Steamy Kitchen Recipes | RSS Feed http://steamykitchen.com Steamy Kitchen Food Blog: fast recipes, simple recipes, with fresh ingredients to create delicious meals. Fri, 01 May 2015 15:39:44 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.1 Asian Steak Kabobs http://steamykitchen.com/16839-asian-steak-kabobs-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/16839-asian-steak-kabobs-recipe.html#comments Fri, 15 Jul 2011 14:55:53 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=16839 We’ve been kabob happy lately, and it’s all because of this man: click on photos to see where we were! and this man: My kids want to be Adam when they grow up. These two men wrote this book: Get this book! I know you’ll love it! Chicken and Waffles on a Stick? hells yeah! You can see more photos ...

The post Asian Steak Kabobs appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>

We’ve been kabob happy lately, and it’s all because of this man:


click on photos to see where we were!

and this man:


My kids want to be Adam when they grow up.

These two men wrote this book:

Get this book! I know you’ll love it! Chicken and Waffles on a Stick? hells yeah! You can see more photos from the book on Matt’s site.

How to make Asian Steak Kabobs

Okay, back to the kabobobobobobs….(I love sayin’ that)

Here’s what I chose for the kabobs:

 

The beef

For steak kabobs, I always choose sirloin: it’s cheaper, perfectly shaped for cutting into kabob chunks (with virtually no waste at all) and it’s got an intense beefy flavor.  These black angus sirloin steaks are from  my client, Sweetbay Supermarket (by the way, I’m giving away $250 gift certificate to Sweetbay).

There’s very little work to be done with the sirloin, except to trim away the outer fat if you’d like.

Then cut into 1½” cubes, oh about this size.

The vegetables

To make the perfect kabobs, it’s not just about the right mix of vegetables (the type of vegetables are totally up to you and what your friends and family prefer) but also how you cut the vegetables.

Ideally, the steak and the vegetables cook in harmony, coming to the right temperature and level of doneness at the same time. You wouldn’t want charred vegetables and undercooked meat, nor would you want perfectly grilled steak but undercooked vegetables.

I’ll go through each type of vegetable for you:

Zucchini or yellow squash should but cut into ¾” thick rounds. If the squash is small, just leave them as rounds. If they’re big ‘n fat, like mine, I cut them into half-moons. You want to make sure that the squash isn’t cut any thinner than ¾” thick – it’s a soft, delicate vegetable that breaks easily when skewered.

For bell peppers, I get every single color – red, green, orange and yellow. Slice the pepper in half first.

Then use your fingers (or a paring knife) to remove the seedy section.

Slice each half into 4 strips (3 if your pepper is small)

Then cut each strip into 3 squares.

For mushrooms, I prefer the meaty portobello. The problem you might run into with mushrooms is that they’re incredibly soft and tear easily when trying to skewer them.

Large portobellos cut thick work great. Slice into 1-inch thick slices, then halve each slice.

For onions, we enjoy both red onions and sweet Vidalia onions. Cut in half, peel away the skin and cut off the stem.

Cut each half into thirds (or half if using small onions)

Then cut each piece in half again.

Cherry tomatoes are left whole. The next step is to marinate. Put all vegetables EXCEPT the mushrooms into a big bowl. We’ll add the mushrooms in later.

I like having the steak and vegetables marinate separately, and in different sauces. For this recipe, I’ve got an Asian flair to the kabobs. To make it easy, I use store-bought salad dressing or marinades.

 The marinade

You can make your own marinade – it’s easy enough (2 tsp freshly grated ginger + 2 garlic cloves, finely minced + 1 teaspoon sesame oil + 2 tablespoons soy sauce)

Or you can cheat and use store-bought dressing:

By the way, San-J has a whole entire line of Asian style gluten-free marinades and dressings – love their stuff. The Makoto Ginger Dressing is found in the refrigerated produce section – you’ll love it, it’s one of my favorites.

What I like: marinate the sirloin steak in one type of dressing and the vegetables in a different type – that way I get a big hit of flavor, different in each bite. 

I place all the sirloin into a large bowl, season with salt, pepper and the ginger dressing. Cover and refrigerate.

For the vegetables, I chose the San-J Orange Sauce. Just season with salt, pepper and toss with the dressing.

Once you’ve tossed the vegetables, add the mushrooms on top and just leave them there.

The mushrooms are too delicate to toss and you want to keep the mushrooms relatively dry to stay meaty. Wet mushrooms get soggy, shrink down and are hard to skewer.

Cover and refrigerate if you’re marinating overnight. If you’re only marinating for a few hours, it’s fine to let the bowl sit on your counter. If you’re like me, refrigerator space is limited!

When you’re ready to cook, skewer the meat and vegetables together. Preheat your grill – one side high heat, the other side on low heat. Start the kabobs on high heat, searing both sides and move them to the lower heat to finish off.

You’ll see that the vegetables and the meat cook evenly together when you take the time to cut your vegetables nicely!

Who’s comin’ for dinner?

Yum
Print

Asian Steak Kabobs

Servings: Serves 6 Prep Time: 2 hours Cook Time: 12 minutes
asian steak kabobs recipe-22

Ingredients:

3 pounds Sweetbay Black Angus Sirloin
3 bell peppers
1 red onion
1 sweet Vidalia onion
1 pint cherry tomatoes
2 zucchini
2 portobello mushrooms
salt and pepper
1 cup Asian dressing or marinade of your choice (you can use two different types, ½ cup each)
bamboo skewers

Directions:

1. Cut the sirloin into 1½” cubes. Place in large bowl, season with salt and pepper. Pour in ½ cup of dressing or marinade of your choice. Cover and refrigerate a couple of hours or up to overnight.
2. Slice the vegetables as shown in the photos. Add all vegetables except for the mushrooms into a large bowl. Season with salt and pepper. Pour in ½ cup of dressing or marinade of your choice. Toss well. Add the mushrooms on top, but do not toss. Cover and refrigerate if marinating overnight. Otherwise, cover and set on counter until ready to cook.
3. While the ingredients are marinating, soak the bamboo skewers in water. When ready to skewer, alternate the steak with the vegetables on the stick.
4. Preheat your grill, high heat on one side and low heat on the other side. Grill the skewers on high heat, covered for 5 minutes. Then flip the kabobs, cover and grill another 5 minutes. Move the kabobs to the low heat, covered, to finish cooking, about another 2 minutes or so, depending on your desired level of doneness.

The post Asian Steak Kabobs appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/16839-asian-steak-kabobs-recipe.html/feed 48
Vietnamese Barbecued Lemongrass Beef http://steamykitchen.com/14565-vietnamese-barbecued-lemongrass-beef.html http://steamykitchen.com/14565-vietnamese-barbecued-lemongrass-beef.html#comments Mon, 14 Mar 2011 01:09:04 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=14565 I think this is my second favorite Vietnamese dish, right after Pho. It’s light, healthy and incorporates the salty, sweet, tangy, spicy, sour elements that make Vietnamese food so tasty. Recipe for Vietnamese Barbecued Lemongrass Beef, courtesy of Periplus Publishing on my other site, New Asian Cuisine.

The post Vietnamese Barbecued Lemongrass Beef appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>

I think this is my second favorite Vietnamese dish, right after Pho. It’s light, healthy and incorporates the salty, sweet, tangy, spicy, sour elements that make Vietnamese food so tasty.

Recipe for Vietnamese Barbecued Lemongrass Beef, courtesy of Periplus Publishing on my other site, New Asian Cuisine.

The post Vietnamese Barbecued Lemongrass Beef appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/14565-vietnamese-barbecued-lemongrass-beef.html/feed 12
Crock Pot Pho (Vietnamese Beef Noodle Soup) http://steamykitchen.com/3136-crock-pot-pho.html http://steamykitchen.com/3136-crock-pot-pho.html#comments Mon, 04 May 2009 12:00:16 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/?p=3136     It’s no secret that good Pho broth requires a gazillion hours of simmering time. Time that I just don’t have. Tony, a boyfriend from a lifetime ago, told me his Dad used to simmer giant vats of pho broth overnight for his little pho restaurant in Houston. So, one day, I thought it would be really genius to ...

The post Crock Pot Pho (Vietnamese Beef Noodle Soup) appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
Crockpot Pho Recipe   

It’s no secret that good Pho broth requires a gazillion hours of simmering time. Time that I just don’t have. Tony, a boyfriend from a lifetime ago, told me his Dad used to simmer giant vats of pho broth overnight for his little pho restaurant in Houston. So, one day, I thought it would be really genius to do the same. Dump a bunch of beefy, tendony, knuckley, marrowey bones into the largest stockpot that I have and let it simmer away while I slept.

Crockpot Pho Recipe

It didn’t quite work out as I had intended:

11:30pm Initial hard boil of the bones to get all the yuck, guck and scum off. Char ginger and onion.

11:38pm Dumped out water, added clean water, the clean bones, spices, ginger and onion. Let the dance begin.

11:45pm Nighty-night

12:35am Is the flame low enough? Maybe I need to check to see.

1:23am Hmmm…I smell something funny. Go check.

2:41am What if it boiled over? Go check.

3:24am What if there’s a gas bubble in the pipe and the the stove spontaneously bursts out in big flames? Maybe I should sleep on the couch closer to the kitchen.

4:45am Gosh I’m hungry. Sneak a big spoonful of Ben & Jerry’s Pistachio Ice Cream.

4:51am Did I forget to put ice cream back in freezer? What if the gas bubble really does happen and stove spontaneously bursts out in flames? Then sleeping on couch is a dumbass idea. Crawl back to bed.

6:00am Kids wake up. Jumps up and down on my belly trying to wake me up.

6:15am PHO-KING TIRED

Enter the Slow Cooker

A few weeks later, I was contacted by the peeps at Crock-Pot® The Original Slow Cooker <- yes, they are insanely paranoid about me using their correct trademarked name, so much that they’ve given me very specific instructions 4 separate times on how to properly spell/mark their product names.) They sent me their new eLume Crock-Pot® Programmable Slow Cooker with Touch Screen Technology to test.

crock-pot-elume <- shiny, pretty and fancy. Oh crap, I forgot the ™ after eLume™.

It’s the perfect size (6.5 quarts) for a big mean mama pot of PHO!!!

Oh yeah, baby! It solves my problem of paranoia when leaving stove on all night.

What I love about the eLume™ Crock Pot® is© its™ lighted™© touchscreen®™©. Just a light tap is all that you need and it’s totally programmable from 30 minutes to 20 hours of cooking time. You can also set it to start cooking at a certain time, but when making my Crock Pot Pho Recipe, I don’t recommend a delayed start time since we are working with raw meat bones.

Crockpot Pho Recipe

How to make Crock Pot Pho

Whether you use the Crock Pot Pho method or the traditional stove top method, there are a couple of steps that you’ll need to do before throwing it all in the Crock Pot or slow cooker. Namely, toasting the spices, grilling the onion/ginger and pre-boiling the bones. These aren’t absolutely necessary steps…you’ll still make great pho…BUT these extra steps will make the difference between good pho and pho-bulous pho.

Toasting the Vietnamese Pho Spices

Toasting spices for Crock pot Vietnamese pho

You can buy Pho spices at most Asian supermarkets – you can buy the spices separately (coriander seeds, cloves, cinnamon, star anise, fennel and cardamom pod) or purchase them already mixed up in a package (which also includes a small mesh bag). The quality of these pre-mixed spices are just okay – but sometimes it’s just convenient to pick up a bag, not to mention much cheaper if you don’t already have many of these spices. A Pho spice pack will typically sell for $1-$3.

This day that I made the Crock Pot Pho, I used individual spices. I didn’t have cardamom pod. So yes, if you are missing one of couple of the spices, it’s okay. To get the best flavor from these spices, you’ll toast them in a dry skillet.

Grilling Ginger and Onion

This is a totally optional step, but it really gives the ginger and the onion a deep, sweet, mellow flavor. When I’m making Pho the traditional stovetop way, I’ll char them in the broiler. But with the crock pot method, I didn’t want to use the oven at all. After toasting the spices (above) in a frying pan, I add a bit of oil and grilled the onion half and thick ginger slices.

crockpot-pho-beef_090418__004_onion-web

Pre-Boiling the Bones

Knuckles, leg bones with lots of marrow are the best for making soup. The marrow will also make the soup rich and thick. The bones are pre-boiled for a few minutes on high heat to clean the bones and get rid of the nasty scum.

You’ll bring a big stockpot of water to a boil on high heat. Add the bones and boil hard for 10 minutes. You’ll see brownish scum rise to the surface. If you hadn’t taken the time to pre-boil the bones, all that scummy stuff ends up in your soup.

crockpot-pho-beef_090418__003_scum-web <– nasty pho-reaky scum

Drain, discard the scummy water and briefly rinse the bones.

Now you’ll add the spices, ginger, onion and bones to the slow cooker.

crockpot-pho-beef_090418__008_pot-web

Fill with fresh, clean, cool water about 1-1/2 inches below the surface. Set your slow cooker on low for 8 hours. I haven’t tried this method on high, but I’m sure it would be just fine.

So let this cook during all day while you’re at work or at night while you sleep and you’ll be rewarded with the cleanest, best tasting pho soups ever. Because the slow cooker doesn’t let the stock boil hard, it’s safe, easy and convenient.

Here’s what the stock looks like when it’s been cooking for 8 hours on low. Notice that the level of the liquid is still pretty high. The low, even setting doesn’t evaporate the precious liquid as much as a stove top can. The stock is strained before serving.

Crock Pot Pho Soup

Other Pho Ingredients

I used different ingredients than my previous version of traditional Vietnamese Pho and I wanted to highlight them. Instead of using dried rice noodles, I used fresh rice noodles found at Asian markets, in the refrigerated section because all these need is a quick dip in boiling water. Very fast!

Crock Pot Pho Noodles

I also bought a package of Vietnamese Beef Balls (called Bo Vien Dan). There are all sorts of balls – beef, pork, chicken, fish, crab, and my favorite – beef tendon. They come frozen in a package and they are pre-cooked, so all you need to do is throw the frozen balls into the same pot of boiling water as you cooked your noodles in. Just boil for a couple of minutes until the beef balls are heated through. I like cutting these beef balls in half, so make them easier to eat. It’s not so pretty trying to stick an entire beef ball in your mouth. Unless…you’re like really into that.

Crock Pot Pho Beef Balls

***

Crockpot Pho Recipe

***

Yum
Print

Crock Pot Pho Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: Cook Time:
crockpot vietnamese pho

This is a recipe for a 6.5 quart (or larger) Crock Pot. Any smaller really isn't that great - you won't get enough stock out of it...because the beef bones are really chunky and big. The thinly sliced meat for the bowls may be easier to slice if you freeze the chunk of meat for 15 minutes prior to slicing. You really want them as thin a possible. You can also do what I do - palm your butcher a $5 bill and he'll slice the meat for you on his fancy slicing machine

Ingredients:

For the Pho Stock:
4 pounds beef bones
1/2 onion
4 inch section of ginger, sliced
1 package Vietnamese Pho Spices (or as many of these spices as you have: 2 cinnamon sticks, 2 teaspoons whole coriander, 1 teaspooon fennel, 3 whole star anise, 3 whole cloves, 1 cardamom pod)
9 cups water
2 1/2 tablespoons fish sauce or to taste
1 teaspoon sugarFor the Pho Bowls
16 ounces fresh or dried rice noodles
1/2 pound flank, london broil, sirloin or eye of round steak, sliced as thinly as possible.
11 ounces Vietnamese beef balls, cut into halfFor the table
1-2 limes, cut into wedges
fresh herbs: cilantro, Thai basil, mint
2-3 chili peppers, sliced
2 big handfuls of bean sprouts
Hoisin sauce
Sriracha hot chili sauce

Directions:

1. Bring a large stockpot with water to boil over high heat. When it comes to a rolling boil, add the beef bones and boil vigourously for 10 minutes.

2. In the meantime, heat a frying pan on medium-low heat. Add the Vietnamese Pho Spices and toast until fragrant, about 2-3 minutes. Dump the spices to the empty Crock Pot or slow cooker immediately. Return frying pan to medium-high heat and add 1 tablespoon of oil. When the oil is hot, add the ginger slices and the onion half. Cook until the ginger is browned on both sides and the onion half is nicely browned and softened. Add the ginger and the onion to the Crock Pot or slow cooker.

3. When the bones have been pre-boiled, drain, discard water and rinse bones briefly to clean them. Add the bones to the Crock Pot or slow cooker. Fill the Crock Pot with fresh, clean, cool water to just 1-1/2 inches below surface, add the fish sauce and sugar. Cover and set the Crock Pot or slow cooker to cook on low for 8 hours. Taste and season with additional fish sauce if needed.

4. When you are just about ready to eat, you'll prep the rest of the ingredients for the Pho bowls. Bring a pot of water to a boil. Add the beef balls and cook until heated through, about 2 minutes. Remove the balls, keeping the water boiling and now cook the noodles according to package instructions. If you are using fresh noodles, all they need is a couple of minutes. Drain immediately.

5. Strain the stock with a fine meshed sieve. Discard the solids.

6. Line up 4 large bowls on counter. Distribute the noodles, beef balls and thin steak slices evenly amongst the bowls. Ladle the hot Pho stock into each bowl. The hot stock should cook the thin steak slices. Serve with lime wedges, fresh herbs, chili peppers, Hoisin sauce and Sriracha hot chili sauce at the table.

===

vietnamese-pho-beef-noodle-soup-recipe Vietnamese Pho Recipe (cooked the traditional, long, slow, stovetop method)

vietnamese-chicken-pho-recipe Vietnamese Chicken Pho Recipe (Pho Ga)

The post Crock Pot Pho (Vietnamese Beef Noodle Soup) appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/3136-crock-pot-pho.html/feed 193
Red Lantern Grilled Sirloin with Chile, Garlic, and Ginger http://steamykitchen.com/2631-red-lantern-grilled-sirloin.html http://steamykitchen.com/2631-red-lantern-grilled-sirloin.html#comments Sun, 22 Feb 2009 16:58:01 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/?p=2631 Photo of Red Lantern’s Grilled Sirloin with Chile, Garlic and Ginger courtesy of Secrets of the Red Lantern Cookbook I love my friends! I needed a few more shots for the cookbook, and asked my good friends Matt and Dannika of MattikaArts if he’d like to take a shot {pun intended..haha i soooo funny! snort.} at photographing some Asian ingredients ...

The post Red Lantern Grilled Sirloin with Chile, Garlic, and Ginger appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
red-lantern-cookbook-steak1

Photo of Red Lantern’s Grilled Sirloin with Chile, Garlic and Ginger courtesy of Secrets of the Red Lantern Cookbook

I love my friends!

I needed a few more shots for the cookbook, and asked my good friends Matt and Dannika of MattikaArts if he’d like to take a shot {pun intended..haha i soooo funny! snort.} at photographing some Asian ingredients and be published in the Steamy Kitchen Cookbook!

This all happened via email and I swear to Buddha that I heard him giggle.

matt <– this guy…he giggled in his email, I could hear it between the commas!

And look at the beautiful photos he took – they will be in the Ingredients section of the Steamy Kitchen Cookbook!

Click on the photo below for the slideshow – there are a total of 7 photos.

matt-wright-photos-01-2

(click on photo for slideshow of 7 photos)

How could you not fall in love with this man???

***

Cookbook Giveaway Winner

Time sure flies by…one minute I’m posting Red Lantern’s Crisp Parcels or Vietnamese Spring Rolls (Cha Gio) and giving away a copy of the caress-me-now cookbook, secrets-red-lantern Secrets of the Red Lantern by Pauline Nguyen – and then a week passes by. I was supposed to draw a random name as the winner. Oops! Got busy, missed deadline…so what’s another day? Well, then another week passes by and here I am, totally apologizing to you for being late announcing the lucky winner of Secrets of the Red Lantern Cookbook!

So, without further delay (cuz you know I’m good at that!) the winner of the cookbook is

Grace says:

Just by reading your post I’m completely sold and intensely craving spring rolls. I prefer my with bean thread/veggie/pork filling but when necessity and/or boredom strikes I grab just about anything from the fridge.

Congrats Grace! Email me your deets and I’ll have the publisher send the book to you: jaden{at}steamykitchen{dot}com.

Red Lantern’s Grilled Sirloin with Chile, Garlic, and Ginger Recipe

Bo Nuong Toi Gung
Two 1/2 pound sirloin steaks
2 handfuls shredded green papaya
1 small handful mixed herbs (perilla, Vietnamese mint, and basil)
1 tablespoon fried shallots
1 tablespoon dried shrimp, soaked in hot water for 5 minutes and drained
3 tablespoons dipping fish sauce

MARINADE
2 teaspoons pickled chili
2 cloves garlic, finely minced
¾-inch piece of ginger, grated with microplane grater
2 tablespoons Asian fish sauce
1 tablespoon superfine sugar
2 teaspoons vegetable oil
Pinch of salt
Mix all the marinade ingredients together until the sugar dissolves. Add the steaks and marinate for 2 hours in the fridge. Grill the steaks over medium to high heat, to your preference (6 minutes for rare, 10 minutes for medium), then rest the steaks for 5 minutes. Reheat the steaks on the grill pan, then cut into thin slices.
Serve with a salad of green papaya, mixed herbs, fried shallots, and dried shrimp, dressed with dipping fish sauce.
SERVES 4

Dipping Fish Sauce

Nuoc Mam Cham

3 tablespoons Asian fish sauce
3 tablespoons rice vinegar
2 tablespoons sugar
2 cloves garlic
1 bird’s-eye chili
2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lime juice

Combine the fish sauce, rice vinegar, ½ cup of water, and sugar in a saucepan and place over medium heat. Stir well and cook until just before boiling point is reached, then allow to cool. To serve, finely chop the garlic and chile and stir in the lime juice.
MAKES 1 CUP

Fried Shallots

Hanh Phi

½ pound shallots, peeled
4 cups vegetable oil

Finely slice the shallots and wash under cold water. Dry the shallots with a cloth, then set them aside on some paper towel until they are completely dry.
Put the oil in a wok and heat to 350 degrees F, or until a cube of bread dropped in the oil browns in 15 seconds. Fry the shallots in small batches until they turn golden brown, then remove with a slotted spoon to a paper towel.
The fried shallots are best eaten freshly fried but will keep for up to 2 days in an airtight container.

—Recipe from secrets-red-lantern Secrets of the Red Lantern by Pauline Nguyen

The post Red Lantern Grilled Sirloin with Chile, Garlic, and Ginger appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/2631-red-lantern-grilled-sirloin.html/feed 14
Vietnamese Pho: Beef Noodle Soup http://steamykitchen.com/271-vietnamese-beef-noodle-soup-pho.html http://steamykitchen.com/271-vietnamese-beef-noodle-soup-pho.html#comments Sat, 09 Feb 2008 20:15:33 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/2008/02/09/vietnamese-beef-noodle-soup-pho/ What the Pho?! I’ve been working hard perfecting the techniques and recipe for Vietnamese Beef Noodle Soup, or Pho, just for you. It’s taken years of kitchen experiments, eating out and scouring for good recipes. Of all the cookbooks that I own, the best recipe that I’ve found for Pho is from: Andrea Nguyen’s Into the Vietnamese Kitchen, which is ...

The post Vietnamese Pho: Beef Noodle Soup appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
Vietnamese Pho Noodle Soup Recipe

What the Pho?!

I’ve been working hard perfecting the techniques and recipe for Vietnamese Beef Noodle Soup, or Pho, just for you. It’s taken years of kitchen experiments, eating out and scouring for good recipes. Of all the cookbooks that I own, the best recipe that I’ve found for Pho is from:

Andrea Nguyen’s Into the Vietnamese KitchenInto the Vietnamese Kitchen Cookbook, which is one of the most comprehensive books on the cuisine of Vietnam. The book also won nominations for a James Beard Foundation award and two International Association of Culinary Professionals (IACP). Definitely a must-have book for Asian food lovers.

So, let’s get right to the Vietnamese Beef Pho Recipe!

The dish is pronounced “fuh” and not “foo” or “foe” or “puh”

Yeah, Pho is cheap eat out…but to be able to make a home made version? Pretty Pho-king amazing, if you ask me.

Pho Spices

It’s best if you can get each spice separately, but I do find that the spice packets are pretty convenient. They cost less than $2.00 and even come with a mesh bag to put all the spices in. Spices include cinnamon sticks, cloves, coriander pods, star anise and cardamom. Whatever you do, don’t use the Pho spice paste that comes in a jar or can. Nasty stuff, that’s Pho-sho’.

Pho Spices use for Vietnamese Pho Recipe

Best Bones for Pho

Knuckle bones are the best to make the stock. The knobby knuckle bones, about the size of your fist, is full of gelatin – which gives body and richness to your broth. The knuckle bones make the biggest difference in your broth! You can find knuckle bones at Asian markets, but at regular supermarkets – you might have to ask your butcher.

Leg bones are also great for the pho broth. Take a look at the photo below. The bone that’s at 12-o’clock position is a leg bone that contains marrow. The marrow is good, but it’s extremely fatty. If I have a lot of marrow bones, I’ll scoop out the marrow with a small spoon or knife and discard after the par-boiling (see below). Having too much marrow will give you a greasy film on your pho broth.

But let’s say that you can’t find leg/knuckle bones. Go ahead and use whatever beef bones your supermarket has and just supplement with some oxtail bones or a pound of beef meat (rump, chuck, brisket, etc.) for extra flavor. Alternatively, you can buy knuckle bones online – Blue Valley Meats offers 100% grass fed knuckle bones for $9 per bag.

 

beef knuckle bones for pho

Blue Valley Meats knuckle bones

Bones are parboiled first for a good 10 minutes in rapidly boiling water – this gets rid of the yucky impurities like blood particles and extra fat. You’ll see gray foam float up to the surface as you boil. After 10 minutes, dump out all of the water, rinse out your pot, rinse the bones, and refill with clean, cool water. I know it’s an extra step, but this will give you the pure, clean-tasting broth.

If you have a lot of marrow bones, use a spoon or knife to scoop out and discard some of the marrow. Do this after the parboil, while the bones are still hot. The marrow can only be scooped out when the bones are hot, otherwise, it solidifies.

 

Charring Onions and Ginger

Charring or roasting the onions and ginger gives you a wonderfully mellow and naturally sweet flavor. I used to char over an open flame on my stovetop with a pair of tongs, but that got pretty tiring. Plus, metal tongs + long time over flame = very hothothot hands. So now, I just raise my oven rack to the highest position and turn my broiler on. See how golden the ginger gets?

Char onions and ginger for Vietnamese Pho Recipevietnamese-pho-recipe-ginger

Damn Scumbag!

So here is my broth boilin’ away with the mesh bag of spices, charred ginger, charred onions and beef bones. You can see floating bits of fat and the damn scumbag.

Fat & marrow bits = good eats. Try to keep that in the broth!

But gotta get rid of the scum! I use a very, very fine mesh strainer designed just for scum. heh. A scumbag strainer. Can you imagine if I had a line of cookware and tools – “Steamy Kitchen Scumbag Strainer.” Straining the scum keeps your broth pure and clean. The lower the simmer, the less scum you have.

A note on broth simmering time – I simmer the broth for 3 hours. According to both Andrea Nguyen and Corinne Trang (author of Authentic Vietnamese Cooking and former editor and director of Saveur’s test kitchen) – all of the flavors in the bone have been extracted after 3 hours.

Skim the Scum when making broth for Vietnamese Pho Recipe

Thin Sliced Meat

You can use a thinly sliced flank steak, london broil, sirloin, eye of round or tri-tip. Instead of beef slices, you could use beef balls (Bo Vien) found in the freezer section of your Asian market. The secret to cutting meat is to cut across the grain. You want your beef slices as thin as possible, and I always throw the whole chunk of meat in the freezer for 15 minutes to make it easier to slice thinly.

How to slice steak for Vietnamese Pho Recipe

Pho Noodles


Rice noodles for vietnamese pho recipe


Vietnamese Beef Noodle Soup typically uses rice noodles. You can buy them dried or fresh. I love the slippery softness of fresh noodles (look in the refrigerator or freezer section.) Most restaurants will use dried, flat rice noodles. Look for ones that are medium thickness and flat like these.

Pho Condiments


Condiments for Vietnamese Pho Recipe


Pho-tastic condiments! On the tables of every Pho restaurant, you’ll see these two condiments, Cock Sauce (Sriracha hot chili sauce) and Hoisin Sauce. You can squirt and slather as much of these two condiments as you want…but I’m a purist.If I’m going to spend a couple of hours carefully crafting a rich, flavor-packed, clean soup – I better taste every damn drop. Condiment sauces just get in the way. Sometimes, I’ll squirt a bit of each sauce in a little dish and dip my meat in the sauce as I take a bite. You ask….why do we call it Cock sauce? See that rooster on the bottle?

Pho Vegetables and Herbs

Fresh mint, cilantro, basil, bean sprouts, limees, sliced chili peppers are just some of my favorite accompaniments. Set a plate at the table and your guests can pick and choose what they like. Here’s a great Pho-tograph of fresh vegetables and herbs.

Fresh Herbs for Vietnamese Pho Recipe

Recommended Tools

These are tools that I recommend and use in my kitchen.




More Pho Recipes

Crock Pot/Slow Cooker Pho Recipe

Crock Pot Slow Cooker Pho
Don’t have time to man a stove? Use your crock pot or slow cooker!

Vietnamese Chicken Pho (Pho Ga) Recipe

vietnamese-chicken-pho-recipe Vietnamese Chicken Noodle Soup (Pho Ga)

Pho-Lovers Pho-Ever

Guilty Carnivore
Eat Drink & Be Merry

Yum
Print

Vietnamese Pho: Beef Noodle Soup Recipe

Servings: 8 Prep Time: 30 minutes Cook Time: 4 hours
vietnamese-pho-recipe-2

Adapted from my favorite Vietnamese cookbook
Into the Vietnamese Kitchen

Sometimes, I omit the 1 pound of beef meat in the broth (you'll see I've made it optional) - as I've found that as long as I have good bones, the broth will have enough flavor to not need the extra beef meat.

Ingredients:

THE BROTH



2 onions, halved
4" nub of ginger, halved lengthwise
5-6 pounds of good beef bones, preferably leg and knuckle
1 pound of beef meat - chuck, brisket, rump, cut into large slices [optional]6 quarts of water
1 package of Pho Spices [1 cinnamon stick, 1 tbl coriander seeds, 1 tbl fennel seeds, 5 whole star anise, 1 cardamom pod, 6 whole cloves - in mesh bag]1 1/2 tablespoons kosher salt (halve if using regular table salt)
1/4 cup fish sauce
1 inch chunk of yellow rock sugar (about 1 oz) - or 1oz of regular sugar

2 pounds rice noodles (dried or fresh)
Cooked beef from the broth (shredded or thinly sliced)
1/2 pound flank, london broil, sirloin or eye of round, sliced as thinly as possible.
big handful of each: mint, cilantro, basil
2 limes, cut into wedges
2-3 chili peppers, sliced
2 big handfuls of fresh bean sprouts
Hoisin sauce
Sriracha hot sauce

Directions:

Char: Turn your broiler on high and move rack to the highest spot. Place ginger and onions on baking sheet. Brush just a bit of cooking oil on the cut side of each. Broil on high until ginger and onions begin to char. Turn over and continue to char. This should take a total of 10-15 minutes.

Parboil the bones: Fill large pot (12-qt capacity) with cool water. Boil water, and then add the bones, keeping the heat on high. Boil vigorously for 10 minutes. Drain, rinse the bones and rinse out the pot. If you have a lot of marrow in the bones, use a small spoon to scoop out and discard some of the marrow. Refill pot with bones and 6 qts of cool water. Bring to boil over high heat and lower to simmer. Using a ladle or a fine mesh strainer, remove any scum that rises to the top.

Boil broth: Add ginger, onion, spice packet, beef, sugar, fish sauce, salt and simmer uncovered for 1 1/2 hours. Remove the beef meat and set aside (you'll be eating this meat later in the bowls) Continue simmering for another 1 1/2 hours. Strain broth and return the broth to the pot. Taste broth and adjust seasoning - this is a crucial step. If the broth's flavor doesn't quite shine yet, add 2 teaspoons more of fish sauce, large pinch of salt and a small nugget of rock sugar (or 1 teaspoon of regular sugar). Keep doing this until the broth tastes perfect.

Prepare noodles & meat: Slice your flank/london broil/sirloin as thin as possible - try freezing for 15 minutes prior to slicing to make it easier. Remember the cooked beef meat that was part of your broth? Cut or shred the meat and set aside. Arrange all other ingredients on a platter for the table. Your guests will "assemble" their own bowls. Follow the directions on your package of noodles - there are many different sizes and widths of rice noodles, so make sure you read the directions. For some fresh rice noodles, just a quick 5 second blanch in hot water is all that's needed. The package that I purchased (above) - needed about 45 seconds in boiling water.

Ladling: Bring your broth back to a boil. Line up your soup bowls next to the stove. Fill each bowl with rice noodles, shredded cooked beef and raw meat slices. As soon as the broth comes back to a boil, ladle into each bowl. the hot broth will cook your raw beef slices. Serve immediately. Guests can garnish their own bowls as they wish.

The post Vietnamese Pho: Beef Noodle Soup appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/271-vietnamese-beef-noodle-soup-pho.html/feed 632