Steamy Kitchen Recipes | RSS Feed http://steamykitchen.com Steamy Kitchen Food Blog: fast recipes, simple recipes, with fresh ingredients to create delicious meals. Thu, 16 Apr 2015 20:35:08 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.1.1 Easy Pad Thai Recipe – Cheater Version! http://steamykitchen.com/31889-cheater-pad-thai-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/31889-cheater-pad-thai-recipe-video.html#comments Wed, 05 Mar 2014 16:25:26 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=31889 In this Easy Pad Thai Recipe: Cheater sauce! Enchance store-bought pad thai sauce with fresh, flavorful ingredients Less than 20 minutes, start to finish Looking for a no-carb version? Replace noodles with zucchini noodles “zoodles” Sometimes a cheater sauce is just the answer. The Asian aisle at my local grocery store has soo many bottles and jars of Asian sauces ...

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Perfect Cheater Pad Thai Recipe

In this Easy Pad Thai Recipe:

Sometimes a cheater sauce is just the answer.

Yummy Cheater Pad Thai Recipe

The Asian aisle at my local grocery store has soo many bottles and jars of Asian sauces – sweet-sour, kung-pao, ginger-garlic. Most of the time, I tell you to skip the pre-made stuff – it’s just easier to combine fresh ginger, fresh garlic, soy sauce or other easy-to-find ingredients to make your own type of sauce:

Sweet & Sour Chicken
Healthy General Tso’s Chicken
Chinese Beef & Broccoli
Sesame Chicken Salad

But when it comes to Pad Thai noodles, a do-it-yourself sauce can be tricky. The recipe for the sauce includes tamarind paste, which isn’t that easy to find in most American grocery stores. Thai Kitchen Pad Thai sauce is the only one my store carries, and it’s good! Let me know if you’ve tried others and have had good/bad results.

Original Pad Thai Sauce

Buy Pad Thai Sauce on Amazon!

This recipe takes 10 minutes to prep and less than 8 minutes at the stove.

10 Minute Cheater Pad Thai Recipe

Pad Thai noodles comes together really fast – so easy to make yet so easy to mess up.

1. Dried rice noodles are not cooked the same way regular pasta noodles are cooked. If you try to cook dry rice noodles in a pot of boiling water (like you do with spaghetti) – you’ll end up with a mushy mushy mushy mess. Instead, soak the noodles in hot (not boiling) water. That will soften the rice noodles and the stir-fry will finish cooking the rice noodles.

Even when making Vietnamese Pho Noodle Soup, another dish that uses dried rice noodles, I soak them in water – then briefly touch down in boiling water to cook. They’ll cook in 1 minute!

Delicious Cheater Pad Thai Recipe

2. The shrimp, egg, garlic, ginger and vegetables all cook at different heat setting and different times. In order to make sure nothing is under or over cooked, you have to adjust heat and add the ingredients into the wok or pan in a certain order. Prepare all of your ingredients first, and have them all ready within arm’s reach.

Tasty Cheater Pad Thai Recipe

3. Shrimp is not very forgiving to cook with. Because of their size, they are so easy to overcook! Then they become rubbery. To make sure that the shrimp is perfectly cook AND also get a nice sear – we sear them each side first before we do anything else. The shrimp are only cooked half-way. We’ll add them back into the pan near the end of the stir-fry. In fact, this is the technique that I use for stir-frying all meats and seafood. Sear at high heat, remove, then add back into finish cooking towards end.

4. Egg is also another funny ingredient – if you just crack an egg into a stir-fry, you’ll end up with a soggy mess. The egg will coat all of the ingredients and weigh down the dish, making it very “wet” and mushy. Instead, right after the shrimp are taken out of the pan, the egg is added to the pan. Give it a good scramble, and when it sets, remove the cooked eggs from pan too. You can just put the egg in the same bowl as the shrimp. This way, your Pad Thai will get nice bits of perfectly scrambled egg.

I know this seems like a lot of information – but don’t worry – here’s a video and the recipe will give you step by step!

Cheater Pad Thai Recipe Video

  

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Cheater Pad Thai Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 8 minutes
Cheater Pad Thai

Ingredients:

1 pound dry rice noodles (about 1/4" wide)
1 tablespoon cooking oil, divided
1 pound raw shrimp, peeled and deveined
1 egg, beaten
2 cloves garlic, finely minced
1/4 pound snow peas, sliced diagonally lengthwise
8 ounces bean sprouts
one 8-ounce jar prepared Pad Thai sauce
1 tablespoon water
optional toppings: Sriracha hot chili sauce, torn fresh cilantro, lime wedges, chopped peanuts

Directions:

1. In a large bowl, fully submerge the dry rice noodles in hot tap water (not boiling, just hot to touch). Let them soak for 8-10 minutes. Drain and set aside.

2. In a wok or large saute pan over high heat, add just half of the cooking oil. When the oil is hot, swirl it around the bottom of the pan and add the shrimp in a single layer. Let cook for 2 minutes. Try not to move the shrimp too much, let them develop a sear and then flip to sear the other side for an additional minute. The shrimp should be half-cooked. Remove the half-cooked shrimp to a bowl and set aside.

3. Keep the pan on the stove and add the beaten egg to the pan, stirring constantly to fry quickly. Remove cooked egg to the same bowl as the shrimp.

4. Turn the heat down to medium-low and let the pan cool down a bit. Swirl in the remaining cooking oil. Add the garlic to the pan and stir fry until the garlic becomes fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the snow peas and bean sprouts and stir fry for another minute. Add the sauce to the pan from the jar. To get every bit of sauce from the jar, add a tablespoon or so of water, close lid, shake jar and pour that into the pan. Add the drained noodles into the pan. Turn the heat back up to medium-high. Stir to combine.

5. The moment the sauce begins to simmer, add the shrimp and egg back into the pan and stir fry everything until the shrimp are fully cooked through, about another minute. Add optional garnishes and serve immediately.

 

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15 Minute Udon Miso Noodle Soup http://steamykitchen.com/10361-japanese-udon-miso-noodle-soup.html http://steamykitchen.com/10361-japanese-udon-miso-noodle-soup.html#comments Mon, 19 Jul 2010 20:32:58 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=10361 Fast food Japanese style! Start to finish, this healthy and light Japanese Udon Miso Noodle Soup takes less than 15 minutes. Udon noodles are white, fat ‘n slighty chewy, wheat-based noodles from Japan. You can find them in the refrigerated section of your Asian grocery store and many regular grocery stores. They also come in dried noodle form too, but ...

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Fast food Japanese style! Start to finish, this healthy and light Japanese Udon Miso Noodle Soup takes less than 15 minutes.

Udon noodles are white, fat ‘n slighty chewy, wheat-based noodles from Japan. You can find them in the refrigerated section of your Asian grocery store and many regular grocery stores. They also come in dried noodle form too, but I prefer the fresh, already-cooked noodles. If you can’t find (or you don’t eat wheat), substitute with any type of noodles, even regular ol’ linguine noodles.

The type of mushrooms I used in the recipe is called shimeji mushrooms, or white beech mushrooms. They’re incredibly healthy, love the slightly slippery texture and these from Hokto Kinoko are grown here in the U.S. organically.

What makes this udon miso soup so flavorful is the addition of miso. Miso is fermented soybean paste, one of the main ingredients in Japanese miso soup. It’s a great staple to have in your refrigerator since there are so many recipes that use miso (Rachael’s Gyoza, Japanese Noodles with Shimeji Mushrooms, Grilled Miso Tenderloin and Sake Miso Marinated Butterfish) and the stuff lasts for about 6 months in the refrigerator.

Here’s a short video of how to make Japanese Udon Miso Noodle Soup with a great tip on what NOT to do with miso.

So this recipe is from Cat Cora’s Classics With a Twist cookbook. Cat’s been touring as part of Macy’s Culinary Council. They’ve got an A-list team of celeb chefs touring nationwide, and I highly recommend checking to see if they’ll be in your ‘hood.

Since I was in NYC when Cat was in Tampa, my assistant attended and got a chance to interview her. Coincidentally, last Thursday, I was taping a cooking segment on Daytime and guess who popped up on an satellite interview! Hoping that one day I get to meet her in person.

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Udon Miso Noodle Soup

Servings: Serves 4 Prep Time: 5 Cook Time: 10
udon-miso-noodle-soup-2805

Store fresh udon noodles in the refrigerator or in the freezer. If you don't have fresh udon noodles, you can substitute with dry pasta or dried noodles of your choice. The vegetables are up to you - keep the vegetables thinly sliced so that they cook quickly. Sliced zucchini, small broccoli florets, cabbage and even frozen corn/peas are great. I've used shimeji mushrooms from Hokto Kinoko, but you can use fresh shitake or just regular white button mushrooms.

If you are using a different kind of miso other than shiro miso (white miso) lessen the amount by a couple teaspoons. Shiro miso is the least salty and intense of all miso.

Ingredients:

One 12-ounce package fresh udon noodles (or substitute with dry pasta/noodles)
4 cups chicken or vegetable stock
1/2 cup thinly sliced carrots
1/2 cup snow peas, sliced on the diagonal
1/2 cup fresh mushrooms
2 tablespoons white miso (shiro miso)
1/2 cup green onions

Directions:

1. Cook the udon noodles according to the package directions, drain and set aside.

2. In a large saucepan, bring the stock to a boil. Lower the heat to medium and add the carrots and cook until the carrots are crisp-tender, 1 to 2 minutes. Add the snow peas and cook until slightly tender but still bright green, about 1 minute. Add the mushrooms, cook for 30 seconds and remove from the heat.

3. Spoon the miso in a medium bowl and add a ladleful of hot broth. Whisk until the miso is completely dissolved, then pour the entire miso mixture into the pot with the soup. Do not boil the soup with the miso, as the miso will become gritty. Stir in the noodles and the green onions.

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Fresh Pear and Shrimp Stir Fry Recipe http://steamykitchen.com/5594-fresh-pear-shrimp-stir-fry.html http://steamykitchen.com/5594-fresh-pear-shrimp-stir-fry.html#comments Tue, 15 Sep 2009 17:53:19 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=5594 What you’ll learn: The competitive sport of eating dim sum How to prepare T.C Choy’s Asian Bistro’s Fresh Pear and Shrimp Stir Fry Recipe Every time I’m back in Hong Kong, I head straight for a good dim sum restaurant. If you haven’t had dim sum before, it’s as close to competitive eating as I’ve ever experienced. And I’m not talking ...

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Fresh Pear and Shrimp Stir Fry Recipe

What you’ll learn:

  • The competitive sport of eating dim sum :)
  • How to prepare T.C Choy’s Asian Bistro’s Fresh Pear and Shrimp Stir Fry Recipe

Every time I’m back in Hong Kong, I head straight for a good dim sum restaurant. If you haven’t had dim sum before, it’s as close to competitive eating as I’ve ever experienced. And I’m not talking about the amount of food consumed, either. In Hong Kong, many dim sum restaurants don’t have a nice, orderly wait list, buzzing beepers or call-aheads. Instead, you start by taking a calculating, broad sweep of the entire layout, and in a split-second survey which dining guests are closest to asking for the check.

You then divide up your party, assign tables (even the kids) and plant yourself right there at the table like hungry vultures.

This signals that you are next to take that table. Not too close, because if the table considers you rude, they’d just linger at the table longer to piss you off. But not too far, because another waiting patron could come squeeze in and take claim.

The moment that the very first guest lifts his/her torso to get out of the chair, you must quickly, effectively and stealthy signal to the rest of your party to dash over and take control of the table-handoff situation. Timing is important. Because if the rest of your party doesn’t recognize your signal, too much time passes or worse yet, ANOTHER waiting party sees your signal and makes a mad dash in for a hostile takeover, you’re totally screwed. And once more than half the table is seated by hostile takeover, you have no chance in hell to get the table back, even if it was rightfully yours.

And I haven’t even gotten to the best part – since the cart-pushers are paid on commission, there’s competition for having the A+, easy-selling dishes like Shrimp Har Gow (you wouldn’t want to be stuck with Black Moss Lotus Seed Steamed Duck Tongue that only a few people would find appetizing). They even jockey for floor space with pushers teaming up to cart-block a path to a good table with hungry guests. Yes, it gets nasty.

Thank goodness we don’t have to experience that type of competitive sport here in Tampa Bay. A few weeks ago, I was shooting a television segment at Publix Greenwise and then afterwards scooted over to T.C. Choy’s Asian Bistro across the street and got to enjoy a dim-sum lunch sans vultures.

I’ve asked them for a recipe to publish, and this is a brand new one that will be part of their new menu. While it’s not a typical “dim sum” dish, it certainly is a very popular recipe from Hong Kong.

Fresh Pear and Shrimp Stir Fry Recipe

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Fresh Pear and Shrimp Stir Fry Recipe

Servings: serves 4 as side dish Prep Time: Cook Time:
pear-shrimp-stirfry-4

adapted from T.C. Choy's Asian Bistro

Ingredients:

1 whole pear, peeled, cored and cut into small wedges
4 ounces thinly sliced carrots
2 tablespoons cooking oil
4 ounces snow peas
1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger
8 ounces shrimp, peeled and deveined
1/2 teaspoon table salt
1 teaspoon sugar
2 tablespoons chicken broth
1 teaspoon cornstarch

Directions:

1. Bring a saucepan of salted water to a boil. Blanch the pear wedges and carrots for 30 seconds, then drain immediately. Pat the shrimp very dry. In a small bowl, mix together the salt, sugar, chicken broth and cornstarch. Set aside.

2. Heat a wok or large saute pan over medium-high heat. Add in the cooking oil and swirl to coat. When the oil is shimmering, add the shrimp and stir fry for 1 minute. Add the grated ginger and continue stir frying for 30 seconds. Add the peas, carrots and pears and toss well. Stir fry for 1 minute. The shrimp should be just barely cooked through.

3. Pour in the chicken broth mixture, stir and let cook for an additional minute, until shrimp is cooked through. Serve immediately.

More recipes to explore:

Garlic Ginger Shrimp Stir Fry (Steamy Kitchen)

Green Beans with Chinese Preserved Radish Stir Fry (Steamy Kitchen)

Chinese Broccoli Beef Noodle Stir Fry (Steamy Kitchen)

Stir Fried Beef and Nectarines (Steamy Kitchen)

Green Bean and Shiitake Mushroom Stir Fry (Steamy Kitchen)

Stir Fried Shrimp, Eggs and Peas + Stir Fry Secrets (Steamy Kitchen)

Stir Fry Chicken and Vegetables (All Recipes)

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Long Life Fertility Noodles Recipe with Happy Shrimp http://steamykitchen.com/316-long-life-fertility-noodles-with-happy-shrimp.html http://steamykitchen.com/316-long-life-fertility-noodles-with-happy-shrimp.html#comments Wed, 14 May 2008 12:26:51 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/?p=316     The Chinese culture is filled with food traditions and symbolisms, so much in fact that I could never keep up and remember them all. During the entire 6 days surrounding my wedding, I deferred to my mother to tell me what to eat to please the Gods of good fortune and fertility. Oh, did I want to have ...

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Long Life Fertility Noodles Recipe with Happy Shrimp

 

 

The Chinese culture is filled with food traditions and symbolisms, so much in fact that I could never keep up and remember them all. During the entire 6 days surrounding my wedding, I deferred to my mother to tell me what to eat to please the Gods of good fortune and fertility. Oh, did I want to have some grapes? I had to eat five of them, not one less because that number that I must not utter, one less than five, means something bad in Chinese. In fact, I am choosing each and every word very carefully in this column so that in case YOU are the one getting married, I do not want to be blamed for any misfortune!

My wedding with Scott was a nice blend of his culture (Scottish-German) and mine. We exchanged vows at Pebble Beach’s legendary 18th hole (ok, Scott just corrected me and said “fairway” not “hole” because I don’t think they’d let 10 pairs of three-inch stilettos aerate the baby-soft skinny grass at the hole), but included Chinese customs throughout the entire week

One custom that we opted out of was serving a whole roast suckling pig at the wedding banquet. According to the Chinese, the pig symbolizes the virginity of the bride, and um, you know where I’m going with that. I say, no sense in pretending or misrepping what is not true, because that would be a lousy way to begin a marriage! Plus, where the heck would we find a whole suckling pig in the middle of a gucci golf resort? Can you even imagine the chef struggling to fit the fat pig on his fancy rotisserie grill?

There is one tradition that I would like to share with you, eating noodles. For birthdays, new year and weddings, noodles are served to represent long life. Don’t be tempted to cut the noodles, or you’ll be “cutting your life short.” You may not be Chinese, but really, there’s no harm in covering all your bases. I mean, who knows what deity drew the short straw and was appointed to be in charge something so boring like “lifespan?”

So, I created this Long Life Fertility Noodles Recipe that covered all your important bases – sort of cramming in as much good fortune as possible on one plate. The sesame seeds and pea pods in the noodles symbolize fertility (remember, if you don’t want children, substitute with any greens, bean sprouts or sliced bamboo shoots.) Shrimp, in Chinese, is pronounced “haa” which sounds like laughter, and may your marriage be full of happiness.

And of course, this column has 688 words, my way of wishing you a smooth path to double prosperity.

Long Life Fertility Noodles Recipe with Happy Shrimp

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My Photo Setup

Long Life Fertility Noodles Recipe with Happy Shrimp - Photo Setup

This was a simple setup, with the big glass window the the right. Yup, that’s my kid’s breakfast table that I’m using. I’ve been noticing that both Bon Appetit and Gourmet magazines have been lots of overhead shots of food. Not a style that I’m fond of – the food isn’t as intimate and you lose a lot of texture from above. But, I wanted to try it and see on this dish.

Take a look at the second photo (above) Do you know how (*&$!!%! hard it was to stand on an itty bitty stool and balance while holding camera still enough to focus? Half my shots were blurry! heehee!

And yes, I know I could have just put the entire thing on the floor and used my tripod…but at that moment in time, I just wasn’t smart enough to think of that. Plus, that was going to be our dinner and who know what random toy airplane, spaceship or car would roll right over the food. Usually, when a toy car goes whizzing by, 2 pairs of pitter patter bare feet are chasing it.

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Long Life Fertility Noodles Recipe with Happy Shrimp

Servings: Yields 2 auspicious servings Prep Time: Cook Time:
2491506182_8472a73107

Ingredients:

6 ounces thin spaghetti noodles
7 ounces shrimp, deveined
1 ½ teaspoon kosher or sea salt, divided
½ teaspoon cornstarch
1 tablespoon cooking oil
1 teaspoon finely minced garlic
1/4 cup snow peas, sliced thin on diagonal
1/4 cup matchstick cut carrots
1 1/2 teaspoons soy sauce
1 teaspoon Chinese rice wine (or dry sherry)
1/4 teaspoon sesame oil
1 tablespoon sesame seeds

Directions:

Bring a stockpot of water to boil. Add 1 tsp of salt to water and cook thin spaghetti, according to package directions. Drain. While pasta is cooking, place shrimp in a small bowl and add the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and the cornstarch. Mix well and let sit for 8 minutes. Rinse the shrimp well, washing off the salt and cornstarch. Pat very dry with paper towels.

In a wok or large skillet, heat cooking oil on high until a bead of water sizzles and evaporates upon contact. Add the shrimp and fry until halfway cooked through, about 1 minute each side. Dish out the shrimp to a plate, keeping as much oil in wok as possible (you should have about 1 teaspoon of oil left and you may add an just a bit of oil into the pan if needed.)

Turn heat down to medium and add garlic. Fry until fragrant, about 15 seconds then add the snow peas and carrots. Fry for 1 minute, until the carrots and snow peas are cooked but still retain a nice crunch. Add the soy sauce and rice wine. Turn heat to high and add the drained spaghetti noodles and shrimp. Toss well to combine. Let cook for 2 minutes, until shrimp is cooked through. Toss with sesame oil and sesame seeds.

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