Steamy Kitchen Recipes | RSS Feed http://steamykitchen.com Steamy Kitchen Food Blog: fast recipes, simple recipes, with fresh ingredients to create delicious meals. Tue, 21 Jul 2015 18:52:51 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.2 Leftover Turkey Recipe: Halal Cart Style Turkey and Rice with White Sauce http://steamykitchen.com/19511-leftover-turkey-recipe-halal-cart-style-turkey-and-rice-with-white-sauce.html http://steamykitchen.com/19511-leftover-turkey-recipe-halal-cart-style-turkey-and-rice-with-white-sauce.html#comments Mon, 21 Nov 2011 18:39:51 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=19511 A recipe just like the Chicken and Rice served on Halal Carts in Midtown Manhattan, but using leftover turkey instead!

The post Leftover Turkey Recipe: Halal Cart Style Turkey and Rice with White Sauce appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>

My parents will be visiting for a week, they arrive a little later this afternoon. This morning, I headed over to the supermarket to stock up on breakfast items, snacks and stuff for dinner tonight. As I was walking up and down the aisles, I thought, “hmmm, wouldn’t it be a fun idea to buy all the stuff that Mom and Dad *wouldn’t* let us buy when we were kids!???”

Ho-Ho’s!
Ding Dongs!
Spongy white bread!
Doritos NOT on sale!
Brand-name cereals!
4 different kinds of ice cream, NOT on sale!
Choco-Tacos!

My shopping cart was like the mecca of junk food and the hottie bag-boy was like, “You having a party?! Who’s comin’ over!?”

“Uh, my parents.”

Yeah, that’s hot.

I didn’t realize until I got home that my parents aren’t going to touch this junk food (I did end up buying Grape Nuts and nonfat plain yogurt for their breakfast); and I certainly won’t be able to eat all this junk food by myself.

Which means, my BOYS will be eating all that nasty sugar.

But wait….that goes against my house rules and all the hard work training the boys not to buy things not on sale or brand-name cereal because the generic ones in the bag are just the same.

Oh.

***

Those of you here just for the recipe, I’m sorry you had to read through my self-therapy just now :-)

If you’ve visited Midtown Manhattan, you must have seen the food carts featuring Halal-style chicken and rice. Moist, savory chicken pieces are cooked right on the cart griddle, deftly chopped with the side edge of the long, wide metal spatula. The edges of the chicken near that crunchy-crispy-fried stage and then tossed with a white, tangy sauce. This is served over golden-colored and cumin-spiced rice with a side of salad and wedge of flatbread.

The lines at lunch can be excrutiatingly long, as the delicious smell of the chicken being grilled can travel far and wide.

A recipe for Halal Chicken and Rice with White Sauce comes from Serious Eats’ brand new book, Serious Eats A Comprehensive Guide to Making & Eating Delicious Food Wherever You Are. (whew…that was a long title)

But I’m not going to give you *that* recipe just yet – today is about hacking this recipe to use your leftover Thanksgiving turkey – because we all know that next week you’ll quickly tire of turkey sandwiches.

 

Ground Turmeric may be an ingredient you’re not familiar with –

Yum
Print

Halal Cart Style Turkey and Rice with White Sauce Recipe

Servings: 4-6 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 30 minutes
Halal Cart Style Turkey with Rice and White Sauce Recipe

Adapted from Serious Eats Cookbook

-If turkey's not your thing, try this with cooked rotisserie style chicken.
-If you can't find Harissa-style hot sauce, regular ol' Tabasco will sub just fine. Serious Eats suggests to toaste the pita or flatbread, but I prefer my flatbread soft and warmed through via the microwave instead. To keep the bread steaming hot (i.e. not dried out), I wrap them in a barely damp towel and then put them in the microwave.
-For Gluten-Free, substitute with GF flatbread of your choice.
-For a healthier version, substitute light olive oil for the butter and use non-fat Greek yogurt and low-fat mayonnaise (or skip the mayo altogether and use Greek yogurt only)

Ingredients:

FOR THE RICE
2 tablespoons butter
1/2 teaspoon ground turmeric
1/4 teaspoon ground cumin
1 1/2 cups long grain or Basmati rice
2 1/2 cups chicken broth
salt and pepper
FOR THE WHITE SAUCE
1/2 cup mayonnaise
1/2 cup Greek yogurt
1 tablespoon sugar
2 tablespoons white vinegar
1 teaspoon lemon juice
1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley
salt and pepper
FOR THE TURKEY
2 tablespoons butter
1/2 onion, thinly sliced
1/2 cup turkey drippings (or chicken broth)
2 pounds cooked, leftover turkey, shredded
TO SERVE
1/2 head iceberg lettuce, shredded
1 large tomato, cut into wedges
1/2 red onion, thinly sliced
flatbread or pita bread, cut into wedges
Harissa-style hot sauce (or hot sauce of your choice, like Tabasco)

Directions:

1. To cook the Rice: Melt the butter over medium heat in a large pot. Add the turmeric and cumin and cook 1 minute. Add the rice and stir to coat. Cook, stirring freqently, until the rice is lightly toasted, about 4 minutes. Add the chicken broth, season to taste with salt and pepper. Raise the heat to high and bring to boil. Cover, reduce to simmer and cook for 15 minutes without disturbing. Remove from heat, keeping the cover on, and let rest for 5 minutes.

2. For the White Sauce, combine all the ingredients together.

3. For the Turkey, heat a large saute pan or frying pan over medium-high heat with the butter. When bubbling, add in the onion and cook for 5 minutes. Pour in the turkey drippings (or chicken broth) and bring to simmer. Add in the leftover turkey and cook for 1 minute just to warm through. Remove from heat, stir in 1/2 of the White Sauce.

4. Wrap the stack of pita bread or flatbread in damp towel. Microwave on medium for 60 seconds to soften and heat through.

5. To serve, divide the lettice, tomato and red onion amongst each plate. Spoon rice onto each plate and top with the turkey. Add a spoonful of the remaining White Sauce onto each plate (you can use this as salad dressing for the salad or just spoon on top of the turkey). Serve with Harissa-style hot sauce.

About Serious Eats book:

(from back cover)

“Ed Levine and the editors of food blog SeriousEats.com bring you the first Serious Eats book, a celebration of America’s favorite foods, from pizza to barbecue, tacos to sliders, doughnuts to egg sandwiches, and much more. Serious Eats crackles with the energy and conviction that has made the website the passionate, discerning authority on all things delicious since its inception in 2006.

Are you a Serious Eater?

1. Do you plan your day around what you might eat?
2. When you are heading somewhere, anywhere, will you go out of your way to eat something delicious?
3. When you daydream, do you often find yourself thinking about food?
4. Do you live to eat, rather than eat to live?
5. Have you strained relationships with friends or family by dictating the food itinerary—changing everyone’s plans to try a potentially special burger or piece of pie?

Ed Levine, whom Ruth Reichl calls the “missionary of the delicious,” and his SeriousEats.com editors present their unique take on iconic foods made and served around the country. From house-cured, hand-cut corned beef sandwiches at Jake’s in Milwaukee to fried-to-order doughnuts at Shipley’s Do-Nuts in Houston; from fresh clam pizza at Zuppardi’s Pizzeria in West Haven, Connecticut, to Green Eggs and Ham at Huckleberry Bakery and Café in Los Angeles, Serious Eats is a veritable map of some of the best food they have eaten nationwide.

Covering fast food, family-run restaurants, food trucks, and four-star dining establishments, all with zero snobbery, there is plenty here for every food lover, from coast to coast and everywhere in between. Featuring 400 of the Serious Eats team’s greatest food finds and 50 all-new recipes, this is your must-read manual for the pursuit of a tasty life.

You’ll learn not only where to go for the best grub, but also how to make the food you crave right in your own kitchen, with original recipes including Neapolitan Pizza (and dough), the Ultimate Sliders (which were invented in Kansas), Caramel Sticky Buns, Southern Fried Chicken, the classic Reuben, and Triple-Chocolate Adult Brownies. You’ll also hone your Serious Eater skills with tips that include signs of deliciousness, regional style guides (think pizza or barbecue), and Ed’s hypotheses—ranging from the Cuban sandwich theory to the Pizza Cognition Theory—on what makes a perfect bite.”

Buy Serious Eats book on Amazon for $18.15

The post Leftover Turkey Recipe: Halal Cart Style Turkey and Rice with White Sauce appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/19511-leftover-turkey-recipe-halal-cart-style-turkey-and-rice-with-white-sauce.html/feed 17
Leftover Turkey Recipe: Turkey Gumbo http://steamykitchen.com/19344-turkey-gumbo-leftover-thanksgiving-turkey-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/19344-turkey-gumbo-leftover-thanksgiving-turkey-recipe.html#comments Wed, 16 Nov 2011 14:00:42 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=19344 Use your leftover Thanksgiving turkey to make this simple Turkey Gumbo Recipe!

The post Leftover Turkey Recipe: Turkey Gumbo appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>

I know it’s a little early to think about Thanksgiving leftovers, but believe me, time goes by so crazy fast! Once the big meal is over, even after the late-night refrigerator raid (you sneak in and pick at the turkey in the refrigerator too, right?!), we’ll always have more than enough leftover turkey for Turkey Gumbo.

Since Thanksgiving is such a big, heavy dinner, I created this recipe with restraint in mind.  It’s a lighter, milder version of gumbo than what you may be used to, a little more broth-y and no mouth-burning cayenne pepper or hot sauce, since the little kids will be enjoying this too (but feel free to douse your version with as much hot chili pepper as you like!)

While the ingredient list may look long, it is ingredients that you’ll probably have on hand anyways from cooking Thanksgiving meal. Leftover turkey meat is stirred into the gumbo at the end, just to heat through. The slow-simmered, richly flavored Turkey Gumbo served over steaming hot rice may just break the monotony of leftover turkey sandwiches this year for you too.

Making the Roux for Turkey Gumbo

Roux is cooking fat+flour over low heat to create a nutty thickener used in much of Southern cooking. It’s a simple, essential step for the gumbo, but takes a little patience as you have to cook the roux over low heat and stir frequently.

Traditional recipes call for 1:1 ratio of fat to flour, but I’ve found that I could use less fat and still achieve the same results, though I think Paula Deen would heartily disagree with me.

I like using butter as my fat, it’s the the most flavor — uh — unless you want to use bacon drippings (yay!) or even lard (double-yay!).

4 tablespoons of butter + 6 tablespoons all purpose flour. For gluten-free version, many have recommended using potato starch or rice flour.

Use a heavy-bottomed pot for best results. Thin pots = more likihood for burned roux. Once the butter starts bubblin’ a bit, sprinkle in the flour and stir.

Stir until the flour is totally incorporated. I use a silicone rubber spatula – here’s why: I’m not patient enough to stand over the stove constantly stirring nonstop. So I leave the silicone spatula in the pot – it doesn’t burn nor does it get hot. Every 30-40 seconds or so, I’ll stir. In the meantime, I’m choppin’ vegetables on a cutting board right next to the stove.

After a nearly 10 minutes, it will look smooth and the color of peanut butter. This is where I stop. By this time not only am I bored to tears, but a lighter roux makes a lighter gumbo. Feel free to keep cookin’ the roux if you have nothing else to do!

I’ve got onions, celery, green pepper, smoked sausage and whatever bits and pieces of vegetable I have in the refrigerator, basically any unused vegetables (like carrots, red bell pepper) from cooking Thanksgiving dinner.

Everything gets s simmered with a can of tomatoes and chicken broth for an hour or so.

In goes the frozen (no need to defrost) or fresh okra

and at the end, stir in the cooked, leftover turkey

Serve over rice. Isn’t this Turkey Gumbo better than your 48th turkey sandwich!?? Serve over rice!

Yum
Print

Turkey Gumbo Recipe (with leftover Thanksgiving turkey)

Servings: 8 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 1 hour
Turkey Gumbo Recipe

Don't worry about the long ingredient list, most of the ingredients are things you'll have in your refrigerator anyways, from cooking Thanksgiving feast! For gluten-free Turkey Gumbo, use rice flour, corn flour or potato starch in place of the flour.

Ingredients:

4 tablespoons butter
6 tablespoons all-purpose flour
2 bell peppers, diced
2 stalks celery, diced
1 onion, diced
5 cloves garlic, minced
2 bay leaves
1/2 teaspoon each: dried oregano, dried thyme
One 14-ounce can diced tomatoes
1 pound kielbasa, smoked or polish sausage, cut into bite-sized pieces
1 quart chicken or vegetable broth
8 cups water
2-3 cups frozen or fresh okra
2 cups cooked, shredded leftover turkey
salt and pepper to taste
small handful fresh parsley, chopped
cooked rice

Directions:

Heat a large stockpot with the butter over medium heat. When the butter begins to bubble a bit, use a whisk or wooden spoon to add in the flour, a little at a time. Continue stirring for a 2 minutes, until the flour is fully incorporated into the butter. Turn the heat to low and cook for 10 minutes, stirring every 30 seconds or so, until the roux has turned into the color of peanut butter. Make sure that the roux does not burn - stay close by!

Return heat to medium and add in the bell peppers, celery and onion and cook for 5 minutes. Add in the garlic and cook another minute or so until fragrant. Add in the bay leaves, oregano, thyme, tomatoes, smoked sausage, broth and water. Bring to a boil and let simmer for 1 hour.

Add in the okra, cook 2 minutes, then add in the cooked turkey. Taste and season with salt and pepper. Stir in chopped parsley. Serve over cooked rice.

The post Leftover Turkey Recipe: Turkey Gumbo appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/19344-turkey-gumbo-leftover-thanksgiving-turkey-recipe.html/feed 23
Thai Basil Turkey Wraps http://steamykitchen.com/12154-thai-basil-turkey-wraps.html http://steamykitchen.com/12154-thai-basil-turkey-wraps.html#comments Tue, 23 Nov 2010 17:35:11 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=12154 Another great leftover Thanksgiving turkey recipe. Comes together in 10 minutes!

The post Thai Basil Turkey Wraps appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>

I recently took a trip to The Pampered Chef headquarters in Chicago to host their first ever live online cooking show featuring holiday recipes and decor tips. I had great fun, thousands of people watched online and here is one of the recipes that we made on the show.

The original recipe calls for chicken, but since I know that you’ll have plenty of turkey leftover from Thanksgiving, this is a great way to use them!

Yum
Print

Thai Basil Turkey Lettuce Wraps

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 5 minutes Cook Time: 5 minutes
Thai-Basil-Chicken-Lettuce-Wrap

Recipe adapted from The Pampered Chef. Bottled poppy seed salad dressing gets the flavorful peanut sauce off to a running start for these refreshing wraps.

Ingredients:

FOR THE PEANUT SAUCE
3 tablespoons dry-roasted peanuts, chopped
2 tablespoons chopped fresh basil, chopped
1/2 cup store-bought poppy seed salad dressing
1 tablespoon light soy sauce
1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger root
1 clove garlic, finely minced
2 tablespoons rice vinegar
2 tablespoons water
FOR THE SALAD
1 cucumber
1/2 medium red bell pepper
3 cups shredded cooked turkey
8 large Boston or bibb lettuce leavesAdditional chopped peanuts and chopped fresh basil (optional)

Directions:

1. Combine peanuts, basil, dressing, vinegar and water in a small bowl; set aside.

2. For salad, peel cucumber; slice into julienne strips, avoiding seeds. Slice bell pepper into thin strips. Shred chicken; toss with half of the sauce. Set remaining sauce aside for dipping.

3. To serve, divide cucumber among lettuce leaves. Spoon turkey mixture over cucumber. Top with bell pepper. Garnish wraps with additional peanuts and basil, if desired. Serve with remaining peanut sauce.

 

 

The post Thai Basil Turkey Wraps appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/12154-thai-basil-turkey-wraps.html/feed 3
Back to School Ideas http://steamykitchen.com/10912-back-to-school-ideas.html http://steamykitchen.com/10912-back-to-school-ideas.html#comments Wed, 18 Aug 2010 15:36:32 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=10912 I’ve got 9 Back to School breakfast, lunch and snack ideas – head over to my guest post on Bon Appetit’s site! Oh and pssst….I’m also featured on Saveur.com for Marcella Hazan’s Simple Tomato Sauce recipe.

The post Back to School Ideas appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>

I’ve got 9 Back to School breakfast, lunch and snack ideas – head over to my guest post on Bon Appetit’s site!

Oh and pssst….I’m also featured on Saveur.com for Marcella Hazan’s Simple Tomato Sauce recipe.

The post Back to School Ideas appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/10912-back-to-school-ideas.html/feed 20
Hello, crispy skin. http://steamykitchen.com/6708-thanksgiving-2009.html http://steamykitchen.com/6708-thanksgiving-2009.html#comments Fri, 27 Nov 2009 13:09:33 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=6708 We’re in K-k-k-kansas, celebrating the holiday at my brother, Jay’s new home. I’m dressed in every bit of warm clothing that I own and have decided that the down comforter doesn’t look so bad at all as a cape. The kids loved the cool weather and the massive backyard. Nice for running around and playing…but THERE’S NOWHERE TO HIDE! Gotcha! ...

The post Hello, crispy skin. appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
We’re in K-k-k-kansas, celebrating the holiday at my brother, Jay’s new home. I’m dressed in every bit of warm clothing that I own and have decided that the down comforter doesn’t look so bad at all as a cape.

The kids loved the cool weather and the massive backyard.

thanksgiving-2009-039

Nice for running around and playing…but THERE’S NOWHERE TO HIDE!

thanksgiving-2009-041

Gotcha!

thanksgiving-2009-042

This is my bachelor brother. He’s handsome, a doctor and available. He even cooks too.

thanksgiving-2009-049

Jay’s making spaghetti squash. How can you not love a man who cooks spaghetti squash!???

thanksgiving-2009-047

Every year, it’s tradition that my husband deep fries a turkey for Thanksgiving at our home and since we’re in Kansas this year, I asked Jay if he’d like a deep fried turkey for dinner which would guarantee a perfect turkey or we could experiment with smoking a turkey in a grill.

Jay has just moved from his posh Los Angeles condo and as a bachelor who’s lived in small, urban space for the past 10 years, his only appliance for outdoor cooking was a mini grill with a propane tank the size of a small fire extinguisher. It would cook a quail nicely. But not a turkey.

So, I told Jay to buy simple turkey deep fryer.

But my brother is not a simple gadget man. His refrigerator TALKS. His coffee machine has so many knobs and buttons that it looks like an airplane cockpit instrument panel.

He bought one of those infrared no-oil turkey fryer contraptions. I was highly suspicious of the thing — especially with an appliance named “The Big Easy” and had really wished Jay would have just gotten the big vat of oil because the whole entire goal of cooking a turkey is CRISPY SKIN. I could care less about the meat. I WANT MY CRISPY SKIN.

All morning and afternoon I was so nervous and distracted about this turkey cooker and the fact that I might not get the crispy skin that I accidentally cut my finger pretty deep. But no worries. My brother is a first-class doctor, double major and past cardiology fellow. Surely he would be able to fix this problem with his fancy at-home medical kit.

Dr. Jay. YOUR FIRST-AID KIT SUCKS DONKEY ASS.

first aid kit

Seriously. This was all he had at home.

Scott said I might need stitches, but since we had more pressing matters to tend to…like cooking a Thanksgiving dinner for 14 guests, I opted to bandage the hell outta the finger and saran-wrap it.

Dr. Jay assured me that dinner guests would include a medical clinic administrator, family doctor,  a surgeon and an oncologist.

Onward with dinner making.

So, it’s 4pm, the turkey has been in the suspicious contraption for 45 minutes. It looks exactly the same as when it came out of the refrigerator.

thanksgiving-2009-052

Check again at 70 minutes….

thanksgiving-2009-069

Now I’m getting a bit freaked out.

Check at 100 minutes (with 40 minutes left to go):

thanksgiving-2009-073

SHITSHITSHIT!!!!

Sun is setting…getting dark…guests will be arriving soon…

Well at least the wingtips are cooked through. 2 wingtips divided by 14 hungry people = no chance that me and my lame finger would stand a chance fighting for a bite.

I hide back in the kitchen. Too scared to look again.

40 minutes later…times up. I see my husband go outside to get the turkey. I’m fretting. Start calculating how long it would take if I just hijack the turkey and stick in the oven. Realized that eating a oven-roasted turkey at 11pm would be a no-go.

Door opens back again…and Scott presents….THE TURKEY!!!! (sidenote: for Christmas, I need to get my brother a MANLY oven mitt. No man should ever have to wear this, especially when frying infrared’ing a turkey. Oh yes, and I’m also getting him a real first aid kit.)

thanksgiving-2009-077

Cooked through perfectly. Infrared thingy….I’m so sorry I ever doubted you.

thanksgiving-2009-079

Hello, CRISPY SKIN!!!!!

thanksgiving-2009-083

Dinner was a success – and only after our meal, after the plates were cleared – did I present to my personal Thanksgiving medical team of 4 doctors and a medical clinic administrator….my lame finger.

They all hovered around, examined, consulted, debated….stiches? amputation? radiation? finger transplant?

and after 40 minutes, they all came to a consensus that I should continue to use a band-aid and ointment.

It should heal fine.

My brother’s lame first-aid kit was really all that was needed.

And then I was presented with a bill for $827.00 (JUST KIDDING!!!!)

***

Martha Stewart Holiday Gift Guide

has just launched! The fine people at MS asked me to contribute my favorite gift ideas along with Etsy, Design Mom, Modern Cat, Black Eiffel, Desire to Inspire and Momologie.

Come see our picks!

martha-stewart-gift-guide

***

The Day After Good Eats

If you’ve kept the turkey bones — make Turkey Congee (Chinese Rice Porridge)!

turkey-congee

The post Hello, crispy skin. appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/6708-thanksgiving-2009.html/feed 57
Sweet and Sour Chicken http://steamykitchen.com/1431-sweet-and-sour-chicken.html http://steamykitchen.com/1431-sweet-and-sour-chicken.html#comments Thu, 18 Sep 2008 14:39:24 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/?p=1431 When Elise asked me to be a guest writer for Simply Recipes, we decided to take Chinese favorites and make them better, lighter and easier to cook at home. So, I grabbed a take-out menu from the local Chinese restaurant and I will be working my way around those recipes for you. The first dish that popped out was Sweet ...

The post Sweet and Sour Chicken appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/sweet-sour-chicken.jpg

When Elise asked me to be a guest writer for Simply Recipes, we decided to take Chinese favorites and make them better, lighter and easier to cook at home. So, I grabbed a take-out menu from the local Chinese restaurant and I will be working my way around those recipes for you. The first dish that popped out was Sweet and Sour Chicken.

If there’s one thing that I detest, it’s greasy fried food covered in goopy Chinese take-out sauce. Okay, so sometimes I like that stuff, but it usually those cravings come at 3 o’clock a.m. during a certain time of the month.

But, I digress.

This recipe for Sweet and Sour Chicken doesn’t deep fry, but instead uses a method for creating a delicate, smooth and succulent chicken that goes perfectly with a lighter sweet and sour sauce. The secret is in the chicken marinade, specifically using egg white and cornstarch, which creates a super-light coating all around the chicken. It won’t be a crunchy, deep fried coating, but I think it’s a nice alternative, both texture-wise and weight-wise!

Read the rest of the recipe for Sweet and Sour Chicken over at Simply Recipes

***

My Spontaneous Los Angeles Trip

Last week, I took a spontaneous trip to LA to shoot a little video that was sent off to a television station. Got an email on Thursday and flew out Monday to see Diane and Todd of White on Rice Couple, two of the most generous and talented people I know. Big hugs to them as they are in Vietnam making a documentary at the moment. Diane is my date to a week in Ixtapa, Mexico to Club Med for their Food and Wine festival!!! Yes, our husbands are jealous.

It was one of my most memorable trips – dinner with Matt and his partner Adam of Matt Bites (who was on Martha Stewart yesterday — cooking with Martha herself! Did you see?) All the pics of that evening are on Diane’s camera…which is in the jungles of Vietnam at the moment…so we’ll have to wait til she gets back.

Also met up with my “sister-in-blog” RasaMalaysia and Sarah of The Delicious Life and Tastespotting. WHY DO WE NOT HAVE PHOTOS OF THIS AWESOME NIGHT??? All of us had cameras, but no pics? WTF!!!

And here’s my baby brother, Jay. He’s 32 years old, a doctor (cardiologist) and moving to Wichita, Kansas next year to take job at a clinic.

HE’S SINGLE. HANDSOME. A DOCTOR. NO ARREST RECORD.

To apply, please send $25 $100 (brother sez i’m too cheap) in a self addressed stamped envelope…haha…just kidding! oknoimnot

Jay

The post Sweet and Sour Chicken appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/1431-sweet-and-sour-chicken.html/feed 39
Martin Yan carves a chicken in 18 seconds! http://steamykitchen.com/359-martin-yan-carves-a-chicken-in-18-seconds.html http://steamykitchen.com/359-martin-yan-carves-a-chicken-in-18-seconds.html#comments Mon, 26 May 2008 18:52:14 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/?p=359 Watch a video of Martin Yan carving a chicken in 18 seconds!

The post Martin Yan carves a chicken in 18 seconds! appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>

Martin Yan carves a chicken in 18 seconds! from Jaden Hair on Vimeo.

Come see his recipe, Pan Seared Steak Rolls Pan Seared Steak Rolls

The post Martin Yan carves a chicken in 18 seconds! appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/359-martin-yan-carves-a-chicken-in-18-seconds.html/feed 23
Ginger, Coriander & Orange Braised Chicken http://steamykitchen.com/256-ginger-coriander-and-orange-braised-chicken-free-drawing.html http://steamykitchen.com/256-ginger-coriander-and-orange-braised-chicken-free-drawing.html#comments Tue, 26 Feb 2008 16:13:57 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/2008/02/26/ginger-coriander-and-orange-braised-chicken-free-drawing/ Inspired by flipping through Nigel Slater's Appetite which has been sitting on my desk for the past 2 weeks because I can't stop looking at it. I love his style of cooking - "a small handful of crabmeat per person" "ginger root - a small lump." Nigel's book teaches you how to improvise an...

The post Ginger, Coriander & Orange Braised Chicken appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
Ginger, Coriander & Orange Braised Chicken

I teased about this awesome package that I got and asked for several testers to help out with product testing. Thank you to the 15 testers to responded! I sent each of them 1-3 samples of tsp spices, and they each cooked with the spice and gave me a short 2 sentence review.

You guys rock.

What is tsp?

tsp spices are organic spices in perfectly measured, freshly sealed, single-use packages. Each tin comes with 12 spice packets – each 1 tsp of the spice. Their products, “packets of pure adventure,” make measuring spoons obsolete and also protect spices from light and air to ensure freshness and the fullest flavor. A reprieve from spice cabinet chaos, these one-teaspoon spice packets are stored in tin cans that look great displayed on the kitchen counter, which makes them a perfect gift for home cooks.

Dried spices lose their potency after 6-12 months and the more light and air that gets exposed to the spice, the shorter the shelf life. Simply put, if you’ve still got that ground ginger in the back of your pantry, inherited from old Aunt Martha, your food is gonna taste like…well…crusty Aunt Martha. Nasty. I love the concept of tsp, because I only open what I need. the rest stays fresh and sealed.

TSP Spices

(photo from tsp spices)

Such fancy packaging…are they expensive?

$7-$9 a box (12 tsp per box) – which is about 30% more than I pay for non-organic supermarket spice. However, I’ve learned something this year. Rather than go find the best deal possible, I’ve decided that I want to buy less and splurge on things that are beautiful, lovely to use and good for my family. I want to really savor and enjoy the things I have in my home, especially in the kitchen. Let me tell you, these spices are gorgeous.

Actually, when I first opened the package, I said out loud to Scott, “Damn. All this packaging – so wasteful! What’s the point of organic spices if you’re going to waste earth’s resources for the packaging?”

And of course, Scott replied, “Stop bitching. Reuse the boxes.” So now my boys’ matchbox cars smell like Oregano.

read on….I’m giving some tsp spice tins away!!!

What did I make with the tsp spices?

The most awesome braised chicken ever. Oranges, garlic, and a blend of tsp ginger and coriander.

Oranges, garlic and spices

Ginger, Coriander and Orange Braised Chicken

Inspired by flipping through Nigel Slater’s Appetite which has been sitting on my desk for the past 2 weeks because I can’t stop looking at it. I love his style of cooking – “a small handful of crabmeat per person” “ginger root – a small lump.” Nigel’s book teaches you how to improvise and create a dish all your own. Forget following recipes word-for-word, he gives you a template and teaches you which flavor combinations work well and when is it done.

Each recipe also has variations at the end. The “Chicken, Garlic and Herbs” recipe (this is the recipe my Ginger, Coriander and Orange Braised Chicken is based on) has options for:

  • a buttery finish
  • a creamy finish
  • use this same recipe to cook lamb with garlic and lemon
  • or even pork steaks with apple and creme

Anyways, I highly recommend this book. And hey, if Jamie Oliver says, “Nigel is a genius” then I’m totally sold.

You can substitute skin-on chicken breasts for thigh. Cut back the simmer time just a bit as the breast will cook faster than the bone-in thigh. Best to check it around the 17 minute mark, timing really will depend on how big and thick your breasts are.

6 chicken thighs, skin-on
1 oranges, cut into 8 wedges
6 cloves garlic, smashed with side of cleaver
1 tsp ground ginger
1 tsp ground coriander
2 tsp kosher salt
fresh ground pepper
1/2 cup white wine
2 1/2 tsp soy sauce
cilantro to garnish

In a small bowl, combine the ginger, coriander, salt and pepper. Season chicken on both sides with the spice mixture. Let sit at room temperature for 30 minutes or overnight in the refrigerator. In large dutch oven or deep skillet, heat 1 tbl olive oil on high heat. When hot, place the chicken, skin side down to brown for 1-2 minutes. Turn skin side up. Turn heat to low, throw in garlic and 4 orange sections (give a nice squeeze as you throw them in to get the juice in the pan). Add wine. Cover and simmer on gentle, low heat for 25 minutes or until chicken is cooked through. Remove chicken to plate, leaving the sauce in the pan. Remove and discard oranges, and add the remaining fresh orange wedges. Turn heat to medium-high and add soy sauce. Cook for 3 minutes until thickened. Pour on top of chicken, garnish with fresh cilantro.

Free tsp spices

Free TSP Spices

Really! Just for you! tsp is sending me 3 twin packs. So, 3 lucky ducks will get a beautiful set of spices.

How to enter

Just comment below and tell me what is your favorite spice combination? That’s it! If you want to link to one of your recipes, feel free to link away.

Contest is open until Saturday March 1st at 10pm est. I’ll take entries up until then and we’ll pick 3 winners using the nifty random number generator.

That’s it! Good luck!

My tester’s reviews

are on the next page!

The post Ginger, Coriander & Orange Braised Chicken appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/256-ginger-coriander-and-orange-braised-chicken-free-drawing.html/feed 252
Roast Chicken with Sweet Plum Sauce http://steamykitchen.com/209-roast-chicken-with-sweet-plum-sauce.html http://steamykitchen.com/209-roast-chicken-with-sweet-plum-sauce.html#comments Wed, 28 Nov 2007 15:53:20 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/2007/11/28/roast-chicken-with-sweet-plum-sauce/ As you can tell, I’m going through a de-cluttering phase, basically purging my home because I know that in order to make room for shiny new crap I have to get rid of all the old crap and tschotchkes , which I think is Yiddish for “shit I don’t need.” Ok, really, my husband threatened to withhold all of my holiday gifts until I go clean my room and stop unnecessary ...

The post Roast Chicken with Sweet Plum Sauce appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
Roast Chicken with Sweet Plum Sauce

As you can tell, I’m going through a de-cluttering phase, basically purging my home because I know that in order to make room for shiny new crap I have to get rid of all the old crap and tschotchkes , which I think is Yiddish for “shit I don’t need.” Ok, really, my husband threatened to fwithhold all of my holiday gifts until I go clean my room and stop unnecessary purchases.

I don’t label myself a compulsive shopper because that would require medication and an extra monthly expense that I’d just rather spend on alcohol. Let’s just call it “model consumerist and creative cabinet stuffer.”….continued…

The process of clearing house required prep work, so I consulted Martha Stewart, 5 books and purchased $189.22 of organizing supplies. I even bought an appropriate outfit to get the job done, because you can’t accurately guess exactly where the crap ends and how long it will take. I wanted to be sure I was adequately dressed for sun, rain, sleet and the Armageddon. Don’t look at me like that. It’s a deep kitchen cabinet.

So how did I end up with so many uni-taskers like the dehydrator, chopper-bopper, swirly-twirly, sucker-pucker, pasta-prestos and a Pocket-Rocket? Well, I’ll tell you exactly why. Because you never know what surprises life hurls through your window and smacks you in the ass. What if tomorrow a herd of elephants tornadoes through my home and the only thing that would save my family is salad shooter, rusty whisk and a snow globe!?

Sometimes I wonder why I consume myself in this just-in-case mentality, torturing my family and friends with fantastical scenarios. I guess when I was a kid, flipping between episodes of Inspector Gadget and McGuyver was an unhealthy thing.

Last month when my husband questioned why I needed a portable oven when I already have a new built-in GE Profile AND a $1300 micro-convection-halogen-triple-deluxe oven, I just stood there dumbly with my mouth wide open and my pouty bottom lip just dangling helplessly. My quick-wit and words failed me. Damn it! I had no good answer for the appliance redundancy and stomped away as my hair erupted into spontaneous flames. Common sense had won again. Curse you!

Before I give up my portable oven, I’m using it one last time for Roasted Chicken with Sweet Plum Sauce. Of course, I’ve included the recipe for making this in a regular oven.The sweet plum sauce can be found jarred at most supermarkets in the Asian section. It’s sweet, sticky and highly addictive.

Oh, and the Pocket-Rocket <–pssst….that’s not an immersion blender. That’s duct taped under the dining table in case I’m stuck with boring guests and drab dinner conversation. Mighty fine entertainment on the evenings when I forget to drape a tablecloth over the glass. I guess that’s where the nickname, “O”-stess with the Mostess came from!

***

Caption this photo:

I call this new cooking technique, “_______________”

Roast Chicken

oh but this Roast Chicken with Sweet Plum Sauce is juicy…moist…

Roast Chicken with Sweet Plum Sauce

and for you roast chicken dark meat fans:

Roast Chicken with Sweet Plum Sauce

 

Yum
Print

Roasted Chicken with Sweet Plum Sauce

Servings: Prep Time: Cook Time:
Screen Shot 2014-02-26 at 2.36.55 PM

Ingredients:

4-lb whole chicken
1/4 cup sweet plum sauce
1 head of garlic, halved
1 lemon, quartered
salt & pepper
3 tbl butter, softened
kitchen twine
1/4 cup sweet plum sauce to serve at table

Directions:

Rinse chicken and cut away extra fat. Pat dry with paper towels inside and out. Place in shallow baking dish and rub softened butter all over chicken, tucking just a bit under the skin of breast. Season generously with salt and pepper outside and inside cavity. Stuff with garlic and lemon. Tie legs of the chicken together, slather sweet plum sauce all over chicken. Set breast side down. Let sit 30 minutes at room temperature. Preheat oven to 450F. Roast chicken 20 minutes. Turn breast side up, lower temperature to 375F and return to oven. Continue to roast another 60-70 minutes, brushing with additional sweet plum sauce towards the end. You may have to loosely tent with tin foil if skin is approaching maximum crispiness (i.e. don’t burn the skin.) Chicken is done when juices run clear as knife tip is inserted into chicken thigh. Thickest part of thigh without touching bone should register 170F. Let chicken rest 10 minutes before carving. Serve with a side of sweet plum sauce for dipping.

Note: During roasting, cover with foil if chicken skin starts to burn, using the _____ technique as illustrated above with bits of foil and toothpicks.

The side dish in the first photo is my 15 Minute Asian Noodles (see below)

***

15 Minute Asian Noodles15 Minute Asian Noodles

Chino Latino Wings Chino Latino Wings

Chinese BBQ Chicken PastriesChinese BBQ Pastries

The post Roast Chicken with Sweet Plum Sauce appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/209-roast-chicken-with-sweet-plum-sauce.html/feed 35
Leftover Turkey Recipe: Chinese Congee (Rice Porridge or Jook) http://steamykitchen.com/211-turkey-congee-rice-porridge.html http://steamykitchen.com/211-turkey-congee-rice-porridge.html#comments Sat, 24 Nov 2007 14:39:17 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/2007/11/24/turkey-congee-rice-porridge/ Use leftover turkey bones to make Chinese Turkey Congee (Rice Porridge or jook)

The post Leftover Turkey Recipe: Chinese Congee (Rice Porridge or Jook) appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
Turkey Congee

Update 11/25/11 Happy Thanksgiving! Guess what my Mom’s got simmerin’ on the stove!? Yep – Chinese Turkey Rice Porridge. Yum…….

On Thanksgiving, we packed the kids in the minivan and headed to Orlando to my brother-in-law’s for a “Boston Market Takeout Thanksgiving.” Oh, don’t groan, it really wasn’t bad at all. While you were all scrubbing layers of grease off your pans, all we did was crumple up take out containers. The best part of celebrating the holidays with people who don’t cook is knowing that the entire turkey carcass is MINE…..ALL MINE.

Such a silly thing to be smug about, but I consider the endless potential of leftover bones just as exciting as the roasted turkey itself. And since we only have turkey once or twice a year, I act like Tom of Tom & Jerry with icons of turkey flashing in my eyes. I could make stock (freeze and use throughout the year), gumbo, casserole, soup and my favorite….Turkey Congee (rice porridge)

Normally, when I spend holiday dinners with other cooks and chefs, it’s a silent game of strategy. But how would you politely and tactfully be the first to lay dibs on the turkey bones if you are a guest? Since many of you will have turkey again for Christmas dinner, I’m going to share my secrets with you. But if you continue through to read…you’ve just waived away your right to use these tricks against me. Deal?

How to tactfully lay dibs on the turkey bones

I’m going to divide this strategy lessons into 3 parts. Before, during and after the meal.

Before the meal

  • The moment you hang up your jacket and take off your shoes – begin your distraction technique. The cook has been up since 4 a.m. washing, chopping, baking, boiling, roasting for this one meal. Their mind is totally focused all the way up to the point of END OF DESSERT COURSE. Talk only about the meal itself. Do not bring up the subject of “leftovers” or “turkey bones.” If anyone else brings up the subject, quickly cut them off and say:

“Do I smell something burning?” BUT you can only play this “burning card” this ONCE in the evening. Any more than that, you might not be invited back next year.

  • Offer to carve the turkey. Do NOT let that turkey go uncarved to the table. If the turkey gets carved at the table, those sexy turkey bones are exposed in front of the entire table and game over. Now everyone is thinking about potential recipes for turkey bones.

Turkey Congee

During the meal

  • The seat closest to the kitchen is the MONEY SEAT. Before everyone else arrives, discreetly crumple up the napkin and take a drink from the water glass at that seat to lay claim.
  • When the cook triumphantly announces, “Dinner is ready!” elegantly (but quickly) sashay to the table and stand behind the chair that you want. You can’t be the first to sit down, that would be rude and way too obvious. But just one hand casually leaning against the back of the chair is fine.
  • Towards end of the meal, keep an eye for anyone finishing early. Do whatever you can to keep them at the table. Strike up engaging conversation with them. Ask OPEN ENDED QUESTIONS.

After the meal

  • Be the first to signal the end of dinner and establish dominance by puffing up your chest, stretching arms out and pushing your chair out.

“Thank you for a lovely meal, name of host. It was truly a delightful Thanksgiving dinner! Let me help you clear the table.” and proceed to take your plate to the kitchen. Your host will surely follow behind you with an armful of dishes.

  • If someone other than cook follows you before host can get to kitchen, BLOCK and REDIRECT.

“Oh, is that cranberry on your collar? That is going to stain! Quick! Take my Tide to Go stain pen.”

  • With only you and cook in kitchen, stand over the turkey carcass, make a big SIGH, and say:

“Wow, that’s a lot of leftover turkey. You’ll be eating turkey for weeks!”

  • By now, the host will be so stuffed of turkey, sick of turkey, focused on the piles of dirty dishes that she/he will not even think twice when you say:

“I’d love to take the bones home, may I?”

SCORE.

Now you can make Turkey Congee, or rice porridge:

***

To me, the most successful leftover turkey dishes do NOT TASTE LIKE LEFTOVER TURKEY. There are countless recipes floating out on the web, but if it just tastes like Thanksgiving turkey but in a different form, what’s the point?

Here’s the secret to making your turkey congee taste incredibly wonderful – dried scallops and dried shrimp.

dried scallops and dried shrimp

You can find both in Asian markets. You only use a few pieces of each and it adds that mysterious “umami” dimension to your turkey congee. If you don’t have either, that is fine, you can substitute with any of the following:

  • 2 tsp fish sauce
  • 1 cup instant dashi stock
  • 3-4 DRIED shitake black mushrooms
  • saute 1/2 diced onion + 4 ounces chopped fresh mushrooms

Turkey congee Recipe

Yum
Print

Turkey Congee (Rice Porridge) Recipe

Servings: Prep Time: Cook Time:
recipe for turkey rice porridge

Ingredients:

Leftover turkey bones (about 1/2 of the bones - save the other half for making stock or whatever)
2 carrots, cut into large dice
3 stalks of celery, cut into large dice
2 tablespoons dried shrimp (optional)
6 whole dried scallops (optional)
9 cups water
1 cup raw rice
2 tablespoons cooking oil
2 cups cooked turkey meat, shredded
fish sauce or soy sauce to taste

Directions:

1. Soak dried scallops and shrimp in 1 cup of hot water for 10 minutes. With your hands, separate the bones into large pieces (no smaller than 3"). In a large stockpot, heat cooking oil over medium-low heat. When hot, add carrots and celery and cook for 3-5 minutes until soft. Add turkey bones and water to pot.

2. With your fingers, shred the scallops into small pieces. Add scallops, shrimp and the soaking water to broth. Turn heat to high and let boil. Immediately turn heat to low and add raw rice.Simmer uncovered or partially covered for 45 minutes, up to 2 hours until rice has thickened into congee. Do not stir while it is cooking. Just leave it alone so that the rice can thicken undisturbed. Stir in cooked turkey meat.

3. Taste, add fish sauce or soy sauce to taste. Start with 1 tablespoon first and add in 1/2 tsp at a time until you reach perfect seasoning.

More Recipes:

Vegetable Fried Rice Why we ate nothing but vegetables for 2 weeks.

Vietnamese Chicken Pho Chicken Pho (Vietnamese Noodle Soup)

The post Leftover Turkey Recipe: Chinese Congee (Rice Porridge or Jook) appeared first on Steamy Kitchen Recipes.

]]>
http://steamykitchen.com/211-turkey-congee-rice-porridge.html/feed 67