Steamy Kitchen Recipes | RSS Feed http://steamykitchen.com Steamy Kitchen Food Blog: fast recipes, simple recipes, with fresh ingredients to create delicious meals. Fri, 24 Apr 2015 17:13:04 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2 Scallop with Mustard Miso Sauce http://steamykitchen.com/21808-scallop-with-mustard-miso-sauce.html http://steamykitchen.com/21808-scallop-with-mustard-miso-sauce.html#comments Wed, 20 Jun 2012 17:14:00 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=21808 One of the seafood guys at the the local grocery store kinda gives me the heebs. He’s super-nice, friendly and helpful BUT as he packages up my seafood order, wraps it up in paper and hands it to me, he holds onto the package of seafood just a leeeeetle too long, winks at me and says, “You come back and ...

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Scallops with Mustard Miso Sauce Recipe

One of the seafood guys at the the local grocery store kinda gives me the heebs. He’s super-nice, friendly and helpful BUT as he packages up my seafood order, wraps it up in paper and hands it to me, he holds onto the package of seafood just a leeeeetle too long, winks at me and says, “You come back and see me again, you hear?” He won’t let go of the package until I quickly nod yes.

Now, perhaps I’m just overly sensitive to people handling my raw food or that I’m just always in a hurry and need to gogogogogoooooo now, but I guess it’s similar to the people who shake your hand and pump just a few too many times (1 pump is strange, 2 pumps doesn’t seem quite enough, 3-4 pumps is good and any more than 5 pumps is just totally awkward).

So when we go to the grocery store, I load up on produce first, then ease over to the seafood/meat departments. Luckily, seafood is first and I can sneakily glance quickly to see who’s behind the seafood counter and if it’s him, I’ll resort to meat. If it’s anyone else, Hallelujah! Seafood tonight, baby!

Last week, it was seafood EVERY NIGHT!! (he was on vacation)

My friends, the scallop looked irresistible behind the glass. They had just come in that morning, dry packed and not yet defrosted, which is perfect. I like to defrost my own scallops and shrimp. They are both frozen at sea or at the port anyways, and I’d rather control the defrosting than not know how long they’ve been sitting out. It’s just safer and cleaner that way.

A quick sear on both sides of the scallop to get some nice crust and then simmered in the mustard-miso sauce for just a couple of minutes to barely cook the insides. They cook super quick – and turn tough/rubbery if you overdo it.

The mustard-miso sauce is savory and tangy. I love that hit of warm heat that grainy mustard gives! This is another miso recipe that I’ve developed for my client, Miso & Easy, makers of convenient miso in a bottle. If you don’t have Miso & Easy, just use regular miso paste (I prefer low sodium white miso called Shiro Miso.)

Scallops with Mustard Miso Sauce Recipe

The ingredients are simple – here they are!

 

Ingredients for Scallops with Mustard Miso Sauce Recipe

Scallops with Mustard Miso Sauce Recipe

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Scallop with Mustard Miso Sauce Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 5 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes
scallops-mustard-miso-sauce-recipe-8044-2.jpg

You can use regular miso paste or the very convenient Miso & Easy.

Ingredients:

1 1/2 pounds scallops
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 tablespoon butter
2 tablespoons mirin
3 tablespoons seasoned rice vinegar
1 teaspoon soy sauce
1/4 cup Miso & Easy (or 2 tablespoons miso paste + 2 tablespoons water)
1 teaspoon mustard
2 teaspoons water
2 teaspoons roasted sesame seeds
1/2 stalk green onions, thinly sliced

Directions:

1. Heat a nonstick frying pan on medium-high heat. Swirl in the olive oil. Add the scallops and cook for 1 minutes each side to brown. Remove the scallops from the pan to a plate and tent with tin foil to keep warm.

2. Turn heat to medium and to the pan, add the butter, mirin, seasoned rice vinegar, soy sauce, miso, mustard and water. Stir well and when the sauce begins to bubble, add the browned scallops back into the pan to finish cooking for 1-2 minutes.

3. Garnish with toasted sesame seeds and scallion greens.

 

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Roasted Carrots with Sesame Ponzu Vinaigrette http://steamykitchen.com/18590-roasted-carrots-with-sesame-ponzu-vinaigrette-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/18590-roasted-carrots-with-sesame-ponzu-vinaigrette-recipe.html#comments Wed, 21 Sep 2011 12:16:55 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=18590 On Monday, I celebrated the completion of our brand new raised bed garden that my rockstar husband built for me (and as a bonus, he also made a organized compost heap thingy too. oh yes, this man is definitely a keeper) by planting 48 onion seeds and 48 carrot seeds. It seemed like a good idea at the time, we’re ...

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On Monday, I celebrated the completion of our brand new raised bed garden that my rockstar husband built for me (and as a bonus, he also made a organized compost heap thingy too. oh yes, this man is definitely a keeper) by planting 48 onion seeds and 48 carrot seeds.

It seemed like a good idea at the time, we’re experimenting with Square Foot Gardening after having bought this book which instructed me to spant 16 seeds per square foot (this only works with carrots and onions, and of course I’ll go into more detail with loads of photos in an upcoming garden post).

But it didn’t occur to me until a few hours later that all 48 carrots and 48 onions would be ripe for plucking at the same time. I’m thinking that many other novice gardeners, in their bright-eyed eagerness, also make this same mistake.

What will I do with 48 carrots? One can only drink so much carrot juice before their skin starts turning a hue of an autumn sunset. But these roasted carrots with a sesame ponzu vinaigrette is definitely on my list.

Six ingredients and a two-liner recipe. Simple yet so different from your normal repertoire of carrot offerings. I promise you that you’ll love the Sesame Ponzu Vinaigrette so much, you’ll be searching for reasons to use it. Fortunately, it goes with everything, including stirring it just plain boiled noodles.

How to make Roasted Carrots with Sesame Ponzu Vinaigrette

Slice your carrots just like this, I like going on the diagonal. Toss ’em with just a bit of olive oil or cooking oil. Then roast in the oven.

The Sesame Ponzu Vinaigrette is just 4 ingredients: sesame oil, ponzu sauce, sesame seeds and green onions.

Ponzu sauce is like the fun-loving sister to soy sauce. It’s a light, tangy, citrusy version of soy sauce, which makes it perfect for any type of dipping sauce (especially for dumplings!), salad dressing recipe or simple way to dress any steamed vegetables. I’m working with client Mistukan, who makes the very best ponzu sauce in the market, to develop simple, everyday recipes using their products.

Other recipes I’ve created for Mitsukan:
Asian Slaw with Ponzu Dressing
Chicken Satay Recipe
Steak Teriyaki Recipe 

Just whisk everything together.

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Roasted Carrots with Sesame Ponzu Vinaigrette

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 5 minutes Cook Time: 20 minutes
Roasted Carrots with Sesame Ponzu Vinaigrette Recipe

This Sesame Ponzu Vinaigrette is so versatile - use it to jazz up grilled tofu, chicken or fish.

Ingredients:

1 pound carrot, peeled and cut into ¾” thick diagonal pieces
2 teaspoons cooking oil or olive oil
1 tablespoon ponzu sauce (I prefer Mitsukan Ponzu Sauce)
1 teaspoon sesame seeds
1 tablespoon chopped green onions
½ teaspoon roasted sesame oil

Directions:

Roast the carrots until just tender but slightly crunchy at 375F for 15-18 minutes. In a small bowl, whisk together the remaining ingredients. Toss with the cooked carrots.

 

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Asian Slaw with Ponzu Dressing http://steamykitchen.com/16578-asian-slaw-ponzu-dressing.html http://steamykitchen.com/16578-asian-slaw-ponzu-dressing.html#comments Fri, 24 Jun 2011 15:00:00 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/16578-asian-ponzu-slaw.html When I think of a summer slaw to go with the barbeque, I want something light, tangy, cold and crunchy. Traditional coleslaw just doesn’t do it – its heavy mayonnaise dressing really weighs down the vegetables. Instead of a mayo-based dressing, my Asian slaw is made with a bright, citrusy ponzu sauce – one of the most versatile Asian sauces ...

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When I think of a summer slaw to go with the barbeque, I want something light, tangy, cold and crunchy. Traditional coleslaw just doesn’t do it – its heavy mayonnaise dressing really weighs down the vegetables. Instead of a mayo-based dressing, my Asian slaw is made with a bright, citrusy ponzu sauce – one of the most versatile Asian sauces that I own.

Ponzu is a Japanese “sauce” however I refer to it as both a dressing and sauce. It’s much lighter than soy sauce, with a distinctive tangy lemon/orange flavor combined with a savory note. It’s a perfect balance of salty, sweet and sour! You can use it as a dipping sauce for potstickers, a light sauce for steamed vegetables and combined with some crushed garlic, make the best marinade ever.

I’m working with Mitsukan (pronounced mit-soo-kon) to develop several recipes using popular Japanese sauces and vinegars. This Asian slaw that I’ve made is incredibly simple: thinly sliced cabbage, carrots, snow peas and fennel with a 4-ingredient dressing: ponzu, sesame oil, sesame seeds and salt. 10-minutes to make and you’re done!

How to make Asian Slaw with Ponzu Dressing

Slice the snow peas on the diagonal into thin matchstick-sized pieces.

For carrots, you can purchase matchstick carrots, or slice them yourself — but only do this if you have a very sharp chef’s knife. Skinny, round hard carrots are difficult to slice with a dull knife.

I cut the cabbage into four wedges – we’ll only use 1 wedge. Then, I shred the cabbage as thinly as possible. To do this, use a vegetable peeler and go along the corner. You can also use a box grater with large holes or…..

use a sharp knife to shred by hand, which I prefer.

For the fennel, cut the white bulb from the green top, reserve the green fronds for another recipe (like Bouillabaisse) — you can use them just as you would fresh herbs.  Cut the bulb into quarters and slice one of the quarters as thin as possible using a knife, vegetable peeler or mandoline (save the rest for another recipe).

The dressing ingredients are simple: ponzu, toasted sesame oil, sesame seeds and salt.

Add 1/4 cup of ponzu to a bowl.

The sesame oil and seeds are added.

Season with a big pinch of salt.

Whisk with fork.

Pour the  dressing over the snow peas, carrots, cabbage and fennel.

Toss to combine and taste. You can add more ponzu and salt if needed.

Serve immediately.

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Asian Slaw with Ponzu Dressing

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time:
Asian-ponzu-slaw-recipe-9578.jpg

If you are not serving immediately, combine the dressing, but do not add the dressing until just before serving.

Ingredients:

1/4 head cabbage, shredded
1/4 lb snow peas, cut on the diagonal into matchsticks
2 carrots, cut into matchsticks
1/4 fennel bulb, sliced as thinly as possible
1/3 cup ponzu sauce, Mitsukan brand preferred
1 tablespoon sesame seeds
1/2 teaspoon dark or toasted sesame oil
salt

Directions:

1) To make the dressing, in a bowl, whisk together the ponzu, toasted sesame oil, sesame seeds and salt.
2) In a large bowl, combine the cabbage, snow peas, carrots and fennel. Add half of the dressing, toss to combine and taste. Keep adding additional dressing until you get the desired flavor.

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Warm Maitake Pasta with Citrus Soy Dressing http://steamykitchen.com/11254-warm-maitake-pasta-with-citrus-soy-dressing.html http://steamykitchen.com/11254-warm-maitake-pasta-with-citrus-soy-dressing.html#comments Mon, 20 Sep 2010 16:29:38 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=11254 Recipe for Warm Maitake Pasta with Citrus Soy Dressing on my food column on Discovery Heath.

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Recipe for Warm Maitake Pasta with Citrus Soy Dressing on my food column on Discovery Heath.

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Black Sesame Lace Cookies http://steamykitchen.com/10931-black-sesame-lace-cookies.html http://steamykitchen.com/10931-black-sesame-lace-cookies.html#comments Fri, 20 Aug 2010 12:28:23 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=10931 Unusual and delicious garnish, recipe for Black Sesame Lace Cookies on New Asian Cuisine.

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Unusual and delicious garnish, recipe for Black Sesame Lace Cookies on New Asian Cuisine.

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Korean BBQ Beef on Crispy Wonton Chip http://steamykitchen.com/3548-korean-bbq-beef-on-crispy-wonton-chip.html http://steamykitchen.com/3548-korean-bbq-beef-on-crispy-wonton-chip.html#comments Thu, 14 May 2009 18:36:49 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/?p=3548 [imagebrowser id=13] Slideshow of Korean BBQ Beef on Crispy Wonton Chip Fundraising events these days usually include children hawking stuff I don’t need (enough magazines already!) athletic events (can’t I just drive that 5K?) or food and wine events (oh yeah, sign me up baby!) These folks who run food and wine festivals sure got the formula right. Have a ...

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Slideshow of Korean BBQ Beef on Crispy Wonton Chip

Fundraising events these days usually include children hawking stuff I don’t need (enough magazines already!) athletic events (can’t I just drive that 5K?) or food and wine events (oh yeah, sign me up baby!) These folks who run food and wine festivals sure got the formula right. Have a bunch of local restaurants dish out samples of their food, wine and beer companies dole out unlimited pours. All they need to complete this formula is maybe a few tour buses, you know, the good ones that have reclinable seats and drive you around town and let you sleep off that gorge-and-glug fest.

A couple of weeks ago, I attended the Florida Aquarium’s SeaGrapes event. Tables and tables of vendors snaked in and out, around and about the aquarium. Over 800 people sipped and snacked their way through the event. It was a record year, they netted over $87,000. People were bidding like crazy at the silent auction! These silent auctions are such a smart thing, get a bunch of people happy-drunk and let them compete with each other to bid on prizes. Love it.

At the Florida Aquarium SeaGrapes event, almost every restaurant vendor served seafood. You know I love my fish…but it was just sorta weird to be waving hi to Nemo while enjoying one of his mates on my plate. But then I found Chef Rick from Publix Apron Cooking School who made a Korean BBQ Beef on Crispy Wonton Chip appetizer that my meat-lovin’ husband just raved about. I’ve modified their recipe a bit, making it easier for the home cook.

The flank steak is marinated in Korean-style sauce. While technically this isn’t “Korean BBQ” it does use similar ingredients in the marinade and the secret ingredient….grated pear.

The pear does 2 things. It sweetens the marinade and it also tenderizes the beef. It’s the secret ingredient of authentic Korean BBQ beef. You’ll grate the pear with a large-holed grater. Traditionally, an crispy Asian pear is used, but you can really use any type of pear.

Korean BBQ Beef on Crispy Wonton Chip Recipe

serves 6 as appetizer

2 green onions, finely chopped
4 cloves garlic, minced
1 pear, peeled and grated
4 teaspoons toasted sesame seeds
1/4 cup soy sauce
1/4 cup mirin (Japanese sweet rice wine)
1 teaspoon sesame oil
1/2 teaspoon cornstarch
1 1/2 pounds flank steak
1 package wonton wrappers, cut into triangles
oil, for frying
1/2 cup apricot marmalade, warmed

Place the first 8 ingredients in a large ziplock bag and mix well. Add the steak and seal the bag, squeezing out all the air. Refrigerate overnight.

Thirty minutes before grilling, remove steak from the marinade (reserve the marinade) and set on counter take off the chill. In the meantime, make the wonton chips. Heat 2 inches of oil in a wok, saute pan (or use your deep fryer) until 375F. Slide the wonton wrapper triangles into the oil and fry for 1 minute each side until crisp. Drain and cool on a rack.

Pour the reserved marinade in a small pot. Bring to a boil, then turn heat to low. Cook for 5 minutes until sauce is thickened.

If grilling outside, pre-heat your grill. If cooking indoors, you can set your broiler on high and place the rank 3 inches below the heat source. Cook 5-6 minutes each side, until medium rare. Let rest for 5 minutes on cutting board. Slice the steak very thinly ACROSS the grain. Combine the steak slices with the thickened and cooked marinade (sauce).

To serve, place a couple slices of the beef onto a wonton chip. Top with a spoonful of warmed apricot marmalade.

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More Korean BBQ Beef…

Korean BBQ Kalbi (Short Ribs) and Bulgogi Recipe

or how about Korean noodle dish to go with it?

Korean Glass Noodles – Chap Chae/Jap Chae

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Sesame Seared Tuna with Lime Ginger Vinaigrette http://steamykitchen.com/3201-sesame-seared-tuna-with-lime-ginger-vinaigrette.html http://steamykitchen.com/3201-sesame-seared-tuna-with-lime-ginger-vinaigrette.html#comments Sun, 26 Apr 2009 08:48:04 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/?p=3201 In conjunction with my podcast with Michael Ruhlman’sRatio: The Simple Codes Behind the Craft of Everyday Cooking. And true to the book’s goal, I didn’t use a recipe to develop the Lime-Ginger Vinaigrette for the Sesame Seared Tuna. After a quick check in the refrigerator, I had one good key lime and a nub of ginger…so following Ruhlman’s ratio for ...

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In conjunction with my podcast with Michael Ruhlman’sratio-small-coverRatio: The Simple Codes Behind the Craft of Everyday Cooking. And true to the book’s goal, I didn’t use a recipe to develop the Lime-Ginger Vinaigrette for the Sesame Seared Tuna. After a quick check in the refrigerator, I had one good key lime and a nub of ginger…so following Ruhlman’s ratio for 3 parts oil to 1 part vinegar, I whisked together this concoction.

Yes, maybe you already know a vinaigrette’s 3:1 ratio, but how about a ratio for Hollandaise, Pizza Dough, Crepe, Sausage, Brine, Custards, Caramel Sauce, Pound Cake, Biscuit Dough plus 22 more formulas? Know a ratio and it’s like knowing 1,000 recipes.

Get Michael’s book – you can buy a signed book (just tell him what you want inscribed in the book) directly from Michael Ruhlman or unsigned (slightly cheaper) from Amazon.

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My steamy interview with Michael Ruhlman

Listen to my steamy podcast with Michael Ruhlman.
Watch Michael Ruhlman’s video about his book, Ratio
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Leiftheit Scale Giveaway

One of Michael Ruhlman’s essential tools in the kitchen is his scale. I can’t emphasize the importance of using a kitchen scale as different ingredients measure differently. Leiftheit has a wide range of kitchen scales, but I like this one the best: leiftheit-scale. It’s as thin as a magazine…sleek and small. I’m giving one of these away to a random commenter! To enter, just comment over at the post where I interviewed Michael Ruhlman.

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In the meantime, enjoy my recipe for Sesame Seared Tuna with Lime Ginger Vinaigrette!

Step-by-step photos: how to make Sesame Seared Tuna

You should have 2 pieces of tuna, wasabi paste and a shallow bowl of sesame seeds. You don’t have to have a mixture of black and white seeds, just one color will do, but you can see that the tuna looks so pretty with the mixture of sesame seeds. Pat the tuna very dry with paper towels:

sesame-seared-tuna-step-0011

Smear wasabi on both sides of the tuna. I love smearing wasabi ON the tuna, instead of having an overly-wasabi’d soy sauce mixture that you will find in most restaurants. Cooking with the wasabi paste on the tuna mellows out its sting. It just tastes better. Trust me. Use as much wasabi as you want:

sesame-seared-tuna-step-0021

Now season the tuna with salt and pepper. Personally, I like using sea salt:

sesame-seared-tuna-step-0031

Now coat each side of the tuna with sesame seeds. Don’t forget the thin sides! All sides should be covered:

sesame-seared-tuna-step-0041

Cook the tuna over medium-high heat. Super-high heat will burn the sesame seeds. Burnt sesame seeds taste bitter…and well…burnt. The white sesame seeds should be browned. This photo above is right before I pulled it off the pan. It was perfect.

sesame-seared-tuna-step-0091

Now, this is important. Don’t overcook the poor fish. I like having the sides seared and the middle raw. However you like it, just don’t overcook. You can take a knife and cut into the middle of the fillet to check on its progress.

avocado-oilThe avocado oil is from my friends at Earthy.com – ooohlala! It’s rich, buttery and a vibrant avocado-y green. I highly recommend it for salad dressing. If you don’t have avocado oil, use olive oil instead.

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Sesame Seared Tuna with Lime Ginger Vinaigrette Recipe

The ratio for a vinaigrette is 3 parts oil to 1 part vinegar. For the oil, you can use olive, vegetable, canola, grapeseed, etc. I used lovely, flavorful avocado oil. The vinegar can be balsamic, rice vinegar, white vinegar, lime juice or lemon juice.  This makes an excellent appetizer!

Serves 4 as appetizer

3 tablespoons black sesame seeds
3 tablespoons white sesame seeds
2 pieces tuna fish fillet (about 1 pound)
1 teaspoon wasabi paste
1 tablespoon cooking oil
1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lime juice (or other vinegar)
1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger
3 tablespoons avocado oil (or other oil)
salt and pepper
2 large handfuls salad greens (optional)

In a shallow bowl, add the black and the white sesame seeds. Pat the tuna very dry. smear a bit of wasabi paste on both sides of the fish. Season the fish with salt and pepper.

Heat a frying pan over medium-high heat and add the cooking oil. When the oil is shimmering, carefully lay the tuna fillets in the pan, not touching. Cook for 2 minutes then flip the tuna. Cook 2 minutes, then flip the fillets to its side to cook 1 minute. Flip one more time to cook the other side for 1 minute so that you have a good sear on all sides. Please take care not to burn the sesame seeds. If the seeds start turning brown too quickly, lower the heat. Remove the fish to a plate.

In a small bowl, whisk together the lime juice, ginger and the oil. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Slice the fish into thin slices and arrange on a plate. Drizzle some of the lime-ginger vinaigrette over the fish. Toss the remaining lime-ginger vinaigrette with salad greens, if desired.

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Tofu and Soba Noodles with Lemon Ginger Dressing http://steamykitchen.com/3112-tofu-and-soba-noodles-with-lemon-ginger-dressing.html http://steamykitchen.com/3112-tofu-and-soba-noodles-with-lemon-ginger-dressing.html#comments Thu, 16 Apr 2009 02:45:21 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/?p=3112 If Heidi Swanson, cookbook author – Super Natural Cooking: Five Ways To Incorporate Whole and Natural Ingredients into Your Cooking and food blogger of www.101cookbooks.com says that this is one of the very best recipes, you’d better believe it. In fact, you might as well cut this article out and make it this week. Heidi specializes in whole, natural foods, ...

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If Heidi Swanson, cookbook author – heidi-swanson Super Natural Cooking: Five Ways To Incorporate Whole and Natural Ingredients into Your Cooking and food blogger of www.101cookbooks.com says that this is one of the very best recipes, you’d better believe it. In fact, you might as well cut this article out and make it this week. Heidi specializes in whole, natural foods, the good-for-you recipes that you probably can use more of. The original version of this recipe is from a quaint restaurant in San Francisco called Pomelo. “Otsu” is the name of this dish on their menu, and it means ” strange; quaint; stylish; chic; spicy; witty; tasty.”

If you don’t like tofu, this recipe is also great with shrimp. Season the shrimp with salt and pepper, grill two minutes each side or until cooked through.

I could also tell you that I made this again last night and tossed in leftover, KFC cold fried chicken, but then I think Heidi would be kinda upset at me.

tofu-soba-noodle-lemon-ginger-dressing-0071

Tofu and Soba Noodles with Lemon Ginger Dressing

(a.k.a. Otsu)

Recipe adapted from Heidi Swanson www.101cookbooks.com who adapted it from Culture & Cuisine Magazine who got it from Pomelo Restaurant. I love how recipes evolve and get passed on! I’ve changed the recipe slightly…enjoy!

You’ll want to get firm or extra-firm tofu for this recipe – any softer will just crumble in the frying pan.


For the dressing:

Grated zest of 1 lemon
1 inch section of ginger, peeled and grated
1 tablespoon honey
3/4 teaspoon Asian chilli powder (or cayenne)
1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
1/4 cup rice vinegar
1/3 cup soy sauce
3 tablespoons grapeseed oil (or olive oil)
1 tablespoons toasted sesame oil

12 ounces dried soba noodles
1 tablespoon cooking oil (whatever oil you use above in the dressing is fine)
12 ounces extra-firm nigari tofu
1/4 cup toasted sesame seeds

To make the dressing, combine all the ingredients except for the oils in a food processor or hand blender. Run the blender for a few seconds, until all ingredients are combined. With the machine running, drizzle in the oils.

Bring a large pot of water to a boil and cook the soba noodles until just tender, then drain.

While the noodles are cooking, drain the tofu, pat very dry and cut into 1-inch cubes. Heat a nonstick frying pan over medium high heat and when hot, pour in the cooking oil. Add the tofu cubes in one layer. Cook for 1 minute until browned, toss gently and continue cooking until all sides are golden brown and firm.

In a large mixing bowl, combine the soba with about 2/3 cup of the dressing and the sesame seeds. Toss until well combined. Add the tofu and toss again gently.

Serves 4 for lunch or as part of multi-course meal

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Korean Glass Noodles – Jap Chae http://steamykitchen.com/618-korean-glass-noodles-jap-chae-2.html http://steamykitchen.com/618-korean-glass-noodles-jap-chae-2.html#comments Wed, 16 Jul 2008 04:42:29 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/?p=618 from the Steamy Kitchen archives…. The software that runs my website has a nifty little feature that tells me what terms people are entering into the search box when they come to Steamy Kitchen. Although smart authors would probably use this information to enhance their site and serve the needs of their readers, the only reason I check this page ...

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jap-chae

from the Steamy Kitchen archives….

The software that runs my website has a nifty little feature that tells me what terms people are entering into the search box when they come to Steamy Kitchen. Although smart authors would probably use this information to enhance their site and serve the needs of their readers, the only reason I check this page is for comic relief. Most terms are legit, such as a recipe for jap chae, but at least once a day, I find a gem, something that just makes me giggle. It’s a total mystery why someone would come to my Asian recipes Web site and enter into the search box: “what foods give you spots” and expect that I have the answer!? I doubt if these people ever found what they were searching for on my blog, but I wanted to take the time to address these curious questions and concerns:

 

  • Egg fried rice secret smell: There should be no secret smell to your fried rice. Maybe you’re using rotten eggs? Dishes that you serve really shouldn’t have secret smells. That’s totally gross.
  • Burger shrink: Thank you, but my hamburgers are emotionally stable. No therapy needed.
  • Horrid Chinese chicken: Most Chinese chickens are pretty nice. Sometimes if you get a mother hen that enjoys nagging and bossing chicks around, yes, then the hen might be a little horrid. But that’s nothing that a bottle of wine can’t handle. That’s how the Chinese came to invent the dish Drunken Chicken.
  • White stuff that goes out of salmon: I don’t know … maybe the salmon has some sort of chickenpox? Bad case of acne? My advice: If your salmon has pus, don’t eat it. But how you landed on my site is a mystery. I’ve never written a recipe for diseased salmon.
  • Chinese chicken cancer: Is this like the Beijing bird flu? Symptoms of the Chinese chicken cancer are: a sudden uncontrollable urge to peck at your computer screen; hair falling out in clumps, leaving you with a mohawk “comb”; strange feeling of wanting to sit on your computer mouse to keep it warm; and, lastly, waking up at the crack of dawn and scaring your mate by screeching “BAAAAKKKAAAACCCCKKKKKK!!!!!” You need professional help. None of my recipes will cure this. And for the rest of you, here’s a recipe for jap chae, the No. 10 most-popular search term on my site. The noodles used in this dish are made from sweet potato starch and become translucent when cooked, which is how they got their English name, “glass noodles.” They are also gluten-free and are wonderfully springy and light. You can use any type of fresh mushrooms, such as shiitake or even the standard button mushroom, but traditionally, dried wood ear mushrooms, found in most Asian markets, are used. Just rehydrate the mushrooms in warm water for 15 minutes, drain and they will be ready for your stir-fry. I love making this dish in the summertime because you can serve these noodles at room temperature or even slightly chilled. ***

This dish can also be spelled: Jab Chae, Chap Chae. The type of noodles used in this dish is made from sweet potato starch and translucent when cooked, which is how they got their English name, “glass noodles.” They are also gluten free and are wonderfully springy and light. I love making this dish in the summertime, because you can serve these noodles at room temperature or even slightly chilled.

You can find them at Asian markets or online at Komart. Glass Noodles Just boil the dried noodles for 5 minutes, drain and toss with sesame oil so that they don’t stick together:

Korean Glass Noodles You can use any type of fresh mushrooms, like shitake or even the standard button mushroom, but traditionally, dried wood ear mushrooms, found in most Asian markets, are used. Just rehydrate the dried wood ear mushrooms in warm water for 15 minutes, drain and they’ll be ready for your stir-fry. The spinach was shy – didn’t want to jump in the group shot.

ingredients

Stir fry the carrots and onions until softened, oh…about 1 minute…but it really depends on how thin you slice your onions and carrots:

Stir fry carrots and onions

Add garlic, scallions and mushrooms. Fry 30 seconds:

Add garlic, scallions and mushrooms

Then add spinach, noodles, soy sauce, sugar, fry 2-3 minutes until noodles are heated through. Turn off heat, toss with sesame seeds and remaining 1 1/2 tsp of sesame oil:

Add remaining ingredients

Jap Chae

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Jap Chae Korean Glass Noodles Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes
jap-chae

Ingredients:

1/2 pound dried Korean sweet potato noodles
2 1/2 teaspoons sesame oil, divided
1 tablespoon cooking oil
3/4 cup thinly sliced onions
2 carrots, cut into matchsticks
2 cloves garlic, very finely minced
3 stalks green onions, cut into 1" lengths
1/2 cup fresh mushrooms, thinly sliced (shiitake or wood ear)
1/2 lb spinach, washed well and drained
2 tablespoons soy sauce
2 teaspoons sugar
1 tablespoon sesame seeds

Directions:

1. Fill a large pot with water and boil. When water is boiling, add the noodles and cook for 5 minutes. Immediately drain and rinse with cold water. Drain again and toss with only 1 tsp of the sesame oil. Use kitchen shears to cut noodles into shorter pieces, about 8 inches in length. Set aside.

2. In bowl, mix soy sauce & sugar together. Add the cooking oil in a wok or large saute pan on high heat and swirl to coat. When the cooking oil is hot but not smoking. Fry onions and carrots, until just softened, about 1 minute. Add the garlic, scallions and mushrooms, fry 30 seconds. Then add the spinach, soy sauce, sugar and the noodles. Fry 2-3 minutes until the noodles are cooked through. Turn off heat, toss with sesame seeds and the remaining 1 1/2 tsp of sesame oil.

 

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Sesame Shrimp with Honey Mustard Sauce http://steamykitchen.com/571-sesame-shrimp-with-honey-mustard-sauce.html http://steamykitchen.com/571-sesame-shrimp-with-honey-mustard-sauce.html#comments Wed, 18 Jun 2008 17:07:32 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/?p=571 It never fails that at least twice a day, I'm asked, "so when are you gonna start your own restaurant?" My reply is always the same, "only when I have an extra million in the bank and I don't have to worry about making money." I know a restaurant is just too much...

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Sesame Shrimp with Honey Mustard Sauce

from Steamy Kitchen food column in Tampa Tribune

It never fails that at least twice a day, I’m asked, “so when are you gonna start your own restaurant?” My reply is always the same, “only when I have an extra million in the bank and I don’t have to worry about making money.”

I know a restaurant is just too much for to handle for my delicate psyche. How would I ever explain to the IRS why “weekly psychotherapy” is part of operating expenses? And the only way I’d be able to handle the long hours and hard work is with back to back shots of double espressos followed by a Red Bull chaser. But really, with that regimen, I’d scare off innocent, unsuspecting people with, “DUDE! YOU! NEED! TO! TRY! MY! SESAME! SHRIMP!” leaping out of the doorway and shoving a sample in any open mouth passing by. Yeah, maybe hyperactive, assertive marketing wouldn’t work well.

Which is why I have so much respect for anyone working in the industry. I just spent the afternoon at a food and wine festival called Forks and Corks in Sarasota, and I’ve gotta say, it was simply fantastic. The festival was sponsored by the Sarasota Originals, a group of 50 independently owned restaurants in the area, and held in the exquisite, palatial courtyard of the Ringling Museum of Art. It was very Sarasota-esque, I felt under-accessorized without a boob job and lip plump.

Behind every restaurant’s sample booth was the owner, generously dishing out sample portions of their signature menu item. Despite being on their feet with only 4 hours of sleep in 90F heat, they rocked on with graciousness.

Independent restaurant owners: I bow down to you

If I ever find that extra million in the bank, you can bet that I’ll be out there thrusting a deep fried sesame shrimp pierced by cocktail sword atcha’. Aya! that sounded naughty.

Chinese Sesame Shrimp with Honey Mustard Dipping Sauce

Adapted from The Seventh Daughter, Cecilia Chiang

Sesame Shrimp with Honey Mustard Dipping Sauce

Serves 6-8

1 pound medium shrimp, shelled and deveined, with tails attached
2 teaspoons kosher salt
1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
2 cups white sesame seeds
1 teaspoon Asian sesame oil
2 tablespoons Chinese rice wine
2 large eggs
1/2 cup cornstarch
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 cup peanut oil, plus additional for deep frying
1 cup water

Chinese Honey-Mustard Dipping Sauce
1/4 cup Dijon mustard
2 tablespoons honey
2 tablespoons peanut oil
2 tablespoons soy sauce

To make sauce – whisk together the mustard, honey, oil and soy sauce until well combined. Set aside until ready to serve.

In a bowl, gently mix the shrimp with salt to coat salt. Cover with cold water, slosh around a few times, drain the shrimp well, and then transfer to a cutting board. Line up 3 shallow bowls and put flour in one, in the second, whisk together sesame oil, wine, eggs, cornstarch, baking soda and the remaining 1/2 cup of flour, 1/2 cup of the peanut oil and the 1 cup of water until well combined. In the third bowl, add sesame seeds.

Heat a wok or large pot with peanut oil for deep frying over high heat until 360F. Work in batches of 4-5 shrimp at a time. For each shrimp, hold by tail, dip in flour, then batter, then sesame seeds. Deep fry in batches of 4-5 shrimp until golden brown, about 2 minutes. Serve with dipping sauce.

***

You might also like these other Chinese dishes:

Firecracker Shrimp with Sweet Chili Sauce – Super easy, always a crowd favorite. Here is also a video of me making the Firecracker Shrimp.

Steamed Spareribs in Black Bean Sauce – a dim sum dish! Video here.

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