gorged on Kraft mac ‘n cheese until I noticed my skin turning the shade of cheese-powder-orange-yellow. Whoah! That color whipped my heart back 28 years to North Platte, Neb., second grade, where I was the only Asian kid in the entire school. This was before “cultural sensitivity” became all the rage.

We didn’t have a lot of money back then; while the other kids scored the 64 pack of Crayola with built-in sharpener, I got only 24. Well, 12 really, but I broke each one in half. I remember having trouble coloring the skin of my family, as Peach just wasn’t right, and Indian Red made me look like I’d swallowed a bottle of Taco Bell hot sauce. The darker kids in school already had dibs on Raw Sienna, so I had to adapt the technique of lightly rubbing a fat Yellow on its side, which made me look rather jaundiced. As a joke, one of the snickering Peach kids tossed his Ultra Orange at me, but I refused to let him see my embarrassment and pretended to be delighted at his generosity. So for the rest of the school year, everyone in my family was colored in Ultra Orange, which brings us back to why I ditched mac ‘n cheese.

If you think about it, mac ‘n cheese really isn’t that convenient. It takes nine minutes to boil water (11 if you watch), 14 to cook the mac and two to reconstitute the “cheese”. Twenty-five minutes for 580 grams of sodium and 49 grams of carbs? I can give you a better fast food. My 15-Minute Asian Noodles are actually healthy and come with real vegetables.

Take a trip to your local Asian market to stock up. Oyster sauce, Maggi sauce and Chinese rice wine are all inexpensive pantry items. The yellow noodles are “fresh” so they only take a couple of minutes to cook.

Be creative with your vegetables. Red bell peppers, carrots, cabbage, scallions, onions, celery, mushrooms, bean sprouts or snow peas are all wonderful in this dish. The only rule is to cut the vegetables as thin as possible to make for a fast stir-fry. This dish is also a great way to use up last night’s leftover chicken slices, seafood, etc.

***

The same day that that I submitted column this to my editor, Andrew came home with this artwork:

Dammit!  Ultra Orange will haunt me forever.

***

Here are the “fresh” egg noodles – boiled for less than 2 minutes!  Just like fresh homemade pasta – you don’t really need to cook more than a couple of minutes. These are found either in the refrigerated section or they are frozen in the freezer (duh!) They both are great! I like keeping a couple of packs in my freezer for emergency noodle snacking or for a lazy dinner. They can be thick with a nice bite like photo below, or really thin and labelled “won ton” noodles. Just make sure you read the package directions for cooking times.

Selection of veg that I used – enoki mushrooms, scallions and julienned carrots. Those perfectly julienned carrots took less than 1 minute to cut – with one of these nifty gadgets – Oxo Julienne Peeler – I also saw it at Target this past weekend. LOVE IT. Take a large thick carrot, peel it with your normal peeler. Stick a fork on one end to anchor the carrot down flat on the cutting board. Use the julienne peeler to cut strips lengthwise down.

Your veg should be cut into thin strips – cuts the cooking time down!

My arsenal of sauces: oyster sauce, Chinese rice wine and my beloved Maggi sauce – which makes EVERYTHING taste better.  If you don’t have Maggi – get some! I know I’m not the only one who has a serious Maggi addiction. And if you must know, Epicurious even has 6 recipes using Maggi sauce.

You can add last night’s leftover chicken slices or just go vegetarian like I did below. If I’m extra extra lazy, I get a cooked rotisserie chicken from the market and shred the meat to serve.

15-Minute Asian Noodles

Yum
Print

15-Minute Asian Noodles

Servings: 2 as main dish, 4 as side Prep Time: Cook Time:
asian-noodles

Ingredients:

1 lb "fresh" Asian noodles (they are found in refrig section or frozen in Asian market)
1/2 cup sliced fresh mushrooms (I use enoki)
2 stalks scallions, cut into 1-inch lengths
1 carrot, thinly sliced or shredded
2 tablespoons oyster sauce
1 teaspoon Maggi sauce (substitute with 2 tsp soy sauce)
1 tablespoon Chinese rice wine (substitute with dry sherry)
2 tablespoon cooking oil (canola or vegetable)
cooked, sliced meat/seafood (optional)

Directions:

1. Boil 6 cups of water and cook noodles according to package directions (timing depends on thickness of noodles). Use your chopsticks to jiggle and separate the noodle strands in the water. Reserve 1/4 cup of hot noodle water. Drain noodles, set aside. While water is boiling, thinly slice your vegetables. Multitask!

2. Heat wok or large fry pan over high heat. When hot, add cooking oil. Add scallions, fry for 10 seconds. Add carrots, fry until softened, 30 seconds. Add mushrooms, fry 30 seconds.

3. Add oyster, Maggi, rice wine and the reserved hot water. Cook for 30 seconds. Add your noodles, fry another minute to incorporate all ingredients.


***

Which Blogger Dish to Cook on TV?

Don’t forget to vote! I’m cooking live on our local ABC station next Tuesday – and have decided to feature of our fellow blogger dishes.  Vote for your favorite dish! I think it’s a great way to promote the world of food blogs. I’ve gotten over 530 votes so far, but the race is close between The Delicious Life‘s Bulgogi Burgers and Rasa Malaysia’s Coconut Butter Prawns! Vote here.

The post 15 Minute Asian Noodles appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/164-15-minute-asian-noodles.html/feed 46
Chinese Steamed Fish Recipe http://steamykitchen.com/132-chinese-steamed-fish.html http://steamykitchen.com/132-chinese-steamed-fish.html#comments Sat, 07 Jul 2007 02:45:21 +0000 http://s198136598.onlinehome.us/blog/2007/07/06/chinese-steamed-fish/ When I go home to visit my Mom, I always ask for this dish, Chinese Steamed Fish. Mom lives in Los Angeles, where there is an Asian market on every street corner. Most have live fish tanks where you can choose which lucky fella gets to come home with you for a dinner date. Steaming is the purest ...

The post Chinese Steamed Fish Recipe appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
Chinese Steamed Fish Recipe

Above: Chinese Steamed Rockfish

What you’ll learn:

  • Essential fish picking calisthenics to maximize your potential
  • Highly effective fish-picking strategies
  • The ideal way of steaming fish

When I go home to visit my Mom, I always ask for this dish, Chinese Steamed Fish. Mom lives in Los Angeles, where there is an Asian market on every street corner. Most have live fish tanks where you can choose which lucky fella gets to come home with you for a dinner date. Steaming is the purest and the most delicious way to cook fresh fish. We top it with soy sauce, cilantro, ginger, green onion slivers, and pour sizzling hot peanut oil all over the fish. You’ll taste the delicate, sweet flavor of the fish.

“Pick out your own fish to slaughter!?” you ask, squeamishly? Absolutely. My Asian friends know the routine. You arrive at the market early in the morning, when you are most alert and the fish are happy, having just eaten their breakfast. Stand in front of the fish tank.

But hold it.

Before you even start looking at the fish, you must do some simple, but essential calisthenic exercises to maximize your fish-picking-potential.

Chinese Steamed Fish Picking Calisthenics

1) First, stand tall, feet shoulder-width apart. Arms up over head and and stretch leeffffttttt. Now riiiiigggghhhhtttt. Good. This helps you warm up and be limber. You may run in place for 30 seconds.

2) Eyes straight ahead, hands to hips. Without moving head, eyes look left. right. straight. circles now. counterclockwise. Perfect. This helps your eyes follow your desired fish in the tank. Because you know. Fish move around.

3) Dominant arm up, pointer finger out and in a relaxed yet confident manner, point left. right. up. down. wiggle. Come on, feel it. Make it burn! Do a little John Travolta move. This exercise help flex your pointer finger to point out desired fish to your fishmonger as the fish swims around trying to avoid you. Yes, you’ll look stupid, but you’re a foodie and you’ll do anything for the freshest fish. Alright. Now you are ready, my friend.

Chinese Steamed Fish-Picking Strategies

The best way to describe how to pick a good fish is to compare it to picking up a guy at a bar.

Rule #1. Don’t pick the ones that are passed out at the bar. The upside down ones are deadbeats. duh!

Rule #2 Don’t pick the super fast with jerky movements either, he’s way too nervous, excited and will (ahem) too early. The courtship will be over before you even know it and you’ll be left totally unsatisfied.

Rule #3 Don’t pick out the biggest, most muscular fish. He’s too busy checking himself out in the reflection of the tank to even notice you anyways. His muscles are too tough and you’ll be chewing ’til next November.

Rule #4 Go for a fish that is relaxed, laid back, confident and having a good time. Nice skin, not too flashy, no body piercings and kind eyes. Because a happy fish is a good eating fish. All them endorphins in its little body makes his meat sweet.

So, lets say you live in Florida, the sunshine state that is surrounded…not 1…not 2…but 3 sides with water that is abundant with seafood…..but your markets don’t have live fish tanks and all they sell is defrosted fillets. No worries. just use those fillets, but talk to your fishmonger to make sure those fillets haven’t been sitting in the case for days. You want as fresh as possible…unless you’re in Florida you’ll just ask for “just defrosted” fillets. Better yet, see if they have any fillets still frozen. Look in the freezer case. Ok, I know, I’m bitching…but come on Florida – don’t be squeamish about live fish!!

Yum
Print

Chinese Steamed Fish Recipe

Servings: Prep Time: Cook Time:
chinese-steamed-fish-recipe-187x125

I like steaming any type of bass, red snapper, yellowtail snapper, rock fish, tilapia, trout, halibut (basically any white fish). I've also steamed salmon this way too with great success.

A Modern Technique for Restaurant Quality Chinese Steamed Fish

If you've ever steamed fish Chinese style before or have read about how to steam fish, here is a new technique for you that I've learnt from my Mom and included a tip from Amy. You'll stuff the fish with scallions/ginger/cilantro and you'll also lay the fish on a bed of the same. After steaming, traditionally you would just serve the fish with its cooking juices and all of the cooked herbs. However, the cooking juice tastes very fishy (not in a good way) and can be cloudy. The herbs have lost all of its flavor during the cooking processes and just aren't very pretty to serve. The secret for restaurant-quality, clean, fresh tasting steamed fish is to serve the fish with fresh herbs and clean sauce. By far, the easiest way to do this is:

  • After steaming, discard the cooked herbs and cooking juices in the pan.
  • In a microwave-safe bowl, add cilantro, chilli, soy, sugar, wine, sesame oil, salt & pepper. Microwave for 30 seconds to warm it up and release its flavors. Pour this on top of the cooked, steamed fish.
  • In a small pan or wok, heat up some cooking oil until smoking hot. Add scallion and ginger to the hot oil and fry for 10 seconds to "pop" the flavors. Pour this hot oil over the fish just seconds before serving.

Another secret to restaurant-quality steamed fish is to steam on medium heat. You want to delicately steam the fish. A high rolling harsh boil will tear apart the delicate flesh of the fish and finished dish will not look as pretty (plus you run the risk of over cooking the fish)

Ingredients:

1 pound whole fish (or fillets 1" or thicker) yields the best results(A)
4 stalks, scallions - cut into 3" lengths
3" piece of ginger - slice into "coins"
small bunch of cilantro
1 1/2 tablespoons Shaoxing wine to pour on fish prior to steaming (or any cooking wine like dry sherry)
salt & pepper(B)
2 tablespoons rough chopped cilantro
1 teaspoon sesame oil
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1/2 teaspoon sugar
1/4 teaspoon salt + 1/4 teaspoon white pepper (or black pepper if you don't have white)
fresh chilli - thinly sliced (optional)(C)
2 stalks, scallions - cut into 3" lengths
2" piece of ginger - finely julienned to the skinniest, thinnest strips you can possibly manage without a microscope
2 tablespoons cooking oil

Directions:

Equipment: shallow pan to hold fish & large pot or wok for steaming. If you don't have a fancy steamer or steamer insert, take a shallow-ish bowl and invert to use as a stand. Or...3 shot glasses inverted.

1. Clean & Stuff: Clean your fish, pat dry. Season generously inside and out with salt and pepper. Take half of (A) and stuff inside the fish. If you are using fillets, skip this.

2. Make your bed: Take the other half of (A) and lay it in a shallow pan. If using fillets, just use all of (A) for the bed. Lay the fish on top of the bed. If fish is too long, cut in half. Pour 1 1/2 tablespoons Shaoxing wine on top of the fish.

3. Steam: Add 2" of water to your large pot, cover and boil. When it is boiling, uncover and wipe the inside of the cover clean of any condensation (all this condensation will drip back down on your fish, diluting the flavor) Put your fish pan inside, propped up with a small inverted bowl. Steam the fish on medium (see below for cooking times).

  • Whole fish 1 lb: check at 12 minutes, add 2 minutes for every 1/2 lb
  • Fillets 1" and thicker: check at 10 minutes, add 2 minutes for every 1/2" more thickness
  • Fillets less than 1": check at 7 minutes
  • Super thin fillets: check at 5 minutes

Check to see if its done at the times indicated.  Poke your chopstick at the flesh near the top fin. If flesh flakes easily near the top fin, then its done. If flesh sticks together still, then add 1-2 more minutes to cooking time. For fillets, just gently poke at the flesh in the middle. Timing really depends on the thickness of your fish.  Also check to make sure you haven't run out of steaming water.

4. Aromatics: Towards the end of the steaming process, you'll want to start preparing the aromatics that garnish the finished dish. Take a microwave-safe bowl, add (B) and microwave for 30 seconds. Set aside. When fish is done steaming, carefully lift the fish out onto a serving platter, discarding all of the cooked cilantro/ginger/scallions and the fish juice in the pan. Pour the hot (B) over fish.

Now we'll work with (C): In a separate pan or wok, heat up cooking oil until you see smoke. Add the ginger and scallions, fry for 10 seconds to "pop" the flavors. Pour this cooking oil + herbs over the fish. You'll hear a very satisfying sizzle!

More Recipes to Explore:

Shanghai Steamed Xiao Long BaoShanghai Steamed Xiao Long Bao

fried rice The Secrets to the Best Chinese Fried Rice

Garlic Brandy Prawns Garlic Brandy Prawns

The post Chinese Steamed Fish Recipe appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/132-chinese-steamed-fish.html/feed 103
Crab and Chinese Sausage Fried Rice http://steamykitchen.com/40-crab-fried-rice.html http://steamykitchen.com/40-crab-fried-rice.html#comments Thu, 08 Mar 2007 02:07:48 +0000 http://s198136598.onlinehome.us/blog/2007/03/08/crab-fried-rice/ Here is my recipe for Crab Fried Rice. I did write another post on fried rice with some similar material and goes a little more in-depth, its a must read: The Secrets to the Best Chinese Fried Rice. Fish sauce is used in a lot of Southeast Asian cooking, especially Thai and Vietnamese. It has a nice salty-sweet flavor to ...

The post Crab and Chinese Sausage Fried Rice appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
Here is my recipe for Crab Fried Rice. I did write another post on fried rice with some similar material and goes a little more in-depth, its a must read: The Secrets to the Best Chinese Fried Rice. Fish sauce is used in a lot of Southeast Asian cooking, especially Thai and Vietnamese. It has a nice salty-sweet flavor to it, and you use it very sparingly, like Anchovy paste. A little goes a long ways! There are several brands of fish sauce, the best one I’ve found so far is called “Three Crabs” Good fish sauce should be the color of brewed tea. Anything darker (like the color of soy sauce) is a lower quality brand.

Chinese sausage is a wonderful ingredient. Its sweet, salty, slightly smoky. Unopened in its package, it will last 3 months refrigerated. After opening, wrap it up and refrigerate. The sausage will last for another month in the refrigerator. Dice the sausage into ¼” cubes. For the best flavor, start with a dry sauté pan or wok set on medium heat. Add sausage and turn to low. The fat will melt (render) and in 7 minutes, remove the sausage leaving the fat. This is where a ton of flavor is! Use this fat to fry the rest of the ingredients. The sausage is smoked, preserved, dried and sold in packages of 10-12 links. The Chinese word for this is: “Lap Cheong” I brought this sausage back home from a recent trip to California (to celebrate Chinese New Year with family). My mom drove us to a friend’s house to pick up a large bag of Lop Cheong. Her friend hand-makes these sausages without any artificial preservatives.

Crab and Chinese Sausage Fried Rice

1 can crab (6-8oz)
1/2 teaspoon grated fresh ginger (grate on rasp grater)
1 teaspoon cooking wine
1/4 teaspoon sesame oil
Salt & Pepper
2 Eggs, beaten
3 cups cooked rice, break up the chunks
2 stalks green onions minced
1/2 cup frozen vegetable mixture (peas/corn/carrot) – defrosted for 15 min
2 teaspoons fish sauce
2 teaspoons soy sauce
1/2 cup diced Chinese sausage
1 teasp cooking wine

1. Marinate the Crab: Drain all the water from the can of crab meat. Marinate the grated fresh ginger, cooking wine, sesame oil.

2. Fry Sausage, Crab & Eggs: Heat up your wok to medium-high. Add the Chinese sausage to the wok, turn the heat down to med-low. Cook until the sausage releases its fat – about 5 minutes. Remove sausage, leaving as much oil in wok as possible. Turn heat to med-high. Add eggs to wok. Add crab to wok. Fry the mixture gently until eggs cooked through but still very soft. Remove, leaving as much oil in wok as possible.

3. Fry Rice: You should have about 1T of oil in the wok. If not, add cooking oil to the wok. Turn heat to high. Once the wok is very, very hot, add green onions, stir fry for 15 seconds. Add the rice – breaking up as many chunks at possible. Let the rice heat up in the wok. Add vegetables. Stir-fry until all is hot. Add fish sauce, soy, salt & pepper Add the Chinese sausage, egg/crab mixture. Stir fry until all ingredients are combined and steaming hot.

If you have the time, read my other post on Secrets of Making the Best Chinese Fried Rice

The post Crab and Chinese Sausage Fried Rice appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/40-crab-fried-rice.html/feed 11