Steamy Kitchen Recipes | RSS Feed http://steamykitchen.com Steamy Kitchen Food Blog: fast recipes, simple recipes, with fresh ingredients to create delicious meals. Fri, 01 May 2015 15:39:44 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.1 Steak with Whiskey Mushroom Sauce http://steamykitchen.com/15868-steak-with-whiskey-mushroom-sauce.html http://steamykitchen.com/15868-steak-with-whiskey-mushroom-sauce.html#comments Wed, 15 Jun 2011 13:51:10 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=15868 For our family, if there ever was a PERFECT cut of steak, it would be the bad-boy Porterhouse steak. It’s big. It’s massive. One giant hunk will feed our family of four. But before I get into our love for Porterhouse (because I’ll get carried away and will forget about anything else I was supposed to tell you), a word ...

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For our family, if there ever was a PERFECT cut of steak, it would be the bad-boy Porterhouse steak. It’s big. It’s massive. One giant hunk will feed our family of four.

But before I get into our love for Porterhouse (because I’ll get carried away and will forget about anything else I was supposed to tell you), a word about the Whiskey Mushroom Sauce:

Simply. Must. Make.

Of course, you don’t have to just use this sauce on Porterhouse – any cut of steak will do. Even pork tenderloin, chicken breasts, grilled tofu….whatever your little heart desires. Promise me you’ll make it.

Oh and bonus: just wanted to mention that this is a one-pan + one piece of tin foil meal!*

Anatomy of the Porterhouse Steak

This summer, I’m beef gal for Sweetbay Supermarket – a Florida based supermarket chain, known for its amazing Black Angus Beef (best job ever, right!?)

Now, back to the Porterhouse. The Porterhouse steak has two very distinct sections on either side of the bone.

 

Image credit: Savio D Silva (check out more beef cut diagrams + many more other diagrams on wide variety of subjects!)

For sake of simplicity, I’ll boil this anatomy of a Porterhouse Steak down to easy terms to relate to. Many of you know what a filet mignon, T-bone and strip cuts are, so we’ll use these terms to describe the anatomy of a Porterhouse. There are so many different cuts of beef that it can get incredibly confusing.

The left side, or the smaller side is part of the tenderloin, the most tender steak cut (pssstt…..it’s what butchers and restaurants call “filet mignon.”) Now the larger side on the right is the strip (pssstt…..the “strip cut.”) The middle? Well, that’s the bone – you can call that the “t-bone” because it’s shaped like a “T.”

You can also think of it this way. A T-Bone steak and Porterhouse steak are very, very similar and found right next to each other. A Porterhouse steak is just a larger T-Bone steak :-)

What’s great about Porterhouse is that it’s a great deal, especially when you can find a piece that has a very large tenderloin section. Also, for families like ours, it’s the absolute perfect cut. My husband, Scott is a filet guy – he loves the tender tenderloin cut. My kids love the big beefy flavor of the longer “strip” side.

So where does that leave me? Well, let’s take a look at what’s left…the meat close to the bone! It’s crazy-tender, full of flavor and for the evening, I’ll ditch all my table manners and bite off all that meat. I swear I was a dog in a former life. Though, I should tell you that I’m also a lover of blue crab, crawfish, chicken wings and ribs….basically I like to work for my food!

The bone that’s left is for our dog, Coco. I try very hard to leave Coco some of the meat on the bone, but when steak is this good…I simply can. not. resist.

Okay, so now that we’ve got the anatomy of the Porterhouse out of the way, let’s focus on the recipe!

As you can see, this Porterhouse is pretty thick. This one steak will feed the four of us for dinner tonight. Well, five if you count the dog too.

Preheat the oven to 375F. The first step is to rub the steak with a little bit of cooking oil. I like doing this instead of oiling the pan. You’ll use less oil this way.

My instructions here are for cooking on the stove and oven….feel free to grill this on your BBQ grill as it’s the perfect weather for grilling now!

Heat a cast iron pan (or other oven-safe pan) on high heat – get it very hot! When it’s hot, lay the steak on the pan. Let it cook, undisturbed for 5 minutes.  After 5 minutes, let’s flip it over.

Let the other side cook for 5 minutes. Then we’ll put the entire pan in the oven to cook for 7 minutes for medium rare (for a 1 3/4″ steak) or 5 minutes if you’ve got a 1-inch steak.

While the steak is in the oven, let’s cook the mushroom sauce. Heat butter in a saute pan and add the onions and the mushrooms. We’ll let that cook on medium for a few minutes.

Once the onions and mushrooms get soft, we’ll pour in 3/4 cup of chicken broth.

And stir in 1 tablespoon of grainy mustard, season with salt and pepper.

The sauce includes whiskey, but please feel free to leave the whiskey out if you prefer. 

Glug…glug…glug…about 2 tablespoons of whiskey**.

Let everything cook for a minute more.

And pour on top of the steak once it’s done.

 

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Porterhouse Steak Recipe with Whiskey Mushroom Sauce

Servings: serves 4 Prep Time: 15 minutes Cook Time: 20 minutes
steak-mushroom-whisky-sauce-9200

Ingredients:

1-2 Porterhouse steaks
salt and pepper
cooking oil
2 tablespoons butter
8 ounces sliced mushrooms
1 onion, sliced
3/4 cup chicken broth
1 tablespoon grainy mustard
2 tablespoons whiskey (or bourbon)

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 375F. Season the Porterhouse steak on both sides with salt and pepper. Let steak rest at room temperature for 15 minutes. Rub both sides of the Porterhouse steak with cooking oil.

2. Heat a oven-safe pan (cast iron preferred) over high heat. When very hot, add the Porterhouse steak to the pan and let cook for 5 minutes. Flip steak and cook an additional 5 minutes. Place entire pan into oven to cook for 5-7 minutes, timing depends on thickness of steak and desired temperature.

For 1-inch thick steak, I recommend 5 minutes and then check internal temperature of the steak.
For 1 1/2 inch Porterhouse steaks, I recommend checking temperature at the 7 minute mark.

125-130F = rare
130-140F = medium rare
140-150F = medium
150-155F = medium well
160-212F = well-done

3. While the steak is the oven, let's cook the mushroom sauce. Heat a saute pan over medium-high heat with the butter. When the butter starts bubbling, add in the mushrooms and the onions. Stir and cook until onions are fragrant and softened.

4. Pour in the chicken broth, mustard, whiskey and season with salt and pepper to taste. Turn heat to low and let simmer for 2 minutes. Just before serving, pour over the steak.

 

***

 

*BONUS: I’ll give you a couple of side dish ideas that will complete the meal with no additional pans – just a piece of tin foil.

1) Oven roasted tomatoes: Slice tomatoes in half, drizzle olive oil on top. Let them cook in the oven at the same time that the steak is cooking. Usually 10 minutes is all it takes.

2) Edamame: Find these healthy Japanese beans already cooked and shelled in the produce section, right next to the tofu. After you’ve made the mushroom sauce and have poured it on the steak, don’t wash that pan yet! Return the pan to the stove and turn the heat to medium. There’s plenty of flavor still in the pan and just add in the edamame. Stir and when the edamame is warmed through, it’s done!

 

**A piece of nifty advice here, if your husband is a Single Malt Scotch Whiskey lover, don’t try to grab any ol’ bottle to cook with. Especially the one that says, GlenFarclas 1968 Family Cask.

More Steak Recipes

Simply Recipes: Steak Fajitas

Leite’s Culinaria: Steak au Poivre

White on Rice Couple: Whiskey Flat Iron Steaks

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Steak with Creamy Whiskey Mushroom Sauce http://steamykitchen.com/7069-creamy-mushroom-whiskey-steak-sauce.html http://steamykitchen.com/7069-creamy-mushroom-whiskey-steak-sauce.html#comments Thu, 07 Jan 2010 13:19:31 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=7069 Every cook should have a great steak topping in their repertoire. Either because you A) enjoy having a sauce smothering your steak B) want to to stretch out a piece of meat to feed the family or C) attempt cover up a botched steak job. I’m in category A, especially if it involves heavy cream and whisky, but I’ve been ...

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Every cook should have a great steak topping in their repertoire. Either because you

A) enjoy having a sauce smothering your steak

B) want to to stretch out a piece of meat to feed the family or

C) attempt cover up a botched steak job. I’m in category A, especially if it involves heavy cream and whisky, but I’ve been known to practice C more often that I care to admit.

When my in-laws are in town, there’s always whiskey in the house. It makes for a more pleasant stay. But your in-laws might prefer bourbon, white wine or other such happy-drink. That’s fine too. Just don’t use red wine, as it makes your cream sauce pink and people in my house don’t eat pink food, especially if it’s on a steak.

How to make a creamy mushroom sauce (with booze)

For this recipe, I’ve used morel mushrooms, but you can use any type of fresh mushrooms you like. Anything from shiitake, crimini, baby portobello, Hokto Kinoko’s maitake, brown/white beech, king trumpet, to even the old standby white button mushroom. The mushrooms can be cut into big chunks, halved or sliced, depending on the type and the size. The general rule about mushrooms is to avoid washing them under water, and instead use a paper towel to brush off any dirt. Mushrooms are like sponges, and when you soak them or even rinse them, they will absorb the water, which makes it difficult to get a good browning in the saute pan.

1. Start with fresh mushrooms, clean the mushrooms by wiping surface with a damp cloth and trimming the stems off.
2. Saute onions slowly in butter or oil (or combo) so that they gently cook.
3. Once the onions are softened and browned (not burnt!) add the mushrooms and saute for just a couple of minutes.
4. It’s time. For the booze. Add a glug of bourbon, whiskey or even beer. Let it bubble a bit to burn off the alcohol.

5. Pour in some heavy cream – the amount is up to you. You can add as little as a tablespoon if you want. I like a lot of cream. I guess that’s why my jeans don’t fit.
6. Let it reduce for a bit.
7. And here’s the secrete ingredient….pour in just a touch of balsamic vinegar. This is to balance out the creaminess of the sauce….because the steak, the mushrooms and the cream is so rich, you need that little acid (or tang) to balance out the flavors. Trust me on this.

And here you go:

This steak was dry aged – see Dry Aging Steaks at Home.

It’s rich, decadent and the best part is that the recipe is flexible. In fact, check out Pioneer Woman’s cookbook – I made her Whiskey Sauce and then used it to top grilled LOBSTER. Oh yeah.


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Steak with Creamy Whiskey Mushroom Sauce Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 15 minutes Cook Time: 15 minutes
0912_mushroom-cream-sauce_4053

Ingredients:

4 steak cuts of your choice (filet, ribeye, sirloin, strip, etc)
cooking oil
salt and pepper
2 tablespoons butter
1/2 onion, minced
1 clove garlic, finely minced
2-3 cups sliced fresh mushrooms
1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg
3 tablespoons whiskey, bourbon, beer or white wine
1 tablespoon good quality balsamic vinegar
1/2 cup heavy cream (though you can use as little as 1 tablespoon)
1 tablespoon finely minced fresh herb of your choice (chives, parsley, tarragon, basil, etc.)

Directions:

1. Rub both sides of each of the steaks with some cooking oil. Season steaks with salt and pepper on both sides.

2. Heat a large frying pan or grill pan over high heat. When very hot, add the steaks. Cook both sides until desired doneness - timing depends on thickness of steak. Generally, for 1-inch thick steak, I grill 5 minutes per side then check with meat thermometer (145F is medium-rare, 160F is medium). Remove steaks to a plate and tent with tin foil to rest.

3. Return the same frying pan to the stove, heat the butter over medium heat. When the butter starts bubbling, add the onions and saute until the onions are soft, transluscent and just slightly golden. Take care not to burn the onions by keeping your heat on medium or even medium-low. This will take about 3 minutes. Add the garlic and saute for an additional minute until the garlic is fragrant.

4. Turn your heat to medium-high and add the mushrooms all at once. Immediately start tossing so that the onion/garlic/butter mixture is evenly distributed amongst the mushrooms. Saute the mushrooms until they are browned and softened, about 3-5 minutes depending on the thickness and size of your mushrooms.

5. Season with salt, pepper and nutmeg. Pour in the whiskey and the balsamic vinegar and let the mixture bubble a bit to burn off some of the alcohol. Turn the heat down just a bit and add in the heavy cream. Let it bubble for another 30 seconds and then taste to adjust the salt. Stir in the freshly minced herbs and pour over just-grilled steak.

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Ginger, Soy and Whiskey Grilled Chicken http://steamykitchen.com/312-soy-whiskey-chicken.html http://steamykitchen.com/312-soy-whiskey-chicken.html#comments Sun, 04 May 2008 04:08:05 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/?p=312 Today is Saturday, May whatever. This morning I woke up and FINALLY gave myself permission to be sick. After uttering those words to my bedside lamp, the already straining cork that had been clinging on for dear life where head meets nose the past 4 days, holding back the gush of mucus (gross), finally popped. I am sick. Which, in ...

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Ginger, Soy and Whiskey Grilled Chicken

Today is Saturday, May whatever. This morning I woke up and FINALLY gave myself permission to be sick. After uttering those words to my bedside lamp, the already straining cork that had been clinging on for dear life where head meets nose the past 4 days, holding back the gush of mucus (gross), finally popped.

I am sick.

Which, in all honesty, just being sick actually feels better than my mind knowing that my body is sick but demanding, “Man up, soldier! YOU ARE NOT SICK.” Yesterday was a big day, when Holly, my editor, flew all the way down from Vermont (brrr) to Florida (aaaahhh) and spent the day with me in the kitchen. It just would have sucked to be snottin’ and sneezing all over the food. It was an absolute must that I was healthy – er- at least functioning fairly well for that day.

Our plan was to spend the day cooking, testing/writing recipes, photographing, eating and editing. Ok, really, my agenda was to distract her as much as possible in the kitchen, get her drunk so that we could forget about editing. Cuz me no likey editing. You could threaten to take a hammer to my cherished kiwi Le Creuset baby dutch oven and I still would choose THAT over picking apart words and trying to come up with a suitable phrases to replace my babbling, wandering musings and cussing. <– that sentence was a run-on and probably didn’t make much sense.

But, I’m totally stoned on Nyquil right now. So back the hell off.

I wanted to show Holly what a “day in the life of a deranged, disorganized food blogger, cookbook-author wannabe” would be like. And boy, did I work her ass off. We created 4 new recipes, photographed them for the book and fed the dinner party for that evening. I had scribbled down recipes for 4 dishes that I had created in my SICK BUT NOT SICK head and when she arrived, I thrusted my notes to Holly and said, “here are my recipe notes!”

They really shouldn’t be classified as “recipes,” because they looked like this:

hoisin, honey, ginger but maybe garlic or maybe just omit both, how about orange marmalade? could use palm sugar too, 5sp, S+P, ribs, slow+low and glaze.

Holly looked at me with the “this is a recipe? are you fucking serious, lady?” look and then muffled into her sleeve, “bluejay calling mother hen…red alert..I REPEAT…red alert…operation steamykitchen is a no go….requesting permission to abort mission.”

But it worked out well – I would add this ingredient, add that ingredient, taste, adjust and Holly would be right there next to me documenting my every glug, pinch, pour and stir on a piece of paper. She wrote legibly, weighed ingredients and even timed my cooking! I think I am in love and need to just stuff her in my pantry and keep her here in my kitchen until this cookbook is done.

The most time consuming part was photographing. It took about an hour for each shot – partly because I still fumble with my camera settings. Ok, I admit I just use 1 setting and turn the wheely dialy thing a little to the left or a little to the right until I get what I want. BUT – I hope you’ll be proud of me – I graduated from the “P” setting on my Canon Rebel XT and am now on the “Av” setting, because 2 weeks ago when I went to my local camera shop, this nice camera salesman told me I should be using “Av” as it’s what professionals use. So I switched to “Av” but I still don’t know why or what the hell it stands for. All I know is that AUTO is for noobs. “P” is for semi-noobs. And “Av” is a setting that if I wave my camera in front of a real photographer pro, he’ll be like, “OMG. she’s so hot, I want to dry hump her Rebel XT” Plus, if I was still using “AUTO” or “P” then I would be a total dork for writing “Food Photographer” on my new business cards.

Yeah. I’m sooooo “Av.”

Oh and the “M” setting???? “M” is PURE EVIL. If you ever think it’s funny to play a joke on me and switch my camera to “M”, I will KICK YOUR ASK.

Here’s one of the dishes that was translated from:

herb, fish, no fish sauce, wrap in wrapper for diff tex? crispy! deep or pan? salmon or white? mince. need filler like potato, egg to bind, pretty to tie with chive.

Which translates to this:

Coriander Fish Cakes with Thai Dipping Sauce

Coriander Fish Cakes with Thai Dipping Sauce

Pretty nice, eh? Actually, if I think about it, the transformation is kinda like me when I first wake up in the morning before any coffee…incomplete thoughts, totally nonsensical and um…not pleasant to look at. Then I have coffee, shower, slather on concealer, pluck brows and get dressed and cha-ching! A nice, pretty package emerges.

***

Alright, now back to the original reason why I am posting – to give you this insanely kick-ass recipe for Ginger, Soy and Whiskey Grilled Chicken that I tweaked from this dude, who I think has the same warped sense of humor that I have.This was a dish I cooked last weekend and was declared a family fav.

Props to J-Vo for the original inspiration and recipe. [Me love you long time, J-Vo!!!!]

chkn, mar in gr ginger, soy, glug whiskey or bourbon? garlic, sugar. grill

:-)

Ginger, Soy and Whiskey Grilled Chicken

serves 4-6 as part of multicourse meal

3-lb whole chicken, carved (or if you prefer, your choice of already cut-up chicken parts)
1 tsp grated fresh ginger
2 garlic cloves, minced
3 tbl soy sauce
3 tbl brown sugar
1/2 lime, juiced (or 1 1/2 tsp white wine vinegar)
1 ounce whiskey/bourbon/scotch
freshly ground black pepper

Combine all ingredients in a zip-lock freezer back. Squeeze all the air out of bag and let the chicken marinate, preferably overnight, but even 1 hour is fine. If marinating overnight, 15 min prior to grilling, drain the marinade into a small pot and reserve. Let chicken sit on the counter so that it can come to room temperature. Boil the reserved marinade and keep at a steady simmer for 5 minutes to cook and thicken.

Heat BBQ grill on high. Grill chicken skin side down for 3 minutes until skin is nice and golden brown. Flip chicken, reduce heat to medium, brush with cooked marinade and close cover. Cook for another 5-7 minutes, until cooked through.

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