Steamy Kitchen Recipes | RSS Feed http://steamykitchen.com Steamy Kitchen Food Blog: fast recipes, simple recipes, with fresh ingredients to create delicious meals. Thu, 30 Apr 2015 14:38:03 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.1 Lebanese Roasted Stuffed Onions http://steamykitchen.com/25722-lebanese-roasted-stuffed-onions-recipe-video.html http://steamykitchen.com/25722-lebanese-roasted-stuffed-onions-recipe-video.html#comments Fri, 19 Apr 2013 16:59:02 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=25722 At the beginning of our Winter growing season, we planted a short row of onions in the raised bed. I’ve been using the long stalks as “green onions”, just clipping what I need. Some of the stalks grew over 3 feet long, and so we had green onions galore so far all year. They taste the same! Since I use ...

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Lebanese Roasted Stuffed Onions Recipe

At the beginning of our Winter growing season, we planted a short row of onions in the raised bed. I’ve been using the long stalks as “green onions”, just clipping what I need. Some of the stalks grew over 3 feet long, and so we had green onions galore so far all year. They taste the same!

Lebanese Roasted Stuffed Onions Recipe

Since I use green onions (or scallions, as some say) almost every day in my cooking, it’s so convenient to go outside and cut a single long leaf  to use in a dish. In fact, I had forgotten that the plant was actually developing a sweet onion underneath the soil until my a few days ago. My parents have been visiting us, and when Dad went out into the garden, he came back with several onions the size of baseballs.

Lebanese Roasted Stuffed Onions Recipe

The garden onions have been used all week long – Mom has been cooking every day and we’ve had Chinese Fried Rice, Vegetable Soup with Papaya, Firm Tofu with Preserved Radish, Lemongrass Pork, Chinese Sausage and Boiled Chicken with Garlic and Ginger Sauce. My house smells very “Chinese”!

Lebanese Roasted Stuffed Onions Recipe

I’ll be posting some homestyle Chinese recipes from Mom soon. In the meantime, I’ve got a recipe for Lebanese Roasted Stuffed Onions from a book called, The Food and Cooking of the Middle East. The onion is boiled for a few minutes until the layers are soft and pliable. The layers are gently taken apart, stuffed with ground meat (try ground lamb!), warming spices like allspice, cinnamon and coriander, basmati rice and then then roasted. What a nice surprise to open up a rolled onion to find a savory, meaty filling!

Lebanese Roasted Stuffed Onions Recipe

What I loved about this dish was that each “stuffed” onion just uses a single layer of onion and that the presentation was so beautiful.

Lebanese Roasted Stuffed Onions Recipe Video

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Lebanese Roasted Stuffed Onions

Servings: 10 stuffed onions Prep Time: 5 minutes Cook Time: 45 minutes
moroccan-stuffed-onions-recipe-featured-1060

Try buying the largest onions you can find. It will be easier to peel apart the layers. As you can see in the video, my onion was rather large! This recipe comes from The Food and Cooking of the Middle East cookbook by Ghillie Basan.

Ingredients:

2 extra-large onions (or 3 large onions)
1 cup white rice
1 tablespoon tomato paste
2 teaspoons cinnamon
1 teaspoon allspice
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon ground coriander
1 1/2 teaspoons kosher or sea salt
freshly ground black pepper
3 tablespoons minced fresh cilantro or parsley (reserve some for garnish)
1 pound ground meat of your choice (original recipe uses lamb)
2 tablespoons white wine vinegar or cider vinegar
3 pinches of sugar
2 tablespoons olive oil

Directions:

The first step is to soak your rice in a bowl cool water. The rice will absorb some of the water -- we'll drain off the water in a later step.

Fill a pot with water (enough to cover a whole onion by 1" and bring to a boil. Cut off the very top and bottom of each onion. Make a cut down one side of each of the onions, cutting into the center from top to bottom. This helps the onion layers cook evenly and make it easier to peel. Add the onions, and let them cook for 10 minutes or until the layers soften and separate easily.

Drain the rice completely. In a large mixing bowl, add the drained rice, tomato paste, cinnamon, allspice, cumin, coriander, salt, pepper, cilantro or parsley and ground meat. Mix well.

When the onions have finished cooking, remove and drain from the boiling water. Let cool and separate out the layers individually and place 1 heaping tablespoon of the filling, wrap onion around filling, but not too tightly to allow rice to expand during cooking.

In a large, oven-safe saute pan over medium-high heat, swirl in the olive oil. When pan is hot, place the onions seam-side down. Let cook for 2 minutes until the bottoms have browned slightly. Add vinegar to the pan and sprinkle the tops of the onions with sugar. Cover the pan and turn the heat to low. Cook for 20 minutes or until the meat and rice are fully cooked, rotating the onions halfway during cooking.


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Steamy Kitchen's Healthy Asian Favorites cookbook cover

My new cookbook is available for purchase now wherever books are sold!

You can also pick up a copy on Amazon for $13.98!

 

 

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Jenna’s Shrimp and Grits http://steamykitchen.com/23092-shrimp-and-grits-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/23092-shrimp-and-grits-recipe.html#comments Thu, 06 Sep 2012 22:10:59 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=23092 Step by step video recipe for Shrimp and Grits from food writer and author Jenna Weber.

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White Jacket Required cover

Do you know Jenna? She runs the blog Eat Live Run and came over earlier this year to hang out and help me with the massive cookbook photoshoot. This woman not only dices carrots like a madwoman, but she’s one of the most talented gals I know. Plus, my kids adore “Auntie Jenna” – when you’re a kid, and you call someone “Auntie” or “Uncle” it doesn’t mean they are related to you, it just means they love you, trust you. I definitely know it’s a Chinese thing, and I’m sure that it’s the same in many other cultures too.

Jenna’s first book, White Jacket Required: A Culinary Coming-of-Age Story, will leave you laughing, crying and hungry. Think about it. There aren’t many books that can make you feel all three!

Will you do me a favor? Give Jenna a shoutout on Facebook and Twitter!

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Shrimp and Grits Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: Cook Time:
shrimp-and-grits-recipe-feature-9281

Although this dish was traditionally served for breakast to shrimpers coming into shore after long weeks out at sea, it's one of my favorite comfort foods for dinner.

Tip for the leeks: You'll be using all of the white stem Cut the leek in half, just under where the green leaves begin. Slice stalk in half lengthwise, rinse the white stalk, set aside. Peel the green leaves apart and wash really well - I like to throw them in a sink-full of cool water as I peel the leaves off. There's a lot of hidden dirt in those leaves!

Ingredients:

3/4 cup stone-ground dry grits
12 slices bacon
1 leek, diced (see note above)
1/2 onion, chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 green pepper, diced
1 pound medium to large shrimp, peeled and deveined
1/4 cup white wine (or vegetable stock)
1/4 vegetable stock
2 cups half-and-half (or milk)
Salt and pepper to taste
Hot sauce (optional)

Directions:

Cook the grits according to package directions. Remove from heat but keep covered on the stove while you prepare other ingredients.

In a cast-iron skillet over medium heat, fry the bacon. When bacon is beginning to crisp up, push the bacon to the side of pan. Add in the shrimp and saute until done, about 2 minutes. Remove the cooked bacon and the shrimp to a bowl.

To the same pan, add leeks, onion, and green pepper to the hot bacon grease and cook over medium high heat until soft and translucent, about 4 minutes. Stir in the garlic and cook for an additional 2 minutes.

Add white wine to deglaze, then stir in the vegetable stock and half-and­ half and bring mixture to a simmer. Continue to simmer sauce until it starts to thicken, about 2 minutes. Taste and season with salt and pepper to taste.

Divide cooked grits among four bowls. Then divide in the shrimp and bacon to each bowl. Ladle sauce over and serve with hot sauce if desired.

Reprinted with permission from White Jacket Required: A Culinary Coming-of-Age Story © 2012 by Jenna Weber, Sterling Epicure, an imprint of Sterling Publishing Co., Inc.

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Pork Chop with White Wine Sauce http://steamykitchen.com/18807-pork-chop-with-white-wine-sauce-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/18807-pork-chop-with-white-wine-sauce-recipe.html#comments Tue, 13 Dec 2011 14:44:03 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=18807 A one-pan meal! A simple recipe for pork chops with white wine pan sauce

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We have a habit of publishing recipes on Steamy Kitchen that involve a boozy pan sauce. The three of us, Adam, Joanne and I all cook with a spatula in one hand and a glass of somethin’ in the other, and it’s just so easy to pour a little of that magic into the pan (oh hello, Salmon with Blackberry Brandy Sauce!)

Most of the time, the booze goes into the pan by purpose (Steak with Creamy Whisky Mushroom Sauce). Other times, after a quick taste test, we notice, “hmmmm….it’s missing something….” and in goes a splash of brandy (Garlic Brandy Prawns) and all is right in the world.

A creamy, white wine sauce is perfect with either chicken or pork – the white meats are delicate enough to let the nuances of white wine shine through.

How to make Pork Chops with White Wine Sauce

Start by brushing each side of the pork chops with olive oil then season with salt.

Add the chops to a hot pan. Sear about 2 minutes on each side or until browned.

Remove the chops to a plate then add some butter, sliced mushrooms and onions to the pan. Cook 2-3 minutes or until soft.

Pour in the wine. When you choose the wine go for a dry white, something like a Chardonnay or Chablis.

Cook the wine, about 1 minute then add in some cream.

Add the pork chops back into the pan, turn heat to low and cover with aluminum foil.

Cook the pork chops until they reach somewhere between 145 and 150 degrees F.

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Pork Chop with White Wine Sauce Recipe

Servings: serves 4 Prep Time: 5 minutes Cook Time: 20 minutes
Pork-Chop-with-White-Wine-Sauce-Recipe.jpg

A simple recipe for bone-in pork chops with a white wine pan sauce. Recipe and photos by Adam and Joanne.

Ingredients:

4 bone-in pork chops, 3/4-inch thick
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 tablespoon salt
1 tablespoons butter
8 ounces sliced mushrooms
1 yellow onion, sliced
1/2 cup dry white wine (suggestion: Chardonnay or Chablis)
1/4 cup heavy cream

Directions:

1)Brush both sides of each pork chop with olive oil and season with salt.
2)Heat a large heavy-bottomed skillet (cast iron preferred) over medium-high heat, about 2 minutes. When hot, add the pork chops to the pan and let cook for 2-3 minutes, until browned. Flip and cook an additional 2 minutes.
3)Transfer pork chops to a plate, then add butter, mushrooms and onions to the hot pan. Sauté until onions are soft, 2-3 minutes.
4)Add wine and cook 1 minute until the wine reduces by half. Reduce heat then add cream, stir until the sauce comes together.
5)Turn heat to low, add pork chops back to the pan and cover with aluminum foil until done. Pork chops are done when the internal temperature is between 145 and 150 degrees F.

More Pork Chop Recipes

Pork Chops with Apricot Brandy Sauce (Steamy Kitchen)

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Bouillabaisse http://steamykitchen.com/15777-bouillabaisse-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/15777-bouillabaisse-recipe.html#comments Mon, 06 Jun 2011 18:30:04 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=15777 A couple of weeks ago, I hosted my buddy Hank Shaw of the award-winning Hunter Gardener Angler Cook at our home and hit 2 out of the 4 activities from his blog name: fishing and cooking. If you must know why those 2 specific activities, our garden is winding down for its summer rest and hunting involves either a gun, ...

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bouillabaisse-recipe

A couple of weeks ago, I hosted my buddy Hank Shaw of the award-winning Hunter Gardener Angler Cook at our home and hit 2 out of the 4 activities from his blog name: fishing and cooking. If you must know why those 2 specific activities, our garden is winding down for its summer rest and hunting involves either a gun, spear, snare or crossbow – none of which I know how to use.

Hank is traveling the U.S. as part of his book tour for Hunt, Gather, Cook: Finding the Forgotten Feast, where he will be visiting each of the 50 States to experience each native species. For us here in Florida, we were out to snag a grouper. You can read about our experience on my blog post. Oh, and if you have a chance, you must read the glowing review by the NY Times of Hank’s book.

Not only did we catch the grouper – but also (from left to right): Bonito, Grouper, 5 Amberjack, 3 Snapper.

bouillabaisse-recipe fishine photo

So what do you make with all this fish, but more importantly the heads and tails of fresh fish? Bouillabaisse, of course.

This Mediterranean seafood stew’s uniqueness comes from the herb and spice combination of orange peel, fennel and saffron, which is what gives the soup its deep golden color.

bouillabaisse-recipe final shot

How to Cook Bouillabaisse

You start with leek, onion and garlic – and saute in olive oil.

Bouillabaisse - leek, onion, garlic

Just a few minutes over medium heat is all you need.

The next step is to add in the herbs. Fennel is essential, but you can also add in other fresh herbs like parsley, oregano and thyme. I only use the green fronds of the fennel (save the white bulb to use in another recipe, like a salad)

bouillabaisse-recipe fennelbouillabaisse-recipe herbs

Use a vegetable peeler to peel strips off the orange.

bouillabaisse-recipe orange peel

This is saffron that I’ve gently crushed with my fingers – I want to get the saffron threads into smaller pieces, almost in a powder form.

 

I’m part of the McCormick Gourmet team, bringing you in-depth information about everyday spices. From McCormick Gourmet’s Enspicelopedia:

About Saffron

Observe the stigma, the tiny strands at the flower’s center, of any crocus in your garden, and you’ll begin to understand why saffron is so expensive. It takes 220,000 dried stigmas from a specific variety of crocus, Crocus sativus, to make one pound of saffron. The flowers appear over a two-week period only, usually in October. Saffron is available as strands and also ground.

The deep orange red color and unique flavor of the famous Spanish rice dish paella, the Indian dessert kheer and French seafood soup bouillabaisse are the work of tiny saffron threads steeped in liquid during cooking. Used both for color and flavor, saffron is a prized spice in Mediterranean, North African and Asian cuisines and in bread and pastries around the world.

Originating in the Middle East, this spice is planted, harvested, dried and packaged by hand. Today, Iran is the largest producer, while India and Spain are much smaller growers, Spain holds the honor of producing the highest quality saffron.

Cultivated in Southern Europe since the 3rd century or before, saffron has found use in medicine, religious offerings, perfume, make-up, potpourri and, of course, cooking. Its vivid orange red color gives it great use as a fabric dye, which makes it humorous to imagine what Greeks and Romans must have looked like after using it perfume luxurious baths.

Chop up 3 tomatoes.

bouillabaisse-recipe- tomatoes

Throw everything into the same pot that has the leek/onion/garlic, water, wine along with the fish trimmings. I’ll spare you the photo of the fish trimmings.

After simmering for 30 minutes, strain the bouillabaisse into another pot.

Now let’s talk about seafood. You can use whatever you want, though traditional Bouillabaisse recipes will call for 3 different kinds of fish along with shellfish. I used Amberjack and Grouper (from our fishing trip), salmon, shrimp, scallops, clams and mussels. Okay, I went a little overboard :-)  Bring the strained Bouillabaisse soup back to a simmer and cook the seafood for just a few minutes.

bouillabaisse-recipe seafood

Ladle into bowls, garnish with fennel and serve.

bouillabaisse-recipe

 

More Bouillabaisse Recipes

Simply Recipes: Bouillabaisse
Family Style Food: Julia Child’s Bouillabaisse
La Tartine Gourmande: My Simplified Bouillabaisse
Use Real Butter: Bouillabaisse Fish Stew
NY Times: Provençal Potato “Bouillabaisse”
All Things Nice: Bouillabaisse

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Bouillabaisse Recipe

Servings: 6 Prep Time: 15 minutes Cook Time: 40 minutes
bouillabaisse-recipe-9350

Bouillabaisse Recipe adapted from Julia Child's Mastering the Art of French Cooking

Ingredients:

3 tablespoons olive oil
1 leek, white part only, chopped
1 onion, chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
peel of 1 orange, orange part only (use vegetable peeler)
3 tomatoes, chopped
1/3 cup chopped fennel fronds
fresh herbs (in any combination): thyme, parsley, oregano
1/2 teaspoon saffron threads, crushed
3-4 pounds of fish trimmings (heads, bones, tail), shrimp shells
10 cups water
1 cup dry white wine
1 tablespoon sea salt
3 pounds of assorted fish and shellfish (clams and mussels should be scrubbed clean)

Directions:

1. In a large stockpot, heat the olive oil on medium heat. When hot, add in the leek, onion and garlic. Saute for 5 minutes until softened but not brown.

2. Add in the orange peel, tomatoes, fennel, fresh herbs, saffron, fish trimmings, water, wine, salt turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Then turn the heat to low and simmer for 30 minutes. Strain the soup into another large pot.

3. Bring the strained soup to a boil over medium high heat. Taste and adjust with additional salt if needed. The soup should be slightly salty (remember we still have unseasoned seafood to add into the soup). Now we'll cook the seafood, adding in the items that require the most cooking time first. If you have whole lobster tails or large crab claws, add them in first and give them a 2-minute head start. Clams next, then the mussels and extra-large shrimp, lastly the fish, scallops and any smaller shrimp. You want to be careful not to overcook the seafood, so 4-5 minutes max then turn off the heat.

4. Ladle bouillabaisse into each bowl with the seafood and garnish with fresh fennel fronds.

 

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Fish with Citrus Caper Sauce http://steamykitchen.com/15433-fish-with-citru-caper-sauce.html http://steamykitchen.com/15433-fish-with-citru-caper-sauce.html#comments Mon, 16 May 2011 14:56:45 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=15433 When it comes to fish, simple is best. This Fish with Citrus Caper Sauce Recipe only takes 10 minutes to cook, start to finish. I've used a combination of orange and lemon, capers, white wine and then finished it with a bit of butter.

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We planted a few citrus trees in our backyard 7 years ago, but shhhh….don’t tell anyone in my neighborhood watch program because technically us homeowners in this lovely planned community are not allowed to plant anything that’s not on THE LIST OF APPROVED GREENERY and citrus trees are not on the list. Which means I have contraband kumquat limes, illegal lemons, hot calamansi and bootleg kaffir.

The trees are in my backyard, hidden from the road and everytime I go out in the backyard to tend to the trees, I feel like a naughty girl. Yes, all it takes is a few citrus trees to make me feel like a rebel. I feel so easy and cheap.

So it’s been 7 years of careful tending, trimming, showering of love and of course, hiding with without a single fruit from year 1 to 6. I’ve heard  that with fruit trees, it takes a few seasons for the plant to get settled in and bear fruit, so I’ve been extremely patient, each season daydreaming of next season’s lemonade.

Finally, last year my calamansi bore fruit (woohoo!) and this year all of the trees are popping out fruit so fast I liken it to watching popcorn explode. pop! pop! POP! Citrus galore!

But now we’re moving and I can’t take the trees with me :-( though I’ve tried to reason to my husband that digging out the 20-foot tall kaffir lime tree and dragging it to our new home would be a fun adventure. NOT.

When we move, I’ll have to start all over again. But in the meantime, I’ll enjoy the fruits of my patience and lovely trees while I can.

This recipe is dedicated to my friend Joe Yonan, food editor of the Washington Post. Joe recently came out with his book called Serve Yourself, Nightly Adventures in Cooking for One.

I don’t normally cook for just myself as I have an entire pack of hungry mouths to feed every night. But since we both work from home and Scott doesn’t eat seafood, sometimes lunch is a simple fish fillet for one (Scott makes a PBJ for himself).

What I love about Joe’s book is that recipes sound like they come from a restaurant menu, but the ingredients and instructions are so unfussy and simple that it’s totally do-able for a party of one.

The recipes are also easily scalable so that you could feed 2 (fancy date!) or 4 (dinner party!) – we’ve made the Catfish Tacos with Chipotle Slaw for the family and it was a big hit.

This Fish with Citrus Caper Sauce recipe isn’t in his book, it’s just something I threw together for a quiet lunch with me, myself and I.  Since most of my readers are cooking for more than one person, I’ve written the recipe out for both serving one (in the body of this post with photos) and four people (in the printable recipe).

How to Cook Fish with Citrus Caper Sauce

Text below is recipe for one serving (see printable recipe at bottom for four servings)

You’ll need:

1 fish fillet (or 1/3 pound shrimp), patted very dry
salt and pepper
2 teaspoons olive oil
1/2 orange (slice 1/4 of the orange into thin slices, the rest will be used for juice)
1/2 lemon (slice 1/4 of the lemon into thin slices, the rest will be used for juice)
1 teaspoon capers (drained)
2 tablespoons white wine
2 teaspoons butter

Season the fish on both sides with salt and pepper. Add olive oil to a hot skillet* and sear the fish fillet on one side.

*I like using a wok when cooking. It gives me the flexibility to cook for one or 8 people – look at all the available surface for cooking!

When you begin to see the color change from opaque to white creep up to halfway up the sides of the fillet, flip the fish over.

Add in the wine, orange/lemon slices, capers and the butter. Squeeze the remaining orange and lemon juice into the pan. Season sauce with a bit more salt and pepper if you’d like. When the sauce begins to bubble, turn heat to medium-low and cook until the fish is cooked through, about 1-2 minutes.

Throw in the fresh parsley and you’re done.

10 minute meal for party of 1.

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Fish with Citrus Caper Sauce Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 5 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes
fish-lemon-caper-sauce-recipe-8668

When it comes to fish, simple is best. This fish recipe only takes 10 minutes to cook, start to finish. I've used a combination of orange and lemon, capers, white wine and then finished it with a bit of butter.

Ingredients:

4 fish fillets of your choice, patted very dry
salt and pepper
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 orange
1 lemon
1 tablespoon capers (drained)
1/2 cup white wine
2 tablespoons butter

Directions:

1. Cut the orange in half. Juice one half of the orange and slice the other half into thin half-moon slices. Repeat with the lemon.

2. Season the fish on both sides with salt and pepper. Heat a large skillet over medium heat. Swirl in the olive oil. When hot, add the fish fillets. Once the cooked edge has reach almost halfway up the fillet, flip the fish.

3. Add in the wine, orange juice, lemon juice, orange/lemon slices, capers and the butter. Season the sauce with a bit of salt and pepper. When the liquid begins bubbling, turn the heat to medium-low, cover and cook until the fish is cooked through, about 1-2 minutes depending on the thickness of your fillet. Serve immediately.

 

 

 

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Seared Scallops with Creamy Sauce http://steamykitchen.com/15113-seared-scallops-creamy-sauce-recipe.html http://steamykitchen.com/15113-seared-scallops-creamy-sauce-recipe.html#comments Mon, 18 Apr 2011 14:13:19 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=15113 Wednesdays are the craziest days in our household. Not only do the boys get out of school 2 hours early each week, but Tae Kwon Do classes start at 5:45pm. Because the boys take separate classes, they normally don’t get out until 7:30pm which means dinner has to be eaten before class. In the afternoons, juggling my own work, homework, ...

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Creamy Scallops and Peppers Recipe

Wednesdays are the craziest days in our household. Not only do the boys get out of school 2 hours early each week, but Tae Kwon Do classes start at 5:45pm. Because the boys take separate classes, they normally don’t get out until 7:30pm which means dinner has to be eaten before class. In the afternoons, juggling my own work, homework, cooking, cleaning and then class is nuts.

So you can imagine why I opt for dinners that only take 15-minutes to make, like this Scallops and Peppers dish. The scallops only take 5 minutes to cook – any longer than they they would turn tough and rubbery anyways.

Spicy Creamy Scallops and Peppers Recipe

The tip to the best scallops is to buy the right kind. Look for scallops that have been “dry packed” – meaning they are not sitting in a preservative solution. The clue? If the scallops at the market are swimming in milky, watery solution, pass on them. Instead, get shrimp and make this same dish.

If you’re getting frozen scallops, look for “dry packed” on the package and check the ingredients, which should just simply say, “scallops”.

Before cooking, pat them very dry and add them to a large, hot skillet. Make sure they don’t touch, otherwise they’ll end up “steaming” rather than searing.

**NOTE The written recipe serves 4, however my photos below depict cooking for 2 people.

Scallops for the Creamy Scallops and Peppers Recipe

Give them plenty of space – you might want to do this in two batches. 1 1/2 minutes each side is all you need in this step, just to get a good sear.

Seared Scallops for the Creamy Scallops and Peppers Recipe

Remove the scallops for now, they’ll finish cooking in the sauce.

Seared and Sauced Scallops for the Creamy Scallops and Peppers Recipe

In the same skillet (no need to clean), add the onions and pepper and saute for a couple of minutes.

Onions and pepper and saute

Next add some wine. glug glug glug.

Wine for the Creamy Scallops and Pepper Recipe

And here’s my secret weapon – Philadelphia Cooking Creme, Santa Fe Blend. You can use any flavor – including Original, Italian Cheese & Herb and Savory Garlic. It’s made from real cream cheese, but designed especially to be used as a ready-made creamy sauce. It easily melts in the pan and is already infused with herbs and spices for that ‘one-stir, dinner’s ready’ sauce.

As a substitute for the Cooking Creme, you can use 6 ounces of cream cheese + 1/2 cup vegetable broth + salt and pepper to taste.

Cooking Creme for the Creamy Scallops

Add the scallops back in and cook for 1 minute (or 2 minutes if you’re using very large scallops).

Adding the Scallops

Throw in the parsley and stir. That’s it!

Parsley for the Creamy Scallops

Dinner’s ready. Serve over rice or pasta.

Ready to eat Creamy Scallops and Pepper

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Seared Scallops with Creamy Sauce Recipe

Servings: 4 Prep Time: 5 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes
Creamy Scallops and Peppers Recipe

This recipe works great with any type of protein - shrimp, beef, chicken or pork - just adjust cooking times. If you are using the smaller bay scallops, shorten cooking time as they cook very quickly.

Feel free to use any Philadelphia Cooking Creme flavor, I've used Santa Fe Blend.

If you'd like to use cream cheese instead of the Philadelphia Cooking Creme, substitutions are below.

Serve over rice or pasta.

Ingredients:

2 tablespoons olive oil, divided
1 pound dry-packed sea scallops
1 or 2 red bell peppers, sliced
1 onion, sliced
1/4 cup dry white wine
EITHER: One 10oz package of Philadelphia Cooking Creme OR [6oz light cream cheese, softened+1/2 cup vegetable broth+salt/pepper to taste]1 tablespoon minced fresh parsley

Directions:

1. Pat the scallops very dry. Heat a large saute pan or skillet over high heat. When hot, swirl in just 1 tablespoon of the olive oil. Add the scallops to the hot pan, try to keep them from touching each other. Give 'em room to sear! Sear 1 1/2 minutes on each side. Remove scallops to plate.

2. In same, now empty skillet, add in the remaining 1 tablespoon of olive oil and turn the heat to medium-high. Add the pepper and onions and saute for 2 minutes until softened.

3. Pour in the wine and let simmer for 1 minute. Mix in the cooking creme (or substitution of the cream cheese+vegetable+salt/pepper). Bring to simmer, stir until sauce is evenly mixed.

4. Add the scallops back into the sauce. Cook for 1 minute. Turn off heat, stir in the parsley. Serve immediately.

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Spinach, Mushroom and Bacon Fondue (video) http://steamykitchen.com/11941-spinach-mushroom-and-bacon-cheese-fondue.html http://steamykitchen.com/11941-spinach-mushroom-and-bacon-cheese-fondue.html#comments Tue, 09 Nov 2010 16:01:17 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=11941 While most of the country is already turned on their heaters and brought out their winter jackets, we’ve been suffering from the unbearable heat with 10,254% humidity until just a few days ago. I envy those of you in cooler states, you get to snuggle under a fuzzy blanket and drink hot chocolate with the mug cradled in your palms ...

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While most of the country is already turned on their heaters and brought out their winter jackets, we’ve been suffering from the unbearable heat with 10,254% humidity until just a few days ago. I envy those of you in cooler states, you get to snuggle under a fuzzy blanket and drink hot chocolate with the mug cradled in your palms for warmth.

Of course, the grass is always greener on the other side, right?

A few days ago, when it finally dipped below 80F and I could safely open the front door without it feeling like a furnace blast, we made fondue at home as well as on my cooking segment on Daytime television (video below)

First, a little about where this recipe came from. I recently hosted a recipe contest with Pacific Natural Foods where 2 winners got an all-expense paid trip to culinary boot camp at the Culinary Institute of America in Napa Valley.

Lucky winners, Michael Natkin of Herbavoracious and Virginia Slim scored the trips — and I got to choose the “Jaden’s Pick” winner, which was this Spinach and Mushroom Fondue by One Spicy Dish blogger, Holly.

I stayed pretty true to her recipe…except for one thing.

I added bacon.

Would you expect anything less from me?

Dipping foods included blanched cauliflower and broccoli florets:

…asparagus spears…

….dunked in the fondue up by happy kid number 1….

…pumpernickel bread chunks, the favorite of kid number 2…

…and apple chunks, my personal favorite.

Yum
Print

Spinach Mushroom and Bacon Cheese Fondue Recipe

Servings: 4 as main course Prep Time: 10 Cook Time: 10
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Adapted from Spinach and Mushroom Fondue by One Spicy Dish blog.

Ingredients:

32 ounces chicken or vegetable broth (I prefer Pacific Natural Food Chicken Broth)
16 oz. mild cheddar cheese, shredded
8 oz. gouda cheese, shredded
2 tablespoons flour or cornstarch (I prefer flour)
1 tablespoon butter
3 oz. frozen chopped spinach, thawed
3 slices bacon, minced
1 clove garlic, minced
4 oz. fresh mushrooms of your choice, chopped
3/4 cup white wine (or beer)Dipping foods:
Broccoli florets
Cauliflower florets
Asparagus spears, ends trimmed and cut into 3" lengths
Green beans, trimmed
Granny smith apples, cut into chunks
Pumpernickel bread, cut into chunks

Directions:

1. Prepare the dipping foods by bringing the chicken stock to a boil in a sauce pot. Add the broccoli, cauliflower, asparagus and green beans and cook for 2 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, strain out the vegetables, reserving the broth. You will use 1/4 cup of this reserved broth in the fondue, but save the rest for another use.

2. In a large bowl, toss together the shredded cheddar, shredded gouda and the flour until flour is coating cheese evenly. Set aside.

3. Take the thawed chopped spinach in your hand and squeeze as much water as you can out of the spinach. Set aside.

4. Heat a fondue pot or medium pot over medium heat with the butter and bacon. Cook the bacon for 2 minutes (make sure the bacon does not burn or cook too quickly). Add the garlic and mushrooms and saute until the mushrooms are softened, about 2 minutes. Pour in wine and 1/4 cup of the previously reserved chicken broth from step 1. Bring to a simmer and in batches, add a handful of the cheese, stirring and letting the cheese melt before adding more. Stir in the chopped spinach. If the fondue becomes too thick, add a couple tablespoons of additional broth.

5. Serve fondue with the vegetables, apples and bread.

Other Fondue Recipes

Aged Cheddar & Guinness Fondue – Steamy Kitchen
Making Swiss Fondue
– David Lebovitz
Crab Fondue – Simply Recipes
Roast Pumpkin & Cheese Fondue – Epicurious
Chevre & Herb Fondue – Je Mange la Ville

***

Tamron Lens Giveaway

pssst….don’t forget, I’m giving away a Tamron lens!

Giveaway is open until 11/30/10

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Summer Shack’s Famous Pan Roasted Lobster http://steamykitchen.com/5621-summer-shack-pan-roasted-lobster.html http://steamykitchen.com/5621-summer-shack-pan-roasted-lobster.html#comments Thu, 17 Sep 2009 13:46:06 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/?p=5621 Lobster is one of those foods that are too damn expensive. Where I live, a lobster is around $18.99 per pound, which is ridiculous for the amount of food you actually get from a single lobster! However, if you’re calculating cost based on how LONG it takes to eat and savor the food item, then lobster’s a pretty good deal. ...

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Lobster is one of those foods that are too damn expensive. Where I live, a lobster is around $18.99 per pound, which is ridiculous for the amount of food you actually get from a single lobster! However, if you’re calculating cost based on how LONG it takes to eat and savor the food item, then lobster’s a pretty good deal. Sure, you can eat the tail in a few bites, but the real prize is in the tiny legs where the meat is the sweetest and most delicate.

In fact, I don’t even like the lobster tail – I’m all about working for my food and would rather trade you the tail for the legs and body. Even the claw doesn’t excite me – you can have that too!

You know I’m in heaven when I have to dissect, pick, suck, nibble and pinch for just the tiniest morsel of meat. A lobster of this size would probably take me an entire hour of labor to finish. Talk about savoring!

I was in Boston last month, and was lucky enough to dine with new friend and author, Debra Samuels. Deb co-authored the book korean-table-debra-samuelsThe Korean Table (I highly recommend this book), my publicist, Grace Niwa and Holly and Rowan from my publisher, Tuttle Publishing.

Holly ordered Summer Shack’s most famous dish, the Pan Roasted Lobster, a dish which really deserves to be highlighted with spotlights and a red carpet. Because it’s that good. I don’t even remember what I ordered – Holly was sitting next to me and the moment this dish was gently laid down in front of her, I couldn’t help it.

The blogger in me came out, I turned to Holly, put my hand on her shoulder, leaned in and said, “I must. I can’t help it. I can’t control the urge. You understand, don’t you?”

She nodded. Of course she understood! Holly is the editor of my cookbook and we had been working closely together like bread and butter for 2 years now!

And so I stood up, picked up her plate of hot, oozing, creamy, savory lobster and whisked it away.

To a table with better light so I could photograph it.

THE SHAME!!! THE HORROR!!!!

I know. I hate taking photos at restaurants.

But when a dish like this Pan Roasted Lobster is this good – and I can score a recipe for you directly from this guy:

jasper-white-summer-shack Chef Jasper White, winner several awards for Best Chef and author of  summer-shack-cookbookI think you’ll understand.

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Summer Shack’s Pan-Roasted Lobster with Chervil & Chives Recipe

recipe from Summer Shack Restaurant – Chef Jasper White (c) Scribner.

The bourbon in this recipe adds a sweetness that mingles potently with the sweetness of the lobster. An excellent Cognac or brandy can be substituted for similar results. Fresh chervil imparts a hint of anise flavor to the lobster; if unavailable, fresh parsley mixed with a small amount of fresh tarragon (1/2 teaspoon) will give a taste almost as good.

Equipment: You will need a medium Chinese cleaver or large chef’s knife, a heavy oven-proof 12-inch sauté pan and tongs.

2 live 1 ¾ pound hard-shell lobsters
2 tablespoons peanut oil
2 shallots (1 ½ ounces), finely diced
¼ cup bourbon or cognac
2 or 3 tablespoons dry white wine
6 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into small pieces and chilled
1 tablespoon finely chopped chervil
1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh chives
kosher or sea salt
freshly ground pepper

1. Preheat the broiler or preheat the oven as hot as possible (500 or 550F). Position the oven rack in the upper third of the oven. You may need to shorten the cooking time slightly if the broiler rack is close to the heat.

2. Split the lobster lengthwise (it will kill the lobster instantly). Remove the tomalley and the roe if present. Now cut off the claw with the knuckle attached (where the knuckle meets the carapace). Cut the lobster halves into quarters. You will now have 6 pieces of lobster. Place the pieces of lobster, shell side down, on a plate.

3. Place the tomalley and roe in a small bowl. With a fork, break them into small pieces.

4. Place a heavy 12-inch sauté pan over the highest heat possible. Allow the pan to heat for 3 to 5 minutes until it becomes extremely hot. Add the oil and heat until it forms a film on the surface of the pan. Slide the lobster pieces, shell side down, into the hot oil. Using tongs, move the pieces in order to evenly sear all the shells. Because the lobster pieces are not flat, you will need to hold them with the tongs and press the shells into the hot oil to accomplish this. The claws need to be seared on only one side. When the shells have all turned bright red, which should take no more than 2 minutes, turn the pieces over. The oil will also have taken on a beautiful red tinge. Add the tomalley and roe to the pan.

5. Place the pan in the oven. If using the broiler, cook for 2 minutes. If using the oven, cook for 3 minutes. The shells should be slightly browned, even a bit charred in places.

6. Remove the pan from the oven and return it to the stove at maximum heat. Turn off the oven and put your plates in to warm. This will take only a minute. Warning: The handle of the pan will be red-hot and will stay hot until the dish is complete. To avoid burns, wear oven mitts from now until the dish is complete.

7. Add the shallots to the fat in the pan and stir. Add the bourbon and ignite. Shake the pan until the flames die down. Add the wine and let liquid in the pan reduce until the pan is almost dry. Turn the heat to low.

8. Quickly remove the pieces of lobster and place, shell side down, on warm plates. I like to “reconstruct” the lobster so that it looks similar to a split lobster. Arrange the claws so that they lean into the center of the lobster.

9. Return the pan to the heat and add the butter, chervil and chives. Swirl or stir the butter in the pan to create a creamy sauce with the pan juices. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Use very little salt, if any, because the lobster adds its own salt. Spoon the sauce over the lobster pieces (see photograph insert following page 50) and serve at once.

Serves 2 as a generous main course or 4 as a light meal or first course

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Aged Black Garlic: a new superfood? http://steamykitchen.com/2927-black-garlic-with-scallops.html http://steamykitchen.com/2927-black-garlic-with-scallops.html#comments Mon, 23 Mar 2009 06:06:28 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/?p=2927 [imagebrowser id=3] View 7 photos in the above slide show Why is it that Asian ingredients that are “good for you” are so darn ugly and nasty sounding? Mom used to feed me and my brother bird’s nest soup, chilled frog jelly soup and countless other strange protein specimens that would probably make you wonder how I’m still alive today. ...

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View 7 photos in the above slide show

Why is it that Asian ingredients that are “good for you” are so darn ugly and nasty sounding? Mom used to feed me and my brother bird’s nest soup, chilled frog jelly soup and countless other strange protein specimens that would probably make you wonder how I’m still alive today.

The latest “it” ingredient is aged black garlic. It’s matte-black and gooey-soft with a chewyishy texture. It’s the new plaything of gourmet restaurant kitchens across the U.S.. and its recent appearance on Top Chef and Iron Chef television shows created newfound fame for this otherwise frightful thing. Trust me, if you found this on your kitchen counter and didn’t know that it was supposed to be black, you’d probably think it was rotten.

Well, good thing it’s not rotten, but rather “aged,” a more pleasant way to describe the process of letting time and temperature do its thing. I spoke with Scott Kim, CEO of Black Garlic, Inc. and he told me that garlic heads either grown in Korea or California are put into a machine he invented which fluctuates temperature and humidity for thirty days. What results is supposedly a garlic that has twice the antioxidants as regular garlic.

I think there’s a lot of misinformation and mystery about black garlic – some articles hint that black garlic has been used for hundreds of years in Korea and Japan as a superfood and Kim claims to have invented the machine a handful of years ago after a story he heard from someone in the garlic business in Korea. I asked, “Is the black garlic exposed to light source in his machine (as I’ve read online)?” Kim answered no.

I asked him how people used to make black garlic before his magical machine and he told me he didn’t know. How do they make black garlic in Japan? He didn’t know either. The scientific study done in Korea of the antioxidant level is not available online, though Kim did offer to send me information in Korean. 

So, I’m highly skeptical on its superfood status and the origins of black garlic until I can find more information. But there’s one thing I’m sure of – and that is I love the taste of black garlic. It’s sweet, mild, caramelly and reminds me of molasses. When you bite into a raw clove, you don’t get the harsh-hit-you-in-the-face that regular garlic has. It’s smooth, soft and the garlic flavor is mellowed out times one-hundred.

I was lucky enough to get a few heads to play with from my friend Chef David Eger of Earthy.com (and in exchange I let him use the photo of black garlic that I shot), where they sell four ounces of black garlic for $10.00. I’ve sliced a few cloves (as best as I could…it’s so soft that it’s difficult to slice), fried them in olive oil with scallops and it was dynamo.

Black Garlic at our Blogger Playdate

My friends, Chef Mark and Jennifer of The Culinary Media Network in New York made a bruschetta out of a few cloves for our dinner party and guests could not stop eating it. I had to steal bruschetta off of people’s plates just to get a photograph of it! If you want to see black garlic in action, watch the Culinary Media Network video below (note: I didn’t speak with Scott Kim, founder of Black Garlic, Inc. until the day after this video was shot – so the comment about the garlic being exposed to light is incorrect.)

Superfood Status?

Is it an ancient Asian secret superfood? I don’t know and am trying to hold my judgement until an independant lab in the U.S. can verify and publish the results in English. But try aged, black garlic for its taste. I like using the black garlic is raw (like in a bruschetta), roasted whole cloves and then smeared on toasted bread with a drizzle of olive oil or sliced and fried like in this recipe.


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Black Garlic with Scallops Recipe

Even if you don’t have black garlic, this is a simple recipe for scallops. Just substitute the black garlic with regular garlic. Just don’t expect any nooky tonight, unless you’re both having the dish!3 tablespoons butter, divided
16 extra-large dry-packed scallops, patted very dry (about 1 ½ pounds)
salt and freshly ground black pepper
3 cloves black garlic, thinly sliced (or use regular garlic)
1-2 teaspoons finely minced jalepeno pepper
¼ cup white wine
2 teaspoons good balsamic vinegar
2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley

Heat a large frying pan with just 2 tablespoons of the butter over high heat. Season the scallops with salt and pepper, and when the butter is bubbling, gently lay the scallops in the pan, not touching. Sear the scallops and cook for 4 minutes, turning once. They should have a lovely golden brown color on both sides. Transfer to a platter.

To the same hot pan on high heat, add the remaining 1 tablespoon of butter. Add the garlic slices and the jalepeno pepper and fry until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Pour in the white wine and the balsamic vinegar into the pan. Let simmer for 1 minute, season with salt and pepper and add the fresh parsley. Pour over scallops.

Serves 4

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Stephanie Izard’s Steamed Mussel and Fennel Escabeche http://steamykitchen.com/2841-mussels-escabeche.html http://steamykitchen.com/2841-mussels-escabeche.html#comments Tue, 10 Mar 2009 03:01:01 +0000 http://steamykitchen.com/blog/?p=2841 Top Chef winner Stephanie Izard I am SO guilty of slacking on my recipe posting duties. Forgive me. I’ve come up with several really good excuses: 1) I’m still editing my cookbook. Working on my intro chapter (why is it that the intro chapter is the last chapter I wrote? Shouldn’t it be a “this !(*%&!_#@ cookbook is killin’ me!” ...

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Top Chef winner Stephanie Izard

I am SO guilty of slacking on my recipe posting duties.

Forgive me.

I’ve come up with several really good excuses:

1) I’m still editing my cookbook. Working on my intro chapter (why is it that the intro chapter is the last chapter I wrote? Shouldn’t it be a “this !(*%&!_#@ cookbook is killin’ me!” chapter? I’m trying to be really peppy and nice in my tone, but my short attention span really doesn’t like it when I pull in something like a 18 month project. So, when you’re reading the Steamy Kitchen Cookbook and it sounds like I’m gritting my teeth while trying to be all light and happy – you know why.

2) Lots of TV segments! Each time I go on television, I have several hours of planning, prepping, shopping, cooking, driving, scripting in addition to the demo on TV. I love it! I think I was born to be on television.

3) Hosting a Food Bloggers Bash in the Bahamas with Club Med! Now that was seriously rockin’ fun.I know you’re all tired of reading about our adventure, but I will never tire of talking about my buddies David, Elise, Matt, Diane, Deb, Adam, Alex and Steve-Anna. Will I host another Bloggers Bash soon? You betcha. Though David is trying to convince us that Cannes in July is the place to be. I don’t care where…just as long as there’s a free bar. There’s even chatter that we may get together and hold a free giveaway for Club Med’s upcoming Food and Wine Festival in September at their Punta Cana (Domincan Republic) resort. And yes, for all you nosy folks, I’m Club Med North America’s freelance food writer, one of the best gigs I’ve ever had.

Enough of excuses. Let’s talk about Stephanie Izard, winner of last season’s Top Chef. Fabulouso woman indeed! Now, in the photos if it looks like I did all the cooking and she just looked pretty for the camera:

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that’s SO NOT TRUE! Stephanie gave us a private cooking lesson and I just happened to jump in at the very last minute to help plate.

Sneaky!!!

Okay, see this totally gorgeous gal? Jessie is Stephanie’s pastry chef…incredibly talented:

jesse - stephanie izard

The the dish that Stephanie taught us is the Steamed Mussel and Fennel Escabeche!

Stephanie Izard Mussels Escabeche

Steamed Mussel and Fennel Escabeche

Serves 4

Escabeche might be spelled or pronounced differently depending on where you find it, but whether it’s referring to Puerto Rican, Jamaican, Spanish or Provencal cuisine, it’s generally the same thing: an acidic marinade. I’ve always liked escabeche on oilier fish like mackerel or on nice plump mussels, where the acidity is a great counter balance.

Steamed mussels

1 tablespoon olive oil
1/2 cup onion, chopped
2 cloves garlic, sliced
2 pounds live mussels
salt and pepper, to taste
2 sprigs of thyme
3/4 cup white wine

Heat a tablespoon of olive oil over medium-high heat in a large saucepot, add onion and garlic and sweat for two minutes. Add mussels, stir to coat, season with salt and pepper.

Add wine and thyme, cover and let steam until the shells just open, which should take about three to five minutes, depending on the size of the mussels.

Once they cool, pull the mussels from their shells, discarding the shells and setting the mussels aside.

Fennel Escabeche

1 tablespoon olive oil
1/2 red pepper, julienned
1/4 cup red onion, thinly sliced
1 cup fennel bulb, thinly sliced
1 serrano chile, seeds removed and thinly sliced
1 clove garlic, minced
3 tablespoons white balsamic vinegar
1 tablespoon white wine
1 teaspoon sugar
salt and pepper, to taste

Heat the olive oil over medium heat, add the veggies and sauté, without browning, until they’re tender, which should take about three minutes. Add balsamic, white wine, sugar and season with salt and pepper. Cook for another minute or until the liquid is reduced until almost all of the liquid has evaporated. Pour the mixture over the mussels and transfer to the refrigerator, chilling it for at least an hour and no more than overnight.

Bruschetta

12 half-inch baguette slices, cut on a bias
1 teaspoon olive oil
salt, to taste
3 large basil leaves, “chiffonade” or sliced into very thin strips.

Preheat oven to 375F.

Brush baguette slices with olive oil, sprinkle with salt then bake until just toasted. While they’re baking, pull the escabeche from the fridge to bring it up closer to room temp.

Once the bread slices are nice and toasted, place three on each plate and top with a small pile of the mussel escabeche then garnish with basil threads.

Tip of the Trade: How to Beard Mussels
Before cooking mussels, they have to be soaked, “bearded” (meaning you have to remove what’s technically called the byssal threads), and then cleaned. First, soak the mussels in clean water for about 15 minutes to loosen any sand stowaways. Next, grab hold of the beard (using a dry towel or even tweezers helps keep your grip on the slippery sucker) and give it a yank, pulling toward the hinged end of the mussel. (Pulling toward the opening end can kill the mussel.) Lastly, clean the shells and edge with an abrasive scrub pad under running water. Now you’re ready to cook.

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These photos were taken by Diane!

But wait…there’s more…

You must read David’s hilarious post-Club Med post, Matt’s awesome “tan and happy” photoshoot, Deb’s amazing photo collage, Diane’s recipe for Club Med’s Green Flash Cocktail and also Stephanie Izard’s blog post on the trip!

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