Recipes – Steamy Kitchen Recipes https://steamykitchen.com Steamy Kitchen: fast recipes, simple recipes, with fresh ingredients to create delicious meals. Sun, 15 Jul 2018 16:07:58 -0400 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.7 Vietnamese Iced Coffee (Cafe Sua Da) https://steamykitchen.com/492-vietnamese-iced-coffee.html https://steamykitchen.com/492-vietnamese-iced-coffee.html#comments Tue, 10 Jul 2018 11:24:39 +0000 https://steamykitchen.com/blog/?p=492 Vietnamese Iced Coffee is an intensely brewed coffee concentrate that drips down into a tall glass of ice and a big spoonful of sweetened condensed milk. To make Vietnamese Iced Coffee, start with medium grind French Roast coffee, brew in a Vietnamese coffee press with 2 tablespoons of sweetened condensed milk, and then pour over […]

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Vietnamese Iced Coffee is an intensely brewed coffee concentrate that drips down into a tall glass of ice and a big spoonful of sweetened condensed milk. To make Vietnamese Iced Coffee, start with medium grind French Roast coffee, brew in a Vietnamese coffee press with 2 tablespoons of sweetened condensed milk, and then pour over ice.

Vietnamese Iced Coffee Recipe

If you love coffee, and have only tried weak, watered down coffee served over ice, you’re in for a big awakening.

Vietnamese Iced Coffee is creamy, rich, smooth and sweet. Oh, and intense coffee flavor. It’s bold in flavor and makes a wonderful Vietnamese Coffee Ice Cream as well.

Vietnamese Iced Coffee Recipe (Cafe Sua Da)

When I made this on TV years ago, I was grateful that I brought extra coffee, ice and sweetened condensed milk – the entire television crew and morning hosts/hostesses all wanted a gallon of Vietnamese Iced Coffee for now….and another one to save for their afternoon treat!

Vietnamese Iced Coffee Recipe (Cafe Sua Da)

What type of coffee for Vietnamese Iced Coffee

To make Vietnamese Iced Coffee, start with using the right grind of coffee. Look for MEDIUM coarse grind coffee. I’ve found French Roast is best, but you can use any type of coffee, as long as the coffee is medium coarse grind, you can use it. Fine grind coffee would fall right through the little holes of the coffee press.

Vietnamese Iced Coffee Recipe (Cafe Sua Da) ground coffee

Medium Grind Coffee – from INeedCoffee.com

Many Vietnamese in America like using Café du Monde coffee from New Orleans. If you are interested in the history of why the Vietnamese use Café du Monde, head over to The Secret Ingredient to America’s Vietnamese Coffee. The yellow can is the most popular (I prefer this over the Café du Monde French Roast – but try both!)

Use Sweetened Condensed Milk

It’s the sweet, sticky, thick stuff – NOT evaporated milk! No substitutions here! Find this at any grocery store.

Vietnamese Iced Coffee Recipe (Cafe Sua Da) sweetened condensed milk

Get a Vietnamese Coffee Press

Found at any Asian market – they usually cost a few dollars, or online – Amazon sells them! I’ve purchased several from this seller on Amazon and they’ve been fantastic. Don’t pay more than $10 per press.

Vietnamese Iced Coffee Recipe (Cafe Sua Da) coffee press

I’ve also used this funny looking press called Aeropress to make Vietnamese coffee and espresso. I love this gadget and use it every morning to brew my coffee in the morning. It’s simple to use. Amazingly effective and highly rated. There’s even a cult following for Aeropress. Ok, so not authentic for Vietnamese coffee, but still great. It’s about $30.

How to make Vietnamese Iced Coffee (Cafe Sua Da)

Step 1: Add 2 tablespoons of sweetened condensed milk to a glass

 Vietnamese Iced Coffee (Cafe Sua Da) - start with condensed milk

 

Step 2: Add 2 tablespoons of ground coffee to the base of the coffee press. Wet the grounds just a little bit with some hot water.

 

Vietnamese Iced Coffee (Cafe Sua Da) - add coffee

Step 3: Screw on the press tight. The coffee should be packed well.

Vietnamese Iced Coffee (Cafe Sua Da) - screw on the press

Step 4: Pour boiled hot water into the coffee press.

Vietnamese Iced Coffee (Cafe Sua Da) - add hot water

Cover with its little hat.

Vietnamese Iced Coffee (Cafe Sua Da) - cover

Step 5: Wait. It will drip veeerrrry….veeerrrry slowly. It takes 3-5 minutes to finish brewing.

Vietnamese Iced Coffee (Cafe Sua Da) - cover

The longer it takes, the stronger the coffee. Notice that there are only a few drops per second. For me, I can’t wait any longer than 5 minutes. If the coffee is dripping too fast, then use a small spoon or tip of knife to screw the press on tighter, 1 turn clockwise. Or if it’s dripping too slow, unscrew 1 turn counterclockwise.

While it’s dripping, go get some ice in a glass. You’ve got nothing else to do!

Vietnamese Iced Coffee (Cafe Sua Da) - drip

Step 6: Once it’s finished, stir well.

Vietnamese Iced Coffee (Cafe Sua Da) - stir

You can set your coffee maker on top of its overturned lid to prevent dripping onto your nice table.

Step 7: Pour over a tall glass filled with ice and enjoy!

Vietnamese Iced Coffee (Cafe Sua Da) - pour over ice

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Vietnamese Iced Coffee (Cafe Sua Da)

You’ll need a Vietnamese Coffee press or an Aeropress.

  • 2 tablespoons Medium-Grind French Roast Coffee
  • 2 tablespoons Sweetened condensed milk
  • ice
  1. 1. Boil water, remove from heat to cool just a bit while you measure out your coffee grounds.

  2. 2. Add sweetened condensed milk to a cup. Fill a separate, tall glass with ice. The more ice you use, the weaker the iced coffee.

  3. 3. Spoon in the coffee into the Vietnamese Coffee Maker. Wet the grounds with about a tablespoon of the hot water. Screw on the press, finger tight. Pour in the hot water and cover. The coffee will slowly drip into the cup. Use the tip of a spoon or butter knife to turn the press clockwise (for tighter press, if the coffee is dripping too fast) or counter-clockwise (too loosen if the coffee isn’t dripping at all.) It should take about 3-5 minutes to finish brewing. Adjust the press as needed.

  4. 4. Stir the hot coffee and the sweetened condensed milk well. Pour over the ice in the tall glass.

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Pineapple Fried Rice https://steamykitchen.com/42313-pineapple-fried-rice-recipe.html https://steamykitchen.com/42313-pineapple-fried-rice-recipe.html#comments Mon, 25 Jun 2018 11:07:07 +0000 https://steamykitchen.com/?p=42313 In this Pineapple Fried Rice recipe, you’ll learn: How to prevent soggy, heavy, goopy fried rice. How to easily cut a whole pineapple to use as a pretty serving bowl. Why cooking certain ingredients separately is essential to the best Pineapple Fried Rice. Pineapple Fried Rice only takes minutes to cook, but can easily become […]

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In this Pineapple Fried Rice recipe, you’ll learn:

  • How to prevent soggy, heavy, goopy fried rice.
  • How to easily cut a whole pineapple to use as a pretty serving bowl.
  • Why cooking certain ingredients separately is essential to the best Pineapple Fried Rice.

Pineapple Fried Rice Recipe

Pineapple Fried Rice only takes minutes to cook, but can easily become a heavy, soggy mess if you just throw all the ingredients into the pan for a stir fry. I’ll show you have to make the best pineapple fried rice at home with some simple cooking tips that will guarantee fluffy, light, tasty fried rice — and NOT soggy, goopy or heavy.

Why use leftover rice

Use leftover rice that’s been refrigerated. Freshly cooked, hot rice will result in too-sticky, glue-like texture in your fried rice. That’s because hot, cooked rice is already sticky and perfectly cooked. Adding this into a wok — with additional ingredients and liquid (like soy sauce) will turn the rice into mush.

Leftover, refrigerated rice has had a chance to dry out a bit. The process of cooking and adding in liquids and wet ingredients (for Pineapple fried rice, it would be soy sauce and pineapple) will rehydrate the rice grains.

Sometimes, I’ll make a batch of rice, then freeze it. When I want to make fried rice, I’ll defrost the rice to use (but make sure you don’t heat it through — just defrost until no longer frozen).

Separate the grains before cooking

Here is another important tip – prior to cooking, wet your hands and run your fingers through the cold rice, separating each grain of rice. Rice won’t stick as much to wet hands. Separating the grains before adding to the wok will make the rice fluffier and lighter. Imagine adding a clump of rice into the wok and trying to separate out the clumps with a spatula – it is too difficult!

Cook ingredients separately

In this recipe for Pineapple Fried Rice, you’ll cook the egg first, then dish out to plate. Then, in same pan, cook the chicken. A couple minutes later, add the shrimp. This is to ensure that each ingredient is perfectly cooked (not over or under cooked) AND that each ingredient maintains their distinct flavor and texture.

Chicken takes longer to cook than shrimp, and if you cooked them together, the shrimp will be rubbery and tough.

The egg is cooked separate because we want perfectly scrambled egg pieces in the fried rice. If you add the egg into the pan along with other ingredients, the egg will just coat all the ingredients and make them heavy. Plus, everything will taste like a mish-mash of ingredients. I want my eggs to taste like eggs, and my shrimp to taste like shrimp!

Cut whole pineapple for serving bowl

If you want to use whole pineapple for Pineapple Fried Rice, use the pineapple as a bowl for a presentation. Take a look at your pineapple. Which side is the flattest? The flattest side should be the bottom of the pineapple bowl. If your pineapple is roly-poly, then go ahead and make a very thin slice, just to create a flat edge. I probably could have sliced mine a little thinner — too thick of a cut and you’ll cut too much flesh (and your bowl will leak)

pineapple fried rice recipe-6810-2
pineapple fried rice recipe-6811-2

Now cut the pineapple in half, lengthwise – keeping in mind here where the “bottom” of the pineapple bowl is.

pineapple fried rice recipe-6815

Reserve half of that pineapple for another use.

Use a knife to cut along the edge of the pineapple, about 1/4″ away from edge. Go all the way around. I like using a flexible boning knife so that i can get deep into the pineapple. Just be careful not to cut all the way through the skin — and especially not through the bottom of the pineapple.

pineapple fried rice recipe-6835

Cut along both sides of the pineapple core. We’ll discard the core later.

pineapple fried rice recipe-6836

Use a large spoon to scoop to lift up the pineapple flesh and loosen the pieces.

pineapple fried rice recipe-6839
pineapple fried rice recipe-6840

Take out the core, and set aside (we might have to use it a little later.)

pineapple fried rice recipe-6841

Scoop and scrape out the rest of the flesh, being careful not to go through the skin or through the bottom of the pineapple.

pineapple fried rice recipe-6842

But oops, see that little hole? Don’t worry. I’ll plug it up. Cut a small piece from your pineapple core, and press it into that hole. That should plug it up nicely.

pineapple fried rice recipe-6844
pineapple fried rice recipe-6845

Now, it’s ready for your Pineapple Fried Rice! Discard the rest of the core. Cut the pineapple flesh into small, bite-sized pieces, about the size of a dice. If you feel like you want more pineapple, feel free to cut the other side as well. But remember, that too much pineapple in the fried rice will mask the flavors of the delicate rice, shrimp and chicken.

Everyday Chinese Cooking by Katie Chin

The original recipe and photo of the dish is from Everyday Chinese Cookbook by Katie Chin (reprinted with permission). I’ve made changes to her recipe (Katie used pre-cooked chicken and pre-cooked shrimp in the recipe), and I think you’ll love the flavors of sweet pineapple in this dish.

More Fried Rice Recipes

Cauliflower Fried “Rice” with kale & chicken – Looking to limit your carbs? Here’s how to use grated cauliflower as rice!

Chicken Fried Rice Recipe

Kimchi Fried Rice Recipe

Shrimp Fried Rice Recipe

Pineapple Fried Rice Recipe

Pineapple Fried Rice Recipe

Pineapple Fried Rice Recipe adapted from Everyday Chinese Cookbook by Katie Chin, reprinted with permission. We’ll be only using HALF of a whole pineapple, that’s cut in half, lengthwise. If you don’t care about serving the rice in the pineapple, then use 1 1/2 cups of diced fresh pineapple. Feel free to use brown rice in this recipe.

  • 1 whole pineapple
  • 2 large eggs (slightly beaten)
  • salt & freshly ground black pepper
  • 4 ounces chicken (cut into bite sized cubes)
  • 4 ounces raw shrimp (shelled & deveined, cut into bite sized cubes)
  • 3 tablespoons cooking oil (divided)
  • 2 stalks green onion (chopped)
  • 1 teaspoon grated or minced fresh ginger
  • 3 cups cold, leftover rice
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 1/2 teaspoon Asian sesame oil
  • 6 white button mushrooms (thinly sliced (or shiitake mushrooms))
  • 1/2 cup fresh or thawed frozen peas
  1. Cut the pineapple according to the step by step photos in the post, above the recipe. Cut pineapple flesh into small dice, we’ll use about 1 1/2 cups. Save the remaining unused pineapple for another use.

  2. In a small bowl, season the chicken salt and pepper and a few drops of sesame oil. In a separate small bowl, do the same for the shrimp. Wet your hands and separate the grains of the cooked, chilled rice.
  3. Heat a wok or large saute pan over medium-high heat. When hot, swirl in just 1 tablespoon of cooking oil. Add in the eggs, and scramble until just set. Transfer to plate and set aside.

  4. Wipe the wok or pan clean with paper towel. Heat wok over high heat. When hot, swirl in 1 tablespoon cooking oil. Add the chicken pieces and stir fry until just browned, but still slightly pink on the inside, about 2 minutes. Add in the shrimp to the wok and stir fry the chicken and shrimp together, until the shrimp is pink and the chicken is just cooked through, about 1 minute. Transfer the chicken and shrimp to same plate as the eggs and set aside.

  5. Return wok to stove, heat over high heat. When hot, swirl in 1 tablespoon of cooking oil. Add in the green onions and ginger and stir fry for 15 seconds, until fragrant. Add in the cooked rice and mushrooms and stir-fry for 2 minutes, until each grain of rice is hot to the core. Add in the soy sauce and sesame oil, give it a good toss. Add in the reserved egg/chicken/shrimp mixture, the pineapple cubes, the peas and toss well. Cook for an 2 minutes, until all ingredients are heated through. Taste, and season with additional soy sauce and black pepper, if desired.

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Chicken Fried Rice https://steamykitchen.com/41853-chicken-fried-rice.html https://steamykitchen.com/41853-chicken-fried-rice.html#comments Sun, 24 Jun 2018 21:02:26 +0000 https://steamykitchen.com/?p=41853 In this authentic Chicken Fried Rice recipe, you’ll learn: Stir fry secrets to creating flavorful, delicate, authentic Chinese fried rice. No gumminess, no soggy fried rice here! Simple marinade for any type of meat to add to fried rice. Fried rice variations – make your own family favorite! Shortcut to fried rice when you don’t have […]

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In this authentic Chicken Fried Rice recipe, you’ll learn:

  • Stir fry secrets to creating flavorful, delicate, authentic Chinese fried rice. No gumminess, no soggy fried rice here!
  • Simple marinade for any type of meat to add to fried rice.
  • Fried rice variations – make your own family favorite!
  • Shortcut to fried rice when you don’t have leftover rice.

chicken fried rice recipe

Authentic Chinese fried rice is so easy to make….but so easy to get wrong. Oftentimes, those attempting fried rice without learning just a couple simple tricks will end up with a goopy, glue-y, heavy mess. I’ll show you the techniques for a restaurant-worthy, Chinese mom approved, Chicken Fried Rice.

chicken fried rice recipe

How to make Chicken Fried Rice

What kind of rice?

chicken fried rice recipe - leftover rice

Fried rice is made with leftover rice, that’s been refrigerated (though I’ll show you a shortcut later.) Leftover rice has had a chance to dry out a bit – which is a good thing – because we’re adding ingredients and liquids (soy sauce) that will add moisture back into the rice.

If you used freshly cooked, steaming hot rice – and added more liquids and ingredients, it becomes gummy and sticky.

You can use brown rice, jasmine rice (popular in SE Asia), short-grain rice (popular in Korea and Japan), basmati rice, multi-grain rice. It’s up to you – as long as it’s already cooked and previously refrigerated. When we cook rice, we’ll make a double batch, so that I have extra for fried rice later in the week.

Before you’re ready to make the fried rice, wet your hands and use your fingers to break up the rice grains – so that each rice grain is separate. You can do this with a fork, but it’s easier and faster to just use wet fingers to break up the clumps (rice doesn’t stick that well to wet hands.) If you don’t break up the clumps, you’ll have a really tough time in the wok, trying to break them up with a spatula.

Rice shortcut

Shortcut: If you’re hankering for some fried rice, but don’t have leftover rice, do this:

  1. Cook rice the normal way, but use 25% less water than normal. No need to be exact, just use a little less water.
  2. After rice cooked, open lid immediately, spread out on a baking sheet (or large plate/tray that will fit in freezer.) Let all the steam escape.
  3. Place baking sheet in the freezer, freeze for 30 minutes. Rice is now ready to use for fried rice. If rice completely frozen, you might have to let it sit out on counter for a bit to defrost.

The freezer will dry out the rice grains, just enough to make fried rice. It’s not as good as day-old rice, but it will work in a pinch.

Marinate the chicken

chicken fried rice recipe - chicken

Marinate your meat, whether you use chicken breast, chicken thigh — or turkey, pork, beef, shrimp — in a little bit of soy sauce, sesame oil and cornstarch. Optional is to use Chinese rice wine (or dry sherry) in the marinade as well. You can marinate the chicken for as little as 5 minutes or up to overnight in refrigerator.

Just a half-pound of meat, cut in very small pieces, like the size of a small dice, will be enough to feed 4 people. We love using a little bit of meat to feed a lot of mouths in Chinese stir-fries!

Why use cornstarch? The cornstarch thickens up the soy sauce so that it clings to the the meat.

Shortcut: use ground chicken, turkey, pork or beef. No slicing needed!

Other ingredients for Chicken Fried Rice

What else do you have in your refrigerator or freezer? We like using frozen peas or frozen diced mixed vegetables (no need to defrost, just use straight from freezer), chopped green onion and eggs. You can use pretty much any vegetable you want:

  • Diced: tomatoes, bell peppers, onion, shallots
  • Leftover: cooked broccoli (just give it a rough chop)
  • Minced garlic or grated fresh ginger
  • Julienned and then roughly chopped: fresh carrots, broccoli stems (peel first), cabbage, Napa cabbage, kale
  • Frozen: peas, diced vegetables
  • Shortcut item: a bag of broccoli slaw mix
  • Eggs

Have all your ingredients ready, at the stove. The stir-frying happens really fast!

Stir Frying Chicken Fried Rice

For the best fried rice, ingredients are added to the wok in batches, stir fried, then removed. They’ll be added back into the wok at a later time.

In this recipe, we’ll cook in this order:

  1. Scrambled eggs, then remove
  2. Chicken, then remove
  3. Rice, then add in the eggs, chicken and peas

Why cook things separately? Because I want my eggs to taste like eggs, and my chicken to be perfectly cooked. If you throw everything in the wok all at once, it will taste like a mish-mash of everything. Also, each ingredient has a different perfect cook time – the eggs will cook faster than the chicken – cooking each item separately ensures that nothing is under or over cooked.

First, the green onion and eggs. Swirl a little oil into a hot wok. Throw in the green onions, give it a quick stir for 10 seconds, then add in two eggs. Scramble and cooked just until set, about a minute. Then scoop out onto a plate. (in the photos, we didn’t use green onion.)

chicken fried rice recipe - eggchicken fried rice recipe - egg

Give the wok a good wipe, no need to rinse.

chicken fried rice recipe - wok

If you’re using other fresh vegetables that need to be cooked, do that now. Hot wok + a little oil + vegetable. Stir fry until just cooked through.

Cook the chicken

Heat the wok over high heat. When very hot, swirl in cooking oil. When oil hot, add in the marinated chicken.

chicken fried rice recipe - chicken

Use your spatula to spread out the chicken into a single layer in the wok. Use all that surface area! Keeping the chicken in a single layer helps the chicken caramelize and cook nicely. Crowded chicken will result in little browning – the chicken will end up “steaming” instead of browning. Once it’s in the wok, just leave it alone and give it time and space to brown.

chicken fried rice recipe - chicken

Resist the temptation to mess with the chicken – just leave it alone. When you move the chicken around too much, it won’t have time to brown.

Take a peek under piece of chicken. Browned? Now flip, stir and toss!

chicken fried rice recipe - chicken

Then spread out on wok again. Let’s let the other sides of the chicken brown.

chicken fried rice recipe - chicken

Once chicken is nearly cooked through, turn off heat and remove chicken. If the chicken is only 80% of the way cooked through, that’s perfect. We’ll add the chicken back into the wok later to finish cooking. It’s important that you don’t overcook the meat.

chicken fried rice recipe - chicken

Add the rice

Wipe the wok clean, if desired. Heat the wok again, on high and swirl a little more cooking oil in the wok. When hot, add in the rice.

chicken fried rice recipe - add rice

Spread it all around the surface area of the wok, Use all that space! Spreading out the rice will help each grain of rice heat up all the way through. Just let it sit in the wok, undisturbed for a bit. If you keep stirring and tossing the rice, it won’t have a chance to heat through. And, you’ll be breaking the delicate grains of rice, releasing more starch, making a gummy mess. So, it’s best to just let it be for a minute. Then, toss, stir and spread out again to warm through.

chicken fried rice recipe - add rice

Finally, it’s time to add back in the ingredients. Add the chicken:

chicken fried rice recipe - add rice chicken

scrambled eggs:

chicken fried rice recipe - add egg

Frozen peas (they’re still frozen, but will defrost perfectly at the end.)

chicken fried rice recipe - add peas

Give it a toss:

chicken fried rice recipe - add peas

Season with the soy sauce, black pepper and a little oyster sauce, if desired. Oyster sauce will add a little sweet/savory flavor to the fried rice. Personally, I love adding fish sauce, in addition to the soy sauce. It adds a ton of umami flavor without weighing down the fried rice.

chicken fried rice recipe - add soy sauce

Toss, spread the chicken fried rice out over the surface of the wok. The egg will finish setting, the chicken will finish cooking, the peas will defrost, and the liquid seasoning will help re-steam the rice. Toss again, spread out again. This action will also help the fried rice cook/heat through evenly.

chicken fried rice recipe

Once the chicken fried rice is hot – it’s done!

More Chinese Rice Recipes

Chinese Sausage & Rice Recipe

Cauliflower Fried “Rice” with Chicken Recipe

Pineapple Fried Rice Recipe

Chicken Fried Rice Recipe

If you don’t have a wok, use a large saute pan (like a frying pan, but with high sides) or even a large dutch oven. You need the high sides in a stir fry – so that ingredients don’t spill out as you toss. Feel free to substitute the chicken with pork, turkey or beef. I also like using ground meat too.

  • 1/2 pound chicken meat (small dice (or use lean ground chicken))
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce (divided)
  • 1 teaspoon cornstarch
  • 1 teaspoon Chinese rice wine (or dry sherry – optional)
  • 1/2 teaspoon Asian sesame oil
  • 1 stalk green onion (chopped)
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 cup frozen peas
  • 3 cups leftover rice (grains separated (use wet fingers))
  • 1 tablespoon oyster sauce (or 1 teaspoon fish sauce)
  • cooking oil (canola, peanut, vegetable)
  1. In a bowl, mix together the chicken, just 1 tablespoon of the soy sauce, cornstarch, rice wine and sesame oil. Stir and let marinate while you proceed to next step.

  2. Heat a wok over medium-high heat. When hot, swirl in about 2 teaspoons of cooking oil. Add in the green onion. Stir fry for 10 seconds. Add in egg and scramble briskly until the egg is just barely set. Remove egg to plate. Wipe wok clean.

  3. Return wok to stove, turn heat to high. When hot, swirl in a little more cooking oil. Add in the marinated chicken and spread out all over the surface of the wok in single layer. Let cook for 1 minute, undisturbed. Flip and toss, spread out again and let cook for another minute. By now, the chicken should be NEARLY cooked through (depends on how big your chicken pieces are). Remove chicken from wok and set aside.

  4. Return wok to high heat. When hot, swirl in a little more cooking oil, about 1 tablespoon. Add in the rice. Spread out over surface of wok and let cook, undisturbed, for 1 minute. Flip and toss, spread out again, let cook for 1 minute.
  5. Add back into the wok, the chicken and eggs. Add in the frozen peas. Give it a good toss. Add in the remaining soy sauce, oyster sauce (or fish sauce) and freshly ground black pepper. Toss again and spread rice out over surface of wok. Let cook, 1 minute. Toss very well, spread out and cook for an additional minute. Taste the fried rice, and adjust with more soy sauce, if desired. Fried rice is ready when each grain of rice is heated through and hot, and the chicken is cooked through.

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Chinese Sausage and Rice Recipe https://steamykitchen.com/26666-chinese-sausage-rice-recipe.html https://steamykitchen.com/26666-chinese-sausage-rice-recipe.html#comments Sun, 24 Jun 2018 12:30:15 +0000 https://steamykitchen.com/?p=26666 In this Chinese Sausage and Rice Recipe, you will learn: Easiest way to cook Chinese sausage How to make savory sweet soy sauce that is drizzled on the rice How to store Chinese sausage Chinese sausage – 臘腸 lap cheong (Cantonese) làcháng (Mandarin) is a cured sausage usually steamed or diced and stir-fried in a wok.  Chinese sausage is […]

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In this Chinese Sausage and Rice Recipe, you will learn:

  • Easiest way to cook Chinese sausage
  • How to make savory sweet soy sauce that is drizzled on the rice
  • How to store Chinese sausage

Chinese Sausage and Rice Recipe

Chinese sausage – 臘腸 lap cheong (Cantonese) làcháng (Mandarin) is a cured sausage usually steamed or diced and stir-fried in a wok. 

Chinese sausage is unlike any meat you’ve ever eaten before. “Lap Cheong” 臘腸 is made most popularly from pork and fat. The sausage is marinated, salted and smoked. You can also find Chinese sausage made from duck liver or pork liver too (darker deep reddish/brown color).

Chinese Sausage and Rice Recipe - uncooked

Chinese Sausage Flavor

Sweet-salty, smokey, savory and unctuous with little pockets of fat that just melt during cooking. Think of candied bacon. Or when maple syrup from your pancake pools onto your thick bacon. That’s about the closest I can get to a description.

How to Store Chinese Sausage

Most Asian supermarkets will stock Chinese sausage – since it’s dried, cured and smoked, the package will last for over a year if unopened (also check the expiration date on package). You can also freeze the package for a long time If you’ve opened a package and only use a few links, wrap the remaining tightly in plastic wrap and refrigerate for up to 6 months or store in freezer.

I prefer Chinese sausage WITHOUT liver. Read the package carefully – the liver sausage is darker, like a blood-red color. Regular pork-based Chinese sausage is a dull-brick red color.

Chinese Sausage and Rice Recipe

220px-Chinesesausageunpackaged If you’ve got a Chinatown in your area, sometimes you’ll find Chinese sausage hanging by string like the photo above! (photo source)

Easiest Way to Cook Chinese Sausage

The easiest way to cook Chinese sausage is to snuggle the links into the same pot (or rice cooker) you are cooking rice. The fatty sausage will cook and flavor the rice at the same time.

Chinese Sausage and Rice Recipe - sliced sausage

Sweet Soy Sauce to Drizzle over Rice

Years ago, Mom taught me her recipe for a simple sweet soy sauce. This is a sauce that you’ll find drizzled on Chinese Clay Pot Chicken & Rice. We love this sweet soy sauce just with Chinese Sausage and rice.

The sauce starts with flavoring oil with garlic and shallots in the wok, and adding a combination of soy sauce, dark soy sauce and rice wine.

Dark soy sauce is a dark, thick, sweeter, less-salty soy sauce used in braises and sauces.

If you don’t have dark soy sauce, that’s okay. Substitute with regular soy sauce and a teaspoon of honey or molasses.

Chinese Sausage and Rice Recipe Video

More Chinese Sausage Recipes

Pressure Cooker Chinese Sausage and Brown Rice

Brussels Sprouts with Chinese Sausage

Roasted Brussels Sprouts Chinese Sausage Recipe

Chinese Sausage and Rice Recipe – with Sweet Soy Sauce

The Sweet Soy Sauce is optional – trust me, the Chinese Sausage will have plenty of flavor alone. Cook the Sweet Soy Sauce while your Chinese Sausage and rice cook. The Sweet Soy Sauce includes dark soy sauce. If you do not have dark soy sauce, substitute: with 2T regular soy sauce + 1 tsp honey or molasses.

For the Chinese Sausage and Rice

  • 1 1/2 cups long grain rice (jasmine rice preferred)
  • 2 3/4 cups water
  • 4 Chinese sausage links (or more)

For the Sweet Soy Sauce

  • 1 tablespoon cooking oil (neutral flavored (vegetable, canola))
  • 2 cloves garlic (smashed)
  • 1 shallot (roughly chopped)
  • 1/4 cup soy sauce
  • 2 tablespoons dark soy sauce (for substitute, see notes at top of recipe)
  • 1 tablespoon Chinese rice wine (or dry sherry)
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • 1/4 teaspoon Asian sesame oil

Cook the Chinese Sausage and Rice

  1. Let’s wash the raw rice grains fist. Fill a pot with the rice and cold water to cover. Use your hands to swish the rice grains, loosening any extra starch and dirt. Rice (like beans) is a raw ingredient and it is important to wash and rinse! Washing also rids the rice of extra starch, which will give us light, fluffy, airy rice – not heavy, sticky and starchy. Tip the pot and carefully pour out the water. Repeat two more times. Drain as much water as possible from the pot. 

  2. Measure and add in the 2 3/4 cups of water.

    Snuggle the sausage in the rice grains. Turn the heat to high. When the water near the edge of the pot starts bubbling, cover the pot and reduce the heat to low. Cook for 18 minutes. Note: While the rice is cooking, make the Sweet Soy Sauce. 

  3. When the rice is finished cooking, turn off heat and keep covered – no peeking! Let it sit with the lid on for 5 minutes to finish the steaming process.

  4. Remove the sausages (careful, they are hot!) and slice them on the diagonal into 1/2-inch-thick pieces. Arrange the sausages on top of the rice and drizzle the Sweet Soy Sauce on top. Serve extra Sweet Soy Sauce at the table for drizzling.

Sweet Soy Sauce

  1. In a small saucepan, add in the oil, garlic and shallot. Turn heat to low and let the garlic and shallot cook slowly until they begin to brown but not burn. Use a slotted spoon and remove the shallots and garlic and discard, leaving the flavored oil. Add remaining ingredients and simmer until thickened, about 2 minutes.

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Scarpetta’s Spaghetti with Fresh Tomato Sauce and Garlic Basil Oil https://steamykitchen.com/6986-scarpettas-spaghetti-with-fresh-tomato-sauce-and-garlic-basil-oil.html https://steamykitchen.com/6986-scarpettas-spaghetti-with-fresh-tomato-sauce-and-garlic-basil-oil.html#comments Fri, 22 Jun 2018 10:32:01 +0000 https://steamykitchen.com/?p=6986 In this Scarpetta’s Spaghetti Recipe, you’ll learn how to make the world-famous pasta dish by Chef Scott Conant of Scarpetta’s Restaurant. The recipe includes their tomato pasta sauce and garlic and basil infused olive oil. It’s a simple recipe! Scarpetta in New York City is most famous for its Spaghetti with Tomato and Basil. People pay […]

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In this Scarpetta’s Spaghetti Recipe, you’ll learn how to make the world-famous pasta dish by Chef Scott Conant of Scarpetta’s Restaurant. The recipe includes their tomato pasta sauce and garlic and basil infused olive oil. It’s a simple recipe!

scarpetta's spaghetti recipe

Scarpetta in New York City is most famous for its Spaghetti with Tomato and Basil.

People pay $24 for a serving.

Yes, that’s right: twenty-four dollars.

And we’re not talking about the family-style mound you’d find in a sticky-floored Italian joint. This is one of those fancy-restaurant, daintily plated serving sizes. If you twirl your fork three times, you’d get it all. Don’t believe me?

But people love it. Although I haven’t been to the restaurant myself, I’ve read the endless rave reviews and since there were too many variations for the recipe online, I just had to call the restaurant directly for the recipe.

And the secret to the famous Scarpetta’s Spaghetti its simplicity.

Scarpetta's Spaghetti Recipe

How to make Scarpetta’s Spaghetti Recipe

To make Scarpetta’s Spaghetti recipe, you’ll first work the tomato. Cut each tomato in half and scoop out the seeds with your fingers. You can use plum tomatoes or regular tomatoes, whichever is freshest. You want a smooth, intensely flavored sauce…and watery seeds don’t belong.

Scarpetta's Spaghetti Recipe - tomatoes

The Garlic Basil Oil has just a few ingredients – fresh basil, sliced garlic and chili flakes.

Scarpetta's Spaghetti Recipe- Garlic Basil Oil Ingredients

Infuse the ingredients in hot olive oil and let sit on stove for 20 minutes or more: 10 minutes on low-low-low heat and then 10 minutes off the heat. The longer you let it steep, the more flavorful the oil will be. You won’t use all of the oil – strain, discard the solids and refrigerate for a few days and use in other recipes. Do not store the garlic in oil at room temperature.

Scarpetta's Spaghetti Recipe Garlic Basil Oil

Scarpetta's Spaghetti Recipe

Just before serving, drizzle or toss the pasta with the Garlic Basil Oil.

Drizzle with Garlic Basil Oil - Scarpetta's Spaghetti Recipe

Scarpetta's Spaghetti Recipe: Fresh Tomato Sauce and Garlic Basil Oil

Scarpetta’s Spaghetti Recipe from Scott Conant and Scarpetta Restaurant. 

Chef Conant likes to use 20 ripe plum tomatoes (no canned). My adaptation includes canned tomatoes as well because I find the recipe works better. Tomatoes used for canning are picked at the peak of ripeness, and many times the fresh tomatoes I find at the market are just so-so. A blend of both fresh tomatoes and quality canned tomatoes provides perfect blend of tart and sweet. Feel free to use all fresh, all canned or a combination.

Don’t expect the usual sauce-heavy spaghetti. Conant’s recipe is light; the barely there sauce combined with the basil-garlic oil is so full of intense flavors, you don’t need to drown your pasta.

This recipe makes 1 pound dried pasta, enough to serve 6-8 people (though at Scarpetta, the serving size is half that!) 

  • 4 ripe organic tomatoes (preferably plum tomatoes)
  • 12 ounces San Marzano or organic whole tomatoes (canned)
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 1/4 teaspoon crushed red chili pepper flakes
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper (to taste)
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1/2 cup freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese
  • 8 fresh basil leaves (well washed and dried, stacked and rolled into a cylinder and sliced thinly crosswise into a chiffonade)
  • 1 pound spaghetti (either high-quality dry or homemade)

For the Basil-Garlic Oil:

  • 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 8 whole cloves garlic
  • 10 whole fresh basil leaves
  • 1/4 teaspoon crushed red chili pepper flakes
  1. Use a sharp vegetable peeler and with a gentle, back and forth sawing motion, peel the tomato skin. Tip: the sawing motion should be very slight, just a quick back and forth motion moving along tomato. 

    Cut the tomatoes in half and use your finger to flick out the seeds.

  2. In a wide pan, heat 2 tablespoons of olive oil over medium-high heat until quite hot. Add the fresh and canned tomatoes, red pepper flakes, and season lightly with the salt and pepper. (I always start with a light hand with the salt and pepper because as the tomatoes reduce, the salt will become concentrated.) Let the tomatoes cook for a few minutes to soften. Then, using a potato masher, chop the tomatoes finely. Cook the tomatoes for 20 to 25 minutes, until the tomatoes are tender and the sauce has thickened. 

  3. Taste and season with salt again. Remember, the pasta will cook in salted water, so the sauce should just be lightly seasoned. If the sauce is too tart (if your fresh tomatoes were not sweet or fully ripened), add a 1/2 teaspoon of sugar to the sauce. 

    (You can make the sauce, which yields about 2-3 cups, ahead of time. Refrigerate it for up to two days or freeze it for longer storage.)

  4. While the tomatoes are cooking, make the basil-garlic oil. Heat a small saucepan over low heat with 1/4 cup olive oil, garlic cloves, basil leaves and pepper flakes. Keep the heat on low to allow the ingredients to warm slowly and release their flavors. When the garlic is lightly browned, turn heat off and let cool for 10 minutes. The longer you let the oil sit, the more infused the oil. Strain the oil, discarding the solids.
  5. To cook the spaghetti, bring a large pot of amply salted water to a boil. Cook the spaghetti until just shy of al dente and drain, reserve a little of the pasta cooking water.
  6. Add the cooked pasta to the sauce and cook over medium-high heat, gently tossing the pasta and the sauce together with a couple of wooden spoons and a lot of exaggerated movement (you can even shake the pan) until the pasta is just tender and the sauce, if any oil had separated from it, now looks cohesive. (If the sauce seems too thick, add a little pasta cooking liquid to adjust it.) Remove the pan from the heat and toss the butter, basil and cheese with the pasta in the same manner (the pasta should take on an orange hue). Drizzle with just a bit of the basil-garlic oil on each plate (you might not use all of it).

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Hot Dogs with Kimchi Relish https://steamykitchen.com/19009-hot-dogs-with-kimchi-relish-recipe.html https://steamykitchen.com/19009-hot-dogs-with-kimchi-relish-recipe.html#comments Wed, 20 Jun 2018 11:18:43 +0000 https://steamykitchen.com/?p=19009 A favorite American street food gets a makeover for the Korean palate.

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Hot Dogs with Kimchi Relish recipe

This recipe for Hot Dogs with Kimchi Relish is from The Kimchi Chronicles by Marja Vongerichten, and if you recognize that last name, you’ll know her husband is the one and only Jean-George Vongerichten, or as I affectionately call “J-Vo”

Hot Dogs with Kimchi Relish recipe

Hot Dogs with Kimchi Relish recipe marlaMarja is Korean and the cookbook is a collection of Korean American recipes that her family enjoys. Most of the recipes are accessible for the home cook, with a couple of odd-ball dishes that J-Vo had a hand in (not in a bad way) – like Korean Baeckeoffe and Jeju Bouillabaisse.

Some of my favs from the book:

Spice-Rubbed Korean Chicken – uses gochugaru (Korean red pepper powder)
Bibimbap
Kimchi Fried Rice
Kimchi Bloody Mary

For the Korean food lover, I absolutely recommend this book!

The Kimchi Chronicles, by Marja Vongerichten is available on Amazon!

c

Hot Dogs with Kimchi Relish recipe

Photo Credit: Andre Baranowski

How to make Kimchi Relish

Start with half a cup of kimchi in a bowl. Add 2 teaspoons of rice vinegar.

Then, add 2 teaspoons of honey. Mix well and serve on top of your next hot dog.

Hot Dogs with Kimchi Relish Recipe

Recipe from Marja Vongerichten, The Kimchi Chronicles 

“In this recipe, my most favorite American street food gets a makeover for the Korean palate. Jean-Georges created a kimchi relish that’s made sweet with honey and sour with rice vinegar. All you need is a baseball game and you’re good to go.”

  • 1/2 cup kimchi (thinly sliced)
  • 2 teaspoons honey
  • 2 teaspoons rice vinegar
  • 4 hot dogs
  • 4 hot dog rolls
  • 4 tablespoons Korean hot mustard (or any spicy mustard)
  1. Preheat a grill to high or preheat a ridged cast iron grill pan over high heat.
  2. Mix together the kimchi, honey, and vinegar in a small bowl.
  3. Grill the hot dogs until browned and crispy, and lightly grill the rolls until they’re golden brown. Put the hot dogs in the rolls and top each one with 1 tablespoon mustard and one-quarter of the kimchi relish.

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Bok Choy Recipe https://steamykitchen.com/2112-bok-choy-recipe.html https://steamykitchen.com/2112-bok-choy-recipe.html#comments Mon, 18 Jun 2018 13:16:05 +0000 https://steamykitchen.com/blog/?p=2112 In this Bok Choy recipe, you’ll learn how a stir-frying trick to cook bok choy perfectly, with amazing garlic flavor (without burning the garlic in the wok). We’ll show you step by step. I’m going to tell you to do something that is totally contrary to many Asian cookbooks out there. Okay, ready? Cold Wokky, […]

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In this Bok Choy recipe, you’ll learn how a stir-frying trick to cook bok choy perfectly, with amazing garlic flavor (without burning the garlic in the wok). We’ll show you step by step.

Bok Choy Recipe

I’m going to tell you to do something that is totally contrary to many Asian cookbooks out there.

Okay, ready?

Cold Wokky, Very Garlickky.

Bok Choy Recipe

The problem with using a very hot wok or frying pan to stir fry with minced garlic and ginger is that you’ll probably burn it. Burnt garlic and ginger is bitter and astringent. Bitter can be good sometimes – I LOVE bitter. But when you’re going for a more delicate flavor, especially in a bok choy dish, you might not want bitter.

When I’m stir-frying vegetables, like in this bok choy recipe, I add the minced garlic and ginger to COLD oil and COLD wok or pan. As the wok and oil heat up, the ginger and garlic gently sizzles. The longer the aromatics stay in contact with the oil (without burning) – the more flavor gets infused into the oil. So, now you’ve got a tablespoon of that an incredible garlicky, gingery oil. Toss the bok choy leaves in that oil, so that each leaf of the bok choy is bathed in heavenly flavor.

How to cook bok choy recipe

Bok Choy Recipe

Start by trimming the bok choy stem off – don’t trim too much – just the end. Cutting the thick stem off will ensure that the bok choy cooks evenly. Separate out the bok choy leaves and rinse under running water.

Bok Choy Recipe - Trim stem off

Bok Choy Recipe - Trim stem off

But leave the tender baby that’s in the middle of each bok choy! That’s the golden nugget!

Bok Choy Recipe - Tender baby bok choy

Finely mince garlic and grate fresh ginger with a microplane grater. Grating the ginger helps break up the tough fibers! (and yeah, sometimes when the ginger is nice and fresh, I don’t even bother peeling off the paper-thin skin)

Bok Choy Recipe - grate ginger

Place wok or frying pan on your stove and pour in the cooking oil. Add the garlic and ginger. Turn the heat to medium-high. Let the ginger and garlic gently sizzle in the oil. When the aromatics become fragrant and light golden brown, add the bok choy leaves. Toss to coat each leaf with the garlicky, gingery oil.

Bok Choy Recipe - Add garlic and ginger to cold oil and wok

Bok Choy Recipe - Add leaves into wok

I really mean it! Toss, baby, toss! Stir! Faster! You only have like 15 seconds of tossing time! I am super wok-stirring queen!

Bok Choy Recipe - Toss

Bok Choy Recipe - Toss

Pour in liquid (you can use broth, water or a combination of broth/water + Chinese cooking wine) Immediately cover and let cook for 1 minute. The liquid will now steam the bok choy. After steaming, season with soy sauce or salt and drizzle a bit of sesame oil on top to finish.

Bok Choy Recipe - Pour in broth, water or wine

Bok Choy Recipe - Let cook for 1 minute

That’s it! I hope you try this method – it works for any type of vegetable, like Napa cabbage or broccoli. For thicker vegetables (like broccoli), increase the steaming time by another minute and maybe add a bit more liquid.

Why do I use tongs to cook bok choy?

Why tongs instead of a standard wok chan (spatula)? Because it’s easier to use the tongs to toss, flip and turn when dealing with delicate vegetables.

More Chinese recipes to explore

Chinese Spinach (Yu Choy) Recipe with Toasted Garlic (Steamy Kitchen)

Chinese Broccoli with Oyster Sauce (Steamy Kitchen)

Chinese Eggplant with Spicy Garlic Sauce (Steamy Kitchen)

Chinese Greens (Yu Choy) Stir Fry (Steamy Kitchen)

 

Bok Choy Recipe

  • 1 1/2 pounds bok choy or baby bok choy
  • 2 tablespoons cooking oil (canola, vegetable or peanut oil)
  • 2 cloves garlic (finely minced)
  • 1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger
  • 3 tablespoons water (or any liquid combination of broth, water, cooking wine)
  • 1 teaspoon soy sauce (or salt)
  • 1/2 teaspoon sesame oil
  1. Start by trimming the stem off – don’t trim too much – just the end. Cutting the thick stem off will ensure that the bok choy cooks evenly. Separate out the leaves, keep the tender center intact. Wash and clean bok choy.  

  2. Finely mince garlic. Grate fresh ginger with a microplane grater. Grating the ginger helps break up the tough fibers.

  3. Place wok or saute pan on your stove and pour in the cooking oil. Add the garlic and ginger. Turn the heat to medium-high. Let the ginger and garlic gently sizzle in the oil. When the aromatics become fragrant and light golden brown, add the bok choy leaves. Toss very well to coat each leaf with the garlicky, gingery oil for 15 seconds. Pour in broth, water or wine. Immediately cover and let cook for 1 minute. Season with soy sauce and drizzle a bit of sesame oil on top.

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How to Make Udon Noodles Recipe from Iron Chef Morimoto https://steamykitchen.com/43189-homemade-udon-noodle-recipe-morimoto.html https://steamykitchen.com/43189-homemade-udon-noodle-recipe-morimoto.html#comments Tue, 12 Jun 2018 14:26:29 +0000 https://steamykitchen.com/?p=43189 Learn how to make homemade Japanese udon noodles from Iron Chef Morimoto: Udon noodle recipe features just 3 ingredients: flour, a little salt and water Chef Morimoto rolls out the udon by hand with a large wooden rolling pin, but you can use a KitchenAid pasta attachment Udon noodle soup is made with 3 ingredients: […]

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Learn how to make homemade Japanese udon noodles from Iron Chef Morimoto:

  • Udon noodle recipe features just 3 ingredients: flour, a little salt and water
  • Chef Morimoto rolls out the udon by hand with a large wooden rolling pin, but you can use a KitchenAid pasta attachment
  • Udon noodle soup is made with 3 ingredients: dashi, soy sauce and mirin

Homemade Udon Noodle Recipe - Morimoto

Homemade Udon Noodle Recipe - Morimoto cookbook Japanese Home CookingIron Chef Morimoto teaches us how to make authentic, homemade udon noodles from scratch. The recipe and step-by-step photos is from Morimoto’s second cookbook “Mastering the art of Japanese Home Cooking.”

The cookbook features Japanese cooking, from classics like miso soup and chicken teriyaki…to dishes that are common in Japanese households, like Omuraisu (omelet with ketchup fried rice) to Sake Shioyaki (salt-grilled salmon).

I had the pleasure of personally trying some of Morimoto’s creations at the grand opening of Morimoto at the MGM Grand in Las Vegas. Not only did I get to meet Morimoto, enjoy his sushi, but he even sang in Japanese for us! See end of post for photos of his new restaurant.

Recipe and photos reprinted with permission from HarperCollins Publishers © 2016 Masahuru Morimoto.

How to Make Udon Noodles Recipe

Homemade Udon Noodle Recipe - Morimoto cookbook Japanese Home Cooking

Chef Morimoto says, “Dried udon noodles are fine, Store-bought pre-cooked udon work well. But there’s nothing like homemade udon and believe it or not, you can really make the irresistibly slick, chewy, spring noodles at home. Udon takes no great skill. Just water, flour, a rolling pin and a little patience. If kneading the dough, which activates the gluten in the flour and gives the noodles their texture, makes your arms tired, do what home cooks in Japan do: put the dough in a resealable plastic bag, wrap in a towel, and knead with your feet!”

To make homemade udon, knead the dough until smooth, about 5 minutes. Cover dough with plastic and let it rest for about an hour. This will make the dough relax and easier to roll out. *Jaden’s note – I like resting the dough for over an hour (timing is flexible here…I’ve let my dough rest anywhere between 1-3 hours, just keep it covered in plastic wrap), it just makes it so much easier to roll out!

Use a big rolling pin (Chef Morimoto likes to use a heavy, straight, wooden rolling pin like this one.)

Homemade Udon Noodle Recipe - use big wooden rolling pin

As you roll the dough, occasionally rotate the dough 90 degrees and dust lightly with flour.

Homemade Udon Noodle Recipe - use big wooden rolling pin

Roll evenly.

Homemade Udon Noodle Recipe - roll evenly

Homemade Udon Noodle Recipe - roll evenly

Dough thickness should be slightly less than 1/4″.

Homemade Udon Noodle Recipe - roll evenly to 1/4"

If you find the dough resisting too much, cover with plastic wrap and let dough rest for 5-10 minutes.

When you get the dough to desired thickness, fold dough in thirds (like a letter fold) and slice into 1/8″ thick noodles.

Homemade Udon Noodle Recipe - cut into noodles

Dust noodles with flour and separate. Cook immediately.

Homemade Udon Noodle Recipe - cut into noodles

Jaden’s Tips for Udon

  • I am so using making homemade pasta with the help of a machine to roll to desired thickness! The rolling pin method was a bit challenging – getting the noodles to even thickness took some patience.
  • If the dough is too hard and stiff to roll out, cover dough with plastic wrap, let sit for at least 10 minutes and let the dough relax.
  • Try using your hand-crank pasta maker (this one is my favorite) or KitchenAid attachment to roll out to desired thickness, which is just under 1/8″ thick.
  • After rolling out to desired thickness, fold sheet into thirds, then let it rest for a few minutes before slicing by hand. Hand-slicing the noodles gives a more homemade feel, I love the unevenness of hand-made noodles.
  • I separated the dough into 4 balls, this made it easier to roll out, instead of dealing with a massive mound of dough!
  • Fresh udon takes a little longer to cook than fresh Italian pasta. Let it cook 7-12 minutes in gentle simmer. Cooking time really depends on how thick your noodles are. Check at the 7 minute mark and adjust. The udon should be soft but not mushy.
  • After cooking noodles immediately dunk them in a ice bath. This will help remove excess starch, stop cooking and bring more “bounce” to the noodles.
  • If you are serving the noodles in a soup, cook the noodles separately from the broth. Meaning, don’t try to cook the udon noodles in the broth itself. Too much starch will be released in cooking process.
  • The broth for udon noodles soup is simple. Start with the basic recipe, and add vegetables, seafood and meats as you please.

UDON BROTH RECIPE (serves 4)

4 cups dashi
2 tablespoons soy sauce
2 tablespoons mirin

In saucepan, combine ingredients and bring to simmer. Serve with fresh udon noodles, garnish with sliced green onion.

Please see the full recipe for Morimoto’s Homemade Udon Recipe below.

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Meeting Morimoto

homemade-udon-noodles-recipe-morimoto-2803
The restaurant is gorgeously designed! It’s described as contemporary Japanese, featuring photographs by Yasumichi Morita. During the Grand Opening Ceremony, we got to participate in the traditional Japanese sake barrel breaking.

We dined at the sushi bar (check out our sushi chef!) Here are the must-try’s:

  • Toro Tartare with Wasabi, Nori Paste, Sour Cream, Sturgeon Caviar – This is the appetizer at the bottom left corner in the photo collage. The tuna is minced so finely by hand, that it’s light as air, creamy and so smooth. The black nori paste surprised me the most. Not many foods are pure-black, and I was concerned it would overpower the delicate toro. But the nori paste isn’t salty like soy sauce, just a lingering slightly sweet, savory, umami-rich accompaniment to the tartare. I loved it paired with the sour cream.
  • Fresh uni! It’s rare to find live uni and this was the third time I’ve ever that had the pleasure to experience this delicacy. The entire process was such a sensory adventure, from picking out the spiky mass, watching the chef open and extract the uni and to be served a grand presentation on ice.

homemade-udon-noodles-recipe-morimoto

More Japanese Noodle Recipes

15 Minute Miso Udon Noodle Soup Recipe

15-Minute Ramen Noodle Soup Recipe

Kimchi Ramen Recipe

Homemade Udon Noodles Recipe from Chef Morimoto

Reprinted with permission by Harper Collins Publishing. From Mastering the Art of Japanese Home Cooking by Masaharu Morimoto. For a simple dashi udon broth, please see above.

  • 5 cups 600 grams all-purpose flour, sifted, plus more for dusting
  • 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 1/4 to 1 1/2 cups water

To make Homemade Udon Noodles:

  1. In a large mixing bowl, combine flour and salt. Add 1 1/4 cups water. Use hands to mix until dough starts to come together in a few large lumps. Firmly press and knead the dough, incorporating any loose flour until there is none left. If necessary, add a little more water, 1 tablespoon at a time, until you can incorporate all of the flour.
  2. Lightly dust work surface with flour. Knead dough (folding and firmly pressing with your palm, folding and pressing forcefully) until dough looks and feels fairly smooth, about 5 minutes. Form dough into ball, wrap in plastic wrap, and let rest at room temperature for 1-5 hours.
  3. On a lightly floured surface with ample room, knead it again for a few minutes. Divide dough into 4 equal-sized balls. Dust each ball with flour and cover with plastic wrap until ready to roll out.
  4. Use rolling pin to roll out the dough, occasionally rotating the dough 90 degrees and lightly using with flour if it threatens to stick to the pin, until just between 1/8″ to under 1/4″ thick. If the dough is too difficult to roll out, cover with plastic wrap, let rest for 10 minutes, and then resume. This rest allows the gluten to relax and makes it easier to roll out.

  5. Fold the sheet of dough into thirds (like a letter fold) and then slice widthwise into approximately 1/8″ thick noodles. Gently separate the noodles and toss them with a little bit of flour, just so they don’t stick together. Cook right away.

To Cook Homemade Udon Noodles:

  1. Bring a large pot of water to boil and prepare a large bowl of icy water. Add noodles to boiling water, stirring frequently and adding 1/4 cup fresh water if the water threatens to bubble over, until they are fully cooked but not mushy, 7-12 minutes (depends on how thick your noodles are). Unlike Italian pasta, Japanese noodles shouldn’t be al-dente, but don’t let them get mushy.)
  2. Drain noodles, transfer to icy water. Briefly and gently rub the noodles with hands to remove some of the starch. Drain from cold water.

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Negative Calorie Chocolate Cake https://steamykitchen.com/14-negative-calorie-chocolate-cake.html https://steamykitchen.com/14-negative-calorie-chocolate-cake.html#comments Mon, 05 Mar 2018 14:10:41 +0000 https://steamykitchen.com/blog/2007/08/05/negative-calorie-chocolate-cake/ I know...you're all wondering....

What an elegant dessert....
a souffle, perhaps?
molten chocolate center?
did it take hours to make?

I am pleased to present to you, my Negative Calorie Chocolate Cake. Never before in the history of desserts has there ever been such an luscious cake that is this good ...

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Negative Calorie Chocolate Cake

I know…you’re all wondering….

What an elegant dessert….
a souffle, perhaps?
molten chocolate center?
did it take hours to make?

I am pleased to present to you, my Negative Calorie Chocolate Cake.  Never before in the history of desserts has there ever been such an luscious cake that is this good for your inner chocoholic self.

Yes. you heard me right. Not just “low fat” “low calorie” or even “no calorie”

Its NEGATIVE CALORIE.  Meaning, you earn credits for eating this dessert.

So, what makes this cake negative calorie?  Well first off, I made it with a Betty Crocker boxed cake mix, replaced the 1/2 cup of oil with a banana, and cooked it in the microwave for 5 minutes in a ramekin.

One night this week…oh…right around 9:00pm….when no one is watching…you are going to try this cake.  You’re asking yourself if this Negative Calorie Chocolate Cake from Betty C. tastes as delicious, luscious, moist and rich as it looks. Here’s your answer:

Negative Calorie Chocolate Cake

But..but…but….how do you get negative calories with that??

Ok. brace yourselves.  Try to follow along now:

Betty Crocker Calories per serving 280
Replace the oil with a banana -40
Saving oven energy and using microwave instead -86
Saving time (10 minutes in micro vs. 40 in the oven) -43
Not having to look up a fancy recipe -05
For using up the ripe smushy banana – instead of tossing it -32
For not having to use your electric mixer – mixing by hand burns calories -47
For pleasing your inner “Instant Grat-Brat” (I want cake NOW!) -10
For being so clever – who else would combine BettyC+banana+micro ? -23
For using something very healthy and full of antioxidants (reduced Pomegranate Juice) -28
For…um….just because I said so -8
Grand Total -32

Can you see me on late-night infomercials pushing my Negative Calorie Chocolate Cake Diet???

Move over Atkins…here comes something steamy-er….

In case you don’t have ramekins, just pour in a 9×11-ish glass Pyrex pan (something microwave safe please) until batter reaches half way up the sides.  Microwave for 11 minutes medium-high, check for doneness. Cut into nice squares and enjoy.

Negative Calorie Chocolate Cake

Other ideas that you can try

-drop a big chunk-o-chocolate in the middle of batter in each ramekin (will it turn into a molten chocolate cake?)
-add raspberries to batter
-applesauce instead of banana? One of our readers, Renee, suggested adding 1T oil to applesauce to keep moist

Negative Calorie Chocolate Cake

I always make this with Betty Crocker Super Moist Cake Mix Dark Chocolate (the one with a Hershey’s logo on it). I’m sure it will taste just as good with other brands of cake mix, but this is my preference. The ingredients below are based on the back of the box (with the exception of the banana) If you use a different brand of cake mix, follow their instructions for ingredients, replacing the banana for the oil or butter. Of course, if you aren’t on a diet – ditch the banana idea and just use the oil/butter as the recipe calls for. 

Note on the banana: It should be a super-ripe brownish banana…like in the photo above. If you don’t have a super ripe banana and can’t wait – just use the oil/butter…the recipe just won’t work well with a firm, yellow banana. 

Note on the microwave times: Each microwave is different. Use the times I have below and test with toothpick. Just note your final time so that you won’t have to check for doneness next time. 

You’ll need about 4-6 small, individual serving sized ramekins.

  • 1 box Betty Crocker SuperMoist Cake Mix (Dark Chocolate)
  • 1 very ripe banana (smushed well with a fork)
  • 3 eggs
  • 1 1/3 cups water
  • Cooking spray to spray the ramekins
  1. In large bowl, mixed together the smushed banana, eggs and water. Whisk until combined.
  2. Stir in cake mix – stir vigorously for a couple of minutes until well mixed.
  3. Spray ramekins with cooking spray. Pour batter into ramekins up to 2/3 full.
  4. Every microwave is different – here are some guidelines:
  5. -For 2 ramekins: microwave on MEDIUM-HIGH (I set my microwave on power strength 8 ) for 5 minutes

    -For 3-4 ramekins: 6 minutes

    -For 5-6 ramekins: 7 minutes

  6. Check with toothpick to see if cake is done. Mushy cake mix stuck to toothpick? Add another 30 seconds. Cake crumbs on toothpick? Done.
  7. Top with warm chocolate sauce, reduced pomegranate juice, fresh raspberries or a sprinkling of powdered sugar (or all of the above!)

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Gyoza Recipe (Japanese Pan-Fried Dumplings) https://steamykitchen.com/5874-gyoza-recipe-japanese-pan-fried-dumplings.html https://steamykitchen.com/5874-gyoza-recipe-japanese-pan-fried-dumplings.html#comments Fri, 09 Feb 2018 13:20:21 +0000 https://steamykitchen.com/?p=5874 Hello friends! Please say hi to Rachael! Rachael lived in Japan for a number of years and here’s her story and a step by step photo tutorial on how to make Gyoza. ~ Jaden How did a girl who was born in the Rocky Mountains and raised in California and who graduated with French and […]

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Gyoza Recipe - LA Fuji MamaHello friends! Please say hi to Rachael!

Rachael lived in Japan for a number of years and here’s her story and a step by step photo tutorial on how to make Gyoza.

~ Jaden

How did a girl who was born in the Rocky Mountains and raised in California and who graduated with French and Law degrees end up writing a food blog called La Fuji Mama and striving to perfect her gyoza recipe?  The story starts seven and a half years ago when I married a man who had lived and studied in Japan.  Six months into our marriage, we moved to Japan, a place completely foreign to me.  Before my marriage, I had traveled all over Europe and lived in Paris, but I had never imagined that I would ever live in Asia.  But there I was, living on the outskirts of Yokohama in a tiny little 400-square-foot, two-bedroom apartment in a neighborhood devoid of any other foreigners.

My kitchen consisted of a large sink, a gas range with two burners and a “fish fryer” beneath the burners (like a little mini broiler), a refrigerator that was considerably shorter than I was, a toaster oven, and two cupboards. I spent my free time exploring, eating, watching and listening, and loving each moment more than the last.  After almost a year, we returned to the States.  Three years later, my husband’s company asked him to transfer to Tokyo, which he happily agreed to.  I soon found myself living in Japan for the second time, this time in downtown Tokyo, in a slightly larger 950-square-foot, three-bedroom apartment, with a slightly larger kitchen, and a spectacular view of Mt. Fuji.

Gyoza Recipe - View of Mt Fuji

I quickly settled into life, feeling much more comfortable the second time around, and trying to embrace the experience.  Our ties to Japan were further strengthened by the birth of our first child in a Japanese hospital.  A piece of my heart will always be in Tokyo because of that experience.

Squirrel in Kimono

Our move back to the US a year ago was a difficult one, but we try to keep the “homesickness” for Japan at bay with trips to Mitsuwa (our nearest Japanese grocery store) and lots of home cooked Japanese meals.

My first foray into Japanese home cooking started a few weeks after we moved to Japan the first time.  One of my neighbors, a woman named Miki, periodically knocked on my door to ask if I wanted to “cook and talk.”   I looked forward to those knocks – they meant that I got to accompany her to her apartment and spend an hour with her, helping her to both cook a meal and practice her English.  It was in her kitchen that I stuffed and pleated my first gyoza.

Miki made it look easy–her hands rhythmically pleating the top layer of the gyoza wrapper and simultaneously pinching it against the smooth bottom layer as she went–finishing each gyoza within moments of having started it.  My first gyoza took me forever to complete, looked sloppy, and didn’t hold together well when cooked.  But with a few pointers from Miki, my gyoza quickly started to look more as they should (although I still can’t stuff and pleat a gyoza as fast as she could).

Over the last seven years I’ve tweaked the gyoza recipe I learned from Miki, adjusting the amounts of ingredients here and there to suit our palates, and adding a couple of ingredients used by other wonderful Japanese cooks I’ve met along the way.

My most recent adjustment to the gyoza recipe is in the technique I use when mixing the filling.  In Elizabeth Andoh’s cookbook, Washoku, she describes a method that helps tenderize the meat and helps hold the filling together.  She explains that it’s “a bit like baseball practice” because you are gathering the filling into a ball and throwing it back into the bowl repeatedly. The bonus to the technique is that you get to play with your food.

How to make Japanese Gyoza

Gyoza Recipe - Gyoza Recipe Ingredients

Gyoza are really easy to make.  Just mince, grate, and measure out your ingredients as called for and then mix the gyoza ingredients together in a bowl using your hands. These gyoza have a hint of heat from the addition of red chili powder.  They also contain aka miso paste (red/dark miso paste), which has a wonderful pungent salty flavor.  If you cannot find aka miso paste, you can either leave it out altogether, or subsitute shiro miso paste (white miso paste).  If you leave the miso out, increase the salt by 1/2 teaspoon.  If you substitute shiro miso paste, leave out the sugar and increase the salt by 1/4 teaspoon.

Gyoza Recipe - Mix ingredients with your hands

 

Gyoza Recipe - Gyoza filling

Yep, you’ve gotta get your hands dirty to make these!  Next you’ll use Elizabeth Andoh’s “baseball practice” technique.  Scoop up the mixture into a ball with your hands and throw it back with some force into the bowl. Repeat this several times to tenderize the meat and help the mixture stick together.  Now it’s time to form your gyoza.  Put a bit of the meat mixture in the center of a wrapper, get your fingertip wet and then trace a line around half of the wrapper.

Gyoza Recipe - Put meat mixture in center of wrapper

Then you fold the wrapper in half over the filling,

Gyoza Recipe - Fold wrapper in half

and pinch it in the center.

Gyoza Recipe - Pinch folded wrapper in the center

Now comes the fun part–the pleating! Holding the wrapper in that middle spot that you just pinched with your left hand, make a pleat in the top part of the wrapper, pinching it against the flat edge of the wrapper at the back.

Gyoza Recipe - Making pleats in the wrapper

Holding the filled half-circle in the left hand, pleat the top of the wrapper from the middle out, pressing it to the flat edge of the wrapper at the back (only the front edge will be pleated–the back edge stays flat).  Proceed to make two or three more pleats to the right of the first pleat.Gyoza Recipe - Making pleats in the wrapper

Then switch sides and pleat the other side (to the left of the pinched middle).

Gyoza Recipe - Making pleats in the wrapper

Set aside the stuffed dumpling with the pleated-wrapper edge up.

Gyoza Recipe - Pleated wrapper edge up

Repeat the process until all of your wrappers have been filled and pleated.  It’s always nice to have a partner in crime for this part because it goes a lot quicker.

Gyoza Recipe - Can be frozen

Now you can either cover the gyoza with some plastic wrap and put them in the fridge for a couple of hours until you’re ready to cook them (or you could freeze them to keep them for longer) or you can cook them right away.  The gyoza are first fried on their flat side (pleats up),

Gyoza Recipe - First fry gyoza on flat side

until the bottom is nice and brown.

Gyoza Recipe - Fry til bottom is nicely brown

Then, water is added and the pan sealed with a lid

Gyoza Recipe - Add water into pan and seal

until the upper part of the gyoza is steamed.

Gyoza Recipe - Steaming

Then you serve them browned side up with a dipping sauce made from soy sauce, rice vinegar, and a few drops of chili oil.

Gyoza Recipe - Dipping sauce
If you can’t find round gyoza wrappers, you can always use square wonton wrappers and cut them into circles using a large biscuit cutter.

Gyoza Recipe - Cut wonton wrappers into circles
Or you can really go all out and make your own wrappers.

Gyoza Recipe - Japanese pan fried dumplings

More Dumpling Recipes

Chinese Potsticker Dumplings (my Mom’s recipe) with homemade wrappers

Chinese Soup Dumplings Recipe (with Pork & Crab)

Xiao Long Bao

Steamed Siu Mai Dumplings

Curried Beef Dumplings

 

Gyoza Recipe (Japanese Pan-Fried Dumplings)

Makes 40 dumplings

  • 4 cups loosely packed, minced Napa cabbage (soft, green, leafy parts only )
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt (or 1/2 tsp table salt)
  • 10 ounces ground pork
  • 2 teaspoons freshly grated ginger (with a microplane grater)
  • 3 cloves garlic (finely minced)
  • 1 stalk green onion (green part only, minced)
  • 2 teaspoon Japanese miso paste (red/dark miso paste)
  • 1 teaspoon Asian sesame oil
  • 1/4 teaspoon red Asian chili powder (optional)
  • 1/4 teaspoon sugar
  • 40 dumpling wrappers

For cooking the dumplings:

  • 4 tablespoon cooking oil (like canola, vegetable)
  • 3/4 cup water

Dipping Sauce:

  • 6 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 3 tablespoons rice vinegar
  • Several drops of chili oil or Asian sesame oil
  1. Toss the minced cabbage with the salt in a large bowl and let it sit for 10 minutes. Using both hands, or a cheese cloth, squeeze the cabbage firmly to drain and discard the excess water (prevent your dumplings from becoming mushy) and then transfer the cabbage to a deep bowl. Add the pork, ginger, garlic, green onion, miso, sesame oil, chili powder, and sugar. Mix everything together with your hands until all the ingredients are evenly distributed. Using your hands, scoop the mixture into a ball, lift it, and then throw it back into the bowl. Repeat several times to tenderize the meat and help the mixture stick together.

  2. Have a small bowl of cold water ready. Lay a dumpling wrapper on a dry work surface, and place a teaspoon of the meat mixture in the center of the wrapper. With a fingertip moistened with water, trace a line along half of the edge of the round wrapper. Fold the wrapper over to enclose the filling, and pinch the wrapper in the center to seal the edges together at that spot. Holding the filled half-circle in the left hand, pleat the top of the wrapper from the middle out, pressing it to the flat edge of the wrapper at the back. Set aside the stuffed dumpling with the pleated-wrapper edge up. Repeat to make 40 dumplings in all.

  3. In a large skillet with a tight fitting lid, heat 1 tablespoon of the cooking oil over medium-high heat. Carefully place as many of the dumplings that can fit without touching in the skillet with the pleated-wrapper edge up. Cook the dumplings for 3 minutes, or until nicely browned on the bottom. Check the progress by lifting 1 or 2 dumplings by their pleated edge.

  4. Once the bottoms are nicely browned, use the skillet lid to shield yourself and carefully pour in 1/4 cup of the water. When the hissing and splattering die down, drizzle in 1 teaspoon of the cooking oil around the edge of the skillet. Place the lid on the skillet to trap in the moisture and then quickly lower the heat to keep the liquid at a bare simmer.

  5. Check the dumplings after 2 minutes. When the wrappers appear slightly translucent and the meat feels firm when pressed lightly with a spoon, remove the lid and raise the heat slightly. Continue to cook until all the water has evaporated and only the oil remains (about 2 minutes). Once you hear a sizzling sound, shake the skillet. The dumplings should slide about. If they seem to stick to the skillet, move the skillet away from the stove and replace the lid for a moment. Remove the dumplings from the skillet with a broad flexible spatula. If you’d like, flip them over so that the seared surface faces up. Cook the remaining dumplings the same way. Serve the dumplings hot accompanied by the dipping sauce.
  6. While the dumplings are cooking, make the dipping sauce by mixing the soy sauce, rice vinegar and sesame/chili oil together in a small bowl.  

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