Steamy Kitchen Recipes | RSS Feed http://steamykitchen.com Steamy Kitchen Food Blog: fast recipes, simple recipes, with fresh ingredients to create delicious meals. Tue, 30 Jun 2015 16:40:20 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.2 Aged Sriracha Hot Sauce Recipe http://steamykitchen.com/35187-aged-sriracha-hot-sauce-fermented-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/35187-aged-sriracha-hot-sauce-fermented-recipe.html#comments Tue, 13 May 2014 15:10:48 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=35187 Did you know that the Huy Fong company that makes the beloved “rooster sauce” sells 20 million bottles of its sriracha sauce a year without spending a single dime on advertising? I find the story about David Tran’s success so amazing and can’t even think of another company that can thrive like this without a PR or marketing strategy. While ...

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sriracha-sauce-recipe-fermented-1772

Did you know that the Huy Fong company that makes the beloved “rooster sauce” sells 20 million bottles of its sriracha sauce a year without spending a single dime on advertising? I find the story about David Tran’s success so amazing and can’t even think of another company that can thrive like this without a PR or marketing strategy.

While I’ve made many versions of sriracha and hot sauces before, this recipe is the closest homemade version I’ve ever tasted. The secret is a simple fermentation that I learned from Karen Solomon’s brand new book, Asian Pickles.

 The book is a tribute to “sweet, sour, salty, cured and fermented preserves from Japan, Korea, China, India.” Here’s a sampling of recipes:

Japan
pickled ginger, preserved seaweed, pickled asian pear with lemon, miso pickles

Korea
kimchi, radish kimchi, squid kimchi, water kimchi, gochujang

China
radish in chile oil, pickled shallots, Tianjin perserved vegetable, five-spice pickled carrots, XO sauce, chile-black bean oil

India
South Indian coconut & cilantro chutney, peach, coconut and ginger chutney, sweet mango pickle, pickled chickpeas

SE Asia
daikon & carrot pickle, pickled chiles with lime, thai pickled cabbage, banana ketchup, Malaysian pickled vegetables

Well, there are many more, but this gives you an idea of what type of concoctions to expect. I highly recommend this book, almost all of the recipes are simple and Karen’s directions are crystal clear. If you’re a lover of the sour and spicy condiments, you’ll find Asian Pickles right up your alley.

I followed the “Fermented Cock Sauce” recipe with great success. I had never fermented hot sauce before, but really, it was as easy as opening a dark cupboard and leaving it there for a week undisturbed. In fact, I had almost forgotten about all about it!

sriracha-sauce-recipe-fermented-1770

My version is much thicker, chunkier than the Huy Fong Sriracha sauce, but that was on purpose. One of the last steps in the recipe is to strain the vinegar (similar to Tabasco) from the chunkier sauce. If I wasn’t so forceful in my straining (you’ll see in the video), the consistency of my sriracha sauce would be smoother, less chunky. I would also run the sauce through a blender one more time at the end.

The resulting flavor is brighter, fresher and more “fruity” than the bottled version. I’m not sure if fermenting longer would provide a more deeper earthy flavor that I love about the bottled version.

sriracha-sauce-recipe-fermented-1764

What type of peppers to use? Any that you would like! I use red jalapeño peppers, which is what Huy Fong uses.

Yes, there are red jalepeño peppers! But they are difficult to find. Karen Solomon recommends looking for Red Fresno peppers, which have a similar taste and heat index as red jalapeño.

I found red jalapeños at Super Target as well as Publix. You can also ask the the produce manager to stock them in for you.

The only rule is red peppers = red sauce. Since I like my hot chile sauce…..not so hot….I added baby red bell peppers, which gave the sauce a sweeter, more mellow taste.

The recipe from Asian Pickles will give you a 2-for-1: you’ll get the sriracha-like sauce on the left and a thinner, vinegary hot sauce that’s similar to Tabasco to the right.

sriracha-sauce-recipe-fermented-1761

Sriracha Making Notes

-In the video, I only made half of the recipe (to yield 1 cup).

-Vary the spiciness with the type of chilies you use. Use red chilies to keep the sauce red.

-For a thinner sauce, similar to Huy Fong Sriracha sauce, only strain lightly (in the video, you’ll see me using a spoon to press down on the hot sauce to extract as much liquid as possible….I ended up with a chunkier sauce!)

-If you find the sauce still too chunky, run it through a blender before bottling

-Both sauces will keep for months (yay for fermentation!) in the refrigerator

How to make Sriracha Sauce video

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Aged Sriracha Hot Sauce Recipe

Servings: 2 cups Prep Time: Cook Time: 15 minutes
sriracha-sauce-recipe-fermented-1758

Recipe from: Asian Pickles by Karen Solomon.

Ingredients:

2 pounds Fresno chiles (or other red chilies)
9 cloves garlic
2 teaspoons kosher salt (or 1 tsp regular table salt)
6 tablespoons distilled white vinegar

Directions:

Wash the chiles and chop off their stems. If you like your sauce less hot, remove the seeds and membranes and discard. 

Work the next step in 2 batches so you don't overload the food processor. Add the chiles,  garlic and salt to the food processor. Process for 2 minutes until very liquid. The mixture should have consistency of a smoothie and appear a bit foamy on top.

Scrape the sauce into a very clean 1-quart (or larger) glass jar. Don't use plastic. Cover the top of jar with paper towel and secure with rubber band. This prevents bugs from entering and allows sauce to breathe. 

Place jar in cool, dark place for 2-4 days. The liquid will settle at bottom, and the thicker sauce will rise to top. The top should be bubbly - which is a sign of fermentation. Taste, and let sit for a few more days if desired. I prefer 7 days of fermentation.

If mold grows, remove the mold with a small spoon - and then proceed to the next step (basically, don't eat the mold directly, but the sauce should be okay).

Pour the sauce through a fine-mesh sieve. Now you'll have the thinner "Tabasco" like vinegary hot sauce and the thicker hot chile sauce. To each, add 3 tablespoons of vinegar and stir well.

You may like to run the thicker sauce through the blender for a finer, thinner consistency. 

Store each tightly sealed in refrigerator. The thicker hot sriracha sauce will keep for up to 4 months. The thinner vinegar hot sauce will keep indefinitely. 

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20 Minute Sriracha Sauce http://steamykitchen.com/31539-20-minute-sriracha-sauce-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/31539-20-minute-sriracha-sauce-recipe-video.html#comments Fri, 07 Feb 2014 16:38:08 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=31539 Like my label!? LOL Back before Sriracha was a “thing” – we just called it “red sauce” and squirted it on just about everything, including scrambled eggs. The original “rooster brand” Huy Fong recipe was so perfect that they had a virtual monopoly at Vietnamese restaurants and competitors didn’t even try to imitate their formula. Fun fact from Forbes: Huy Fong ...

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20 Minute Sriracha Sauce RecipeLike my label!? LOL

Back before Sriracha was a “thing” – we just called it “red sauce” and squirted it on just about everything, including scrambled eggs.

The original “rooster brand” Huy Fong recipe was so perfect that they had a virtual monopoly at Vietnamese restaurants and competitors didn’t even try to imitate their formula. Fun fact from Forbes: Huy Fong Foods has seen a 20% increase in revenue nearly every year since its founding in 1980.

After the news of the temporary shutdown of Huy Fong operations in Irwindale, California, the people of the Internets went crazy. Apparently, the fumes from cooking thousands of pounds of chiles were becoming unbearable for Huy Fong’s residential neighbors. (We hear they’ve resumed shipping, but I haven’t been able to confirm this.)

It’s actually easier than you think to make your own Sriracha – a food processor and medium pot is all you need. If you’re used to just squeezing the rooster bottle (heehee) for your hot sauce fix, you’ll be shocked at how many more flavor profiles you can get from homemade.

20 Minute Sriracha Sauce Recipe
You can make your sauce thinner if you like – run the sauce through a blender to get it less chunky. But I likey mine chunky :-)

While I love the original Huy Fong sauce, it’s missing balance and depth.

Here’s what good  flavor translates to – a balance of the 5 S’s:

  • Salty
  • Savory
  • Sour
  • Spicy
  • Sweet

I’d also add in a B – bitterness – but people don’t like that “B” word (plus it doesn’t start with an “S” ruining my awesome convenient and catchy teaching moment (eye roll and head shake).

The perfect condiment should have all of these flavor elements. Here’s why this 20-Minute Sriracha recipe that I’ve modified from Nom Nom Paleo Cookbook is perfect:

  • Salty and Savory: choice of fish sauce, coconut amino or Bragg’s. Not only do these sauces provide a salty flavor, but they all have “umami” which adds savory notes.*
  • Sour – vinegar
  • Spicy – chiles. But not too spicy. I like using s combo of hot peppers and mild peppers. If a sauce is too spicy, you can’t taste anything else on your plate.
  • Sweet – honey, and sweetness of peppers

Plus, the bonus of homemade is that your sauce is so much more vibrant, bright and full flavored. You’ll want this sauce on your eggs in the morning. in your noodle soup, on your meatloaf, in your stir-fries.

*Bragg’s Liquid Aminos is found in health food stores, Whole Foods and most major supermarkets have this too. Look near the BBQ sauces and Worcestershire sauce. Love this stuff. I’ve been using this in place of soy sauce and fish sauce on everything. It’s healthier, non-GMO, gluten-free, non-fermented. Every homemade salad dressing I’ve been making lately has a Bragg’s in it! Good stuff.

*Coconut Aminos is a new ingredient for me. I found it at my local health food store. It’s raw, gluten-free, 100% organic, dairy-free, vegan, soy-free and contains 17 naturally occurring aminos. I like this just as much as Bragg’s. Give it a try!

20 Minute Sriracha Sauce Recipe

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Big thanks to Nom Nom Paleo Food for Humans Cookbook by my friends Michelle Tam and Henry Fong for another stellar recipe. LOVE this cookbook, I can’t recommend it enough and have purchased copies for my friends.

None of us are Paleo dieters, but the recipes are so versatile and delicious that anyone can benefit from this book! Every recipe has a photo, most with vibrant step by step photos.

If you haven’t already, check out the Cauliflower Bacon Fried Rice that I’ve made from the Nom Nom Paleo.

——-

Watch how easy it is to make this homemade Sriracha sauce!

20 Minute Sriracha Sauce Recipe Video

 

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20 Minute Sriracha Sauce Recipe

Servings: 3 cups Prep Time: 5 minutes Cook Time: 15 minutes
20 minute sriracha sauce recipe featured-0858

Use any type of peppers you want! If you want your sauce red colored - stick to red peppers. My favorite is a combo of red jalapeno or red serrano and mini sweet peppers (the kind you find on veggie trays to eat raw) - smaller and sweeter than bell peppers.

In fact, if you want to use bell peppers, go ahead!

Ingredients:

1/2 pound fresh red jalapeno peppers
1/2 pound fresh mini sweet snacking peppers
7 garlic cloves, smashed and peeled
1/3 cup apple cider vinegar (or white or unsweetened rice vinegar)
3 tablespoons tomato paste
4 tablespoons honey
2 tablespoons fish sauce, Braggs Liquid Aminos or Coconut Aminos

Directions:

STEP 1: In a food processor or high speed blender, add all ingredients and blend until smooth.

STEP 2: In a medium saucepan over high heat, pour the sauce in and cook on high until it begins to boil. Reduce to a simmer and cook for 10-15 minutes. Taste and adjust with additional honey, vinegar or Bragg's (or whatever you're using) if needed. You're looking for a nice balance of flavor. Fry an egg and try a spoonful on it. Tastes wonderful? Turn off heat and allow sauce to cool completely.

STEP 3: Transfer the sriracha sauce to jars. Sriracha will keep for 2 weeks in the refrigerator. Better yet, can them and store in pantry!

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Kale Kumquat Salad http://steamykitchen.com/30289-kale-kumquat-salad-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/30289-kale-kumquat-salad-recipe-video.html#comments Fri, 27 Dec 2013 17:10:25 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=30289 Have you ever had a kumquat before? It’s a small little thing, and the way you eat a kumquat is somewhat counter-intuitive to any other citrus that you may be familiar with. First off, the skin is the sweetest part of the fruit – and thank goodness too – can you imagine peeling that tiny kumquat with a knife!? The ...

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Kale Kumquat Salad Recipe

Have you ever had a kumquat before? It’s a small little thing, and the way you eat a kumquat is somewhat counter-intuitive to any other citrus that you may be familiar with.

Kale Kumquat Salad Recipe

First off, the skin is the sweetest part of the fruit – and thank goodness too – can you imagine peeling that tiny kumquat with a knife!? The entire kumquat is edible, though I flick out the seeds. The thin skin is sweet with a slight bitter edge and there’s very little flesh involved on the inside.

This salad with sliced kumquat, fresh mushrooms and walnuts with a citrus vinaigrette was inspired by a stop at Los Angeles International Airport! Watch the video to find out what restaurant is a must-stop at LAX.

Kale Kumquat Salad Recipe Video

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Kale Kumquat Salad Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 5 minutes Cook Time:
Kale Kumquat Salad Recipe

Citrus dressing makes enough for recipe plus leftover for another day!

Ingredients:

FOR THE DRESSING
1/2 orange, juiced
2 tablespoons champagne vinegar (or red wine, white wine vinegar)
1 clove garlic, finely minced
freshly ground black pepper
1 1/2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
1 tablespoon honey
2 tablespoons olive oilFOR THE SALAD
1/2 pound kale, chopped, tough stems discarded
1/2 pound arugula
pinch of sea salt
1/2 cup kumquats, thinly sliced and seeds removed
3/4 cup mushrooms, sliced
1/4 cup walnuts, chopped

Directions:

Make the salad dressing by combining the vinaigrette ingredients in a jar with a tight fitting lid (like a mason jar) and shake well to combine.

Place the kale in a large bowl. Sprinkle with salt. Using massaging motion, rub the kale leaves together to break up and soften the kale.

To serve, toss kale with some of the dressing (I used about 1/4 cup of the dressing), nuts, mushrooms and kumquats.

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Roasted Duck with Chinese Steamed Buns http://steamykitchen.com/28629-roasted-duck-with-chinese-steamed-buns-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/28629-roasted-duck-with-chinese-steamed-buns-recipe-video.html#comments Mon, 07 Oct 2013 18:51:03 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=28629 On the dinner plate, Chicken has been the reigning king of fowl for far too long. I’ve been asking my meat market to stock a more diversified fresh poultry section, but apparently, I’m the only fool asking for such. Any poultry other than chicken and ground turkey gets banned to the frozen foods department: quail, duck, goose and turkey. (Guinea ...

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chinese smoked duck and steamed buns-9934

On the dinner plate, Chicken has been the reigning king of fowl for far too long. I’ve been asking my meat market to stock a more diversified fresh poultry section, but apparently, I’m the only fool asking for such. Any poultry other than chicken and ground turkey gets banned to the frozen foods department: quail, duck, goose and turkey. (Guinea fowl, partridge, pheasant and pigeons can be had but only on special order).

I’m on a quest to lay off chicken for a while and explore some of the “other poultry”- both in the kitchen as well as on our homestead. While it’s a little too early to talk about the 20, 18, 17 duck eggs that we’re incubating (they’ll hatch this week), our plan all along is to raise our own meats.

Smoked Duck and Chinese Steamed Buns Recipe

Oh, before any of my readers freak out, no we haven’t cooked Duckie Momo or Nibbles. Both of them are on the “protected list” and are considered our pets. 

The past two weeks of recipe testing were devoted to taking one of the most elaborate Chinese dishes and creating a no-fuss, simple recipe that anyone can make.

Smoked Duck and Chinese Steamed Buns Recipe

Have you ever tried one of China’s most celebrated dishes – the sublime Roast Peking Duck with its crackling, crispy skin served in a fluffy Chinese steamed bun? It’s a complicated, multi-step recipe that involves air-drying the duck, blowing the duck to separate the skin from the body (essential to get the crackly-thin skin), pouring boiling water over the duck to tighten the skin, and roasting the duck while hanging (the duck, not you). If you’re interested, Serious Eats has an easier version.

Smoked Duck and Chinese Steamed Buns Recipe

I wasn’t interested in getting my version of the recipe to match Peking Duck, but rather to create a recipe that we could build on and that any kitchen novice to tackle. I distilled the dish to just 3 main ingredients.

1) duck
2) green onion (scallion)
3) bun made with a brilliant secret ingredient

Prep and hands-on cooking is less than 1 hour. (The duck will take longer in the oven, but it’s inactive, hands-off babysitting)

Smoked Duck and Chinese Steamed Buns Recipe

Roasting the Duck

The original Peking Duck is slathered and basted with a sweet/salty liquid of soy sauce and honey. I opted to simply season the duck with salt and pepper. Why make it any more complicated than than, when the duck itself has such incredible flavor?

I’m using our outdoor wood-fired grill from Memphis Grills, which acts as our outdoor oven. Yes, it’s wood-fired! We use 100% hardwood wood pellets that fuel the grill. It’s cleaner and healthier than charcoal and gives everything we cook a natural wood-fired taste.

You can roast your duck in your oven or out in your BBQ grill.  The most foolproof method of cooking duck is low and slow to keep the meat moist and tender — and then finish off with a blast of high heat to crisp up the skin.

Smoked Duck and Chinese Steamed Buns Recipe

Green Onion Goodness

In Asian cookery, green onion (or scallion) is used more than just for garnish. Raw green onion, cut into very thin, long slivers  and soaked in ice-cold water adds curly crunch texture! Plus, soaking it in water mellows out the spicy/harsh flavor of raw green onion. Give it a try. Here’s a more in-depth post on how to do this as a garnish.

In addition to curly-crunchies, I also minced some of the green onion with salt and flash-cooked with smoking-hot cooking oil to make “Scallion Oil.” It’s easy. It takes 5 minutes.

Smoked Duck and Chinese Steamed Buns Recipe

Cheater Chinese Steamed Buns

Okay, get ready for my secret ingredient. Prepared dough! This is a trick I learned from my Mom. A can of prepared sourdough biscuit dough creates light, fluffy, pillowy steamed buns!

All you have to do is roll out the dough discs into ovals and fold over. Steam for 8 minutes. Done.

The only thing missing now is the Sweet Chili Sauce, which you can make yourself, purchase (try finding Mae Ploy brand) or use purchased sweet plum sauce.

Roasted Duck with Chinese Steamed Buns Recipe Video

 

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Smoked Duck with Chinese Steamed Buns Recipe

Servings: 8-10 Prep Time: 45 minutes Cook Time: 2 hours
chinese smoked duck and steamed buns featured-9948

You'll also need roasting pan with rack (if oven cooking). I do not truss the duck (tie duck legs together), because I find that it's unnecessary - the bird cooks more evenly if you don't truss. Plus, an untrussed duck is easier to carve.

Regarding the prepared dough in a can: Look for the regular sized cans (the giant, fat "Grands" are too big). From my testing, the sourdough biscuits work the best, but buttermilk biscuits also work too.

Ingredients:

1 whole duck
kosher salt and pepper
1 large bulb ginger, sliced
1 whole garlic bulb, cut in half
8 stalks green onion/scallion)
1/2 cup cooking oil (rice, vegetable, canola or peanut)
2-3 cans prepared sourdough biscuit dough
1 tablespoon white vinegar
Prepared Asian Sweet Chili Sauce or Plum Sauce

Directions:

Preheat oven or grill to 300F

1. To clean the duck, I like to give it a little salt rub to thoroughly clean the skin. Rub a handful of kosher salt all over the duck. Give that duck an exfoliating scrub! Rinse all salt away and pat dry. Season duck with salt and pepper, inside and outside. Cut away and discard any extra fat. Stuff the duck with the ginger and garlic. I like to sew the cavity shut, but it's not necessary.

OVEN COOKING: Place duck, breast side up in roasting pan with rack. Roast duck at 300F for approximately 45 minutes per pound, or until internal temperature of duck is 160F. Turn up the heat to 450F and roast an additional 5-8 minutes to crisp up the skin.

GRILL COOKING: Prepare for indirect cooking at 300F. Have a drip pan as well - the duck is very fatty and you'll want something to catch the fat. Roast until internal temperature of duck is 160F, approximately 45 minutes per pound. Turn up the heat to high and roast an additional 5-8 minutes to crisp up the skin.

2. While the duck is cooking, let's prepare the scallions and bun.

SCALLION OIL: Mince 4 stalks of green onion. Place in a large, heat-proof bowl (like Pyrex or Corningware). Set aside.

CURLY-CRUNCHY SCALLION: With the remaining 4 stalks of green onion, slice as thin as you can at a very steep angle. Place in a bowl of ice water.

BUN: Flour clean surface to work on. Roll each biscuit into a oval shape. Fold over in half and place on a square of parchment paper. Cover with plastic wrap and set on counter until ready to cook.

3. Once the duck is cooked, remove from grill or oven and let rest while we steam the bun and make the Scallion oil.

BUN: In a large wok, bamboo steamer or large saute pan, add 2 cups of water with 1 tablespoon white vinegar. When boiling, steam the buns for 8 minutes on medium heat.

SCALLION OIL: While the buns are steaming, in a small pot or frying pan, heat up the 1/2 cup of cooking oil until the oil begins to smoke. Carefully pour the super-hot oil over the minced scallions and salt, mix well.

4. Carve the duck at the table, slice the duck breast into very thin slices to eat in between the steamed buns! Add a little Scallion Oil, Curly-Crunchy Scallion and Asian Sweet Chili Sauce.

 

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Sweet and Sour Chicken with Cherries http://steamykitchen.com/27925-sweet-and-sour-chicken-with-cherries-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/27925-sweet-and-sour-chicken-with-cherries-recipe-video.html#comments Mon, 12 Aug 2013 17:32:26 +0000 http://www.steamykitchen.com/?p=27925 Growing up in Nebraska, the closest family was nearly 8,000 miles away in Hong Kong and so our “family” was made of neighbors and co-workers of my Dad at the city utility offices. On the weekends, the adults would play cards, mah-jong (my parents taught everyone!) and have grand potlucks. We spent many weekends with one of Dad’s co-workers, Walt ...

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sweet and sour chicken cherries recipe featured-9533

Growing up in Nebraska, the closest family was nearly 8,000 miles away in Hong Kong and so our “family” was made of neighbors and co-workers of my Dad at the city utility offices. On the weekends, the adults would play cards, mah-jong (my parents taught everyone!) and have grand potlucks.

We spent many weekends with one of Dad’s co-workers, Walt and his wife Alice, who had a lovely backyard full of fruit trees. They were an older couple and became Jay and my substitute “Grandma and Grandpa.” I remember vividly the massive netting contraption that Walt would drape over the majestic cherry tree once the fruit started ripening to prevent darting bird-theives from snatching the prized fruit.

sweet and sour chicken cherries recipe featured-9535

Every year in the summer, we’d be invited over for cherry harvesting, where the netting would be gently lifted off like a veil, revealing the layers and layers of branches holding bright red cherries ready for picking. The rest of the evening and days that followed were dedicated to pitting, pie-making and canning.

Walt and Alice both passed away long ago and I wonder if that cherry tree still stands? I’ve been temped to ask my parents for their old address to use Google Earth to peer into the backyard, but that thought just kinda creeped me out!

sweet and sour chicken cherries recipe featured-9545

This recipe, Sweet and Sour Chicken with Cherries is a tribute to Walt and Alice. When we first moved to the United States, they welcomed us into their home and we became part of their family. Alice taught Mom how to bake Cherry Pie, Mom taught her how to Chinese Egg Rolls. They babysat me and my brother so that my parents could go out on a date. Alice patiently read some of my very first children’s books to me and helped me learn English!

You can use either sweet or tart cherries with this recipe – this is a sweet and sour dish, so adjust the amount of honey or vinegar based on how sweet your cherries are. I love my Sweet and Sour Sauce – it’s a healthy version that uses orange juice for a nice fruity zing. If fresh cherries aren’t in your life right now, feel free to use another fruit – both fresh pineapple and mango work great. Oh, I’ve even used frozen, pitted cherries in the recipe with great results as well.

Sweet and Sour Chicken with Cherries Recipe Video

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Sweet and Sour Chicken with Cherries

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes
sweet and sour chicken with cherries recipe featured-9534

You can use either breast meat or thigh meat (or even thinly sliced pork). For a vegetarian version, substitute the meat with extra firm tofu cubes (still following the same recipe instructions)

If fresh cherries aren't available, use fresh pineapple or mango chunks. Also, frozen cherries work well too. Canned cherries are too sweet.

Ingredients:

6 ounces boneless chicken, cut into bite sized pieces
1 tablespoon soy sauce
½ teaspoon cornstarch
2 tablespoons cooking oil, divided
½ onion, cut into 1” chunks
1 ½ cups fresh cherries (2 handfuls), pitted and halved
1/2 red pepper, cut into 1” chunks
1/2 yellow pepper, cut into 1” chunksFor the Sweet and Sour Sauce
1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger
2 tablespoons honey or agave nectar
3 tablespoons orange juice
3 tablespoons ketchup
3 tablespoons white vinegar

Directions:

In a bowl, toss the chicken meat with the soy sauce and cornstarch.

In a separate bowl, whisk together the ingredients for the sweet and sour sauce.

Heat a wok or saute pan over high heat. Swirl in just 1 tablespoon of the cooking oil. When hot, add in the marinated chicken. Spread chicken out all over the surface of wok in single layer. Let cook for 2 minutes, undisturbed, until browned. Flip chicken pieces and brown the other side, about 1 minute. Chicken should be browned but still uncooked in the middle. Remove chicken from wok and set aside.

Keep the wok on stove and turn the heat to medium-high. Swirl in the remaining cooking oil. When hot, add the onions and stir fry for 1 minute. Add in the cherries, red and yellow bell peppers. Stir fry for 2 minutes, until the bell peppers are cooked, but still colorful and crunchy.

Add the partially cooked chicken back into the wok and pour in the sweet and sour sauce. Bring to a simmer and cook an additional minute, or until the chicken is fully cooked through. Careful not to overcook the chicken!

 

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Carolina Barbequed Pulled Pork Sandwiches with Spicy Tangy Slaw http://steamykitchen.com/4404-barbequedpulled-pork-sandwiches-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/4404-barbequedpulled-pork-sandwiches-recipe.html#comments Thu, 09 Jul 2009 03:23:30 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=4404 Yesterday, Dr. BBQ andI tag-teamed on a Daytime segment. Ray brought his Big Green Egg to the roof of the studio end filmed a segment on pulled pork sandwiches, western North Carolina style. This thing really does look like a muppet character with its mouth wide open, huh!? GIMMEEEE PORK….. That above right there in the mouth of the Egg ...

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Yesterday, Dr. BBQ andI tag-teamed on a Daytime segment. Ray brought his Big Green Egg to the roof of the studio end filmed a segment on pulled pork sandwiches, western North Carolina style.

This thing really does look like a muppet character with its mouth wide open, huh!?

GIMMEEEE PORK…..

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That above right there in the mouth of the Egg is a pork butt. An overnight-smoked pork butt. That’s a sweet pig’s ass.

Which really isn’t the pig’s ass. But you’d think with a name like “BUTT” you’d expect to be eating the pig’s ass. Who the hell named a pig’s shoulder “BUTT??”

Dr. BBQ’s Carolina Pulled Pork Sandwiches video

uh oh.

BEFORE you watch the video….I just wanna say that:

Dearest Daytime Host Dave,

I know that at the very beginning of the video it looks like you got a pie thrown at your face. A big, fat whipped cream pie.

Something happened to the video somewhere along the line from the studio to satellite to my home through the cable tubes to my recorder to the DVD to my computer to iMovie through the Internet tubes to BlipTV back through the Internet tubes into your computer monitor.

Somewhere along that chain, somehow you got blasted with whipped cream. But at least it was quick-disappearing whipped cream, after a few seconds it magically disappears! I am so sorry, but I’ve tried three times to wipe the whipped cream off the video, but I can’t seem to fix the problem.

So to make it up to you, I will let you throw a pie at ME, 5 seconds before we go on air. I think that’s quite fair, don’t you?

Love, happiness and pie,

Jaden

Thank you Sur La Table for providing the beautiful Foldable Grilling Tools

Here’s host Dave, adjusting his microphone. Rob the floor manager and camera man coordinates the cameras, the talent and the set.

Dr. bbq

And this is his Dr. BBQ’s latest cookbook, The NFL GameDay Cookbook. The recipe for the Barbequed Pulled Pork Sandwiches are from this book. Your lover promised some nookie tonight if you bought the book.

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So here’s what Ray made:

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Oh, you want a closer look?

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But WAIT! I didn’t even tell you my part in this tag-team!

Oh wait til you see what I made with his pulled pork…I Asian-fied it with a special BBQ sauce recipe from Kogi BBQ Taco Truck in Los Angeles…I’ve got a recipe and video of the: kogi-bbq-taco-31 Korean Style Tacos with Kogi BBQ Sauce.


Carolina Barbequed Pulled Pork Sandwiches with Spicy Tangy Slaw

Fromnfl-gameday-cookbook The NFL Gameday Cookbook by Ray, Dr. BBQ, Lampe and published by Chronicle Books

Barbecued Pulled Pork Sandwiches

This is what real barbecue is all about. A long slow cooked pork shoulder is as good as it gets. Yes, the butt comes from the shoulder. It’s the shoulder blade or the butt end of the whole shoulder. These sandwiches are best served topped with coleslaw. Pick one of mine or use your family favorite.

For the rub
3 tablespoons salt
2 tablespoons black pepper
1 tablespoon granulated garlic
1 tablespoon paprika

One 7 to 8 pound pork butt, fat cap trimmed off
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
1/2 cup apple juice or apple cider
2 cups Dr. BBQ’s Carolina Barbecue sauce (Recipe below)
12 hamburger buns

To make the rub, in a small bowl combine the salt, pepper, granulated garlic and paprika. Rub the meat with the oil and then sprinkle liberally with the rub. Put in the refrigerator for at least a half hour and up to 12 hours.

Prepare the grill or smoker indirect at 275 F using hickory and cherry for flavor. Put the butt in the cooker and cook until the internal temperature is 160 F. This should take 6 to 8 hours depending on your cooker. Lay out a big double piece of heavy duty aluminum foil and put the pork butt in the middle. As you begin to close up the package pour the apple juice over the top of the butt and then seal the package, taking care not to puncture it put it back in the cooker. Return the package to the cooker and cook until the meat reaches an internal temperature of 195F. This should take another 2 to 3 hours. Remove the package from the cooker to a baking sheet. Open the top of the foil to let the steam out and let it rest for 1 hour. Using heavy neoprene gloves or a pair of tongs and a fork transfer the meat to a big pan. It will be very tender and hard to handle. Discard the juices as they will be quite fatty. Shred the meat discarding the fat and bones. It should just fall apart. Continue to pull the meat until it’s shredded enough to make a sandwich. Add 1 cup of the sauce and mix well. Reserve the additional sauce for serving on the side. Serve on fluffy white buns topped with Cole slaw.

Makes 12 sandwiches

Dr. BBQ’s Carolina Barbecue Sauce

1 cup vinegar
2/3 cup ketchup
2 teaspoon sugar
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon Worcestershire
1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes

In a small saucepan mix together the vinegar, catsup, sugar, salt, Worcestershire and pepper flakes. Cook over low heat for 5 minutes stirring to blend.
Makes about two cups

Spicy Tangy Slaw

This slaw goes well with all the real barbecue dishes.

One 16-ounce package of shredded Cole slaw mix
1/2 red bell pepper, sliced thin
1/2 medium onion, sliced thin
1 jalepeno, halved and sliced thin

For the dressing:
1/3 cup olive oil
1/4 cup cider vinegar
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes
1/2 teaspoon sugar
In a large bowl mix together the dressing ingredients. Add the slaw mix, the red pepper, the onion and the Jalapeno. Toss to coat. Let rest 5 minutes and toss again. Refrigerate for at least 4 hours and preferably overnight.

Makes about 8 servings.

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Roasted Asparagus with Balsamic Soy Browned Butter http://steamykitchen.com/1559-roasted-asparagus.html http://steamykitchen.com/1559-roasted-asparagus.html#comments Sun, 19 Oct 2008 13:47:30 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/?p=1559 (slideshow of 10 step-by-step photos that led up to the money-shot of the Roasted Asparagus with Balsamic Soy Browned Butter) My inbox is filled with emails from supporters of the “eating local” movement, urging people to consume food that is grown and produced in their local area. The movement is nothing new, for the past few years I’ve been reading ...

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(slideshow of 10 step-by-step photos that led up to the money-shot of the Roasted Asparagus with Balsamic Soy Browned Butter)

My inbox is filled with emails from supporters of the “eating local” movement, urging people to consume food that is grown and produced in their local area. The movement is nothing new, for the past few years I’ve been reading about it in national newspapers, popular food magazines and countless websites. Many of my friends are participating in the challenge of consuming only locally grown foods for the entire month of October. I myself am a big fan of eating local to support our local economy, for a better quality of produce and for taking care of our environment. How many planes, trains and automobiles did that cantaloupe have to hitch a ride on before arriving in my breakfast bowl?

We regularly visit the farmer’s market, the local produce stand and even grow our own vegetables and herbs in the backyard (Don’t be fooled to think that I have a green thumb. I don’t. Growing your own food is easier than you think, but that’s for another column.)

But, sigh. Some days I just don’t have the energy, budget, nor the willpower to be a responsible member of this planet that we live on. Especially when it’s 5:15pm, my kids are hungry, it’s two days until payday and I’m rushing to the supermarket. Oh the drama that plays out in the backseat of the minivan, “MOOOOOMM…we’re staaarrrrvvvvinngg…we need cooooookies and cheese puffs for dinner….MAAMMMMAAAA…puleeeeeeze??”

Quick. Asparagus is on sale. They only take 15 minutes to cook. Will make Roasted Asparagus with Balsamic Soy Browned Butter. Kids will eat ’em if I smother enough butter on ’em. But they are from Peru. The little sticker says so. Ahh, crap, who cares. The package goes in the cart and it’s what’s for dinner with a rotisserie chicken.

Well at least the supermarket was kind enough to tell me where my food is coming from. Okay, so I didn’t choose the mushrooms from Myakka, a farming area 20 minutes from me. But to ease my guilt, I imagined feeding a poor little starving child of an asparagus farmer in Peru. The child looks up at me with those cute, gigantic eyes. The widowed farmer smiles at me gratefully and whispers, “Thank you, Jaden for buying my asparagus.” I get a warm, cozy flutter in my heart.

Quickly, I stuff my tiara, cape and halo back into my handbag. Angelina Jolie is like totally my BFF.

YEAH, DO YOU SEE WHERE MY KIDS GET THE DRAMA THING FROM????

I have a feeling I’m going to get some complaint emails from environmentalists, pro eating local people and the mushroom farmer from Myakka that neglected to feed. I welcome and embrace all feedback. But instead of sending me an email, I would like to invite you over to my home, specifically at 5:15pm to babysit my tots while I run out to source my locally grown ingredients. You can lecture me about being a responsible human being all you want.

Could you also run a load of laundry while I cook dinner too?

Roasted Asparagus with Balsamic Soy Browned Butter

Roasted Asparagus with Balsamic Browned Soy Browned Recipe

The recipe for Roasted Asparagus with Balsamic Soy Browned Butter is from the Cooking Light The Complete Cookbook, a MASSIVE book weighing in at 4.4lbs with 1,200 recipes, 630 color photographs and a companion DVD. It’s an awesome book that I reach for when I don’t know what to cook. Totally worth every penny.

So I’ve given you the recipe below, straight from the book — but I did make a few changes to the recipe so I’ve highlighted my changes to the recipe in the paragraph below. This way you have both versions.

Roasted Asparagus with Balsamic Soy Browned Butter

Recipe from Cooking Light The Complete Cookbook

Here are the changes that I made to the recipe: Instead of roasting the asparagus in the oven at 400F, I broiled them instead as it saves me time from pre-heating the oven, saves energy and doesn’t get the house all hot. Place the oven rack about 8 inches from the heating element. Toss the asparagus with 1 1/2 tablespoons of olive oil instead of cooking spray as directed in the recipe. Turn on the broiler and broil the asparagus 4 minutes. Rotate the asparagus by shaking the pan or using a spatula. Continue broiling until the asparagus are crisp-tender, about 3 minutes. Continue on with the recipe and top the asparagus with a handful of almonds.

serves 6

2 pounds asparagus spears, trimmed
cooking spray
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon pepper
2 tablespoon butter
2 teaspoons low-sodium soy sauce
1 teaspoon balsamic vinegar

Preheat oven to 400F. Arrange asparagus in a single layer on a baking sheet; coat with cooking spray. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Bake for 12 minutes or until tender.

Melt butter in a small skillet over medium heat; cook 3 minutes or until lightly browned, shaking pan occasionally. Remove from heat; stir in soy sauce and vinegar. Drizzle over asparagus, tossing well to coat.

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Other recipes you may enjoy:

Scallop Salad with Sweet Vanilla Chili DressingScallop Salad with Sweet Vanilla Chili Dressing

Potatoes Anna with Cinnamon and Coriander

Sesame Shrimp with Honey Mustard Sauce

Chinese Pastries with Hoisin Chicken

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